Title:
TOOL BAG
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A tool bag is disclosed. According to one embodiment, the tool bag includes a plurality of tool fasteners, a plurality of tool indicia, and a means for attaching the tool bag to a tool organizer. Each tool indicia is associated with a tool fastener.



Inventors:
Guirlinger, Edward G. (New Albany, OH, US)
Application Number:
12/029173
Publication Date:
06/05/2008
Filing Date:
02/11/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
224/251, 224/257, 206/459.5
International Classes:
B65D85/00; G01M99/00; A45F3/14; A45F5/00; B25H3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
OLSZEWSKI, JOHN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Lech Law, LLC (Dublin, OH, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

21. A tool bag comprising: a plurality of tool fasteners; a plurality of tool indicia, each tool indicia associated with a tool fastener; and a means for attaching the tool bag to a tool organizer.

22. The tool bag of claim 21, wherein the means for attaching comprises a hook.

23. The tool bag of claim 21, wherein the tool fasteners comprise a plurality of pockets formed of fabric.

24. The tool bag of claim 23, further comprising an interior portion and an exterior portion, and wherein the plurality of pockets includes at least one pocket disposed in the interior portion and at least one pocket disposed along the exterior portion.

25. The tool bag of claim 21, wherein the plurality of tool fasteners include a first pocket and a second pocket, the first pocket and the second pocket comprising a common portion of fabric.

26. The tool bag of claim 21, further comprising an adjustable shoulder belt attached to the tool bag by a connector.

27. The tool bag of claim 26, further comprising at frame that forms a rigid contour and wherein the connector is attached to the rigid contour.

28. The tool bag of claim 21, further comprising at frame that forms a handle.

29. A tool bag comprising: a rigid frame, the frame comprising: an integrated handle, at least one integrated hook disposed along the top of the frame, at least one contour disposed along the top of the frame, the contour capable of retaining an attachable shoulder belt; and a flexible covering comprising: a plurality of pockets; a plurality of tool indicia, each tool indicia disposed on an associated pocket.

30. The tool bag of claim 29, wherein the flexible covering forms an interior portion and an exterior portion.

31. The tool bag of claim 30, wherein the plurality of pockets includes at least one pocket disposed in the interior portion and at least one pocket disposed along the exterior portion.

32. The tool bag of claim 29, wherein the plurality of pockets includes a first pocket and a second pocket, the first pocket and the second pocket comprising a common portion of fabric.

33. The tool bag of claim 29, further comprising a shoulder belt.

34. The tool bag of claim 33, wherein the shoulder belt is adjustable.

35. A tool bag comprising: a rigid frame, the frame comprising: an integrated handle, two integrated hooks disposed along the top of the frame, two contours disposed along the top of the frame, the contours capable of retaining an attachable shoulder belt; a shoulder belt comprising two connectors, each connector removably attached to a respective contour of the frame; and a flexible covering forming an interior cavity, the flexible covering having an exterior surface, the flexible covering comprising: a plurality of pockets disposed within the interior cavity; a plurality of pockets disposed along the exterior surface of the flexible covering; a plurality of tool indicia, each tool indicia disposed on an associated pocket.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application is a Continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 11/166,903, filed Jun. 24, 2005, which is a Continuation-In-Part of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/667,251, filed Sep. 19, 2003, issued as U.S. Pat. No. 7,210,689. The entirety of the above-referenced applications are incorporated by reference herein for all purposes.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to portable tool boxes, chests, containers and organizers for storing, transporting and organizing sets of tools. Specifically, the present invention relates to a tool bag for use in cooperation with a wheeled tool organizer having vertical tool supports which may be disposed in an open or closed configuration, facilitating a visual inspection of all tools when disposed in the open configuration.

2. Description of the Related Art

Portable tool boxes and tool cabinets are well known for storing and transporting tool sets. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,378,005 describes a portable tool truck invented by George Norton. The '005 device comprises a plastic body with a compartment formed in the front face of the body adapted to retain tools therein, and two doors mounted on either side of the body. The doors pivot in opposite directions into an overlapping arrangement that seals off the compartment formed by the face of the body. While the invention of Norton is adequate for retaining and transporting tools, it does not facilitate taking a visual inventory of all of the tools retained therein. Further, the invention of Norton fails to provide a specific place for each tool of a tool set.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Advantages of the Invention

The present invention provides numerous advantages and benefits over prior art tool bags and tool organizers. Such advantages and benefits will be readily ascertained by those of ordinary skill in the related arts.

According to a first aspect of the present invention, a first example tool bag is provided. The tool bag includes a plurality of tool fasteners, a plurality of tool indicia, and a means for attaching the tool bag to a tool organizer. Each tool indicia is associated with a tool fastener.

According to a second aspect of the present invention, a second example tool bag is provided. The second example tool bag includes a rigid frame. The frame comprises an integrated handle, at least one integrated hook disposed along the top of the frame, and at least one contour disposed along the top of the frame. The contour is capable of retaining an attachable shoulder belt.

The second example tool bag further includes a flexible covering. The flexible covering comprises a plurality of pockets and a plurality of tool indicia. Each tool indicia is disposed on an associated pocket.

According to a third aspect of the present invention, a third example tool bag is provided. The third example tool bag includes a rigid frame. The frame comprises an integrated handle, two integrated hooks disposed along the top of the frame, and two contours disposed along the top of the frame.

The contours are capable of retaining an attachable shoulder belt. The shoulder belt comprises two connectors, each connector removably attached to a respective contour of the frame.

The third example tool bag further includes a flexible covering forming an interior cavity. The flexible covering has an exterior surface, and the flexible covering comprises a plurality of pockets disposed within the interior cavity and a plurality of pockets disposed along the exterior surface of the flexible covering.

The third example tool bag further includes a plurality of tool indicia. Each tool indicia is disposed on an associated pocket.

The objects, features and advantages of the present invention are readily apparent from the following description of the preferred embodiments when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Comprehension of the invention is facilitated by reading the following detailed description, in conjunction with the associated drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a first example tool organizer disposed in a closed configuration in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the tool organizer of FIG. 1 disposed in an open configuration;

FIG. 3 is a front view of the tool organizer of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a side view of the tool organizer of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a rear view of the tool organizer of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a front view of the tool organizer of FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the tool organizer of FIG. 1 with a storage drawer removed;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of the tool belt of the tool organizer of FIG. 1;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the tool belt of the tool organizer of FIG. 1;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a second example tool organizer in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the tool organizer of FIG. 10 with a tool module removed;

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of the tool organizer of FIG. 10 with both tool modules removed;

FIG. 13 is an exploded view of a seat bracket and the upper frame of the tool organizer of FIG. 10;

FIG. 14 is a rear perspective view of the tool organizer of FIG. 10 with both tool modules removed;

FIG. 15 illustrates the removable tool carrier of the tool organizer of FIG. 10;

FIG. 16 is a flowchart illustrating the processing steps of an example method for accounting for a set of tools which may be checked out to a third party for use.

FIG. 17A is a perspective view of a third example tool organizer in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 17B is a side view of the third example tool organizer of FIG. 17A;

FIG. 18 is an exploded view of the third example tool organizer of FIG. 17A;

FIG. 19 is a perspective view of the third example tool organizer of FIG. 17A with the tool bag and both tool modules removed;

FIGS. 20A-20E are side views of the third example tool organizer of FIG. 17A illustrating various handle positions;

FIGS. 21A-21D are side views of the third example tool organizer of FIG. 17A illustrating various handle positions;

FIG. 22A is a side view of the third example tool organizer of FIG. 17A illustrating the upper frame portion in an open position;

FIG. 22B is a side view of the third example tool organizer of FIG. 17A illustrating the upper frame portion in a partially folded position; and

FIG. 22C is a side view of the third example tool organizer of FIG. 17A illustrating the upper frame portion in a completely folded position.

DRAWING REFERENCE NUMERALS

The following reference characters identify the associated elements depicted in the drawings describing the present invention

 100Tool organizer
 110Frame
 112Handle
 114Rear wheel
 116Front wheel
 118Parts box
 120Load bearing step
 124Storage bin
 130Vertical tool support
 132Retaining means
 140Tool fastener
 142Tool indicia
 144Tool
 150Protrusion
 155Retaining means
 400Tool belt
 410Belt portion
 412First belt end
 414Second belt end
 416Pad
 418Tool belt handle
 420Tool support
1000Modular tool organizer
1012Handle
1014Tray
1016Pin
1018Hinge
1020Rear wheel
1022Front wheel
1024Storage box
1030Tool support handle
1032Tool support retainer
1040Tool fastener
1042Tool indicia
1112First tool module
1114Second tool module
1116Upper frame component
1118Lower frame component
1120A/BKnob
1122Tool support
1124A/BBracket
1126A/BSupporting cross-member
1202Step
1204Brake lever
1302Travel base
1304Seat
1306Seat belt
1308A/BProngs
1310A/BReceptacles
1402Removable tool carrier
1404Storage compartment
1406Handle
1502Handle
1504A/BAttachment hooks
1506Shoulder strap
1700Foldable tool organizer
1812First tool module
1814Second tool module
1816Upper frame component
1818Lower frame component
1820Handle
1822Tray
1850Tool bag
1910Hinge
1912Indexing plate
1914Indexing holes
1916Pin
1950Integrated cover
1952Alarm
2110Lock plate
2112Hinge
2114Guide bolt
2116Pin
2118Spring
2120Release rod
2122Release handle
2130Hinge

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Referring now to the drawing figures, there is illustrated in FIG. 1, a first example tool organizer 100 embodying the present invention. Tool organizer 100 is intended to contain a predetermined set of tools for use by a professional or hobbyist at a location within or away from a work shop. Tool organizer 100 comprises a frame 110 including a handle 112. The frame 110 is supported by two rear tires 114 and two front casters 116. The frame 110 supports several parts storage boxes 118 for containing miscellaneous tools, machine parts, work pieces and/or accessories that may be commonly needed by the user.

Tool organizer 100 includes a set of storage panels or vertical tool supports 130 for storing a specific set of tools. The specific set of tools may be selected based on the typical activities of the user. For example, the tool organizer 100 may be populated with a first set of tools for a plumber, a second set of tools for an electrician, or a third set of tools for a general maintenance worker. In the illustrated embodiment, each vertical support includes a rigid inner structure and an outer fabric covering which forms one or more tool fasteners 140 to hold a tool 144. Each tool fastener 140 has a specific size and shape so as to properly contain a specific tool 144 and includes a tool indicia 142 indicating the specific tool 144 which is associated with the tool fastener 140. Each tool fastener 140 of the example tool organizer 100 is a pocket into which a specific tool 144 may be placed and stored. Of course, other types of tool fasteners 140 may be contemplated, such as loops, straps, velcro, and hooks, for example.

The tool organizer 100 may be disposed in a closed configuration, as illustrated in FIGS. 1, 3 and 4, or in an open configuration, as described more fully below with reference to FIGS. 2 and 6. The tool organizer may be disposed in the closed configuration by securing the vertical tool panels 130 using a panel retaining means 132. In the illustrated embodiment, the panel retaining means 132 are straps that employ hook and loop fasteners, commonly referred to as velcro. Of course, retaining means of other types, including snap fasteners, buckles and hasps, for example, are acceptable substitutes.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 6, by releasing the retaining means 132, the user can open the vertical tool panels 130 of the tool organizer 100. This enables the user to visually detect every tool 144 of the particular tool set contained within the tool organizer 100, and note any missing tools using the associated indicia.

According to one aspect of the present invention, a method is presented for using the example tool organizer 100 to facilitate an inspection and/or inventory process to efficiently determine a first level of completeness, i.e. to identify any missing tools from the set of tools. The method begins with disposing the tool organizer 100 in an open configuration and visually inspecting each tool fastener 140 to determine whether a tool 144 is disposed therein. The visual inspection Her includes determining whether the each tool 144 disposed within a tool fastener 140 is associated with the tool indicia 142. Preferably, the tool indicia 142 is a printed tool name, although it may be an alpha-numeric code or other indicia such as bar-code.

The method also includes recording the first level of completeness of the tool set, such as by noting the missing tools or tool indicia. The further includes releasing the tool organizer and contents to a third party and, at some future time, receiving the tool organizer 100 and returned contents from the third party. Again, the user configures the tool organizer 100 in an open configuration and visually inspects the returned contents of the tool organizer 100 to determine a second level of completeness of the tool set. The first and second levels of completeness are compared to determine whether one or more tools 144 from the tool set were not returned with the tool organizer 100.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, respective side and rear views of the example tool organizer 100 are depicted. As illustrated, the tool organizer 100 includes an integrated tool belt 400 which may be detached from tool organizer 100 and used to carry a subset of the tool set apart from the tool organizer 100. In an alternate embodiment of the present invention, the tool belt 400 may be replaced by a tool bag or tool box to maintain the same accountability as the tool organizer 100.

Referring now to FIG. 9, there is illustrated the tool belt 400 detached from the tool organizer 100. Tool belt 400 includes a belt portion 410 having a first end 412 and a second end 414. A retaining means 415 is disposed at belt end 414. Tool belt 400 also includes a tool support 420 for holding the subset of tools and a handle 418. Like the tool fasteners of the panels of the tool organizer 100, each tool fastener of the tool belt has a particular size and shape to securely hold a specific tool, and each tool fastener of the tool belt 400 has an associated indicia of the specific tool to be stored.

When integrated with the tool organizer, the retaining means 415 of belt end 414 cooperates with a corresponding strap 155 attached to the tool organizer. Likewise, belt end 412 cooperates with a retaining means (not shown) also attached to the tool organizer 100. The weight of the tools in the tool belt 400 is further supported by handle 418 which may be looped over a correspondingly place protrusion 150 formed within the frame 110 of tool organizer 100.

When the tool belt 400 is not integrated with tool organizer 100, retaining means 415 may cooperate with belt end 412 to form a loop which may be placed around a user's waist or over a user's shoulder, as illustrated in FIG. 10. Tool belt 400 also includes a pad 416 to distribute pressure and provide a cushion for the user when the tool belt 400 is worn over the shoulder. Alternatively, the user may use handle 418 to carry tool belt 400.

Modular Tool Organizer

There is illustrated in FIGS. 10 and 11, a second example tool organizer 1000 embodying the present invention. Tool organizer 1000 is particularly useful for professionals who may be required to supply a set of tools at a remote worksite. Modular tool organizer 1000 is designed to be easily placed in and removed from a passenger vehicle or truck. Modular tool organizer 1000 comprises four major components which may be disassembled to facilitate transportation and reassembled at a remote workplace. The four major components are a first tool module 1112, a second tool module 1114, an upper frame component 1116, and a lower frame component 1118.

Upper frame component 1116 includes a handle 1012 and a tray 1014. Handle 1012 and tray 1014 are integrated into the upper frame 1116 by a hinge 1018, and they may be adjusted to any of several positions using an adjustment mechanism, such as a spring-loaded pin 1016. For example, handle 1012 may be positioned at a roughly 45 degree angle to accommodate moving and tilting the fully assembled tool organizer 1000, as shown in FIGS. 10 and 11. Handle 1012 may be positioned horizontally, as illustrated in FIG. 12, to serve as a work surface to hold tools or spare parts during a job. In yet another example, handle 1012 may also be positioned vertically to conserve space during transporting the components of the tool organizer 1000, as illustrated in FIG. 13.

Referring back to FIG. 11, the two tool modules 1112 and 1114 attach to and are supported by the upper frame component 1116. Tool module 1112, for example, attaches to the upper frame 1116 using brackets 1124A and 1124B which engage corresponding cross-members 1126A and 1126B of the upper frame component 1116. Each of the two tool modules 1112 and 1114 may be lifted and maneuvered using a tool support handle such as handle 1030, and each includes two vertical tool supports, such as tool support 1122 of tool module 1112. As in the first example embodiment, the vertical tool supports may be retained by tool support closure 1032, and each vertical support includes one or more tool fasteners 1040 to hold a tool, and each tool fastener 1040 has a specific size and shape so as to properly contain a specific tool. Each tool fastener 1040 further includes a tool indicia 1042 indicating the specific tool which is associated with the tool fastener.

Lower frame component 1118 includes two rear wheels 1020 and two front casters 1022. The lower frame component 1118 supports several parts storage boxes 1024 for holding various machine parts, work pieces and/or accessories that may be commonly needed by the user, but are typically not considered part of the tool inventory. Lower frame component 1118 includes two apertures for receiving two corresponding prongs 1308A and 1308B of upper frame component 1116. When the upper frame component 1116 is received by lower frame component 1118, the two may be secured by tightening corresponding knobs 1120A and 1120B. These attachment mechanisms enable the tool organizer 1000 to be assembled and disassembled as desired.

Referring now to FIG. 12, tool organizer 1000 is illustrated with both tool modules 1112 and 1114 removed. The removal of the tool modules facilitates the use of step 1202 which is integrated into the lower frame component 1118. The tool organizer 1000 may be stabilized using brake 1204 which prevents rotation of the rear wheels 1020.

Referring now to FIG. 13, there is illustrated a travel base 1302 which adapted to fit in a passenger seat of a car or truck, such as seat 1304. Travel base 1302 may be secured to seat 1304 using a standard passive restraint, such as seatbelt 1306. Travel base 1302 includes receptacles 1310A and 1310B which are adapted to receive corresponding prongs 1308A and 1308B of upper frame 1116. Upon securing travel base 1302 to seat 1304 and attaching upper frame component 1116 to travel base 1302, tool modules 1112 and 1114 may be attached to upper frame component 1116. The modular nature of tool organizer 1000 enables the tool organizer to be easily inserted and removed from a car or truck. By breaking the tool organizer into several modules, the weight of the assembled tool organizer and its contents may be distributed over all of the modules, each of which may be more easily lifted and maneuvered.

Referring now to FIG. 14, a rear perspective view of tool organizer 1000 is illustrated. As shown, the lower frame 1118 includes a rear storage compartment 1404, saw horse support 1408 and a handle 1406. Handle 1406 may be used to facilitate lifting the lower frame component 1118 into and out of a transporting vehicle. Saw horse support 1408 may be used to support a piece of wood or other workpiece to facilitate cutting the wood or other workpiece. A removable tool carrier 1402, more clearly illustrated in FIG. 15, is shown attached to the rear of tool organizer 1000.

Removable tool carrier 1402 includes a handle 1502, two attachment hooks 1504A and 1504B and an adjustable shoulder strap 1506. Removable tool carrier 1402 further includes a plurality of tool fasteners. Each tool fastener has a specific size and shape so as to properly contain a specific tool. Each tool fastener further includes a tool indicia indicating the specific tool which is associated with the tool fastener.

Method for Using Tool Organizer

Referring now to FIG. 16, there is illustrated an example methodology for using the example tool organizer to track, maintain and account for a set of tools which may be checked out to a third party for use. Examples of such third parties include, for example, in-house maintenance personnel and independent contractors. At block 1605, the methodology includes configuring the tool organizer in an open configuration. By so configuring the tool organizer, every tool retained therein may be visually inspected (1610) by flipping through the vertical tool supports, similar to leafing through the pages of a book.

Upon or during the visual inspection, a level of completeness of the tool set is recorded (1615). The level of completeness may be any of a number of representations of the tool set, including a list of tools missing from the tool set, a list of tools present in the tool set, a grade according to a predetermined scale, or a set of check marks in an inventory list, for example. At block 1620, the tool organizer may be checked out or released to the third party for use.

Once the third party returns the tool organizer (1625), the contents are once again visually inspected to determine a level of completeness at the time of check-in (1630). The first and second levels of completeness are then compared to determine any changes in the tool set (1635). Appropriate actions may be taken by the owner of the tool set based on any changes to the tool set. For example, the third party may be charged for any missing tools.

Foldable Tool Organizer

There is illustrated in FIGS. 17A and 17B, a third example tool organizer 1700 embodying the present invention. Tool organizer 1700 is particularly useful for professionals who may be required to supply a set of tools at a remote worksite. Foldable tool organizer 1700 is designed to be easily placed in and removed from a passenger vehicle or truck. Foldable tool organizer 1700 comprises components which may be configured to facilitate transportation and reconfigured at a remote workplace. As illustrated in FIG. 18, the components include a first tool module 1812, a second tool module 1814, a foldable upper frame component 1816, and a lower frame component 1818. A removable tool bag 1850 or other tool carrier may be optionally included with the foldable tool organizer 1700.

Referring now to FIG. 19, upper frame component 1816 includes a handle 1820 and a tray 1822. Handle 1820 and tray 1822 are integrated into the upper frame component 1816 by a hinge 1910, and they may be adjusted to any of several positions using an adjustment mechanism, such as a spring-loaded pin 1916. Pin 1916 cooperates with indexing holes 1914 of indexing plate 1912 to secure handle 1820 and tray 1822 in a position determined the indexing holes 1914. Of course, although indexing holes 1914 are illustrated in detail on only one side of tool organizer 1700, they may be provided on both sides of the tool organizer to provide increased stability. As further illustrated in FIGS. 20A-20D and FIGS. 21A-21D, handle 1820 and tray 1822 may be positioned at any of a number of predetermined angles associated with the indexing holes 1914. Further, as illustrated by FIG. 20E, handle 1820 and tray 1822 may be positioned approximately parallel with upper frame component 1816 to accommodate transportation of the tool organizer 1700. Optionally, indexing holes may be provided to secure the handle 1820 and tray 1822 in such a folded position.

Referring now to FIG. 22A, tool organizer 1700 is shown in an open position or configuration. As shown in the detail view of FIG. 22A, the upper frame component 1816 is attached to the lower frame component 1818 via a lock plate 2110. Lock plate 2110 is secured to the upper frame component 1816 by a hinge 2112, and lock plate 2110 is secured to the lower frame component 1818 by a guide bolt 2114. The upper frame component 1816 is maintained in an upright, open configuration by spring pin 2116 which passes through an aperture in the lower frame component 1818.

To prepare the tool organizer 1700 to be transported in a vehicle or for storage in a more space efficient manner, it may be configured into a more compact shape. Namely, the handle 1820 and tray 1822 may be folded to be roughly parallel with the upper frame component 1818, as previously described, and the upper frame component 1818 may be folded forward and down as illustrated in FIGS. 22B and 22C.

In order to fold the upper frame component 1816 of tool organizer 1700, the pin 2116 securing the upright position of the upper frame component may be removed from the aperture in the lower frame component 1818. To remove the pin, spring 2118 may be retracted by lifting release rod 2120 using release handle 2122. Once pin 2116 is removed, the upper frame component 1816 is free to rotate about hinge 2130. Forward rotation of the upper frame component causes the lock plate 2110 to slide downward relative to the guide bolt 2114 attached to the lower frame component 1818. Once the upper frame component has been sufficiently folded forward, a notched portion of the lock plate cooperates with the guide bolt 2114 to secure the upper frame component 1816 in the folded or closed configuration. The tool organizer 1700 may be reconfigured into the open position by reversing the process.

Foldable tool organizer 1700 further includes an integrated cover 1950 and alarm 1952 illustrated in FIG. 19. When not in use, the example integrated cover 1950 may be stored in a container attached to the tool organizer, Cover 1950 may be removed and unfolded to completely cover the tool organizer and its contents. Cover 1950 may be used to protect the tool organizer and its contents from inclement conditions or to protect against theft. Cover 1950 may include a mechanism for locking the cover to prevent unauthorized use of the tool organizer or its contents. Alarm 1952 may be a motion sensing alarm which may be activated to prevent tampering with an unattended tool organizer or its contents. In one embodiment, alarm 1952 and cover 1950 may be used simultaneously to secure the tool organizer. In such an embodiment, the cover may include indicia warning that the tool organizer is armed with an alarm.

Although the invention has been described in terms of specific embodiments and applications, persons skilled in the art can, in light of this teaching, generate additional embodiments without exceeding the scope or departing from the spirit of the claimed invention. Accordingly, it is to be understood that the drawing and description in this disclosure are proffered to facilitate comprehension of the invention, and should not be construed to limit the scope thereof.





 
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