Title:
CABLE MANAGEMENT BRACKET
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A device, method and system for supporting and managing cables are disclosed herein. The exemplary device may have two or more vertical support posts. The two or more support posts may support one or more equipment shelves. The two or more support posts may support one or more cable supports for supporting cables. The two or more support posts may be partially or completely enclosed. The enclosures may be solid, slotted or perforated on one or more sides including the top as in a cabinet enclosure.



Inventors:
Datri, Theodore (Millis, MA, US)
Weinegger, Mark (Franklin, MA, US)
Application Number:
11/940587
Publication Date:
05/22/2008
Filing Date:
11/15/2007
Assignee:
C.E. Communication Services, Inc. (Franklin, MA, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47B81/00; A47B55/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20070284324Inside Wall Mounted Hanging RodsDecember, 2007Goldstein
20080011698Hitch accessory storage deviceJanuary, 2008Simon
20100057245PICKING CART AND PICKING SYSTEMMarch, 2010Hironaka et al.
20090101613Articulating modular storage systemApril, 2009Botkin
20100096351RACK MODULE AND FURNITURE HAVING A RACK MODULEApril, 2010Park
20040099622Foldable storage and display rackMay, 2004Lee
20050167381Folding rack for chafing dishAugust, 2005Fariello
20080302742Adjustable shelf for storing electronic devicesDecember, 2008Fulmer
20050161464Holder for flaccid flat articles such as napkinsJuly, 2005Fiola
20080272073RACK SYSTEM AND SUPPORT MEMBER FOR SUPPORTING A FOLDING RACK IN A DISHWASHERNovember, 2008Pike et al.
20050016939Desktop filing systemJanuary, 2005Eby et al.



Primary Examiner:
NOVOSAD, JENNIFER ELEANORE
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BOURQUE & ASSOCIATES (MANCHESTER, NH, US)
Claims:
1. A cable rack device comprising: two or more vertical support posts; one or more equipment shelves supported by the two or more support posts; and one or more cable supports supported by the two or more support posts above the one or more equipment shelves.

2. A cable rack device of claim 1, further comprising a base coupled to a bottom end of each support post.

3. A cable rack device of claim 1, wherein the one or more cable supports comprise one or more cable support bases extending between and coupling one of the two or more support posts to another of the two or more support posts.

4. A cable rack device of claim 1, wherein the one or more cable supports comprise a cable support base extending between two of the two or more support posts and a horizontal sections extending by telescoping means from both lateral sides of the cable support base.

5. A cable rack device of claim 1, wherein the one or more cable supports comprise a cable support base extending between two of the two or more support posts, a horizontal sections extending by telescoping means from both lateral sides of the cable support base and a vertical section extending by telescoping means vertically from a distal end of each horizontal section.

6. A cable rack device of claim 1, wherein the one or more cable supports comprise a cable support base extending between two of the two or more support posts, a horizontal sections extending from both lateral sides of the cable support base and a vertical section extending vertically from a distal end of each horizontal section and wherein the cable support base, the horizontal sections, and the vertical section are constructed from bending a single sheet of material.

7. A cable rack device of claim 1, wherein the one or more cable supports is located six feet or higher on the support posts

8. A cable rack device of claim 1, wherein the components of the cable rack device are bolted together to allow for multiple configurations.

9. A cable rack device of claim 1, further comprising an additional cable support base coupling one of the support posts to a support post of another cable rack device.

10. A cable rack stand comprising: a rack base providing lateral stability two vertical support posts extending from opposite sides of the base; one or more equipment shelves coupled and supported by the two or more support posts; and one or more cable supports supported by the two or more support posts above the one or more equipment shelves wherein the cable supports comprises: a support base extending between the two support posts, horizontal sections extending by telescoping means generally horizontally from both lateral sides of the support base, and a vertical section extending by telescoping means generally vertically from a distal end of each horizontal section.

11. A cable rack stand of claim 10, wherein the one or more cable supports are located six feet or higher on the vertical support posts from the rack base.

12. A cable rack stand of claim 10, wherein the components of the cable rack device are bolted together to allow for assembly of multiple configurations.

13. A cable rack stand of claim 10, further comprising an additional cable supports coupling one of the support posts to a support post of another cable rack stand.

14. A cable rack stand of claim 10, wherein the one or more cable supports are sized to receive a hundred or more communication cables.

15. A cable rack stand of claim 10, wherein the one or more equipment shelves extend laterally from one side of the support posts.

16. A cable rack stand of claim 10, wherein the horizontal sections extend generally horizontal from each side of the cable support base in an alternating pattern.

17. A component cable rack system comprising: two or more cable racks each comprising a base providing lateral stability, two support posts extending from opposite sides of the base, one or more equipment shelves coupled and supported by the two support posts, and a cable support supported by the two support posts above the one or more equipment shelves wherein the cable support comprises a support base extending between the two support posts, horizontal sections extending by telescoping means from both lateral sides of the support base, vertical section extending by telescoping means from a distal end of each horizontal section and; a cable support couple one of the two support posts of one of the two or more cable rack with one of the two support posts of another of the two or more cable racks.

18. A component cable rack system of claim 17, wherein the one or more equipment shelves extend laterally from a front side of the support posts.

19. A component cable rack system of claim 17, wherein the components of the cable racks are bolted together to allow for multiple configurations.

20. A component cable rack system of claim 17, wherein the cable rack is partially enclosed on one or more sides by one of: a solid, slotted, and perforated panels.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is related to and claims priority from U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/866,307 filed on Nov. 17, 2006 entitled Cable Management Bracket, which is incorporated fully herein by reference

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to cable management and more particularly, relates to managing cables routed above a rack.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

In many industries such as banking, telecommunications, and Internet-based business there exists a need for high-speed communications services. It is now common for companies to have multiple racks 1, FIG. 1, arranged in rows containing dozens of servers, switches, and other communication and computer equipment within a single room. The communication and computer systems typically involve hundreds to thousands of cables/wires providing input and output for the various resources.

Traditionally, these cables have been routed using cable ladders 2, FIG. 2. These cable ladders are typically supported by rods 3 hung from the ceiling or are secured to independent, stand-alone floor supports. While generally effective, the known designs suffer from several limitation or disadvantages.

One such disadvantage of the known designs is that they are often difficult to install, particularly in a retrofit situations. In many applications, a drop ceiling is used in the room. However, most drop ceilings cannot support the weight of a loaded cable ladder 2. As a result, the rods 3 of the cable ladder 2 must be secured directly to the structural ceiling rather than the drop ceiling and require the drop ceiling to be removed. Unfortunately, removing a drop ceiling can introduce a significant amount of dust/debris into the air which can damage the communication and computer equipment in the room.

Yet another disadvantage of the known designs is that they take up a lot of valuable space. Because of the difficulty in installing ceiling-hung cable ladders 2, independent, standalone floor supports are used. However, the floor supports take up space that could otherwise be used more productively. Additionally, floor support cable ladder systems are expensive due to the amount of material needed.

Accordingly, what is need is an improved cable management system. The improved cable management system should preferably be easily retrofitted to an existing facility. The improved cable management system should preferably not require removal of a drop ceiling and should preferably utilize wasted space in the facility. Moreover, the improved cable management system should be a cost effective solution for cable routing that can be easily installed.

It is important to note that the present invention is not intended to be limited to a system or method which must satisfy one or more of any stated objects or features of the invention. It is also important to note that the present invention is not limited to the preferred, exemplary, or primary embodiment(s) described herein. Modifications and substitutions by one of ordinary skill in the art are considered to be within the scope of the present invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other features and advantages of the present invention will be better understood by reading the following detailed description, taken together with the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of one embodiment of a prior art rack;

FIG. 2 is a top perspective view of one embodiment of a prior art cable ladder system;

FIG. 3 is top perspective view of one embodiment of the bracket according to the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a front perspective view of the bracket according to the present invention shown in FIG. 3 secured to a prior art rack; and

FIG. 5 is top perspective view of another embodiment of the bracket according to the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

According to one embodiment, the present invention features a bracket 10, as shown in FIG. 3, that is secured to the top 7, as shown in FIG. 4, of a rack 1 for managing and routing cables, wires, or the like. A typical rack 12, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4, includes a base 2, two vertical side posts 3, 4 a spaced distance W apart from each other and extending generally upwards from the base 2 (typically 19 or 23 inches apart from each other and 7 feet tall) to which communication and computer equipment 9 is secured and supported, and a top angle bar 5 secured to the top 7 of the side posts 3, 4 with one or more bolts 6. The side posts 3, 4 may be panels or other components used to support computer equipment. The computer equipment 9 may be secured to the vertical side posts 3, 4 or may be positioned on shelves extending from the side posts 3, 4. The rack 1 may have one or more equipment components. Those skilled in the art will recognize that various other embodiments and designs of racks 1 exist and the present invention is not limited to any specific rack design unless specifically claimed as such. The side posts 3, 4 may include sides for partially enclosing one or more sides by solid, slotted or perforated panels.

The bracket 10, FIG. 3, according to the present invention is secured to a rack 1 as shown in FIG. 4. The bracket 10 features a base cable support 12 having a longitudinal length L that is substantially the same as the width W (FIG. 1) of the rack 1 (for example, preferably approximately 20 inches when used with a rack 1 having a width W of 23 inches) and a height H of approximately 1.5-2.0 inches. The base 12 features one or more apertures, slots, or opening 18 (preferably two apertures 18 at opposite ends 15, 16 of the base 12), for securing the bracket 10 to the top 7 of the rack 1. In practice, the user simply removes or loosens the bolts 6 that secure the top angle bar 5 to the side posts 3, 4 of the rack 1 (preferably just the top bolt 6′), places the bracket 10 between the top angle bar 5 and the side posts 3, 4, and retightens the bolts 6.

The bracket 10 also features a plurality of channel members 14, 16 disposed along the longitudinal length L of the base 12 a spaced distance apart from each other. The channel members 14, 16 extend generally outwardly and upwardly from the base 12 to form a channel or passageway for supporting the cables above the rack 1. While the channel members 14, 16 may feature any shape that forms a passageway for retaining the cables, the channel members 14, 16 preferably have a generally “L” shape and include substantially horizontal sections 20, 21 and substantially vertical sections 22, 23.

The base cable support 12 and plurality of channel members 14, 16 may be constructed from a single sheet of material as shown in FIG. 3, according to one exemplary embodiment. By staggering the channel members 14, 16, the channel members 14, 16 may be constructed by bending the channel members 14, 16 at angles from the base cable support 12. The base cable support 12 and plurality of channel members 14, 16 are not limited to the above described method of construction and may use other methods for example molded material or a combination of methods and parts.

In the exemplary embodiment, the channel members 14, 16 feature long and short horizontal sections 20, 21 that extend generally perpendicularly horizontally from the base 12 on opposite sides of the base 12 and vertical sections 22, 23 that preferably extend generally perpendicularly upwardly from the long and short horizontal sections 20, 21. For illustrative purposes only, the long and short horizontal sections 20, 21 preferably have a length of approximately 4.5 and approximately 1.5 inches, respectively, and vertical sections 22, 23 preferably have a length of approximately 2.5 inches.

Referring specifically to FIG. 4, the bracket 10 is preferably secured to the rack 1 such that the long channel members extend toward the back 11 of the rack 1 while the short channel members 16 extend towards the front 13 of the rack 1. This arrangement is desirable because the front of the equipment 9 is generally secured to the rack 1 such that the equipment 9 extends generally towards the rear 11 of the rack. As a result, the bracket 10 according to the present invention utilizes space above the rack 1 which is otherwise wasted. Additionally, the bracket 10 according to the present invention can be easily secured to an existing rack 1 since installing the bracket 10 only requires loosening the bolt 6 of the rack, placing the bracket 10 in position, and retightening the bolts 6.

In an alternative embodiment, the bracket 10, FIG. 5, may feature channel members 14, 16 that are adjustable in length and height. For example, the channel members 14, 16 may feature horizontal 20, 21 and/or vertical sections 22, 23 that are telescopic. According to this embodiment, the horizontal 20, 21 and vertical sections 22, 23 feature a first and at least a second sections that move relative to each such that the user can adjust the lengths and height of the channel members 14, 16. A locking device such as a setscrew or the like is preferably provided to lock the channel members 14, 16 in the desired positions.

In an alternative embodiment, the bracket 10 may be used to couple the rack 1 to other racks 1 to provide a cable runway between racks 1. The brackets may be the same size or larger to allow for passage of individuals between coupled racks 1. The brackets may also be of different shapes, for example, the bracket may be curved and connect racks at ninety degree angles from another. In another example, the bracket may be “T” shaped and provide a multiple path runway between separate rows of racks that are perpendicular to each other.

While the channel members 14, 16 of the present invention have been shown having a generally “L” shape, this is not a limitation of the present invention. The channel members 14, 16 may also have a curved or “V” shape. Additionally, the present invention may also feature channel members 14, 16 that extend outwardly from the base 12 substantially along the entire longitudinal length L of the base 12.

As mentioned above, the present invention is not intended to be limited to a system or method which must satisfy one or more of any stated or implied object or feature of the invention and should not be limited to the preferred, exemplary, or primary embodiment(s) described herein. The foregoing description of a preferred embodiment of the invention has been presented for purposes of illustration and description. It is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise form disclosed. Obvious modifications or variations are possible in light of the above teachings. The embodiment was chosen and described to provide the best illustration of the principles of the invention and its practical application to thereby enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize the invention in various embodiments and with various modifications as is suited to the particular use contemplated. All such modifications and variations are within the scope of the invention.

The invention claimed is: