Title:
Divice to paint out-of-reach surfaces
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A clamping device into which can be fitted a brush, roller, or any other tool or attachment. The hollow part of the pole attached to the clamping device used to house the handle of the painting tool which is also held tightly by the said clamp. Also on the said pole an adjustable guard or spacer to assist the painter to hold the brush on the surface being painted steadily and with even pressure and to assist painting long, straight and accurate strokes. The brush, roller or any other attachment can be fitted and clamped to the head of the pole with the aid of butterfly-clips, clamps or such similar devices, thus enabling quick and easy changes of the tool.



Inventors:
Rabi, Sharon (Cholon, IL)
Havosha, Uzi Ezra (Tel Aviv, IL)
Application Number:
11/998930
Publication Date:
06/19/2008
Filing Date:
12/04/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
248/110, 248/351
International Classes:
A46B17/02; A46B17/00; F16M13/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
CHIN, RANDALL E
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
UZI EZRA HAVOSHA & PARTNERS (Moshav Bet-Elazari, IL)
Claims:
The present invention is not intended to be limited to the embodiments described above, but to encompass any and all embodiments within the scope of the following claims.

1. A paint brush holder comprising a clamp to hold paint brush handles, a means to tightly close the said clamp, a means to tightly close a pole into the said paint brush holder and, guard wheels to help guide the paint brush along a specified path, whereby ceilings and other out-of reach surfaces can be painted accurately while the painter is standing on the floor.

2. A paint brush holder as claimed in claim 1 wherein the said clamp is opened and closed by means of a hand operated screw mechanism.

3. A paint brush holder as claimed in claim 1 wherein the paint brush is replaced by other tools requiring operation far from the operator.

4. A paint brush holder as claimed in claim 1 wherein the holder does not clamp the brush or other tool directly but a secondary adjustable device holds the brush or other tool and the said paint brush holder clamps firmly the said adjustable device.

5. A paint brush holder as claimed in claim 1 further comprising a pole with an adjustable pivoted joint whereby the angle of the head of the said pole, relative to the said pole, is adjustable.

6. A paint brush holder as claimed in claim 1 wherein the angle of the said wheels can be adjusted whereby the said wheels can face many directions.

7. A paint brush holder as claimed in claim 1 wherein the distance of the said wheels can be adjusted whereby the said wheels can prevent the said brush from reaching a surface that is desired to keep free from new paint.

8. A paint brush holder as claimed in claim 1 wherein there is a threaded hole to attach a threaded pole.

9. A pole being a long handle for a paint brush holder comprising a means to adjust the angle of the said paint brush holder, a means to hold tool handles and wheels to act as a steadying and distancing device from an adjacent surface from that being painted.

10. A pole as claimed in claim 9 wherein the angle of the said wheels is adjustable.

11. A pole as claimed in claim 9 wherein the distance of the said wheels from the said brush is adjustable.

12. A pole as claimed in claim 9 wherein the said wheels are attached to a clip-on device for ease of attachment to and removal from the said pole.

13. A paint brush holder comprising a clamp to hold paint brush handles, a means to tightly close the said clamp, a means to tightly close a pole into the said paint brush holder, guard wheels to help guide the paint brush along a specified path and, a detachable tray for catching paint drips whereby ceilings and other out-of reach surfaces can be painted accurately while the painter is standing on the floor.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention is in the field of property decoration or maintenance and in particular in the field of painting surfaces that are ordinarily out-of-reach without the use of a ladder or similar device.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

For aesthetic reasons buildings are generally painted periodically. It is also known that in order to keep their value, buildings require regular maintenance. As part of the maintenance program, regular painting of ceilings or other places that are hard to reach without special equipment like a ladder.

Conversely, it is common and standard in many countries that the wall is covered with hangings such as wallpapers, tapestries or murals.

As part of this regular maintenance program, ceilings and walls require re-painting. The easiest and fastest method to paint large clear uninterrupted areas is done by using a tool well known in the art known as a roller. However, when painting the ceiling, it is very difficult to prevent the brush or roller from touching the adjacent wall near the seam or joint with the ceiling thereby causing paint to go on the adjacent wall. This is very undesirable, especially where the wall coverings are not easily cleanable.

Likewise, when painting the upper parts of walls, it is very difficult to prevent the brush or roller from touching the ceiling, at the seam or joint with the wall thereby causing paint to go on the ceiling. This is equally undesirable.

In order to prevent this type of damage it is possible to “mask” the adjoining area with masking tape. This method can not be used if the surface to be masked has been recently painted. It is also not practical if the adjoining surface is has a covering of a mural or a tapestry or wallpaper. In addition placing the masking tape adds to the cost of labor, as such additional and time-consuming protective work is required in order to complete the work satisfactorily.

For this reason, normal practice is to carry out ceiling painting in two stages. Firstly, a line is carefully painted at the intersection with the wall or round light fittings and the like, and this is done with a narrower brush. Then the second stage of painting, with a roller or wider brush, the larger uninterrupted areas are painted.

This present system of painting ceilings and the upper parts of walls requires the use of ladders or the erection of scaffolds.

This presents a number of problems.

    • A: The furniture has to be moved away from the wall in order to allow for the erection of a scaffold, or for the placing of ladders near the edge of the room. This work often takes two people to do and uses manpower which could be more efficiently utilized.
    • B: Having finished one section with a brush and then being ready to move to the next, it is necessary to move the ladder. This entails climbing down the ladder, taking all the painting equipment and paint down at the same time and then moving the ladder to the new location and then climbing up the ladder again, bringing up also all the equipment, and paint, etc. It is usual to bring equipment down, each time to prevent damage from paint spillage. Another option could be for the painter to remain at the top of the ladder and with his legs, move the ladder to the next place to be painted. This can be a dangerous process for all but the most experienced, as the ladder is unstable when this is being done, thereby risking the ladder toppling over, together with the painter and the paint pot.
    • C: Light fittings are usually on the ceiling or on the upper part of walls requiring the painter to work carefully around each fitting.
    • D: The work itself is then carried out in two stages, first using small brushes for the edging and detail, and then later, a roller or a wide brush for the larger unobstructed areas.
    • E: This process is normally carried out at least twice, as two coats of paint are usually applied.
    • F: In some rooms, for example bathrooms, there are immovable obstructions on the floor which prevent the possibility of the placement of the ladder in a convenient position for work.

Additionally when painting the lower parts of walls, it is very difficult to prevent the brush or roller from painting also the floor, at the joint with the wall. Also, this kind of painting requires the painter to work bent over or crouching down, both of which are undesirable positions for careful and accurate paint work.

Another difficulty which often presents itself, especially when painting ceilings, is that paint drips on to the floor. Paint dripping on the floor causes damage.

Prior art reveals a number of innovations in this field none of which satisfactorily solve the above mentioned difficulties as effectively as the present invention. U.S. Pat. No. 2,810,148 issued in 1957 appears to reveal a painting brush that is held, by a wheel, at a distance from the surface perpendicular to the surface being painted. The wheel is not easily adjustable in all directions as the one revealed in the present invention. U.S. Pat. No. 5,329,663 issued to Council reveals a paint brush holder with two fixed positions for holding a brush. This patent does not allow for the versatility of the present invention as is described below.

There is therefore a need for a system and method of painting one surface, up to the edge of an adjacent surface without touching the latter surface with the painting tool especially when painting surfaces that are hard to reach like ceilings. There is a need for the tool to be versatile in its ability to be adjustable to allow a wide variety of tools to be attached and in its ability to work in a wide variety of work situations.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description present embodiments of the invention, and are intended to provide an overview, or framework, for understanding the nature and character of the invention as it is claimed. The accompanying drawings are included to provide a further understanding of the invention, and are incorporated into and constitute part of this specification. The drawings illustrate various embodiments of the invention and, together with the description serve to explain the principles and operations of the invention.

The invention comprises a clamping device into which can be fitted a brush, roller, or any other tool or attachment. The hollow part of the pole attached to the clamping device could be used to house the handle of the painting tool which is also held tightly by the said clamp. Also on the said pole could be an adjustable guard or spacer to assist the painter to hold the brush on the surface being painted steadily and with even pressure and to assist painting long, straight and accurate strokes. The brush, roller or any other attachment can be fitted and clamped to the head of the pole with the aid of butterfly-clips, clamps or such similar devices, thus enabling quick and easy change of the tool.

The object of the invention is to hold, for example, a brush firmly at the end of a pole so that a painter can paint distant objects like ceilings, which are otherwise not reachable without a ladder or other apparatus.

Another object of this invention is to have a brush or other tool holder that is adjustable to suit the size of the brush or tool and which holder is held firmly by the said clamping device of this invention.

Another object of this invention is for the upper part of the telescopic pole to be adjustable to face different angles.

Another object of this invention is for the guard or spacer to be fully adjustable to all directions and distances from the painted surface and to be lockable in the desired position.

Another object of this invention is for the said guard or spacer to have wheels to slide smoothly on a surface adjacent to the one being painted. This would usually be to assist the painter to paint the edge of the ceiling where it joins with the upper part of the wall. The wheels could have the ability to lock in the chosen position. The wheels could be attached to the pole by means of a snapping action.

Another object of this invention is for the said guard or spacer to fit firmly on the said pole and be removable with ease.

Another object of this invention is for there to be a drip-tray that would be remain vertically below the brush or roller applying the paint. Its purpose is to catch any drops of paint which fall from the said brush or roller. This drip-tray is easily removable, enabling it to be rinsed, cleaned and quickly reassembled.

This invention is designed to make it easier for both professional painters and also for the domestic market, to paint, using a variety of painting tools, to reach areas which are out of normal reach, without the need to erect and stand on scaffolds or ladders. Attachments other than paint application tools could also be fitted in the said clamping device to be able to carry out other operations, like for example, sanding, cleaning and even screwing a screw. When standing on a ladder, the painter can only paint the area he can reach from his position. This invention will enable him to save time and money by enabling him to do the same or better work without a ladder.

Another object of this invention is for a comfortable padded handle to be fitted to the said pole in order to preventing blisters and sores on the hands of the painter.

The pole of this invention could also be made of varying telescopic lengths, or having the possibility of screwing into the base another pole to enable a longer reach.

Another object of this invention is for painters to stand safely on the floor, without incurring any risk of falling from a height. This also applies to difficult places for painting like stair cases and stair wells or the eaves under a roof.

Another object of this invention is to save the time required to move items of furniture which would otherwise have to be moved in order to allow a ladder or scaffold to be erected.

This invention uses simple mechanical means which will help reduce manufacturing costs and hence make the device marketable to a wider population.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and form a part of this specification, illustrate embodiments of the invention and, together with the description, serve to explain, by way of example only, the principles of the invention:

FIG. 1: is a schematic drawing of this invention.

FIG. 2: is a drawing of this invention being used in action.

FIG. 3: is a drawing of this invention used with a telescopic pole.

FIG. 4: is a drawing of the angled pole and guard wheels.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

As will be appreciated the present invention is capable of other and different embodiments than those discussed above and described in more detail below, and its several details are capable of modifications in various aspects, all without departing from the spirit of the invention. Accordingly, the drawings and description of the embodiments set forth below are to be regarded as illustrative in nature and not restrictive.

FIG. 1 shows a brush holder 100, with a clamp 102 which can hold a, brush 112, roller or similar tool. The brush holder 100 is hollow at its lower end to accommodate a pole 104. The clamp 102 is closed tightly on the brush or other tool by screwing the screws 106. The combination of the handle of brush 112 being in the hollow of the brush holder 100 and the clamp 102 being closed tight on the two sides of the brush 112, holds the brush 112 sufficiently firmly to enable it to carry out painting jobs on ceilings and other remote places. In order to keep the brush 112 at a constant distance from the adjacent wall there is at least one wheel 108 whose angle and distance from the wall is adjustable.

FIG. 2 shows a painter 120 holding a pole 104 connected to a brush holder 102. The guard wheels 108 keep the brush at the desired distance from the edge of the wall.

FIG. 3 shows the clamp 102 of this invention about to grip a roller. In this embodiment the guard wheels 132 are flexible to various angles and various distances from the clamp 102. The pole 134 in this embodiment is telescopic.

FIG. 4 shows the pole 140 of this device angled 142 to paint difficult to reach areas. The wheel guards 144 are positioned to roll on the vertical wall, thereby making the painting more accurate.