Title:
Golf card game
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A golf card game comprises a plurality of cards, each having a point value associated with the card, and indicia related to a feature associate with an aspect of golf. A selected group of the cards form a hand for each player, and the point values of the cards in the hand are combinable to define a hand score. A scoring guide is provided that has a scoring conversion system for converting the hand score of a hand to a numerical golf score corresponding to the scoring convention for an actual round of golf. A first range of hand scores corresponds to a par score, a second range of hand scores corresponds to a birdie score, a third range of hand scores corresponds to a hole-in-one score, a fourth range of hand scores corresponds to a bogey score, a fifth range of hand scores corresponds to a double bogey score, and a sixth range of hand scores corresponds to a triple bogey score.



Inventors:
Rogers, Steve (Crescent City, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/655444
Publication Date:
07/24/2008
Filing Date:
01/19/2007
Assignee:
Sports Card Games,Inc. (Puyallup, WA, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F1/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LAYNO, BENJAMIN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PERKINS COIE LLP - SEA General (SEATTLE, WA, US)
Claims:
I/we claim:

1. A card game assembly for use in playing a card game by a plurality of players and related to golf and a scoring convention for an actual round of golf, comprising: a plurality of cards, each of the plurality of cards having indicia on one side corresponding to at least one of a plurality of point values associated with the card, a selected group of the plurality of cards being combinable to form a hand for each player, the point values of the cards in the hand being combinable to define a hand score; a scoring guide having a scoring conversion system for converting the hand score of a hand to a numerical golf score corresponding to the scoring convention for an actual round of golf, the scoring conversion system is configured so a first range of hand scores corresponds to a par score, a second range of hand scores corresponds to a bogey score, a third range of hand scores corresponds to a hole-in-one score, a fourth range of hand scores corresponds to a bogey score, a fifth range of hand scores corresponds to a double bogey score, and a sixth range of hand scores corresponds to a triple bogey score; and instructions for playing the simulated round of golf using the plurality of cards, the instructions defining how to arrange the cards to form the hand for the player, to play a plurality of hands, to determine the score in each player's hand in accordance with the scoring guide, and to convert the numerical hand score of each player's hand to a numerical golf score for each player in accordance with the scoring conversion system.

2. The card game assembly of claim 1 wherein the scoring conversion guide comprises conversion portion that identifies the indicia on each of the plurality of cards and a first point value associated with each of the plurality of cards, and the scoring conversion guide identifies a second point value for each of the plurality of cards when the card is combined with another card designated as a wild card.

3. The card game assembly of claim 1, further comprising a scorecard having indicia associated with the plurality of holes related to a simulated round of golf, the indicia including a par score for each of the plurality of holes, the scorecard configured to allow the numerical golf score of each player for each of the plurality of holes in the simulated round of golf to be recorded on the card.

4. The card game assembly of claim 1 wherein the round of simulated golf includes at least one par-three hole and at least one par-four hole, and the scoring conversion system is configured so the ranges of numerical scores for at least one of the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh range of numerical hand scores are different from each other. corresponds to par score for at least a hole, a second range of numerical hand scores.

5. The card game assembly of claim 1 wherein the round of simulated golf includes at least one par-four hole, and wherein the scoring conversion system is configured for the par-four hole so that the first range of numerical hand scores corresponds to par score for the par-four hole, the second range of numerical hand scores corresponds to birdie score for the par-four hole, the third range of numerical hand scores corresponds to hole-in-one score for the par-four hole, the fourth range of numerical hand scores corresponds to bogey score for the par-four hole, the fifth range of numerical hand scores corresponds to double bogey score for the par-four hole, and the sixth range of numerical hand scores corresponds to triple bogey score for the par-four hole.

6. The card game assembly of claim 1 wherein the round of simulated golf includes at least one par-five hole, and wherein the scoring conversion system is configured for the par-five hole so that the first range of numerical hand scores corresponds to par score for the par-five hole, the second range of numerical hand scores corresponds to birdie score for the par-five hole, the third range of numerical hand scores corresponds to hole-in-one score for the par-five hole, the fourth range of numerical hand scores corresponds to bogey score for the par-five hole, the fifth range of numerical hand scores corresponds to double bogey score for the par-five hole, and the sixth range of numerical hand scores corresponds to triple bogey score for the par-five hole.

7. The card game assembly of claim 1 wherein the plurality of cards include a first set of the plurality of cards having a numerical value equal to zero, a second set of the plurality of cards having numerical values of positive numbers, and a third set of the plurality of cards having numerical values of negative numbers.

8. The card game assembly of claim 7 wherein the cards have the indicia thereon showing the numerical values of the plurality of cards, and the indicia for the positive numerical values are a first color, and the indicia for the negative numerical values are a second color different than the first color.

9. The card game assembly of claim 1 wherein the cards have indicia thereon identifying the feature associated with an aspect of golf corresponding to the numerical point value of the card.

10. The card game assembly of claim 9 wherein the feature identified by the indicia includes at least one of hole-in-one, double eagle, eagle, birdie, par, bogey, double bogey, triple bogey, quadruple bogey, rough, in-the-drink, water hazard, lost ball, snowman, sand trap, mulligan, and a bunker.

11. The card game assembly of claim 1 wherein the plurality of cards have at least one card designated as a mulligan card, and the instructions include a rule that allows a player who draws the mulligan card from the draw pile the option of drawing up to two additional cards from the draw pile during a turn.

12. A card game assembly for a plurality of players and related to golf and a scoring convention for each of a plurality of holes in a round of golf, comprising: a plurality of cards, each of the plurality of cards having indicia corresponding to at least one of a plurality of point values associated with the card, a selected group of the plurality of cards being combinable to form a hand for each player, the point values of the cards in the hand being combinable to define a numerical hand score; a scoring guide having a scoring conversion system for converting the numerical hand score of a hand to a numerical golf score corresponding to the scoring convention for each of the plurality of holes in a simulated round of golf; a scorecard configured to allow each of the players to record the numerical golf scores; and instructions for playing the golf card game and the simulated round of golf, the instructions defining how to: arrange a selected number of cards distributed to each of the players face down and in card positions to form the hand having at least first and second rows of cards arranged to form a plurality of scoring columns; form a draw pile having cards not distributed to the players, the cards in the draw pile being face down; form a discard pile from at least one of the cards, the discard pile having cards oriented face up; play a hand comprising a plurality of turns, wherein each player, in sequence beginning with a first player, during the player's turn the player elects to: draw a card from the discard pile and replace a face down card from the selected player's hand, wherein the face down card being replace is turned face up and placed in the discard pile; or draw a card from the draw pile and either i) replace a face down card from the selected player's hand with the drawn card wherein the drawn card is placed face up in the selected player's hand and the face down card being replaced is turned face up and placed in the discard pile to complete the selected player's turn, or ii) place the drawn card face up in the discard pile to complete the selected player's turn, and wherein the players continue to take turns in sequence until a first player has a hand wherein all of the cards in the first player's hand are face up; determine the score in each player's hand using the scoring guide and either i) adding the first point values of the cards in each column or ii) determining the second point value for the combination of cards in each column, and then adding together the points from each column to determining the numerical hand score of that player's hand; convert the numerical hand score of each player's hand to a numerical golf score for each player in accordance with the scoring conversion system; record the numerical golf score for each player on the score card in an area corresponding to the hole being played for the selected hand; play hands for each hole in the simulated round of golf in accordance with the instructions until completion of the simulated round of golf; and add the numerical golf score for all of the holes in the simulated round of golf for each player to determine a final round score for each player.

13. The card game assembly of claim 12 wherein the instructions are configured to determine which player has honors and is the first to play by comparing the point values of one or more of the cards in the hand of each player, and selecting the player to play first based upon the point value of the one or more cards.

14. The card game assembly of claim 12 wherein the scoring conversion guide comprises conversion portion that identifies each of the plurality of cards and a point value associated with each of the plurality of cards.

15. The card game assembly of claim 14 wherein each point value associated for each of the plurality of cards is a first point value, and the scoring conversion guide comprises a second conversion portion that identifies a second point value for each of the plurality of cards when the card is combined with another card designated as a wild card.

16. The card game assembly of claim 12 wherein the round of simulated golf includes at least one par-three hole and at least one par-four hole, and the scoring conversion system is configured so the ranges of numerical scores for at least one of the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh range of numerical hand scores are different from each other. corresponds to par score for at least a hole, a second range of numerical hand scores.

17. The card game of assembly claim 12 wherein the round of simulated golf includes at least one par-four hole, and wherein the scoring conversion system is configured for the par-four hole so that the first range of numerical hand scores corresponds to par score for the par-four hole, the second range of numerical hand scores corresponds to birdie score for the par-four hole, the third range of numerical hand scores corresponds to hole-in-one score for the par-four hole, the fourth range of numerical hand scores corresponds to bogey score for the par-four hole, the fifth range of numerical hand scores corresponds to double bogey score for the par-four hole, and the sixth range of numerical hand scores corresponds to triple bogey score for the par-four hole.

18. The card game assembly of claim 12 wherein the round of simulated golf includes at least one par-five hole, and wherein the scoring conversion system is configured for the par-five hole so that the first range of numerical hand scores corresponds to par score for the par-five hole, the second range of numerical hand scores corresponds to birdie score for the par-five hole, the third range of numerical hand scores corresponds to hole-in-one score for the par-five hole, the fourth range of numerical hand scores corresponds to bogey score for the par-five hole, the fifth range of numerical hand scores corresponds to double bogey score for the par-five hole, and the sixth range of numerical hand scores corresponds to triple bogey score for the par-five hole.

19. The card game assembly of claim 12 wherein the plurality of cards include a first set of cards having a numerical value equal to zero, a second set of cards having numerical values of positive numbers, and a third set of cards having numerical values of negative numbers.

20. A card game assembly for a plurality of players and related to golf and a scoring convention for each of a plurality of holes in a round of golf, comprising: a plurality of cards corresponding to at least one of a plurality of numerical values associated with the card, a selected group of the plurality of cards being combinable to form a hand for each player, the numerical values of the cards in the hand being combinable to define a numerical hand score; a scoring guide having a scoring conversion system for converting the numerical hand score of a hand to a numerical golf score corresponding to the scoring convention for each of the plurality of holes in a round of golf; and instructions for playing the golf card game and the simulated round of golf, the instructions defining how to arrange the cards for the hand of each player, to draw and discard cards until completion of the hand, determine the numerical hand score in each player's hand using the scoring guide after completion of the hand and convert the numerical hand score of each player's hand to a numerical golf score for each player in accordance with the scoring conversion system.

21. A method of playing a golf card game related to golf and the scoring system for a round of golf, comprising: distributing a selected number of cards to each of a plurality of players, at least a plurality of cards having indicia corresponding to at least one of a plurality of point values associated with the card, a selected group of the plurality of cards being combinable to form a hand for each player, the point values of the cards in the hand being combinable to define a hand score; arranging the cards in the hand of each player face down and in card positions so the hand has at least first and second rows of cards arranged to form a plurality of scoring columns; forming a draw pile having cards not distributed to the players, the cards in the draw pile being face down; forming a discard pile from at least one of the cards, the discard pile being oriented face up; playing a hand comprising a plurality of turns for each player, during each turn of a player, the player turn elects to: draw a card from the discard pile and replace a face down card from the selected player's hand, wherein the face down card being replace is turned face up and placed in the discard pile; or draw a card from the draw pile and either i) replace a face down card from the selected player's hand with the drawn card wherein the drawn card is placed face up in the selected player's hand and the face down card being replaced is turned face up and placed in the discard pile to complete the selected player's turn, or ii) place the drawn card face up in the discard pile to complete the selected player's turn; and wherein the players take turns in sequence until a first player has a hand wherein all of the cards in the hand are face up; determining the score in each player's hand using a scoring guide, wherein the scoring guide has a scoring conversion system for converting the numerical hand score of a hand to a numerical golf score corresponding to the scoring convention for each of the plurality of holes in a simulated round of golf, wherein determining the score includes either i) adding the first point values of the cards in each column or ii) determining the second point value for the combination of cards in each column, and then adding together the points from each column to determining the numerical hand score of that player's hand; converting the numerical hand score of each player's hand to a numerical golf score for each player in accordance with the scoring guide; and playing hands for each hole in the simulated round of golf.

22. The method of claim 21 wherein, during the plurality of turns of a hand and after the first player has a hand with all cards face up, the remaining players each draw a final drawn card from the draw pile and replace a card from that player's hand with the final drawn card, and turn all of the cards in that player's hand face up.

23. The method of claim 21, further comprising recording the numerical golf score for each player corresponding to the hole being played for the selected hand.

24. The method of claim 21, further comprising adding the numerical golf score for all of the holes in the simulated round of golf for each player to determine a final round score for each player.

25. The method of claim 24, further comprising determining which player has the lowest final round score to determine which player is the winner of the simulated round of golf.

26. The method of claim 21, further comprising recording the numerical golf score of each player for each hold on a score card that simulates a score card usable at a golf course.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention is directed to a golf-related game, and more particularly to a golf-related card game.

BACKGROUND

Golf has been played and enjoyed by millions of people around the world. Golfers typically play a round of golf on a golf course using golf clubs and one or more golf balls. A round of golf typically includes playing nine or eighteen holes on the golf course in accordance with the standard rules of golf. The rules, including the scoring convention for a round of golf, are set forth in “The Rules of Golf” and “The Decisions on the Rules of Golf,” which are written, interpreted and maintained by the United States Golf Association (USGA) and the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews (R&A), and which are incorporated herein in their entirety by reference thereto.

Golf is a very social sport, particularly recreation-level golf. Even when people are not able to play a full or partial round of golf on the golf course, they still enjoy entertainment activities related to golf. For example, people enjoy watching golf on television or reading golf-related material (e.g., magazines and books). Many people also enjoy playing other games related to golf, including card games. For example, many people play Golf Solitaire or “Golf for Four Or More,” each of which use a standard 52-card deck of playing cards. While the golf-related card games are entertaining, they have only a tenuous connection to golf, which many golf enthusiasts find lacking.

SUMMARY

The present invention provides a golf-related card game that overcomes the drawbacks of other golf-related card games and provides additional benefits. One embodiment of the present invention provides a card game assembly for use in playing a card game by a plurality of players. The card game assembly comprises a plurality of cards, each of the plurality of cards having first indicia corresponding to a point value associated with the card, and second indicia related to a feature associated with an aspect of golf. A selected group of the cards are combined to form a hand for each player, and the point values of the cards in the hand are combinable to define a hand score. A scoring guide is provided that has a scoring conversion system for converting the hand score to a numerical golf score, which corresponds to the scoring convention for an actual round of golf. In one embodiment, the scoring conversion system is configured so a first range of hand scores corresponds to a par score, a second range of hand scores corresponds to a birdie score, a third range of hand scores corresponds to a hole-in-one score, a fourth range of hand scores corresponds to a bogey score, a fifth range of hand scores corresponds to a double bogey score, and a sixth range of hand scores corresponds to a triple bogey score.

The card game assembly of one embodiment includes instructions for playing the card game, thereby playing a simulated round of golf using the plurality of cards. The instructions provide rules about how to arrange the cards to form a hand for each player, how to play a plurality of hands, how to determine the score in each player's hand in accordance with the scoring guide, and how to convert the hand score of each player's hand to a numerical golf score for each player in accordance with the scoring convention of actual golf.

In one embodiment, a card game assembly provides a golf card game for two or more to play a simulated round of golf using a scoring convention used in an actual round of golf. The card game assembly comprises a plurality of cards each having at least one of a plurality of numerical point values associated with the respective card. Selected cards from the plurality of cards are combinable to form a hand for each player. The numerical point values of the cards in a hand are combinable to define a numerical hand score for a hole in the simulated round of golf. A scoring guide is provided that has a scoring conversion system for converting the numerical hand score of a hand to a numerical golf score corresponding to the scoring convention used in a round of golf. Instructions and rules are provided for playing the golf card game and the associated simulated round of golf. The instructions explain how to arrange the cards for the hand of each player, how to draw and discard cards until completion of the hand, how to determine the numerical hand score of each hand by using the scoring guide after completion of the hand, and how to convert the numerical hand score of each player's hand to a numerical golf score for each player in accordance with the scoring conversion system.

Another embodiment provides a method of playing a golf card game related to golf and the scoring convention used for a round of golf. The method comprises the step of distributing a selected number of cards to each of a plurality of players, at least a plurality of cards having indicia corresponding to at least one of a plurality of point values associated with the card, a selected group of the plurality of cards being combinable to form a hand for each player, the point values of the cards in the hand being combinable to define a hand score. The method also includes the step of arranging the cards in the hand of each player face down and in card positions so the hand has at least first and second rows of cards arranged to form a plurality of scoring columns. The method also includes the steps of forming a draw pile with the cards not distributed to the players. The cards in the draw pile are arranged face down. The method also includes forming a discard pile from at least one of the cards, the discard pile being arranged face up.

The method of the embodiment also comprises the step of playing a hand that includes a plurality of turns for each player during the hand. During each turn, the player elects to draw a card from the discard pile and replace a face-down card from the selected player's hand, wherein the face-down card being replaced is turned face up and placed in the discard pile; or draw a card from the draw pile. The drawn card either i) replaces a face down card from the selected player's hand with the drawn card, wherein the drawn card is placed face up in the selected player's hand and the face down card being replaced is turned face up and placed in the discard pile to complete the selected player's turn, or ii) is placed in the discard pile face up to complete the selected player's turn. The players take turns in sequence until a first player has a hand wherein all of the cards in the hand are face up.

The method of the embodiment also includes the step of determining the score in each player's hand using a scoring guide, wherein the scoring guide has a scoring conversion system for converting the numerical hand score of a hand to a numerical golf score corresponding to the scoring convention for each of the plurality of holes in a simulated round of golf. Determining the score includes either i) adding the first point values of the cards in each column or ii) determining the second point value for the combination of cards in each column, and then adding together the points from each column to determine the numerical hand score of that player's hand. The numerical hand score of each player's hand is converted to a numerical golf score for each player in accordance with the scoring guide. The method includes the step of playing hands by each player for each hole in the simulated round of golf.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic isometric view of a golf card game assembly in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention, the game including a plurality of cards, a scoring system sheet, a scorecard, and instructions.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged plan view of the cards of the game of FIG. 1; the cards are shown face up so the numerical value and indicia on the cards are visible.

FIG. 3 is a reduced plan view of one of the cards of FIG. 2 shown face down so the numerical value or other indicia on the face of the card is not visible.

FIG. 4 is a scoring system in accordance with at least one embodiment, the sheet including a scoring system portion, a card point value portion, and scoring examples.

FIG. 5 is an instruction sheet containing instructions and rules of the game in accordance with at least one embodiment.

FIG. 6 is a plan view of a starting hand of a card game in accordance with at least one embodiment.

FIG. 7 is a scorecard in accordance with at least one embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present disclosure describes a golf-related card game for a plurality of players to play a simulated round of golf using the scoring convention for an actual round of golf. Several specific details of the invention are set forth in the following description and in FIGS. 1-7 to provide a thorough understanding of certain embodiments of the invention. One skilled in the art, however, will understand that the present invention may have additional embodiments, and that other embodiments may be practiced without several of the specific features described below.

FIG. 1 is a schematic isometric view of a golf card game assembly 10 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. The card game assembly includes a plurality of cards 12, a scoring system 14, scorecards 16, and an instruction sheet 18. The illustrated embodiment includes a container 20 configured to hold the cards, the scoring sheet, the scorecards, and the instructions. In one embodiment, the scoring sheet and/or the instructions can be attached directly to the container, so they do not get lost. In yet another embodiment, the scoring sheet and/or the instructions can be printed or otherwise applied directly onto the container. In the illustrated embodiment, the container is a cylindrical, metal “card tin” with a body 22 and a top 24. Other embodiments can have other containers with other shapes, and/or made from other materials.

The card game assembly 10 includes at least one deck 26 of the cards 12. The deck contains a plurality of cards that can be shuffled and distributed during play to form hands 27 that the players will use to play the different holes in the simulated round of golf, as described in greater detail below. FIG. 2 is an enlarged plan view of the cards 12 in the deck 26. The cards are illustrated in a face-up arrangement so the face 28 of the cards can be seen. The cards include a plurality of cards having indicia 30, such as a number, on the face indicating a numerical point value of that card. The cards can have negative numbers, positive numbers, and/or zero. In the illustrated embodiment, the cards have negative numbers in the range of −4 to −1, positive numbers in the range of +1 to +8, and a 0. Other embodiments can have cards with different numbers or different ranges of positive or negative numbers. The numbers or other indicia can also be color coded. For example, the positive numbers are a first color, such as green, and the negative numbers are a different color, such red, to allow for easy and quick recognition by the players.

The cards 12 of the illustrated embodiment also include one or more words 32 or other nomenclature indicating a feature related to golf. In the illustrated embodiment, the word on the face 28 of each card has a direct or general relationship to the numerical value on that card. For example, the word on the card having a numerical value of −1 is “BIRDIE,” which corresponds to the nomenclature for a hole score of one under par. The word on the card having a numerical value of +1 is “BOGEY,” which corresponds to the nomenclature for a hole score of one over par. Other cards can have sayings, slang terms, or other words on the face, either alone or in combination with a number, and generally corresponding to an aspect or feature of golf. For example, one of the cards in the illustrated embodiment includes the words “IN THE DRINK,” which refers to a golf ball entering a water hazard. Another card has the word “SNOWMAN,” which typically corresponds to a golfer's hole score of eight strokes. In the illustrated embodiment, the cards include one of the words HOLE-IN-ONE, DOUBLE EAGLE, EAGLE, BIRDIE, PAR, BOGEY, DOUBLE BOGEY, TRIPLE BOGEY, QUADRUPLE BOGEY (a.k.a. QUAD BOGEY), ROUGH, IN-THE-DRINK, LOST BALL, SNOWMAN, SAND TRAP, MULLIGAN, AND BUNKER. Other embodiments can have other words or indicia on the face of the cards.

The cards 12 in the illustrated embodiment are round and also have an image of a golf ball on the face of the card. As best seen in FIG. 3, all of the illustrated cards have an identical image 36 of a golf ball on the back 34, so that a player can not tell what numerical value or other indicia is on the face of the card just by looking at the back of the card. In other embodiments, the cards can have shapes, colors, images, or other indicia different from those shown in the illustrated embodiment.

The cards 12 in the illustrated embodiment include several duplicates of selected cards. As an example, the deck 26 of the cards 12 (shown in FIG. 2) include three each of the following cards: “HOLE-IN-ONE −4” (card 40), “DOUBLE EAGLE −3 (card 42), “EAGLE −2” (card 44), “BIRDIE −1” (card 46), “PAR 0” (card 48), “BOGEY 1” (card 50), “DOUBLE BOGEY 2” (card 52), “TRIPLE BOGEY 3” (card 54), “QUADRUPLE BOGEY 4” (card 56), “ROUGH 5” (card 58), “IN THE DRINK 6” (card 60), “LOST BALL 7” (card 62), and “SNOWMAN 8” (card 64). The deck has two each of the following special cards: “WILD HOLE-IN-ONE” (card 66), “MULLIGAN CARD DRAW” (card 68), and “POT BUNKER” (card 70). The deck has eight “SAND TRAP” cards (card 72), and only one “HONORS” card (card 74). The illustrated deck of cards discussed above is only one embodiment described for illustrative purposes. One of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that other embodiments can have a deck of cards with different numbers of cards, different numbers of duplicate cards, different combinations of cards, and/or different nomenclature or numbers on the cards.

Each of the cards 12, except for the “HONORS” card (card 74), has a corresponding point value associated with the card. In the illustrated embodiment, the cards have point values ranging from negative four (−4) points to fifteen (15) points, inclusive. Some of the cards also have second point values associated with each card when the card is combined with the “WILD” card (card 66 in FIG. 2). As is discussed in greater detail below, the point value of each card in a player's hand 27 (FIG. 1) at the completion of a hand is used to determine the total hand score of that player's hand. The scoring system 14 (FIG. 1) is then used to convert the total hand score to a numerical golf score for that player's hand.

In the illustrated embodiment, the first and second point values of each card 12 are shown below in Table 1. Other embodiments can have other point values for the cards. In yet other embodiments, some or all of the cards can have just a single point value associated with each card. In another embodiment, some or all of the cards can have three or more point values associated with each card.

TABLE 1
Card Point Values
First PointSecond Point Value
Card NameValue(w/Wild Card)
HOLE-IN-ONE−4−8
DOUBLE EAGLE−3−6
EAGLE−2−4
BIRDIE−1−2
WILD CARD00
PAR00
BOGEY10
DOUBLE BOGEY20
TRIPLE BOGEY30
QUADRUPLE BOGEY40
ROUGH50
IN THE DRINK60
LOST BALL70
SNOWMAN80
SAND TRAP1010
MULLIGAN1010
POT BUNKER1515

FIG. 4 shows a scoring system 14 in accordance with at least one embodiment. The scoring system includes a point value table 78 that lists the point values of all of the cards 12. Accordingly, a player can refer to the point value table while playing to help determine the point values of the cards in his or her hand 27. In another embodiment, the point value table can be in a different location, such as on a separate sheet, on the container 20 (FIG. 1), on the instruction sheet 18 (FIG. 1), or in another location. The point values for each card can also be identified in another format other than the table format. In addition, it is noted that the point value for each card 12 can be the same as the number on the face of the cards, although other embodiments can have point values for cards that do not match the numbers on the cards.

During a game, the players play at least one hand of cards 12 for each hole in a simulated round of golf. At the conclusion of a hand 27, a scorekeeper or the players determine the hand score for each player's hand. The point value of the hand is then converted into a numerical golf score corresponding to the scoring convention for an actual round of golf. In the illustrated embodiment, a point conversion portion 76 of the scoring system 14 shown in FIG. 4 has conversion tables 80 that list a range of point values of a hand and the corresponding numerical golf score for that range of point values. The illustrated scoring system portion has one conversion table 82 for use when the players are playing a hand corresponding to a par-three hole, another conversion table 84 corresponding to scoring for a par-four hole, and another conversion table 86 corresponding to scoring for a par-five hole. Other embodiments can include the conversion information in greater or fewer tables, or in other formats.

In the illustrated embodiment, the point conversion portion 76 has one portion configured for a par-three hole to convert the hand score of a player's hand 27 within selected ranges to one of the selected numerical golf scores, as listed below in Table 2.

TABLE 2
Conversion Table for Par-Three Hole
Numerical
Hand Score for Par 3 HoleGolf ScoreName of Golf Score
+20 and over+4Quadruple Bogey
+16 to +19+3Triple Bogey
+11 to +15+2Double Bogey
 +5 to +10+1Bogey
+4 to −80Par
 −9 to −19−1Birdie
−20 and under−2Hole-In-One

In the illustrated embodiment, the point conversion portion 76 has another portion configured for a par-four hole to convert the hand score of a player's hand 27 within selected ranges to one of the selected numerical golf scores, as listed below in Table 3.

TABLE 3
Conversion Table for Par-Four Hole
Numerical
Hand Score for Par 4 HoleGolf ScoreName of Golf Score
+20 and over+4Quadruple Bogey
+16 to +19+3Triple Bogey
+11 to +15+2Double Bogey
 +5 to +10+1Bogey
+4 to −60Par
 −7 to −15−1Birdie
−16 to −19−2Eagle
−20 and under−3Hole-In-One

In the illustrated embodiment, the point conversion portion 76 has another portion configured for a par-five hole to convert the hand score of a player's hand 27 within selected ranges to one of the selected numerical golf scores, as listed below in Table 4.

TABLE 4
Conversion Table for Par-Five Hole
Numerical
Hand Score for Par 5 HoleGolf ScoreName of Golf Score
+20 and over+4Quadruple Bogey
+16 to +19+3Triple Bogey
+11 to +15+2Double Bogey
 +5 to +10+1Bogey
+4 to −40Par
 −5 to −10−1Birdie
−11 to −15−2Eagle
−16 to −19−3Double Eagle
−20 and under−4Hole-In-One

Although the illustrated embodiment uses the particular ranges for the point conversion portion 76 and the conversions to the numerical golf scores as discussed above, other embodiments can use other hand scores or ranges of hand scores to convert into corresponding numerical golf scores. The scoring system 14 of the illustrated embodiment is consolidated on a single sheet that includes the point conversion portion 76. In another embodiment, the scoring system can be in one or more tables in one or more different locations, such as on the scorecard, one or more separate sheets, on the container 20 (FIG. 1), on the instruction sheet 18, or other location. Accordingly, a player can refer to the point value table 78 while playing to help determine the point values of the cards in his or her hand 27.

FIG. 5 is the instruction sheet 18 containing instructions and rules 90 of the game in accordance with at least one embodiment. The instructions and rules provide the players with information and guidance about the object of the game, the set up of the game, the number of people who can play the game, how to begin the game, and how to determine who goes first. The instructions and rules also provide the players with information and guidance about how to create and arrange a hand 27, how to play the hands 27 in a round, when the round is over, how to score, what to do if the cards run out, and what to do in the event of a tie. The instructions and rules also provide information and guidance about the selected cards, including the WILD CARD (card 66—FIG. 2), the MULLIGAN (card 68—FIG. 2), the POT BUNKER (card 70—FIG. 2), the SAND TRAP (card 72—FIG. 2), and the numbered cards having positive numbers, for example cards 50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60, 62, and 64 (FIG. 2) in the illustrated embodiment. The instructions in the illustrated embodiment also include examples of calculating hand scores and the associated numerical golf score.

In the illustrated embodiment, the card game can be played with two or more players. If up to four players are playing, a single deck 26 of the cards 12 (FIG. 2) can be used, and if more than four players are playing, two or more decks should be used. The object of the game is for a player to get all of the cards in his or her hand turned over (face up) first with the lowest possible hand score, while leaving the other players with as many cards in their hand as possible face down. This reduces the opportunity for the other players to exchange cards to lower their hand score.

Before play begins, the players should designate a scorekeeper, and either the players or the scorekeeper writes in the player names on the scorecard 16 (discussed below). The players also determine how many holes they will play in the simulated round of golf. Typically, the players play nine or eighteen holes during one game. The HONORS card (card 74—FIG. 2) is removed from the deck and the remaining cards are shuffled, scrambled, or otherwise mixed and placed face down on the playing surface (e.g., a table), thereby forming a draw pile 100 (FIG. 1).

Each player chooses six cards 12 from the draw pile 100, while keeping the cards face down and without looking at the face 28 of the cards. The six face-down cards define the starting hand for each player. In one embodiment, the six cards can be dealt or otherwise distributed face down to each player, rather than being selected by the players. As best seen in FIG. 6, the cards are arranged in two rows 104, with three cards in the top row 104a and three cards in the bottom row 104b to provide scoring columns 106. In the illustrated embodiment, a hand has a left scoring column 106a, a center scoring column 106b, and a right scoring column 106c.

In one embodiment, the players determine who begins the play by having each player turn over the upper left card 108 and the upper middle card 110, so the two cards are face up. The point values of these two cards, as defined in the point value table 78 (FIG. 4), are added together. The player with the lowest combined point value of the two cards receives the HONORS card (card 74—FIG. 2), and begins play at the first hole in the simulated round of golf. In case of a tie, every player must turn one additional card face up, beginning with the upper right card 112 and, if needed, continuing from left to right in the bottom row 104b, until one of the players has a cumulative point value of the face-up cards lower than all of the other players. This player receives the HONORS card and goes first.

Play begins with the player with the HONORS card (card 74—FIG. 2) turning one card 12 from the draw pile 100 (FIG. 1) face up, thereby creating a discard pile 102 (FIG. 1). The player with the HONORS card can keep the first card of the discard pile if desired. If the player wants to keep the first card from the discard pile, that card is exchanged with any card in the player's hand 27 and placed face up in the player's hand in the same position that had been occupied by the exchanged card. The exchanged card from the player's hand is then placed face up in the discard pile. The player can not look at the face of the card in his or her hand before exchanging it with the card from the discard pile 102.

If the player does not want the first card 12 from the discard pile 102, he or she leaves the card in the discard pile and draws another card from the draw pile 100. The player looks at the face 28 of the card drawn and decides whether he or she wants to keep it or not. If the player wants to keep the drawn card, it is exchanged with any card in the player's hand 27 and placed face up in the player's hand in the same position that had been occupied by the exchanged card. The exchanged card from the player's hand is then placed face up in the discard pile and the player's turn is over. Accordingly, the player with the HONORS card (card 74—FIG. 2) has the option of drawing twice from the draw pile at the start of the game. If the player does not want to keep the drawn card, the card is placed face up in the discard pile 102, and the player's turn is over.

After the player with the HONORS card (card 74—FIG. 2) completes his or her first turn, the other players take turns in sequence in the clockwise direction. During a player's turn, the player has the option of drawing a card 12 from the discard pile 102 or the draw pile 100; the player must choose one or the other. If the player does not like the card drawn, they can immediately place the drawn card face up in the discard pile. If the player wants to keep the drawn card, the player exchanges it with any card in their hand 27 and places the drawn card face up in their hand in the same position that had been occupied by the exchanged card. The card removed from the player's hand is then placed face up in the discard pile, and that player's turn is over.

During normal play (after determining who goes first), no player is allowed to turn over any of the face-down cards 12 in their hand 27 while the card remains in the player's hand, or until the end of the hand (as discussed below). After a card from a player's hand is turned over or otherwise seen by the player, that card must be exchanged with the drawn card and put into the discard pile. The player can not peek at a card in his or her hand prior to choosing which card to exchange for the drawn card. If a player looks at a face-down card in their hand while the card is in the hand, that player is assessed a one-stroke penalty (i.e., adding +1) to that player's numerical golf score for that hole. For example, if the player's numerical golf score prior to assessing a penalty was a −1 (i.e., a birdie), the player's numerical golf score after assessment of the penalty would be a 0 (a par).

After a player discards a card 12 and completes his or her turn, the next player in sequence begins a turn, and this next player can pick up the card discarded by the prior player and placed in the discard pile 102. Accordingly, a player may elect to keep a card and be forced to discard an even better card that was face down in the player's hand 27 and exchanged for the drawn card.

A round or hand is over when a player has all six cards in his or her hand face up and has discarded the exchanged card. At this point, each of the players (in the clockwise sequence) then has one final draw from the draw pile 100 only. The final draw can not be from the discard pile 102. The drawn card can be exchanged with a card in the player's hand or placed in the discard pile. If, after a player's final draw and disposition of that drawn card, that player still has cards face down in his or her hand, the player turns all of the cards in the hand face up. In the event that the cards in the draw pile run out before any of the players has all six cards face up, the hand is over and all of the players turn all of their cards face up.

After the six cards 12 in each of the hands 27 are face up, the scorekeeper must accurately tally the point values of each player's hand 27 and then use the scoring system 14 (discussed above) to determining the point values of the cards 12 and the hand score and to convert the hand score to the numerical golf score for the hole. The cards must remain in position in the row and column arrangement until the scorekeeper determines the point value of the cards and the hand score. In one embodiment, if a player moves the cards in his or her hand in any way prior to the scorekeeper tallying the point values of the cards, the player is penalized and automatically receives a quadruple bogey (+4) for the numerical golf score for that hole.

The point value of a hand is scored vertically using the columns 106a, 106b, and 106c, and the point values of the cards in the columns. The scorekeeper determines the point values of each card in a column 106 and, if appropriate, adds the point values of the cards in the column together to obtain a column score for that column. This column scoring is performed for each of the three columns, and then the three column scores for the hand are added together to determine the final numerical hand score.

In the illustrated embodiment, the column scoring process includes adding the numbers shown on the faces 28 of the two cards 12 in a column 106. If the numbers on both cards in a column are identical and are positive numbers, then the column score is a “0”, rather than the sum of the two numbers. Otherwise the card is played at its face value (unless combined with a wild card). If one of the cards in a column is a WILD card (card 66—FIG. 2), then the other card in the column receives its second point value as discussed above and shown in Table 1. For example, if the other card in the column has a positive number, the card receives its second point value of “0”. Accordingly, the column score for a wild card and a card having a positive number is “0”. If the other card in the column, however, has a negative number on its face, that card receives its second point value, which is double the first point value. Accordingly, the column score for a wild card and a card having a negative card is two times the number on the card. If a column includes two wild cards, the column score is “0”.

If a card 12 in a column 106 is a SAND TRAP card (card 72—FIG. 2) or a MULLIGAN card (card 68—FIG. 2), the card receives 10 points, which is added to the point value of the other card in the column. If a card in a column is a POT BUNKER card (card 70—FIG. 2), the card receives 15 points, which is added to the point value of the other card in the column. A wild card in a column does not zero out the MULLIGAN card, the SANDTRAP card, or the POT BUNKER card.

The scorekeeper then converts the final numerical hand score for the hand 27 into a numerical golf score for the hole using the appropriate portion of the scoring system 14. Accordingly, the numerical hand score for a hole, depending upon whether the hole is a par-three, par-four, or par-five hole, will convert to a numerical golf score, and that numerical golf score is recorded on the scorecard 16 for the player and in the space corresponding to the particular hole being played. The player who wins a hole (i.e., the player with the lowest numerical golf score) receives the HONORS card (card 74—FIG. 2) for the next hole. If the player with the HONORS card from the previous hole ties with another player for the hole, the player with the HONORS card keeps the HONORS card for the next hole.

The process for playing the hands 27 for a hole in a simulated round of golf is repeated, and the numerical golf score for each player and each hole is recorded on the scorecard 16. As best seen in FIG. 7, the scorecard 16 is similar to a golf scorecard of the type used at golf courses. In one embodiment, an actual golf scorecard can be used. The scorecard identifies the holes to be played in a round, the par score for each hole, and the total par score for all of the holes listed. The scorecard also includes blank areas 120 where the names of the players can be written. The scorecard also include blank areas 122 for each of the players where the player's numerical golf score for each hole can be recorded. Upon completion of the simulated round of golf, each player or the scorekeeper adds up the numerical golf scores for each hole in the simulated round of golf to achieve a total score. The player with the lowest total score for the simulated round of golf is the winner of the round.

From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that specific embodiments of the invention have been described herein for purposes of illustration, but that various modifications may be made without deviating from the spirit and scope of the invention. Accordingly, the invention is not limited except as by the appended claims.