Title:
COMPOSITE MASONRY BLOCK
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A masonry block wall system includes a plurality of brackets which establish a wall framework. Each bracket includes a plurality of fins adapted to receive and support at least one block member such that the fins establish a desired alignment of block members relative to one another.



Inventors:
Belsley, Dale J. (South Lyon, MI, US)
Application Number:
11/615200
Publication Date:
06/26/2008
Filing Date:
12/22/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/745.1
International Classes:
E04B2/18
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
FIGUEROA, LUZ ADRIANA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
CARLSON, GASKEY & OLDS, P.C. (BIRMINGHAM, MI, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A masonry block wall system, comprising: a plurality of brackets arranged to establish a wall framework, each of said plurality of brackets having a plurality of fins adapted to receive and support at least one block member such that said plurality of fins establish a desired alignment of block members relative to each other.

2. The wall system as recited in claim 1, wherein said plurality of brackets comprise bracket studs that each have a plurality of fins sufficient to receive and support at least a portion of at least three block members.

3. The wall system as recited in claim 1, wherein said plurality of fins receive a corresponding slot of said at least one block member to secure said at least one block member to said plurality of brackets.

4. The wall system as recited in claim 1, wherein said plurality of fins are disposed along a height of said plurality of brackets and on each side of a width of said plurality of brackets, wherein adjacent fins along said height of each of said plurality of brackets extend in opposing directions from one another and adjacent fins along said width of each of said plurality of brackets extend in a similar direction relative to one another.

5. The wall system as recited in claim 4, wherein each of said plurality of brackets include a face section disposed along said height and said width of each of said plurality of brackets.

6. The wall system as recited in claim 1, wherein said plurality of fins of adjacent brackets of said plurality of brackets extend in an opposite direction relative to each other.

7. The wall system as recited in claim 1, wherein said plurality of brackets establish a horizontal spacing and a vertical spacing of block members relative to each other.

8. The wall system as recited in claim 1, comprising at least one cross member extending between said plurality of brackets to support said wall framework.

9. The wall system as recited in claim 1, wherein the wall system includes an inner wall and an outer wall, wherein said plurality of brackets establish a width between said inner wall and said outer wall.

10. The wall system as recited in claim 1, wherein each of said plurality of brackets include at least one trough that funnels water through the wall system.

11. A method of assembling a wall system, comprising the steps of: (a) positioning a plurality of bracket members to establish a self-supporting wall frame; and (b) attaching a plurality of block members to the plurality of bracket members.

12. The method as recited in claim 11, wherein said step (a) comprises the steps of: affixing a first row of the plurality of bracket members at a starter strip; and connecting a second row of the plurality of bracket members to the plurality of bracket members of the first row.

13. The method as recited in claim 11, wherein the plurality of bracket members are bracket studs and said step (a) comprises the step of: affixing a first bracket stud at a starter strip; and affixing a second bracket stud adjacent to the first bracket stud along the starter strip.

14. The method as recited in claim 11, wherein said step (b) comprises: sliding the plurality of block members over a plurality of fins of the plurality of bracket members.

15. The method as recited in claim 11, comprising the step of: (c) applying an adhesive to at least a portion of the plurality of block members to secure the plurality of block members to the plurality of bracket members.

16. The method as recited in claim 15, wherein said step (c) comprises: applying the adhesive along an interface between each of the plurality of block members and a corresponding bracket member; and applying the adhesive within a plurality of joints extending between adjacent block members.

17. The method as recited in claim 11, wherein said step (b) is performed subsequent to said step (a).

18. The method as recited in claim 11, comprising the step of: (c) insulating and reinforcing the wall system.

19. A composite masonry block wall system, comprising: a first row of composite masonry blocks; and a second row of composite masonry blocks affixed to said first row, wherein said composite masonry blocks each include a first block member, a second block member and at least one bracket member, wherein said bracket members establish a wall frame independent of said first block members and said second block members.

20. The wall system as recited in claim 19, wherein said bracket members of said first row and said second row form a self-supporting wall frame, wherein said bracket members of said first row and said second row are spaced apart a length equal to approximately 50% of a length of said first block members and said second block members.

21. The wall system as recited in claim 19, wherein said bracket members each define a plurality of tabs and a plurality of leg members, wherein said plurality of tabs of said bracket members of said first row are at least partially received by said plurality of leg members of said bracket members of said second row.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention generally relates to building components, and more particularly to composite masonry blocks for constructing wall systems.

Modern day building construction, including construction of commercial and residential buildings, often includes the construction of concrete wall systems. A plurality of masonry blocks are stacked in a plurality of rows to construct the wall systems. Typical masonry blocks include masonry face members which are outwardly aligned and parallel and include structural cross members that extend between the parallel faces. Traditional concrete masonry blocks are of unitary construction, with the cross members and face members all formed of a concrete material.

Traditional masonry blocks include a one-piece construction. Therefore, the masonry blocks must be transported, in finished form, from the point of fabrication, storage, and/or sale, and ultimately to the construction site. Utilization of concrete cross members increases the weight of each individual unit. The relatively high weight of the individual masonry block members is undesirable from the viewpoint of an installer who must lift, transport, and possibly re-lift the masonry block members several times during the installation process.

Attempts have been made to provide a reduced weight masonry block at a low cost. For example, masonry block assemblies are known which include a pair of masonry block members which are bridged by coupling members of a different material. Although masonry block assemblies of this type are lighter than traditional masonry blocks, these masonry block assemblies typically are difficult to assemble and impractical to manufacture. In addition, these masonry block assemblies must be installed using the same basic method as standard masonry blocks and may be difficult to insulate.

Accordingly, it is desirable to provide an improved composite masonry block of reduced weight which is simple to manufacture and simple to assemble to construct a wall system.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A masonry block wall system includes a plurality of brackets which establish a wall framework. Each bracket includes a plurality of fins adapted to receive and support at least one block member such that the fins establish a desired alignment of block members relative to one another.

A method of assembling a wall system includes positioning a plurality of bracket members to establish a self-supporting wall frame and attaching a plurality of block members to the plurality of bracket members.

A composite masonry block wall system includes a first row of composite masonry blocks and a second row of composite masonry blocks affixed to the first row. Each composite masonry block includes a first block member, a second block member and at least one bracket member. The bracket members of the composite masonry blocks establish a wall frame independent of the first block members and the second block members.

The various features and advantages of this invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description. The drawings that accompany the detailed description can be briefly described as follows.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1A schematically illustrates an example composite masonry block;

FIG. 1B schematically illustrates an assembly view of the composite masonry block illustrated in FIG. 1A;

FIG. 2A illustrates an example block member of the composite masonry block illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 2B illustrates a top view of the example block member;

FIG. 2C illustrates an end view of the example block member;

FIG. 3A illustrates an example bracket member of the composite masonry block illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3B illustrates a top view of the example bracket member;

FIG. 3C illustrates an end view of the example bracket member;

FIG. 3D illustrates an in-process assembly view of a block member received on the example bracket member;

FIG. 4 is a flowchart of an example method for assembling a composite masonry block wall system;

FIG. 5A illustrates a plurality of bracket members positioned in a plurality of rows to form a wall frame;

FIG. 5B illustrates the wall frame illustrated in FIG. 5A and including a plurality of block members in phantom view;

FIG. 6 illustrates a cross-sectional end view of a plurality of joints between a plurality of composite masonry blocks;

FIG. 7 illustrates a second example composite masonry block;

FIG. 8A illustrates an example block member of the composite masonry block illustrated in FIG. 7;

FIG. 8B illustrates a top view of the example block member of FIG. 8A;

FIG. 8C illustrates an end view of a second example block member of the composite masonry block illustrated in FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 illustrates an example bracket member of the composite masonry block illustrated in FIG. 7;

FIG. 10 schematically illustrates a composite masonry block wall system;

FIG. 11A illustrates another example wall system;

FIG. 11B illustrates a bracket stud of the example wall system illustrated in FIG. 11A; and

FIG. 11C illustrates a side view of the example wall system of FIG. 11A.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

FIGS. 1A and 1B illustrate an example composite masonry block 10 that includes a first block member 12, a second block member 14, and a bracket member 16. The first block member 12 and the second block member 14 comprise a first material which is different than a second material of the bracket member 16. In one example, the first block member 12 and the second block member 14 are concrete and the bracket member 16 is metal, such as 25 gauge galvanized sheet metal, for example. In another example, the bracket member 16 is plastic. The first block member 12, the second block member 14, and the bracket member 16 may comprise any other materials known to be suitable by those skilled in the art who have the benefit of this description.

The bracket member 16 is a single sheet member and is connected between the first block member 12 and the second block member 14. The bracket member 16 has a width W that establishes a spacing between the first block member 12 and the second block member 14. The bracket members 16 may be manufactured having different widths to obtain composite masonry blocks 10 of various sizes while utilizing standard sized block members 12, 14. That is, the actual width of the composite masonry block 10 is controlled by the width W of the bracket member 16. The actual width W of the bracket member 16 will depend upon design-specific parameters including, but not limited to, the desired size and strength of the composite masonry block 10.

The first block member 12 and the second block member 14 each have a length L1. In one example, the length L1 of the first and second block members 12, 14 is approximately sixteen inches. In another example, the length L1 is approximately eight inches. However, the first and second block members 12, 14 may be manufactured to the specifications of any desired length.

The bracket member 16 has a generally planar body which is continuous and uninterrupted immediately adjacent the length L1. The bracket member 16 has a length L2, which is in one example approximately 50% of the length L1 of the first block member 12 and the second block member 14. In another example, the length L2 of the bracket member 16 is 75% of the length L1 of the first block member 12 and the second block member 14. In yet another example, the length L2 of the bracket member 16 is coextensive with the entire length L1 of the first block member 12 and the second block member 14. In yet another example, the size of length L2 decreases as the size of length L1 decreases. That is, the length L2 of the bracket member 16 may be scaled to any size in proportion to the length L1 of the block members 12, 14. For example, the length L2 may be in the range of approximately the thickness of the material of the bracket member 16 up to approximately eight inches. A worker in the art would understand how to design the bracket members 16 and the block members 12, 14 to provide composite masonry blocks 10 of multiple sizes and strengths.

FIGS. 2A, 2B, and 2C, with continued reference to FIG. 1, show an example first block member 12. The block member 12 is shown and described as typical of both block members 12 and 14. The example first block member 12 includes a positioning member 18 located near a first end 19 and another near a second end 21 of the first block member 12. The bracket member 16 receives and aligns the block members 12, 14.

A slot 22 is defined between each positioning member 18 and the first block member 12 (FIG. 2B). A fin 32 on the bracket member 16 receives the slot 22 (see FIGS. 3A-3C) for receiving and aligning the first and second block members 12, 14 with respect to the bracket member 16.

A depression 24 on the first block member 12 is adjacent each positioning member 18. In one example, the depressions 24 are directly aligned with the example slots 22. The depressions 24 are filled with an adhesive, such as mortar or glue, for example, during installation of the composite masonry block 10, and secure the first block member 12 and the second block member 14 to the bracket member 16, as is further discussed below.

Each of the first end 19 and the second end 21 include a beveled corner 23 (FIGS. 2B and 2C). In one example, the beveled corner 23 is at about a 45 degree angle relative to the face of the block member 12.

FIGS. 3A-3C, with continued reference to FIGS. 1 and 2, illustrate the bracket member 16 having a top face 26 and opposing side faces 28. The top face 26 extends parallel to the length L1 and between the first block member 12 and the second block member 14. The opposing side faces 28 are positioned at opposite ends of the top face 26 and extend in a transverse direction away from top face 26. The side faces 28 are generally perpendicular to and extend between the block members 12, 14 in an assembled condition.

The top face 26 includes at least one opening 30 (FIGS. 3B and 3C), unless the top face 26 is required to be closed for horizontal reinforcement of the composite masonry block 10. The openings 30 provide an installer of the composite masonry blocks 10 with the ability to insulate and vertically reinforce the composite masonry block 10. Optionally, the opposing side faces 28 may include at least one opening where necessary to provide insulation and horizontal reinforcement during specific installation criterion.

The opposing side faces 28 have fins 32 near their edges. The fins 32 at least partially receive the slots 22 of the first and second block members 12, 14 to assemble the composite masonry block 10 (See in-process view illustrated by FIG. 3D). The fins 32 each include a plurality of openings 34 to permit an adhesive to penetrate through the openings 34 and fixedly attach the first block member 12 and the second block member 14 to the bracket member 16.

Each example fin 32 also includes a plurality of corrugations 36 near an end 38 opposite from the top face 26, in one example. In another example, the fins 32 includes a plurality of flute members 43. The corrugations 36 and flute members 43 provide a friction surface between the first and second block members 12, 14 and the bracket member 16 and secure the slots 22 of the first and second block members 12, 14 on the fins 32 of the bracket member 16.

Each opposing side face 28 of the bracket member 16 further includes a leg member 40. In one example, the leg member 40 is integrally formed on the opposing side faces 28 adjacent the end 38. In another example, the leg member 40 is attached to the side face 28 by welding, gluing or by any other known attachment means. The leg members 40, in combination with the fins 32 and the slots 22, retain, align and stabilize the first block member 12 and the second block member 14 with respect to the bracket member 16.

The top face 26 of the bracket member 16 includes fins 42 at each of its sides. The fins 42 extend in a transverse direction from the top face 26 (i.e., in a direction parallel to the opposing side faces 28). The fins 42 include a plurality of openings 34, which are identical to the openings 34 of the side face 28 fins 32, which allow an adhesive to penetrate and fixedly attach the first and second block members 12, 14 to the bracket member 16.

The fins 32 of the opposing side faces 28 include a clip 33 near the end 38. The fins 42 correspondingly include clip engagement holes 35 near opposite ends of each fin 42. The clips 33 are received within the clip engagement holes 35 to attach additional bracket members 16 together to form a wall frame 90 (See FIG. 5A). In one example, the clips 33 are hook members which snap into the clip engagement holes 35. Other configurations are contemplated to connect the bracket members 16 as would be understood by those skilled in the art who have the benefit of this description.

A plurality of tabs 37 are punched outwardly from the top face 26 in a direction opposite the opposing side faces 28. In one example, each tab 37 has a rounded corner which slideably engages a slot 39 of the leg member 40. The tab 37/slot 39 engagement, in combination with the clip 33/clip engagement hole 35 connection, positions the bracket members 16 in a plurality of rows (See FIGS. 5A and 5B).

The bracket member 16 also includes a plurality of troughs 41. The troughs 41 are located on the top face 26 and the opposing side faces 28 of the bracket member 16. The troughs extend along the lengths of the top face 26 and opposing side faces 28. In one example, the top face 26 and each opposing side face 28 includes two troughs 41, with one trough 41 located on each side of the leg member 40. It should be understood that the troughs 41 may be positioned at other locations of the bracket member 16. The troughs 41 funnel water away from the composite masonry block 10 and thereby reduce the penetration of water within an interior of the composite masonry blocks 10 (i.e., the troughs 41 prevent water from penetrating through the composite masonry blocks 10).

Referring to FIG. 4, and with continuing reference to FIGS. 1-3, a method 100 for assembling a composite masonry block wall system that includes the composite masonry block 10 is illustrated. At step block 102, a plurality of the bracket members 16 are positioned at a desired location. The bracket members 16 are preferably positioned in a plurality of rows and form a wall frame 90 (See FIG. 5A). For example, a first row 46 of bracket members 16 is affixed to a starting strip 44, for example, which may be bolted or glued to a footing. In one example, the first row 46 of bracket members 16 is bolted to the starting strip 44. In another example, the bracket members 16 of the first row 46 are attached to the starting strip 44 with an adhesive. The bracket members 16 of the first row 46 are attached to the starting strip 44 in any known manner.

A second row 48 of bracket members 16 is attached to the first row 46 of bracket members 16 (FIG. 5A). In one example, the second row 48 of bracket members 16 is snap-fit to the first row 46 of bracket members 16 via the clip 33/clip engagement hole 35 connection and the tab 37/slot 39 engagement. Additional rows of bracket members 16 are added as required by design specific parameters including the size of the wall desired. The bracket members 16 establish the horizontal and vertical spacing of the block members 12, 14. Advantageously, the positioning of the bracket members 16 into rows in the manner illustrated with respect to step block 102 allows the quality of the installation of the wall system to be controlled.

The block members 12, 14 attach to the plurality of bracket members 16 at step block 104. In one example, the wall frame 90 is established independently of the block members 12, 14 (See FIG. 5B). That is, the wall frame 90 is self-supporting. The block members 12, 14 are positioned slightly above and in front of the bracket member 16 and are inserted over the fins 32 of the opposing side faces 28 of the bracket member 16 between the positioning members 18 to attach the block members 12, 14 to the bracket member 16 (See FIG. 3D). That is, the block members 12, 14 are slid over the fins 32 in a downward direction on each side of the bracket member 16 to assemble the composite masonry block 10.

Next, at step block 106, an adhesive is applied to at least a portion of the plurality of block members 12, 14 to permanently affix the block members 12, 14 to the bracket members 16. In one example, the adhesive comprises mortar. In another example, the adhesive is polyurethane glue. The adhesive is sprayed or injected onto the composite masonry blocks 10 with a mortar mixer/pump. One example adhesive is applied at a plurality of joints 50 between each composite masonry block 10 (See FIG. 6). In another example, the adhesive is applied at each depression 24 of the first and second block members 12, 14. In yet another example, the adhesive is applied along the length L1 of each block member 12, 14. Advantageously, the composite masonry blocks 10 may either be assembled on-site (i.e., at the construction site) or at a fabrication facility.

At step block 108, insulation is sprayed within the openings 30 of the top face 26 and the opposing side faces 28 of the bracket member 16. The insulation sound proofs the wall system and improves the thermal efficiency of the wall system. Additionally, vertical and horizontal reinforcement may be provided to the composite masonry blocks 10 at step block 108.

FIG. 7 shows a second example composite masonry block 52. The composite masonry block 52 includes a first block member 54, a second block member 56, and a bracket member 58. The bracket member 58 establishes the horizontal and vertical spacing between the first block member 54 and the second block member 56. The first block member 54 and the second block member 56 comprise a first material which is different than the material of the bracket member 58. In one example, the first block member 54 and the second block member 56 are concrete. In another example, the bracket member 58 is metal. One example metal includes 25 gauge galvanized sheet metal. In another example, the bracket member 58 is a synthetic, such as a plastic, for example.

FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 8C, with continued reference to FIG. 7, illustrate the first block member 54 of the composite masonry block 52. The block member 54 is shown as typical of both block members 54 and 56.

The first block member 54 has a length L3 between a first end face 59 and a second end face 61. In one example, the length L3 is approximately sixteen inches, although the actual length will vary depending upon design specific parameters. In one example, the first block member 54 includes a slot 62 coextensive with the length L3 for receiving a portion of the bracket member 58 (see FIG. 8B).

The slot 62 further extends along the first and second end faces 59, 61 from a top end 63 towards a bottom end 65 of the first block member 54 (See FIG. 8C). Therefore, a portion of the bracket member 58 extends along each of the first and second end faces 59, 61 of the first block member 54.

The first end face 59 and the second end face 61 each include a bevel angle 55 near the top end 63 of the first block member 54. In one example, the bevel angle 55 is about a 45° angle relative to the face of the block member 54.

FIG. 9, with continued reference to FIGS. 7 and 8, shows the bracket member 58 having a top face 64 and opposing side faces 66. The bracket member 58 is comprised of a single sheet member and is aligned with the length L3 of the first and second block members 54, 56. In addition, the opposing side faces 66 of the bracket member 58 extend along the first and second end faces 59, 61 of the first and second block members 54, 56. The bottom side of the composite masonry block 52 is open to provide further weight reductions.

The bracket member 58 has a width W2 that establishes a spacing between the first block member 54 and the second block member 56. The bracket member 58 may be manufactured having different widths to obtain composite masonry blocks 52 of various sizes while utilizing standard sized block members 52, 54. That is, the actual width of the composite masonry block 52 is controlled by the width W2 of by the bracket member 58. The actual width W of the bracket member 58 will depend upon design-specific parameters, including but not limited to, the desired size and strength of the composite masonry block 52.

The top face 64 of the bracket member 58 includes a plurality of openings 68. The openings 68 provide an installer of the composite masonry blocks 52 with the ability to insulate and reinforce the composite masonry block 52. Optionally, the opposing side faces 66 may include at least one opening where necessary to provide insulation and reinforcement during specific installation criterion.

The top face 64 of the bracket member 58 has at least two fins 70 which extend along its length. The fins 70 extend transversely from the top face 64 in a direction away from the top face 64. The fins 70 of the top face 64 are received within the slot 62 of the first and second block members 54, 56 to assemble the composite masonry block 52.

The opposing side faces 66 each include side fins 72 and a bottom fin 74. The side fins 72 are received at the slot 62 of the first and second end faces 59, 61 of the first and second block members 54, 56. The bottom fin 74 at least partially wraps around the bottom end 65 of the first and second block members 54, 56. The bracket member 58 is securely affixed to the first and second block members 54, 56 via an adhesive. Any known adhesive is suitable to attach the bracket member 58 to the first and second block members 54, 56. The bracket member 58 could include a tab/slot arrangement similar to the tab/slot arrangement of the bracket member 16 illustrated in FIGS. 3A through 3C. The composite masonry block 52 is assembled at a fabrication facility prior to being shipped to the construction site, in one example.

FIG. 10 illustrates a composite masonry block wall system 82 which includes an interior side 78 and an exterior side 80. The wall system 82 may include a plurality of the composite masonry blocks 10 or a plurality of the composite masonry blocks 52. The exterior side 80 of the wall system 82 may include block members having a decorative face. The block members of the interior side 78 include a non-decorative face. The faces of the block members 10, 52 of each of the exterior side 80 and the interior side 78 are parallel to one another.

The composite masonry blocks 10, 52 are positioned in a plurality of rows to assemble the wall system 82. For example, the wall system 82 includes a first row 102 and a second row 104. Although the example wall system 82 is shown and described as having two rows, it should be understood that the wall system 82 may include any number of rows. Each row 102, 104 includes a plurality of the composite masonry blocks 10, 52 abutted one next to another. The first row 102 is positioned at a starting strip 86, for example, which may be glued or bolted to a footing. The second row 104 is positioned atop the first row 102. Subsequent rows may be added in a like manner to construct the wall system 82.

FIGS. 11A-11C illustrate another example wall system 200. The wall system 200 includes a plurality of bracket studs 202 (See FIGS. 11B and 11C) which establish a framework F of the wall system 200. The bracket studs 202 are disposed adjacent and parallel to one another along a starting strip 206, which may be attached to a footing. The actual number of bracket studs 202 used to establish the framework F, and the spacing between each bracket stud 202, will vary depending upon design specific parameters including, but not limited to, the size of the wall system 200 desired.

A plurality of block members 208 (which are identical to block members 12, 14 illustrated in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2) are received on each bracket stud 202. The framework F of the wall system 200 is established independently of the block members 208. Therefore, the bracket studs 202 dictate both the horizontal spacing S and the vertical spacing V of the block members 208. The horizontal spacing S and the vertical spacing V are dictated by the spacing X between adjacent bracket studs 202 and a height H of each bracket stud 202, respectively. It should be understood that the spacing X and height H of the bracket studs 202 may be designed and manufactured to any specification to fabricate a wall system 200 of any size. In addition, the dimensions of the block members 208 are directly proportional to the spacing between adjacent bracket studs 202. For example, block members 208 of approximately sixteen inches in length are used where the bracket studs 202 are spaced approximately eight inches apart.

The framework F may include cross members 210 to provide support to the wall system 200. The cross members 210 extend between adjacent bracket studs 202 to provide the necessary structural support. The wall system 200 includes an inner wall 212 and an outer wall 214 (See FIG. 11C). A width W of each bracket stud 202 controls the distance between the inner wall 212 and the outer wall 214 (See FIG. 11B).

FIG. 1B illustrates example features of the bracket studs 202 which establish the framework F of the wall system 200. The bracket studs 202 each include a plurality of fins 216 for receiving, supporting and positioning the block members 208. The bracket studs 202 and the block members 208 are comprised of different materials, in one example. The block members 208 may be received on the fins 216 in an identical manner as that disclosed with respect to FIGS. 1 through 5 (i.e., via the positioning members and slots of the block members). A plurality of fins 216 extend vertically along the height H on each side of the bracket studs 202. The actual number of fins 216 included along the height H will vary depending upon the size of the wall desired.

In the illustrated example, each bracket stud 202 includes three rows (R1, R2 and R3) of fins 216, with each row R1, R2 and R3 including at least two fins 216 (i.e., one fin 216 on each side of width W of the bracket stud 202). The first row R1 of fins 216 extend in a first direction D1 away from the bracket stud 202. The second row R2 of fins 216 extend in a second direction D2 away from the bracket stud 202. The second direction D2 is opposite from the first direction D1. Direction D1 and direction D2 are transverse to the height H and the width W of each bracket stud 202. The third row R3 of fins 216 extend in the first direction D1 (parallel to the fins 216 of the first row R1) away from the bracket stud 202. That is, adjacent fins 216 along the height H of each bracket stud 202 extend in opposite directions.

If additional rows are included on the bracket stud 202, this alternating pattern of fin 216 positioning continues along the entire height H of the bracket studs 202. Although three rows are illustrated, it should be understood that the actual number of rows of fins 216 will vary depending upon design specific parameters including, but not limited to, the size of the wall system 200 and the height H of each bracket stud 202.

Additionally, adjacent fins 216 of adjacent bracket studs 202 extend in opposite directions relative to one another. For example, the fins 216 of row R1 of bracket stud 202A extend in the first direction D1 and the fins 216 of the row R1 of the bracket stud 202B extend in the second, opposite direction D2 (See FIG. 11A).

Each bracket stud 202 also includes a face section 218 extending between the opposing fins 216 of each row. Troughs 220 extend along the face sections 218 of each bracket stud 202. The troughs 220 funnel water through the framework F to reduce the penetration of water within an interior of the wall frame F (i.e., the troughs 220 prevent water from penetrating through the block members 208 and settling within the wall system 200).

The foregoing description shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in any limiting sense. A worker of ordinary skill in the art would recognize that certain modifications would come within the scope of this invention. For that reason, the follow claims should be studied to determine the true scope and content of this invention.