Title:
Crypt Arrangement
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A crypt arrangement (10) for a cemetery comprises upright hollow cells (11) and upright angled sections (12, 13, 14) arranged in a layer. Burial crypts are formed by spaces within the cells (11), and by spaces between the cells and the angled sections (12, 13, 14). At least one planting zone (22) is formed by a space at least partially defined by some of the cells (11) and the angled sections (12, 13, 14). Each cell (11) is generally rectangular when viewed from above, and comprises a continuous upright wall formed from a pair of generally parallel side walls, and a pair of generally parallel end walls. The angled sections (12, 13, 14) each comprise two orthogonal wall portions. Each wall portion has a free end which abuts a corner of a respective cell. Each angled section also has a corner portion which abuts with a corner of another cell. The cells (11) and the angled sections (12, 13, 14) can be arranged in modules placed in a repeating pattern, with each module having at least one planting zone (22).



Inventors:
Martin, James Paul (Queensland, AU)
Application Number:
11/996742
Publication Date:
08/21/2008
Filing Date:
07/26/2006
Assignee:
ROCKHAMPTON CITY COUNCIL (Queensland, AU)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/741.12
International Classes:
E04H13/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
AKBASLI, ALP A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
CAESAR RIVISE, PC (Philadelphia, PA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A crypt arrangement for a cemetery, comprising a plurality of upright hollow cells and a plurality of upright angled sections arranged in a substantially horizontal layer, wherein burial crypts are formed by spaces within the cells and by spaces between the cells and the angled sections, and further wherein a planting zone is formed in at least one space at least partially defined by some of the cells and the angled sections.

2. A crypt arrangement as claimed in claim 1, wherein a planting zone is formed in at least one space which is fully surrounded by some of the cells and the angled sections.

3. A crypt arrangement as claimed in claim 2, wherein each cell is generally rectangular when viewed from above, and comprises a continuous upright wall formed from a pair of generally parallel side walls, and a pair of generally parallel end walls.

4. A crypt arrangement as claimed in claim 1, wherein the angled sections each comprise two orthogonal wall portions.

5. A crypt arrangement as claimed in claim 4, wherein each wall portion of the angled sections has a free end which abuts a corner of a respective cell.

6. A crypt arrangement as claimed in claim 5, wherein each angled section has a corner portion which abuts with a corner of a cell.

7. A crypt arrangement as claimed in claim 6, wherein abutting portions of the cells and angled sections have opposed vertical grooves therein which form composite bores to receive a sealing member in use.

8. A crypt arrangement as claimed in claim 1, wherein the cells and the angled sections are arranged in modules placed in a repeating pattern in the crypt arrangement, and each module has at least one planting zone.

9. A crypt arrangement as claimed in claim 1, wherein at least two cells are arranged in orthogonal orientations in plan view.

10. A crypt arrangement as claimed in claim 1, wherein the planting zone has an area equal to approximately two cells placed side by side.

11. A crypt arrangement as claimed in claim 1, wherein the cells are of substantially identical construction, and the angled sections are of substantially identical construction.

12. A method of constructing a crypt arrangement for a cemetery, including the steps of placing a plurality of upright hollow cells spaced apart in a substantially horizontal layer, with each cell providing a burial crypt therein; arranging a plurality of upright angled sections with the cells to form burial crypts in spaces between the cells and the angled sections; arranging the cells and angled sections to at least partially define at least one planting zone; and placing vegetation in the planting zone.

13. A method of constructing a crypt arrangement as claimed in claim 12, wherein each cell is generally rectangular when viewed from above and comprises a continuous upright wall formed from a pair of generally parallel side walls and a pair of generally parallel end walls, and each angled section comprises two orthogonal wall portions each having a free end; the method further comprising the steps of abutting the free ends of each angled section with a corner of a respective cell; and abutting a corner position of each angled section with a corner of a cell.

14. A method of constructing a crypt arrangement as claimed in claim 12, including the step of arranging the cells and the angled sections in modules placed in a repeating pattern in the crypt arrangement, each module having at least one planting zone.

15. A cemetery comprising a plurality of spaced-apart upright hollow cells arranged in a substantially horizontal layer, each cell providing a burial crypt therein; a plurality of upright angled sections arranged with the cells to form burial crypts in spaces between the cells and the angled sections; and at least one planting zone, each planting zone being at least partially defined by some of the cells and the angled sections.

Description:

This invention relates to an improved crypt arrangement for cemeteries. In particular, the invention is directed to a modular spatial arrangement of crypt cells and angled sections to form a space-efficient cemetery having planting zones for trees or like vegetation.

BACKGROUND ART

The applicant's earlier international patent application no. PCT/AU97/00032, published as WO 97/27375 [“the '375 application”] discloses a crypt system comprising precast concrete cells arranged in parallel rows, with the cells in each row being spaced apart, and staggered relative to the cells in adjacent rows. The cells abut at their corners. In this manner, both the spaces within the cells, and the spaces between the cells, can be used as burial chambers or crypts. The disclosure of the '375 application is incorporated herein by reference.

The crypt system of the '375 application is particularly suited to lawn cemeteries, and provides a highly efficient burial crypt arrangement, both in terms of space and materials required. The crypts are formed in a very compact arrangement, and the number of cells required is approximately half the number of crypt spaces achieved.

It is often desirable to incorporate trees, shrubs or other vegetation in a cemetery for a more natural appearance, and/or to provide shade or privacy for visitors. However, the crypt system of the '375 application, and other modular crypt systems such as that of U.S. Pat. No. 4,134,239, do not accommodate planting zones within the burial area.

It is an aim of this invention to provide an improved crypt arrangement which allows for the incorporation of planting zones.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one broad form, this invention provides a crypt arrangement for a cemetery, comprising a plurality of upright hollow cells and a plurality of upright angled sections arranged in a substantially horizontal layer, wherein burial crypts are formed by spaces within the cells and by spaces between the cells and the angled sections, and further wherein a planting zone is formed in at least one space at least partially defined by some of the cells and the angled sections.

In another form, the invention provides a method of constructing a crypt arrangement for a cemetery, including the steps of (i) placing a plurality of upright hollow cells spaced apart in a substantially horizontal layer, with each cell providing a burial crypt therein; (ii) arranging a plurality of upright angled sections with the cells to form burial crypts in spaces between the cells and the angled sections; (iii) arranging the cells and angled sections to at least partially define at least one planting zone; and (iv) placing vegetation in the planting zone.

In yet another form, the invention provides a cemetery comprising (i) a plurality of spaced-apart upright hollow cells arranged in a substantially horizontal layer, each cell providing a burial crypt therein; (ii) a plurality of upright angled sections arranged with the cells to form burial crypts in spaces between the cells and the angled sections; and (iii) at least one planting zone, each planting zone being at least partially defined by some of the cells and the angled sections.

Throughout this specification, the term “cell” is intended to mean a structural unit comprising a burial chamber or crypt formed by a space bounded by a wall. Typically, each cell is constructed of concrete.

Typically, each cell is generally rectangular when viewed from above. It may comprise a continuous upright wall formed from a pair of generally parallel side walls, and a pair of generally parallel end walls. The walls may be tapered in thickness, being thicker at their top than at their bottom.

The cell has an open top, which in use, is closed by a lid. It preferably has an open bottom.

The crypt spaces formed by the spaces between the cells and the angled sections are also closed by respective lids in use. All the lids may be of the same shape and size, and therefore interchangeable.

Like cells and angled sections may be stacked in two or more layers. Intermediate lids may be used to divide each crypt space vertically, enabling two or more persons to be buried in each crypt space.

The cells are typically made of concrete, but other suitable materials may be used.

Preferably, the angled sections each comprise two upright orthogonal planar wall portions.

In a preferred embodiment, each wall portion of the angled sections has a vertical free end which abuts with a corner of a respective cell. Each angled section also has a corner section which abuts with a corner of another cell.

Vertical grooves may be provided in the abutting portions of the cells and angled sections, to house a sealing member therein.

The rectangular cells may be arranged in either of two orthogonal orientations to achieve a desired configuration which leaves opens spaces therein which can be used as planting zones for trees.

Preferably, the cells and the angled sections are arranged in modules which can be arranged in a repeating pattern in the crypt arrangement. Each module may have one or more planting zone.

In order that the invention may be more fully understood and put into practice, a preferred embodiment thereof will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic plan view of a crypt arrangement according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2. is a plan view of the cell of the crypt arrangement of FIG. 1.

FIGS. 3-5 are plan views of respective angled sections of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a schematic plan view showing multiple crypt arrangements of FIG. 1 arranged in a repeating pattern.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

A crypt arrangement 10 according to one embodiment of the invention comprises a plurality of crypt cells 11 and angled sections 12,13,14, arranged as shown in FIG. 1.

The crypt cell 11 is shown in plan view in FIG. 2, and is typically a precast concrete cell as described in the '375 application. Namely, each crypt cell 11 is formed by a continuous wall of generally rectangular shape when viewed from above. The cell 11 is open at its top and bottom, and can be closed by a lid (not shown) as described in the '375 application. The cells 11 are preferably of identical construction, and can be made from the same mould, or identical moulds.

Preferably, the corners of the rectangular cells 11 are chamfered or truncated and have outer faces 16 which are angled obliquely to the sides of the cells. The oblique outer face of a cell corner is wholly within a notional rectangular boundary defined by the outer faces of the side walls of the cell. Each oblique outer face 16 may contain a vertical groove 17 which can be filled with grout, silicon compound or other sealant to seal the junction between the cell 11 and an angled section 12,13 or 14.

The wall on at least one pair of opposed sides of the cell may be of tapered thickness, being thicker at its top than its bottom.

The three angled sections 12,13,14 are shown in plan view in FIGS. 3-5, respectively. They are shown in silhouette for simplicity. The angled sections 12,13,14 can also be precast concrete members.

Each angled section 12,13,14 comprises two generally planar portions which, in use, are upright. The planar portions are arranged orthogonally to each other and join at a corner which is chamfered or truncated and has an oblique outer face 18. A vertical groove 19 is provided in the outer face 18 of the corner of the angled section. The oblique outer face 18 is adapted to abut against oblique outer face 16 of a corner of a cell 11, as shown in FIG. 1. Consequently, the two opposing grooves 17, 19 form a composite bore which holds a sealing member or material, such as grout, a silicon bead, or a rod of elastomeric material.

The free edges of the angled sections 12,13,14 are configured so that they each have an obliquely angled face 20 which, in use, abuts against a oblique corner face 16 of a respective concrete cell 11, as shown in FIG. 1. The free ends of the angled sections 12,13,14 are enlarged by having an angled extension thereon which strengthens or reinforces the distal end of the respective oblique face 20.

The obliquely angled faces 20 on the free ends of the angled sections 12,13,14 are also provided with an upright groove 21. Again, when the obliquely angled face 20 of an angle section 12,13,14 abuts the oblique corner face 16 of a cell 11, the two opposing grooves 17, 21 form a composite bore which receives a sealing member or material.

The cells 11 and the angle sections 12,13,14 are positioned and orientated so that the angled sections close the spaces between the cells 11, to thereby form crypts between the cells 11. (The spaces within the cells 11 also form crypts, as described in the '375 application). In the illustrated embodiment, the space between a pair of cells 11 is defined by the long side of one cell, the short side of another cell 11, an angled section, and a half portion of another angled section.

Larger spaces 22, roughly equivalent to two crypt spaces, are formed in the crypt arrangement between cells and angle sections. These larger spaces 22 are used as planting zones. Typically a tree 15 is planted in a planting zone, but other vegetation such as shrubs, or a small flower garden, may be cultivated in a planting zone.

The cells 11 and angled sections 12,13,14 can be arranged in modules which, in turn, can be arranged in repeating patterns, as shown in FIG. 6. These patterns may be regular, or random.

Modules of 24 cells as shown in FIG. 1 may be spaced apart to allow for irrigation lines to be laid between modules.

The illustrated embodiment uses standard crypt cells and angle sections, thereby reducing manufacturing costs. These components still allow versatility, allowing different crypt arrangements to be formed by changing the positioning and orientation of the cells and angled sections. The use of materials is minimised, as each wall of a cell or angled section normally forms a wall for two adjacent crypt spaces, or for a crypt space and an adjacent planting zone.

The foregoing describes only one embodiment of the invention, and modifications which are obvious to those skilled in the art may be made thereto without departing from the scope of the invention.

For example, in a modified arrangement, in which the cells and angle sections have constant (rather than tapered) thickness, a universal angle section can replace the three angle sections shown in FIG. 1. This universal angled section is can be inverted and/or rotated to suit.





 
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