Title:
Mechanical Plush Character
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
There is illustrated and claimed the structure and method for performing a certain set of sequences of a toy character. Depending on the programming of a microprocessor and the functioning of various motor means the character can go from a standing position to a sitting position; a standing to a sitting position and a back position and back to a standing position, and a standing to a sitting position, a back position, a rollover position and, eventually, back to a standing position.

The character is also capable of performing other functions.




Inventors:
Lund, Bruce D. (River Forest, IL, US)
Starrick, Michael D. (Maywood, IL, US)
Paulson, Paul N. (Evanston, IL, US)
Srirangam, Krishnan (Chicago, IL, US)
Application Number:
11/532839
Publication Date:
08/07/2008
Filing Date:
09/18/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
446/491, 446/376
International Classes:
A63H11/00; A63H13/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20060234596GOLF DISC SCORECARDOctober, 2006Arredondo
20090227174DEVICE FOR STIMULATING, FOCUSING AND SOOTHING A PERSONSeptember, 2009D'entremont
20060063466Wearable toy and methodMarch, 2006Conarro
20070197121Toy airplane with finger roller launching systemAugust, 2007Nelson et al.
20020086610Cap rocketJuly, 2002Lapointe et al.
20050032455Modular, structural building element, construction toyFebruary, 2005Holmes
20050287906Multi-functioned insert mold board systemDecember, 2005He
20080274665Building base plates assembled to build block sets in two or three dimensional configurationsNovember, 2008Cheng
20070207699TOY VEHICLE WITH STABILIZED FRONT WHEELSeptember, 2007Hoeting et al.
20030040255Charging system for easily recharging batteries for toysFebruary, 2003Hauptner et al.
20100003889FLEXIBLE MECHANICAL APPENDAGEJanuary, 2010Greenley et al.



Primary Examiner:
DENNIS, MICHAEL DAVID
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
JACK SHORE (CHICAGO, IL, US)
Claims:
We claim:

1. A toy character assembly comprising a body portion, first and second leg assemblies movably connected to said body portion, a first bidirectional motor means for moving a first leg assembly and body portion relative to each other, a movable arm assembly connected to said body portion, a second bidirectional motor means for operating said arm assembly, means interconnecting said first and second leg assemblies for moving said second leg assembly by said first leg assembly, a microprocessor for controlling the operation of said first and second motor means to obtain the desired sequence of events for said motor means and arm and leg assemblies, power means for operating said microprocessor and switch means for activating said microprocessor.

2. A toy character assembly as set forth in claim 1 in which the movable arm assembly is positioned to engage one of said leg assemblies in a slapping manner when operated by said second motor means upon receiving instructions from said microprocessor.

3. A toy assembly as set forth in claim 1 in which the means interconnecting the first leg assembly with the second leg assembly includes a rod assembly, a spring having one end in engagement with said rod and its other end connected to a drive member for said second leg whereby upon movement of the first leg in one direction said rod will act against said spring to move said drive member to move the second leg in the same direction.

4. A toy character assembly as set forth in claim 3 in which the rod is a part of a teeter-totter mechanism and includes a central pivot in contact with a pivot stop secured to said body portion and the rod ends are located in said first and second leg assemblies whereby when the first leg is moved in the opposite direction the central pivot will contact said pivot stop to move the second leg in the opposite direction from said first leg.

5. A toy character assembly as set forth in claim 1 in which there are rib means provided on the back of said legs assemblies for facilitating the sitting and standing of said toy character assembly when the body and leg portions are moved by said first motor means as determined by said microprocessor.

6. A toy character assembly as set forth in claim 1 in which upon actuation of the switch means the microprocessor actuates the second motor means to move the movable arm assembly into a lowered position, the first motor means moves the body portion forward approximately 10 degrees, the second motor means moves the movable arm up and the first motor means moves the second leg up to move the character into a sitting position, the first motor means moves the body portion into an upward position, the first motor means rocks the body and the second motor means moves the arm into a ground engaging position and the first motor means moves the body to its standing position.

7. A toy character assembly as set forth in claim 1 in which upon actuation of the switch means the microprocessor actuates the second motor means to move the moveable arm to a lowered position, the first motor means moves the body portion forward approximately 10 degrees, the second and first motor means are activated to move the arm up in conjunction with one leg to destabilize the character and move it into a sitting position with the body portion leaning over the legs, the first motor means straightens up the body portion and then moves it into a back prone position, the first motor means shakes the legs to present an agitated condition, the first motor means raises the body portion to a seated position and then moves the body portion over the legs and the second motor means moves the arm to help support the body portion and then the first motor means raises the body portion to an upright position whereby the character has returned to its standing position.

8. A toy character assembly as set forth in claim 1 in which upon actuation of the switch means the microprocessor actuates the second motor means to raise the movable arm and the first motor means moves the body portion partially over its legs, the first motor means is actuated to raise the legs to move the character into a sitting position and then moves the body portion backward to lay the character prone with its leg raised, the first motor means moves the body portion on its sides and then extends its legs to move it into a back prone position, the first and second motor means moves the arm and legs to move the character on its side, the first motor means extends the legs and moves the character into a face down position, the first and second motor means are operated to support the body on its arm and legs and the first motor means moves the body portion upward to place the character back into a standing position.

9. A method of moving a toy character from a standing position to a sitting position and then back to a standing position, the toy character having a head and a body portion, at least one movable arm, two movable legs connected to said body portion, bidirectional motor means for operating said arm and legs, a microprocessor for controlling the action of said motor means and switch means for said microprocessor consisting of the steps of (1) standing the character up with the movable arm at a lowered position, (2) moving the body portion forward approximately 10 degrees, (3) moving the arm up in conjunction with one leg to destabilize the character whereby it falls into a sitting position with the body portion leaning over the legs, (4) straightening up the body portion, (5) rocking the body with the movable arm in a ground engaging position, and (6) moving the body to an upright position wherein the character has returned to its standing position.

10. A method of moving a toy character from a standing to a sitting position, into a back prone position and then back to a starting position, the toy character having a head and a body portion and at least one movable arm and two movable legs connected to said body portion, bidirectional motor means for operating said arm and legs, a microprocessor for controlling the action of said motor means and switch means for said microprocessor consisting of the steps of (1) standing the character up with the movable arm at a lowered position, (2) moving the body portion forward approximately 10 degrees, (3) moving the arm up in conjunction with one leg to destabilize the character whereby it falls into a sitting position with the body portion leaning over the legs, (4) straightening up the body portion, (5) moving the body portion back into a prone position, (6) shaking the legs to present an agitated condition, (7) raising the body portion to a seated position, (8) moving the body portion over the legs and rocking the legs and moving the arm to where the body is supported by the legs and arm, and (9) raising the body portion to an upright position wherein the character has returned to its standing position.

11. A method of moving a toy character from a standing position to a sitting position, into a back prone position, turning it on its side with its legs bent, extending its legs and moving it back to a back prone position, returning it to a sitting position, turning it over to a front prone position and finally moving it back to a standing position, the toy character having a head and a body portion and at least one movable arm and two movable legs connected to said body portion, bidirectional motor means for operating said arm and legs, a microprocessor for controlling the action of said motor means and switch means for said microprocessor, consisting of the steps of: (1) standing with arm raised and the body portion partially bent over its legs, (2) raising its legs to move it into a sitting position with its body portion extending over its legs, (3) moving the body portion backward to lie prone with its legs raised, (4) moving the body on its side with the legs in its raised position, (5) extending its legs and moving back to a back prone position, (6) operating said arm and legs to move the character on its side, (7) extending the legs and then moving the legs to move it into a face down position, (8) moving the legs and body portion whereby the body is supported by its arm and legs, and (9) moving the body portion upward to place the character back into a standing position.

12. A method of moving a toy character from a standing position to a sitting position, the toy character having a head and relatively movable body portion, at least one movable arm connected to the body portion in a lowered position, two movable legs each having a rearwardly disposed arcuate shaped member, which legs are movably connected to said body portion, a first bidirectional motor means for operating said arm, a second bidirectional motor for moving said body portion and legs relative to each other, a microprocessor for controlling the action of said first and second bidirectional motor means and switch means for said microprocessor comprising the steps of (1) standing the character up with a movable arm at lowered position, (2) moving the body portion forward by said second bidirectional motor means approximately 10 degrees, (3) moving the arm up by said first bidirectional motor means in conjunction with moving one legs up by said second bidirectional motor means to destabilize the character whereby it falls in to a sitting portion on the arcuate leg members with the body portion leaning over the legs, and (4) straightening up the body portion by said second bidirectional motor means to place the character in a sitting position.

13. A method including the steps of claim 12 for moving the character from a sitting position into a prone position and back to a sitting position in which the legs are joined by a teeter-totter mechanism comprising the additional steps of (1) actuating the microprocessor to activate the second bidirectional motor means to move the body portion into a prone position wherein the character has moved past the center of gravity with the legs slightly elevated, (2) actuating the microprocessor to (a) activate the second bidirectional motor means to move the legs through a kicking action through the teeter-totter mechanism, and (b) to activate the first bidirectional motor mechanism to move the arm to simulate an excited condition, and (3) operating the second bidirectional motor to move the body portion to an upright sitting position.

14. A method including the steps of claim 12 for moving the character from a sitting position into a prone position and then a side position in which the legs are joined by a teeter-totter mechanism and the body portion has a lower rounded section and a wedge extending therefrom comprising the additional steps of (1) actuating the microprocessor to activate the second bidirectional motor mean to move the body portion into a prone position and the first bidirectional motor means to move the arm to an intermediate position wherein the body portion has moved past the center of gravity and the legs have remained slightly elevated, (2) the microprocessor actuates the second bidirectional motor to move the legs upward and due to the rounded body section and wedge the character rolls on its side where it is supported in its extended position by a leg and an extended arm.

15. A method including the steps of claim 14 for moving the character from one side position to its other side position comprising the (1) steps of the microprocessor directing power to the first motor mechanism to move the arm into contact with a leg to create a rearward instability to fall on its back, (2) the microprocessor activates the second bidirectional motor to move the body portion to a more upright position with the arm in engagement with a first leg to prevent movement thereof, (3) the microprocessor directs power to the second bidirectional motor to move a second leg upward to create an instability resulting in the character moving to its other side and then to move the first leg upward to create a stable condition.

16. A method including the steps of aim 15 for moving the character from its other side to a face down position and then into a standing position comprising the steps of (1) activating the microprocessor to supply power to the second bidirectional motor to extend the legs and then move one leg in a rearward direction which through the teeter totter linkage moves the other leg in a forward direction and subsequently moves the second leg forward to place the character in a face down prone position, (2) the first bidirectional motor is activated to extend the arm, (3) the microprocessor directs power to the second bidirectional motor to move the legs forward into a generally perpendicular position and the first bidirectional motor to extend the arm generally parallel to the legs, and (4) the second directional motor moves the body portion into an upright standing position.

17. A method as set forth in claim 16 in which the first directional motor is activated to repeatedly move the arm against a surface to simulate a slapping action.

18. A method of moving a toy character from a sitting position to a standing position, the toy character having a head and body portion with an arm connected to the body portion in a raised position, the two movable legs each having a rearwardly disposed arcuate shaped member, a first bidirectional motor means for operating said arm and a second bidirectional motor for moving said body portion and legs relative to each other, and a microprocessor for controlling the action of said first and second bidirectional motor means and switch means for said microprocessor comprising the steps of (1) activating the second bidirectional motor means to rock the body portion backwards and quickly forward on the leg arcuate members and to a position approximately 90° to the legs, and (3) at the same time operates the first motor mechanism to move the arm into a position approximately parallel to the legs into a stable position, and (4) the microprocessor activates the second motor mechanism to move the body portion to an upright position and the first motor mechanism to moves the arm to a lowered position.

19. A toy character as set forth in claim 1 in which the character is moved from a seated position to a standing position by actuating said second bidirectional motor to move the body portion into a bent position and the first bidirectional motor to move the arm into a downwardly extending position to form a stable base for the character and then operating the second bidirectional motor to raise the body portion into a standing position.

20. A toy character assembly as set forth in claim 8 in which the body portion has lower rounded portion and a wedge member to facilitate movement of the character from a prone position to a side position.

Description:

Toy dolls or animals that perform various functions such as walking, talking, sitting, standing, lying on their back, rolling over, etc. are very popular with young children. They must be relatively inexpensive, attractive and simple to operate. Such toys serve as a continuous source of enjoyment and comfort.

There is herein described and illustrated a toy character that is programmed and designed to go through a series of motor operated actions. This is accomplished by motors for moving the torso, legs and/or arm of the character to effectuate sitting, wobbling, standing and various prone positions. The actions are suitably controlled by a microprocessor motor controller that is battery operated. To accomplish the various movements desired there are provided bi-directional motors for controlling arm movement and leg and torso movements. The legs are pivotally connected to the torso and are interconnected by a teeter-totter mechanism that is designed so that both legs can move forwardly to bring about a sitting action or be moved, in opposite directions to simulate an excited condition or when desired to assist in rolling over. Also, there is controlled movement so the character can wobble, slap its legs hard or against a surface, roll over and stand up.

There are also provided suitable audio messages that emanate from a speaker when certain actions occur as regulated by the microprocessor.

The details and operation of the toy character will be clear from the following drawings and the description thereof in which:

FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view showing the internal components of a toy plush character;

FIG. 1A is a bottom cross sectional view of the teeter-totter mechanism of the character at line 1A-1A;

FIG. 2 is a profile view of the toy character;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 illustrating the arm in a partially raised position;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 2 with the plush removed except for the head portion;

FIGS. 5A-5L are a sequence of views showing the character moving from the standing position to a sitting position and back to a standing position;

FIGS. 6A-O illustrate a sequence of views wherein the character moves from a standing position to a sitting position to a supine position where it exhibits an excited condition back to a sitting position and ends up in a standing position.

FIGS. 7A-CC illustrate another sequence of view wherein the character moves from a standing position to a sitting position to a prone position then a rollover position and back to a standing position. At its various positions, it is programmed to perform additional functions

Referring first to FIG. 1 there is illustrated the mechanisms that brings about the various moving modes of the toy plush character 10.

The plush character 10 includes a head portion 12 having plastic eyes 14, nose 15, arms 16, 18, legs 20, 22 and attached feet 58, 60. The arm 16 is referred to as an active arm since it is designed to be moved up and down by a reversible arm motor mechanism 28 to provide a slapping action against a leg 22 or surface 64 when desired. Arm 18 is passive and the non-active hand 19 thereof contains a selection mode switch 30. There is also provided a front activation switch 31 and on the end of the arm 16 is an arm switch 35 which indicates the position of active arm 16 relative to spring driven leg 20. A speaker 33 is also provided that is secured to a housing or torso 38. The various switches activate a microprocessor motor controller 32 that regulates the reversible motors 28, 34 to effectuate the desired movements of the legs, 20, 22 arms 16 and torso housing 38 and sounds emanating from the speaker 33. A switch 39 is provided to turn the power off and on.

The legs 20,22 are pivotally hinged to the torso housing 38. Leg 20 and torso housing 38 are directly driven by a reversible motor mechanism 34.

As shown more specifically in FIG. 1A, the leg 22 is moved in the same direction as the leg 20 through the action of a rod 40 having a spring contact cylinder 42 that engages a torsion spring 44. The other end of the torsion spring 44 is connected to a right leg drive member 46 that is connected to the leg 22 to move it forwardly with but slightly behind the directly driven leg 20.

The rod 40 is part of a teeter-totter linkage 48 and has balls 50 connected to the ends thereof which balls 50 fit into the circular recesses 20A and 22A (not shown) formed in their respective legs 20, 22. The teeter-totter effect is accomplished by a central pivot 52 that engages a pivot stop 54 secured to the housing 36 when the leg 20 is moved in a rearward direction. When leg 20 moves in a forward direction the central pivot 52 moves away from the pivot stop 54 and a teeter-totter action does not occur with the result that both legs 20, 22 move forward together.

It remains to note that the power to the microprocessor and motors are powered by batteries 56 in the feet 58, 60. An activator switch 61 is located on the top of the right foot 46, whose function will be described hereinafter.

Now referring to FIG. 2, we see a profile view of character 10. The character 10 has specially shaped leg rib 66 on the back of its legs to facilitate the working and standing of character 10 after the character 10 has performed various actions. In this view, we see the character 10 with active arm 16 in the lowered position so that active arm could impede the action of spring driven leg 22.

In FIG. 3, we see the active arm 16 moved forward in relation to the body of character 10 moving independently of spring driven leg 22. Active arm 16 works in conjunction with spring driven leg 22 to move character 10 from a standing position to various other positions including a seated position, a face down position, a position for a roll over and back to a standing position. Active arm 16 interacts with spring driven leg 22 at various times and in various positions to place character 10 into the appropriate position to complete the described actions as controlled by the microprocessor motor controller 32.

In FIG. 4, we see the mechanism of character 10 with the plush removed except for the head 12. All remaining components are functional in this view. FIG. 4 is provided to help explain the functions of character 10 in the remaining figures.

Referring now to FIGS. 5A-5 there is illustrated one of the sequences that the character 10 moves through to entertain a child. This sequence can be initiated by the selector switch 30, by foot switch 61 or by front activation switch 31 or by various other means such as a sound sensor.

FIG. 5A shows the character 10 standing with the active arm 16 in a lowered position.

In FIG. 5B, the microprocessor controller 32 directs power to motor mechanism 34 which tilts the torso or housing 38 of character 10 forward approximately 10 degrees. The processor motor controller 32 also directs power to arm motor mechanism 28 to move the active arm 16 to a position approximately parallel to the surface 64 on which character 10 has been placed.

In FIG. 5C, the microprocessor 32 directs the arm motor mechanism 28 to move the arm 16 to a lowered position and at the same time the microprocessor motor controller 32 operates motor 34 to move the torso 38 of character 10 back to a somewhat straight up position perpendicular to the surface 64 on which the character 10 has been placed. The two movements described with respect to 5C are performed simultaneously and at sufficient speed to cause instability in the character 10 to allow the character 10 to wobble back and forth. This sequence of moves can continue or the character 10 can proceed to FIG. 5D.

In FIG. 5D, the microprocessor motor controller 32 sends power to the motor mechanism 34 to move the torso 38 of character 10 approximately 5 degrees forward. At the same time, the microprocessor motor controller 32 sends power to the arm motor mechanism 28 to move the active arm to a position approximately parallel to the surface 64 on which the character 10 has been placed. Although the particular arrangement uses the active arm 16 to assist in these movements, the character 10 could have a weight distribution from front to back that would eliminate the need to use the arm.

FIG. 5E shows the active arm 16 moved to a position approximately 60 degrees from the position in FIG. 5D and the directly driven leg 20 is moved to a position forward approximately 45 degrees. The spring driven leg 22 moves under tension spring pressure 44 in the same direction as the directly driven leg 20 although somewhat later that the direct driven leg 20. This causes an elevated instability and the character 10 moves toward a seated position as illustrated in FIG. 5F.

In FIG. 5G, the microprocessor motor controller 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to lean character 10 fully forward to compensate for the inertial forces of the sitting down action of FIGS. 5E and 5F.

In 5H, we see the character 10 in a position where stability has been established. The microprocessor motor controller 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to move the torso 38 of the character 10 to a sitting up position, with the torso 38 approximately perpendicular to the surface 64.

In FIG. 5I, the microprocessor motor controller 32 activates the motor mechanism 34 to move the torso 38 of character 10 backwards and quickly forward to rock character 10 forward on specially shaped leg ribs 66.

In FIG. 5J, character 10 is resting on the heels of legs 20 and 22 as well as on the end of active arm 16.

In FIG. 5K, the microprocessor motor controller 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 30 to move the torso 38 of character 10 to a position approximately 90 degrees to the legs 20 and 22. At the same time, microprocessor motor controller 32 directs power to the arm motor mechanism to bring the active arm 16 to a position closer to parallel to the legs 20 and 22. This position working in conjunction with the weight of the batteries 56 create a stable base for the character 10.

In 5L, the microprocessor motor controller 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to move the torso 38 of character 10 to an upright position. At the same time the microprocessor motor controller 32 directs power to the arm motor mechanism 28 to move the active arm 16 to a lowered position as in FIG. 5A.

We turn now to FIGS. 6A-O in which the character is moved through another sequence actuated by selector switch 30 or by various other means such as a sound sensor or other switches.

FIG. 6A shows the character 10 standing with the active arm 16 in a lowermost position.

In FIG. 6B, the microprocessor motor controller 32 directs power to motor mechanism 34 which tilts the torso 38 of character 10 forward approximately 10 degrees. The microprocessor motor controller 32 also directs power to arm motor mechanism 28 to move the active arm 16 to a position approximately parallel to the surface 64 on which character 10 has been placed. The microprocessor 32 reverses the arm motor mechanism 28 to move the arm 16 to a lowered position and at the same time the microprocessor 32 reverses the motor 34 to move the torso 38 of character 10 back to a somewhat straight-up position perpendicular to the surface 64 on which the character 10 has been placed. The two movements described are performed simultaneously and at different speeds to cause instability in the character 10 to allow the character to wobble back and forth. This sequence of moves can continue through several cycles dependent on the input from microprocessor motor controller 32.

In FIG. 6C, we see the active arm 16 move to a position approximately 60 degrees upward from the position in FIG. 6B and the directly driven leg 20 is moved to a position forward approximately 45 degrees. The spring driven leg 22 moves under spring pressure in the same direction as the directly driven leg 20 although some what later than the direct driven leg 20. This causes an elevated instability and the character 10 moves toward a seated position as illustrated in FIG. 6D.

In FIG. 6E, the microprocessor motor controller 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to lean character 10 fully forward to compensate for the inertial forces of the sitting down action of FIG. 6C and FIG. 6D.

FIG. 6F shows the character 10 in a position where stability has been established. The microprocessor motor controller 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to move the torso 38 of the character 10 to a sitting up position, with the torso 38 approximately perpendicular to the surface.

In FIG. 6G, the microprocessor motor controller 32 moves the torso 38 of character 10 back into a back prone position.

In FIG. 6H, the character 10 has moved past the center of gravity and the legs 20 and 32 have remained slightly elevated.

In FIG. 6I, the microprocessor 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 a programmed number of milliseconds to raise the leg 20 during which period the leg 32 remains in its lowered position. The motor mechanism is then reversed to lower leg 20 which raises leg 22 through the teeter-totter mechanism 48 previously described. Briefly, when the leg 20 moves down, leg 22 moves up through the action of the center pivot 52 of the teeter-totter linage 48 working in conjunction with the pivot stop 54 (see FIG. 1A). When leg 20 is driven back to its lowered position as shown in FIG. 6J, the spring 44 returns leg 22 to the ground and the process is begun again to make the legs kick up and down relative to each other.

FIG. 6J shows the active arm 16 that is raised and lowered by activation of the arm motor mechanism 28 by microprocessor 32 to stimulate an excited condition in the character 10.

In FIG. 6K, we see the character 10 in a position where stability has been established. The microprocessor 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to move the torso 38 of the character 10 to a sitting up position, with the torso 38 generally perpendicular to the surface 64.

In FIG. 6L, the microprocessor motor controller 32 activates the leg motor mechanism to move the torso of character 10 backwards and quickly forward to rock character 10 forward on shaped ribs 66.

FIG. 6M shows the character 10 resting on the heels of legs 20 and 22 as well as on the end of active arm 16.

In FIG. 6N, the microprocessor motor controller directs power to motor mechanism 34 to move the torso of character 10 to a position approximately 90 degrees to the legs 20 and 22. At the same time, controller 32 directs power to the arm motor mechanism to bring arm 16 to a position closer to parallel to the legs 20, 22. This position working in conjunction with the weight of the batteries 56 creates a stable base for the character 10.

In FIG. 6O, the microprocessor motor controller 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to move the torso of character 10 to an upright position. At the same time, the microprocessor motor controller 32 directs power to the arm motor mechanism 28 to move the active arm 16 to a lowered position as in FIG. 6A.

Now referring to FIG. 7, we see the character 10 moving through another sequence to delight the child. This sequence can be initiated by selector switch 30 or by various other means such as a sound sensor or other switches.

In FIG. 7A, we see the character 10 standing with the active arm 16 at a lowered position.

In FIG. 7B, we see that the controller 32 directs power to mechanism 34 which tilts the torso 38 of character 10 forward approximately 10 degrees. The controller 32 also directs power to arm motor mechanism 28 to move the active arm 16 to a position approximately parallel to the surface on which character 10 has been placed. The microprocessor 32 directs power to the arm motor mechanism 28 to reverse the action of the motor 28 to move the arm 16 to a lowered position and at the same time the controller 32 directs power to reverse the motor 34 to move the torso 38 of character 10 back to a somewhat straight up position. The two movements described are performed simultaneously and at sufficient speed to cause instability in the character 10 to allow the character to wobble back and forth. This sequence of moves can continue through several cycles dependent on the input from microprocessor motor controller 32.

FIG. 7C shows the active arm 16 moved upward to a position approximately 60 degrees from the position in FIG. 7B and the directly driven leg 20 has been moved to a position forward approximately 45 degrees. The spring driven leg 22 moves under spring pressure in the same direction as the directly driven leg 18 although somewhat later than the direct driven leg 18. This causes an elevated instability and the character 10 moves towards a seated position as illustrated in FIG. 7D.

In FIG. 7E, the controller 32 directs power of the motor mechanism 34 to lean character 10 fully forward to compensate for the inertial forces of the sitting down action of FIGS. 7C and 7D.

In FIG. 7F, we see the character 10 in a position where stability has been established. The controller 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to move the torso 38 of the character 10 to a sitting up position, with the torso approximately perpendicular to the surface.

In FIG. 7G, the motor controller 12 moves the arm 16 to an intermediate position and the torso back toward a prone position.

In FIG. 7H, the torso has moved past the center of gravity into the prone position and the legs 20 and 22 have remained slightly elevated.

As shown in FIG. 7I, the controller 32 has powered the motor mechanism 34 to move direct driven leg 20 upward and spring driven leg 22 also moves upward under the action of spring 28 and right leg drive member 48. Because of a rounded lower torso position 70 which includes a wedge 71 biased to the right side, character 10 will roll to the right and end in position 7J with character 10 on its right side.

In FIG. 7K, the controller 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to move the legs 20 and 22 to a position in line with the torso. The rod 40 (see FIG. 1A) has been moved away from the fixed stop 38 during the raising of the legs 20, 22 and is then returned to the position shown in FIG. 1 and the teeter-totter action has not taken place allowing the legs to return to an inline position with the torso.

In FIG. 7L, the controller 32 directs power to the arm motor mechanism 28 to rapidly move active arm 16 to a position in contact with spring driven leg 22 at approximately its right knee. The active arm 16 creates a rearward instability to cause character 10 to fall on its back as shown in position 7M.

In FIG. 7N, the controller directs power to the arm mechanism 28 to move active arm 16 forward to position 30 degrees up from the surface.

In FIG. 7O, the motor controller 32 directs power to the leg motor mechanism 34 to move the torso of character 10 forward to a more upright position. It should be noted that the active arm 16 is in contact with the instep of right foot 60 which is connected to spring driven leg 22 locking spring driven leg 22 in place. It is to be noted that when the arm engages leg 22 the arm switch 35 contacts spring driven leg 22 and end of active arm 16 locks in instep of foot 60 shown in FIG. 7P, the microprocessor 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to move direct driven leg 20 upward. With spring driven leg 22 locked in place direct driven leg 20 is lifted without moving spring driven leg 22 and instability to the left is created in character 10.

Due to the instability that occurs in FIG. 7P, the character 10 rolls onto its left side as shown in FIG. 7Q.

FIG. 7R shows character 10 resting on its left side ready to proceed to the next action. In this position, the leg 20 is lifted relative to leg 22 (see FIG. 7P).

In 7S, the controller 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to move direct drive leg 20 to a position equal to the spring driven leg 22 in which position the character 10 is stable.

In FIG. 7T, the controller 32 directs power to the leg motor mechanism 34 to move direct drive leg 20 and spring driven leg 22 to a somewhat straight position. In this position, the central pivot 52 of the teeter totter is in contact with the pivot stop 54.

In FIG. 7U, the motor controller 22 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to move direct leg 20 in a rearward direction against the pivot stop 54 which causes the teeter totter linkage 48 to act against the pivot stop 54 to move the spring driven leg 22 forward to a position somewhat perpendicular to the torso 38 of character 10. The action of the teeter totter mechanism is described with respect to FIG. 1A.

The instability created in FIG. 7U moves the character 10 to rest on the inside of right foot 60, toe of left foot 58 and left side of head 12 as shown in FIG. 7V.

In FIG. 7W, the microprocessor motor controller 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to move direct driven leg 20 in a forward direction which allows the spring driven leg 22 to move under spring tension rearward until direct driven leg 20 and spring driven leg 22 are parallel which action allows the character 10 to assume a forward prone position.

In FIG. 7X, the controller 32 directs power to the arm motor mechanism 28 to rapidly more active arm 16 up to a position approximately parallel to the surface.

In FIG. 7Y, the controller 32 directs power to the arm motor mechanism 28 to rapidly more active arm 16 down against the surface to simulate a surface slap. This sub-sequence can be repeated numerous times as directed by the microprocessor motor controller 12.

In FIG. 7Z, the microprocessor 32 directs power to the motor mechanism 34 to move direct driven leg 18 slightly backwards then slowly forwards.

In FIG. 7AA, the controller 32 directs power to the leg motor mechanism 34 to move direct driven leg 20 in a forward direction to a position approximately perpendicular to the surface 64 with left foot 58 flat on the surface. Because of spring 44, the spring driven leg 22 forward movement lags behind the direct drive leg 20.

In FIG. 7BB, the motor controller 32 directs power to the arm motor mechanism 28 to more active arm 16 down to assist the character to position 7BB. This allows spring driven leg 22 to move forward and right foot 60 to rest flat on the surface.

In FIG. 7CC, the controller 32 directs power to the leg motor mechanism 34 to slowly move the torso of character 10 to a standing position.

It is intended by the following all invention that fall within the true spirit and scope of the claims.





 
Previous Patent: Toy construction set

Next Patent: Interactive motion apparatus