Title:
Casino chess game
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A chess game set is disclosed which contains a chess board, said chess board comprising a harlequin pattern of eight by eight alternately colored square spaces with four additional rows of eight alternately colored square spaces adjacent each side of the main playing area. Additionally, the set comprises from two to four complete sets of chess pieces, each set of said chess pieces comprising flat circular disks having a different color from at least one other said set of chess pieces. The flat circular disks have the ability to fit within each space on the chess board, with each flat circular disk having a chess piece symbol positioned on at least one side of the flat circular disk.



Inventors:
Mccray, Donald (Comfort, WV, US)
Application Number:
11/600736
Publication Date:
05/22/2008
Filing Date:
11/17/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/261
International Classes:
A63F3/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
PIERCE, WILLIAM M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
JOHNATHAN E. GRANT (SILVER SPRING, MD, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A chess game set, said chess game comprising a) a chess board, said chess board comprising a harlequin pattern of eight by eight alternately colored square spaces with four additional rows of eight alternately colored square spaces adjacent each side of the main playing area; and b) from two to four complete sets of chess pieces, each set of said chess pieces comprising flat circular disks having a different color from at least one other said set of chess pieces, said flat circular disks having the ability to fit within each space on the chess board, each said flat circular disk having a chess piece symbol positioned on at least one side of said flat circular disk.

2. The chess game set of claim 1, wherein said chess board is square.

3. The chess game set of claim 2, wherein each corner of said chess board contains a blank square, formed by the arrangement of the harlequin pattern.

4. The chess game set of claim 3, wherein each of said corner of said chess board has a different color, wherein said color matches one of said sets of chess pieces.

5. The chess game set of claim 3, wherein each of said set of said chess pieces comprises a check piece used to identify each player's piece, said check piece having the same color as a player's other chess pieces, wherein said check piece is placed in the blank square to identify the player's pieces.

6. The chess game set of claim 5, where the word check is printed on said check piece.

7. The chess game set of claim 1, wherein a point value is positioned on said flat circular disks on the opposite side from where the chess symbol is positioned.

Description:

FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE

A chess game is disclosed which allows for more than two players, using a unique chess board and set of rules.

BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE

The game of chess is thought to have originated in what is now northern India or Afghanistan sometime before 600 AD. While there is considerable controversy over the facts, the most widely accepted scenario is that chess appeared in India around 600 A.D., was adopted in Persia around 700 A.D., and was absorbed by Arab culture around 800 A.D. The Arab/Muslim influence was responsible for its later introduction into other cultures.

The variation familiar to Europeans and Americans traveled from the Indus region, through Iran, (Persia) to the main commercial centers of Italy and Spain by about 1000 AD. A bit later, seafaring Vikings carried the game into Scandinavia and Iceland. By 1100-1200 AD, the game became known in central Europe, and was well established across all of Europe by 1400 AD, with the game rules which we use today. (See http://math.uww.edu/˜mcfarlat/177hist.htm). Over the years, there have been many variations to the game of chess. One variation of chess (called Shogi) is now popular in Japan; another variation is played in China. Many local variations in chess rules persist even today in isolated rural areas, for example in India.

As chess has become more popular in America, a number of variations of the game have been introduced in the gaming world over the past 40 or 50 years.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,419,228 (Egli et al.) discloses a multilevel, multi difficulty board game with circular symmetry. A board game is provided that is adaptable to one, two or three levels of play wherein the game board may be set correspondingly to one, two or three physical levels. The board is preferably round and accommodates two, three or four players. Game pieces are placed on the board, during play, from a choice of spots on an outer ring of the game board and progress inwardly toward the center of the board. When a player is able to position his four different color game pieces at the center of the board on corresponding colored game piece spots, and then move the pieces to a home board, he or she is the winner.

U.S. Patent No. 2005/0212209 (Reynolds) discloses a game board with a square central playing area having a relatively large number of playing positions thereon, with each edge of the central playing area having two matrices of three rows and eight columns of playing positions extending therefrom. These playing position extensions provide for the initial placement of conventional chess or checker playing pieces thereon at the beginning of multiple player games, and permit play by up to eight players. The initial playing position extensions are colored differently from one another over the lighter colored squares of the alternating dark and light colored playing positions, with the playing pieces assigned to each starting position being similarly colored. Rules are for the most part similar to conventional chess and checker rules, but allow chess pawns and checkers to make larger moves than in conventional play in order to compensate for the larger central playing area of the board.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,513,849 (Navin) discloses a method of playing chess for four players which utilizes a modified chess board and a plurality of distinguishable sets of playing pieces. The game board consists of 160 alternating light-colored and dark-colored squares arranged in the shape of a cross; it has two prominent lines or boundary indicators that intersect at the center of the board. Four sets of conventional chess pieces are used, each set being a different color, and all pieces move according to the standard rules of chess. Pawns may be promoted by advancing six squares to cross the center of the board. Each player defends his/her king against three opponents' pieces while attempting to win the game by capturing any opponents' king which has suddenly become exposed to direct attack or by being the last player to put a checkmated king in “check” before the checkmated player's turn occurs, even if another player initially established the checkmate. A stalemate can also end the game and is scored as a four-way draw.

U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,142,474 and 6,260,848 (Tachkov et al.) discloses a modified game of chess comprising four individual armies. There can be two, three, or four individual participants. A game board is modified to comprise seventy-two alternating smaller squares of equal dimensions for a total of 144 squares, but of two distinct alternating colors. The game board has a border with linear groups of designation marks for initial pawn movements. The methodology is novel in that two, three, or four participants, each initially with his or her own modified army of chess pieces, can form or dissolve alliances with other armies. Armies may also, by checkmate, control one or more defeated armies. The result is a modified game for experienced players, with each team positioned in a different corner of the board.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,067,578 (Chang) discloses a modified game of chess comprising four individual armies. There can be two, three, or four individual participants. A game board is modified to comprise seventy-two alternating smaller squares of equal dimensions for a total of 144 squares, but of two distinct alternating colors. The game board has a border with linear groups of designation marks for initial pawn movements. The methodology is novel in that two, three, or four participants, each initially with his or her own modified army of chess pieces, can form or dissolve alliances with other armies. Armies may also, by checkmate, control one or more defeated armies. The result is a modified game for experienced players.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,778,187 (Deak Jr.) discloses a method for playing a modified chess game, on a modified chess board having a main playing area of eight squares by eight squares with each side extending four rows to form a plus-type design having a total of 128 alternating black and white squares, uses two to four sets of conventional chess pieces, each set being a different color. At least two of the sets are arranged so that all queens occupy the same colored squares. Then all pieces move in the conventional manner. In addition, when a pawn takes an opposing piece and enters into one of the four extended rows, it continues on a straight path toward the furthest row of that extended area.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,250,633 (Mohtasham et al.) discloses a game of skill including a playing board having a perimeter surrounding a playing area divided into equally sized boxes, wherein each box is marked with an identifying element, such as a geometric shape and/or symbol of a particular color. The identifying elements dictate the permitted direction of movement of corresponding playing pieces along avenues formed by the arrangement of identifying elements within the boxes. Scoring points are indicated at the juncture of four box corners, identifying the center of four adjacently positioned boxes in a square area. The playing pieces are provided in contrasting colors to identify each player. Each player is provided with four sets of playing pieces, the playing pieces in each set being of a particular group to identify the permitted movement of the playing pieces of that group. Each player is further provided with scoring pieces of contrasting color. When a scoring point is surrounded on three sides (i.e., three boxes) by playing pieces from either opponent occupying those boxes, the player who closes the fourth side, i.e., the last of the four boxes, gains the scoring point, and places the scoring piece over the scoring point. The first player to score a predetermined number of points, or more than 50% of the total number of scoring points on the playing board, wins the game.

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE

This disclosure is directed to a casino chess game that can be played by two to four people.

The game is comprised of a board and the appropriate number of different chess pieces. In one embodiment of the disclosure, the chess pieces are poker chips having printed emblems for the chess pieces.

In another embodiment of the disclosure, the game can be played for money. Each playing piece on the board has a different dollar value, and the player who accumulates the most dollars based on the pieces captured.

In another embodiment of the disclosure, the game may be played for points. These points may be redeemed for prizes, or cash.

In yet another embodiment, the game may be played as a regular chess game, wherein the game is won by having the last remaining king on the board.

Additionally, given that there can be from two to four players, the playing board is extended by four rows on each side.

In a further embodiment of the disclosure, each corner of the board has a place to put captured pieces, and to indicate which color is being played by each player.

With the foregoing and other objects, advantages, and features of the disclosure that will become hereinafter apparent, the nature of the disclosure may be clearly understood by reference to the following detailed description of the disclosure, the appended claims, and the views illustrated in the drawing:

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the game board, with the casino chess chips in place;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the front side of a casino chess chip;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the back side of a casino chess chip; and

FIG. 4 is a score sheet.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DISCLOSURE

Referring to FIGS. 1-4, the chess game 1 consists of a board 2 and at least four sets of a full complement of chess pieces 3, 4, 5, and 6.

The game board 2 is square and is comprised of a chess board having the standard harlequin pattern of alternating black and red squares 34 with eight squares in each row 7 and column 8. However, on each side 9, 10, 11, 12, of the chess board, there are four additional rows of alternating black and red squares, such that each printed column 8 has sixteen alternating black and red squares. Four rows 7 will still comprise eight alternating black and red squares. While the traditional black and red colors may be used for the squares, any other colors may be used, including but not limited to black and white, dark green and light green, dark blue and light blue, yellow and purple, or any other contrasting combination.

Put another way, a first set of eight columns, each sixteen squares long, is centrally and perpendicularly superimposed on top of a second set of eight columns, the second set of columns being a mirror image of the first set of eight columns, thereby forming a plus sign.

The positioning of the harlequin squares forms a blank square on each corner 13, 14, 15, and 16 of the board.

The chess game will contain 8 pawns 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, two rooks 25, 26, two knights 27, 28, two bishops 29, 30, one queen 31, and one king 32. There will be four sets of chess pieces included with the game. Each set of pieces will be a different color, to distinguish each player's pieces from one another.

The designation of the each player's color will be made by placing a blank colored chip in the box to the right of the player. Alternatively, each of the boxes on the board may designate a specific color to which the playing pieces to the left of the box are matched.

Regular chess pieces may be used. Preferably, “poker chips” 33 with images of the various chess pieces are used. The images may be embossed or raised. The chips 33 may be made of plastic, wood, cardboard, paper, metal, clay filled, or any other material. The chips 33 may be the traditional circular poker chip, having a size of approximately: 1 9/16″ in diameter, with a ⅛″ width. The sizes of the chips 33 may vary, depending on the size of the board 1. The shape may also vary, such that the chips may also be square, filling the squares 34 of the board The chip itself may be made of plastic, wood, cardboard, paper, metal, or any other material.

The chips 33 may have the images of the various chess pieces on one or both sides of the chip. Alternatively, the image of the chess piece may be on one side of the chip, with a point value 35 on the other side 36 of the chip. For example, the following values or points may be used for each of the pieces:

Pawn1
Knight5
Bishop10
Rook15
Queen20
King25

Each chess piece of each team will be identified by the colors and markings around the rim 55 of the chess piece. For example, the following colors may be used with the following pieces:

    • King=black with white marks
    • Queen=green with white markings
    • Bishop=red with white markings
    • Knight=white with blue markings
    • Rook=blue with white markings
    • Pawn=white with no markings

As mentioned above, the colored poker chips will have a red, blue, green, or yellow colored disk in the center of the chip, to identify the players.

The individual pieces are played as they normally would be in a regular two person chess game.

The king 32 can move one square in any direction on an unoccupied square as long as it does not put him in check. The king captures by moving into a square occupied by an opponent's piece. There is no castling.

The queen 31 can move any number of squares in any direction if its path is not blocked. The queen captures by moving into a square occupied by an opponent's piece.

The rooks 25 and 26 can move any number of squares vertically or horizontally if its path is not blocked. The rook captures by moving into a square occupied by an opponent's piece.

There is one bishop 29 on a light square. He can move any number of squares diagonally if his path is not blocked, but only on light squares. Another bishop 30 can only move diagonally on dark squares if his path is not blocked. The bishops capture by moving into a square occupied by one of the opponent's pieces.

The knight 27 and 28 moves two squares vertically or horizontally and one square to the left or right. Alternatively, the knight can move one square vertically or horizontally, and two squares to the left or right. The move is in the shape of an “L.” It can jump over other pieces to an unoccupied square, or land on an opponent to capture him. If the knight begins its move on a light square, it lands on a dark square. Inversely, if the knight begins its move on a light square, it lands on a light square. The pawn(s) 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24 may move one or two squares on the first move, then one square on each move. The pawn must move straight ahead, never backward. The pawn captures diagonally. If the pawn on the far right or far left attacks diagonally into another color zone, he must continue to the last row of that color zone, then turn around and go back to the center zone. The pawn then turns and around and goes back to the center zone. It then turns and returns to its original direction. There is no en passant. There is no pawn promotion.

In an alternative embodiment, a pawn can be promoted to a queen, if the pawn moves into the last row of the opposite side of the board. The pawn will not be crowned king by moving the pawn to the last row of either of the opponents to the left or to the right of the player moving the pawn.

In yet another embodiment, any pawn reaching the last row of any of the opponents may be crowned and assume the powers of a queen.

There are a number of different ways to play the casino chess game.

One way is to play casino chess is by single elimination, wherein each player keeps the points from the pieces that were won before the player's king is lost. For example, if a player captures three bishops, the number “3” is written in the row on the score sheet next to the word “bishop,” and the total score for capturing the three bishops (each worth 10 points) will be 30 points. Every piece that is captured is recorded on the score sheet, and then tallied for the total score.

The winner of the chess game (the player that achieves the final check mate) takes all of the remaining pieces on the board, and the pieces he has captured, and totals the score. In one embodiment of the game, the player who achieves the final checkmate is the ultimate winner; in other versions of the game, the player with the most points wins.

In another version of the game, a multi game tournament, the number of points of each player of all of the games is added, and the player with the highest score wins the tournament. There can be an unlimited number of players with four players at each table, with the winner of each table advancing until the winner with the most points wins.

In a further embodiment of the disclosure, each player has one additional piece or casino chip, known as the check piece, and is used to identify each player's piece The color of the disk is the same color as that of the having the player's other chess pieces and is used to identify each player's piece. It is preferred that the word “Check” be printed on the chip. More specifically, each check piece can be a colored disk with the word “check” printed or engraved in its center. The check piece is positioned in the upper left hand corner 51 of the large square 52 of the player's color zone, preferably positioned to the right of the player. This square may be white, with a circle for positioning the check piece, or, alternatively, the square may be the same color of the player's pieces.

In one embodiment of the disclosure, when an opponent's king is placed in check, a check piece, belonging to the player placing the opposing king in check, is placed on top of the checked king to show all players which color has the king in check. If the king in check is in checkmate, and there is no possible way for to move out of checkmate, the captured king is removed from the board, and all of his remaining men on the board belong to and are now controlled by the player that captured the king. For example if the blue team places red king in check, and red king has no moves to get out of check, the red king is captured and removed from the board, and all of the red king's pieces are now part of the blue's team. The blue check piece can be placed next to or on top of red's check piece in the red zone square to show all players which pieces are controlled by the blue team.

If someone capture's the blue team's king, they could control the blue and red pieces, as well as their original pieces.

Check and checkmate can occur a few different ways. If a red zone player places the green zone king in check, and the green zone king has a move, on his turn, to get out of check, then the red zone player's turn is over. If the blue or yellow zone player on either of their turn(s) can block the green zone king's only escape and place him in checkmate, that player captures the green zone king and all of his remaining pieces.

In a preferred embodiment, there is no stalemate. If the king cannot move without going in check, and there are no other pieces that can move, the king is surrendered and all remaining pieces go to the team (player) that has been the king in stalemate.

There have been disclosed a number of embodiments of the games in this disclosure, However, it is to be understood that various changes and modifications may be made thereto without departing from the spirit of the disclosure.





 
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