Title:
Composite Concrete Masonry Unit and Method
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A composite concrete masonry unit having first and second block members separated from one another and interlocked to one another by an insulating body. The first block and a first block interior side and the second block has a second block interior side that are spaced apart from one another as substantially the same distance by the insulating portion such that there is no easy path for heat transfer through the composite concrete masonry unit. The composite concrete masonry unit is designed to minimize thermal transmittance coincidental to maximizing structural integrity when assembled into a wall.



Inventors:
Schmid, Donald T. (Clarence, NY, US)
Application Number:
11/936191
Publication Date:
05/08/2008
Filing Date:
11/07/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/745.19
International Classes:
E04B1/74
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
SAFAVI, MICHAEL
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HODGSON RUSS LLP (BUFFALO, NY, US)
Claims:
What is claimed:

1. A composite concrete masonry unit comprising: a first block member having a opposed first and second load support sides with a first block member interior side that meets with the first load support side at a peripheral edge; a second block member having opposed first and second load support sides with a second block member interior side that meets with the first load support side at a peripheral edge; an insulating body positioned between the first block member interior side and the second block member interior side to interlock the first and second block members; and wherein the peripheral edge of the first block member and the peripheral edge of the second block member are spaced a distance from one another such that no portion of the first block member is significantly closer to the second block member such thermal transmittance through the composite concrete masonry unit is minimized.

2. A composite concrete masonry unit according claim 1 wherein the first block member has first edge portion and the second block member has a facing second edge portion that are spaced from one another by the distance, and the first block member has a third edge portion and the second block member has a facing fourth edge portion that are spaced apart from one another by the distance in order to not increase heat transfer.

3. The composite concrete masonry unit according to claim 2 wherein the first block member has a fifth edge portion and the second block member has a facing sixth edge portion that are spaced apart from one another by the distance in order to not increase heat transfer.

4. The composite concrete masonry unit according to claim 3 wherein the first block member has a seventh edge portion and the second block member has a facing eighth edge portion that are spaced apart from one other by the distance in order to not increase heat transfer.

5. The composite concrete masonry unit according to claim 4 wherein the first block member has a ninth edge portion and the second block member has a facing tenth edge portion that are spaced apart from one another by the distance in order to not increase heat transfer.

6. A composite concrete masonry unit according claim 2 wherein the first block member has a eleventh edge portion and the second block member has a facing twelfth edge portion that are spaced apart from one another by a second distance, the first block member has a thirteenth edge portion and the second block member has a facing fourteenth edge portion that are spaced apart from one another by the second distance in order to not increase heat transfer through the composite concrete masonry unit and wherein the second distance is less than the first distance.

7. The composite concrete masonry unit according to claim 6 wherein the first block member has a fifteenth edge portion and the second block member a facing sixteenth edge portion that are spaced apart from one another by the second distance in order to not increase heat transfer.

8. The composite concrete masonry unit according to claim 7 wherein the first block member has a seventeenth edge portion and the facing second block member has a eighteenth edge portion that are spaced apart from one other by the second distance in order to not increase heat transfer.

9. The composite concrete masonry unit according to claim 8 wherein the first block member has a nineteenth edge portion and the second block member has a facing twentieth edge portion that are spaced apart from one another by the second distance in order to not increase heat transfer.

10. The composite concrete masonry unit according to claim 1 wherein the insulating body has a serpentine shape.

11. The composite concrete masonry unit according to claim 1 wherein first block member interior side faces the second block member interior side and no portion of the first block member interior side is significantly closer to the second block member interior side such thermal transmittance through the composite concrete masonry unit is minimized.

12. A unit comprising: a first block member having a opposed first and second load support sides with an first block member interior side that meets with the first load support side at a peripheral edge; a second block member having opposed first and second load support sides with an second block member interior side that meets with the first load support side at a peripheral edge; an insulating body positioned between the first block member and the second block member interior sides to interlock the first and second block members; a protrusion extending from the first block interior side and protrusion halves extending from the second block member interior side and wherein the insulating body has protrusion recesses for receiving the protrusion and protrusion halves in order to interlock the first and second block members; and and wherein the peripheral edge of the first block member and the peripheral edge of the second block member are spaced from one another such that no portion of the first block member is significantly closer to the second block member such that thermal transmittance through the composite concrete masonry unit is minimized.

13. The unit according to claim 12 wherein the first and second block members are tapered.

14. The unit according to claim 12 wherein the first block member has first edge portion and the second block member has a facing second edge portion that are spaced from one another by the distance, and the first block member has a third edge portion and the second block member has a facing fourth edge portion that are spaced apart from one another by the distance in order to not increase heat transfer.

15. The unit according to claim 14 wherein the first block member has a fifth edge portion and the second block member has a facing sixth edge portion that are spaced apart from one another by the distance in order to not increase heat transfer.

16. The composite concrete masonry unite according to claim 12 wherein first block member interior side faces the second block member interior side and no portion of the first block member interior side is significantly closer to the second block member interior side such thermal transmittance through the composite concrete masonry unit is minimized.

17. A method of making a composite concrete masonry unit comprising: providing a first block member having a opposed first and second load support sides with an first block member interior side that meets with the first load support side at a peripheral edge; providing a second block member having opposed first and second load support sides with an second block member interior side that meets with the first load support side at a peripheral edge; providing an insulating body and positioning the insulating body between the first block member and the second block member and interlocking the first and second block members; providing a protrusion extending from the first block interior side and providing protrusion halves extending from the second block member interior side and providing the insulating body with protrusion recesses for receiving the protrusion and protrusion halves in order to interlock the first and second block members; and spacing the peripheral edge of the first block member and the peripheral edge of the second block member apart from one another such that no portion of the first block member interior side is significantly closer to the second block member interior side such that thermal transmittance through the composite concrete masonry unit is minimized.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims priority to U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/857,304 filed Nov. 7, 2006 to Schmid, for a composite concrete masonry unit, the contents of which are hereby incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND

This composite concrete masonry unit invention relates generally to a building block and deals more particularly with a building block having advantageous insulating and structural properties.

It is known that in order to minimize the thermal conductivity between two sidewalls of a building block, the block may be constructed with a quantity of insulating material positioned between its two sidewalls. An illustrative example of such a block is described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,185,434 which discloses two members that are spaced from one another so as to define a continuous gap therebetween in which insulating material is disposed. One of the problems associated with such blocks is that heat transfer through the block may be significant which has the disadvantageous result of increased energy consumption when attempting to heat or cool the interior of a structure built with such blocks. Another problem associated with such blocks is that they may fracture or break prior to or during installation.

Accordingly, there is a need for a block that is sturdy and which has improved insulating properties.

SUMMARY

The invention includes a composite concrete masonry unit configured to minimize thermal transmittance coincidental to maximizing structural integrity when assembled into a wall. The composite concrete masonry unit has a first block member and a second block member each made of concrete and spaced from one another by a distance, such that there is a gap between the first and second block members. An insulating body is positioned in the gap and interlocks the first and second block members together. Heat transfer through the composite concrete masonry unit is minimized because the distance between the first block member and second block member is substantially the same throughout the composite concrete masonry unit. Thus, there is no heat transfer path through concrete from a first side of the composite concrete masonry unit to a second side of the concrete masonry unit by which heat energy may readily flow from one side of the composite concrete masonry unit to the other side of the concrete composite masonry unit. As a result, the composite concrete masonry unit advantageously provides for superior insulation, while retaining structural integrity. The composite concrete masonry unit may be used in the construction of walls of a building, house or other structure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES

A composite concrete masonry unit invention is illustrated throughout the drawing Figures. The same reference number is used to call out the same or similar surfaces, structures or features throughout the drawing figures of the embodiments of the composite concrete masonry unit, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a composite concrete masonry unit.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the composite concrete masonry unit without the insulating body.

FIG. 3 is a is a perspective view of the first and second block members wherein the insulating body is not present.

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of composite concrete masonry units positioned adjacent to one another without insulating bodies.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view, partly in broken line, of the insulating body.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view, partly in broken line, of the concrete masonry unit detailing the insulating body.

DESCRIPTION

As shown in FIGS. 1-3, the composite concrete masonry unit 20 invention comprises a first block member 22, a second block member 24 and an insulating body 26 (also referred to herein as insulating portion 26) positioned between the first block member 22 and the second block member 24. The insulating body 26 interlocks the first and second block members 22, 24 to hold the composite concrete masonry unit 20 together. The composite concrete masonry unit 20 is configured to minimize thermal transmittance coincidental to maximizing structural integrity when assembled into a wall. The first and second block members 22, 24, respectively, are separated from one another by the insulating body 26. The insulating body 26 abuts against each of the first and second block members 22, 24, respectively, which advantageously decreases the possibility of air currents being formed internal to the composite concrete masonry unit 20. In addition, because the first and second block members 22, 24, respectively, and the insulating body 26 are interlocked to form the composite concrete masonry unit 20, the composite concrete masonry unit 20 is structurally sound and advantageously has low thermal conductivity. In addition, the composite concrete masonry unit 20 is advantageously well suited for use in the construction of structures, for example, houses, office buildings, modular panels, etc.

As shown in FIG. 1, the composite concrete masonry unit 20 has opposed first and second side walls 30, 32, respectively, opposed end walls 34, 36, respectively, and opposed first and second support walls 38, 40, respectively, that are separated by the first and second side walls 30, 32. In one of the preferred embodiments the first and second side walls 30, 32, respectively, are planar and parallel to one another, and the opposed end walls 34, 36, respectively may be substantially parallel to one another. When the composite concrete masonry unit 20 is placed on a surface 200 the second support wall 40 contacts the surface 200, and the first block member 22, second block member 24 and insulating body 26 extend in a vertical direction relative to the surface 200, as shown in FIG. 1.

Each of the first and second block members 22, 24, respectively, is comprised of a cementitious material or baked clay capable of supporting a compressive load, or may comprise concrete or other suitable material. The insulating body 26 is comprised of a quantity of insulating material. The insulating material may be urea or phenol formaldehyde, polystyrene, phenolic resins, or polyurethane foam or other suitable material with low thermal transmittance. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 5, the insulation body 26 extends slightly beyond the opposed end walls 34, 36 a mating distance X, and extends beyond the second load supporting wall 40 to effect mating of adjacent insulating portions 26 with the thickness of the mortar between composite concrete masonry unit 20 taken into account. The insulation portion 26 may be flush with the first and second support walls 38, 40, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 5 for ease of handling and so that the block may thereby be readily laid down flat on a surface. In addition, the composite concrete masonry unit 20 has an grout opening 120 defined by a grout opening sidewall 121 that flares inwardly moving in the direction first support wall 38 to the second support wall 40 of the composite concrete masonry unit 20, as shown in FIG. 2.

In order that the first and second block members 22, 24, respectively, can be assembled and interlocked quickly to form the composite concrete masonry unit 20, in one of the preferred embodiments the material from which the insulating body 26 is made is preferably a type of premolded insulation such as expanded polystyrene. If desired, foam-in-place insulation such as polyurethane foam or any other suitable insulation may be used. To assemble the composite concrete masonry unit 20 with the premolded insulating body 26, the first and second block members 22, 24, respectively are initially arranged in their desired spaced apart relationship relative to one another and subsequently held in such relation, such that a space or gap 27 extends from the first block member 22 to the second block member 24, as shown in FIG. 3. The gap 27 has a serpentine shape. The insulating body 26 is then inserted into the gap 27 to thus interlock the first and second block members 22, 24 together, and the result is the assembled composite concrete masonry unit 20. In one of the preferred embodiments, the insulating body 26 is tapered and the taper matches a taper of the first and second block members 22, 24, respectively, which provides for a close fit between the first and second block members 22, 24, respectively, and the insulating body 26.

Reference is now made to FIGS. 2-4, and it is pointed out that the insulation portion 26 is not shown. The first and second block members 22, 24, respectively, are in their spaced apart relationship immediately prior to the insertion of the insulating body 26 between them. As shown, the first block member 22 has a first block interior side 23 that that has curved and linear portions, and the second block member 24 has a second block member interior side 25 that has curved and linear portions, and the gap 27 is defined between the first and second block member interior sides 23, 25.

The first block member interior side 23 is opposite the first side wall 30, and the first block member 22 has first block member ends 52, 53. The first block member interior side 23 has a protrusion 50 extending therefrom that is part of the first block member 23. The protrusion 50 has first and second spaced apart end portions commonly designated 51. The first block member 22 has opposed first and second load support sides 54, 56. The first block member interior side 23 and associated protrusion 50 flare outwardly moving in a direction from the first load support side 54 to the second load support side 56. Thus, the thickness of the first block member 22 and the associated protrusion 50 increases moving in a direction from the first load support side 54 to the second load support side 56. In other words, the first block member 22 has a taper 58 in a direction moving from the second load support side 56 to the first load support side 54, as shown in FIG. 2.

The first block interior side 23 includes surface portions 29 that meet with one another and includes, moving from left to right in FIG. 2, a first generally straight surface portion 60 that extends to a first concave surface portion 62, which extends to a second straight surface portion 64. The second straight surface portion 64 extends to a second concave surface portion 66 which extends to a first convex surface portion 68. The first convex surface portion 68 extends to a third straight surface portion 70 which extends to a second convex surface portion 72. The second convex surface portion 72 extends to a fourth straight surface portion 74 which extends to a third concave surface portion 76. The third concave surface portion 76 extends to a recessed surface portion 78 which extends to a fourth concave surface portion 77. The fourth concave surface portion 77 extends to a fifth straight surface portion 80 which extends to a third convex portion 82. The third convex surface portion 82 extends to a sixth straight surface portion 84 which extends to a fourth convex surface portion 86. The fourth convex surface portion 86 extends to a fifth concave surface portion 88 which extends to a seventh straight surface portion 90. The seventh straight surface portion 90 extends to a sixth concave surface portion 92, which extends to an eighth straight surface portion 94, as shown.

The second block member interior side 25 is opposite the second side wall 32, and the second block member 22 has opposed second block member ends 102, 104. The second block member 24 interior side 25 has protrusion halves, commonly designated 50a extending therefrom. Each protrusion half 50a has an end portion 51a. The second block member 24 has opposed first and second load support sides 106, 108. The second block member interior side 25 and associated protrusion halves 50a flare outwardly moving in a direction from the first load support side 106 to the second load support side 108. Thus, the thickness of the second block member 24 and associated protrusion halves 50a increase moving in a direction from the first load support side 106 to the second load support side 108. In other words, the second block member 24 has a taper 58a in a direction moving from the second load support side 108 to the first load support side 106, as shown in FIG. 2. It is pointed out that when composite concrete masonry units 20 are aligned such that they are adjacent to one another, as shown in FIG. 4, the protrusions halves 50a of adjacent second block members 24 are adjacent and form the shape of a protrusion 50b that has the substantially the same shape as the protrusion 50 shown in FIG. 2. A grout space 57 extends between the adjacent composite concrete masonry units 20.

The second block interior side 25 includes a surface portions 29a that meet with one another and face the interior surface 23 of the first block 22. Moving from left to right in FIG. 2, the second block interior side 25 includes a recessed surface portion 78a which extends to a third concave surface portion 76a. The third concave surface portion 76a extends to a fourth straight surface portion 74a which extends to a second convex surface portion 72a. The second convex surface portion 72a extends to a third straight surface portion 70a which extends to a first convex surface portion 68a. The first convex surface portion 68a extends to a second concave surface portion 66a which extends to a second straight surface portion 64a. The second straight surface portion 64a extends to a first concave surface portion 62a, which extends to a first straight surface portion 60a. The first straight surface portion 60a extends to a sixth concave surface portion 92a which extends to a seventh straight surface portion 90a. The straight surface portion 90a extends to a fifth concave surface portion 88a which extends to a fourth convex surface portion 86a. The fourth convex surface portion 86a extends to a sixth straight surface portion 84a which extends to a third convex surface portion 82a. The third convex surface portion 82a extends to a fifth straight surface portion 80a which extends to a fourth concave surface portion 77a. The fourth concave surface portion 77a extends to a recessed surface portion 78a.

As shown in FIGS. 1-3, there are line segments designated A, B, C, D and E that indicate a distance from the first block member 22 to the second block member 24 at the first load support side 54,106 of each, when they are spaced apart prior to the introduction of the insulating body 26 in the gap 27. There are also line segments A′, B′, C′, D′, and E′ that indicate a second distance from the first block member 22 to the second block member 24 at the second load support side 56, 108 of each, when they are spaced apart prior to the introduction of the insulating body 26 in the gap 27. The lengths of lines segments A, B, C, D, and E are all equal to one another, and the lengths of lines segments A′, B′, C′, D′, and E′ are all equal to one another, in order to decrease heat transfer through the composite concrete masonry unit 20 by providing no portion or surface in the composite concrete masonry unit 20 wherein the first and second block members 22, 24 are significantly closer to one another. No portions of the first and second block members 22, 24 are closer to one another to such an extent that there would be an impact on overall heat transfer through the composite concrete masonry unit 20. In addition, line segments A′, B′, C′, D′, and E′ have a shorter length than line segments A, B, C, D, and E due to the taper 58, 58a of the first and second block members 22, 24.

Each of the opposed first and second load support sides 54, 56, of the first block member 24 has a peripheral edge 33a, 33b, respectively, with edge portions where each meets the interior side wall 23, as will be described in greater detail presently. Similarly, each of the opposed first and second load support sides 106, 108, of the second block member 24 has a peripheral edge 35a, 35b, respectively, with edge portions where each meets the interior side wall 25.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the line segment designated A indicates a distance from the first load support side 54 of the first block member 22 where it meets the fourth convex surface portion 86 at a first edge portion 87, to the first load side 106 of the second block member 24 where it meets the fourth convex surface portion 86a at a facing second edge portion 89.

The line segment designated B indicates the distance from the first load support side 54 of the first block member 22 at another point where the first load support side 54 meets the fourth convex surface portion 86 at a third edge portion 91, to the first load support side 106 of the second block member 24 where the first load support side 106 meets the straight surface portion 90a at a facing fourth edge portion 93.

The line segment designated C indicates the distance from the first load support side 54 of the first block member 22 where it meets the seventh straight surface portion 90 at a fifth edge portion 95, to the first load support side 106 of the second block member 24 where it meets the forth convex surface portion 86a at a facing sixth edge portion 97.

The line segment designated D indicates the distance from the first load support side 54 of the first block member 22 where it meet the sixth straight surface portion 84 at a seventh edge portion 99, to the first load support side 106 of the second block member 24 where it meets the first straight surface portion 60a at a facing eighth edge portion 101.

The line segment designated E indicates the distance from the first load support side 54 of the first block member 22 where it meets the eighth straight surface portion 94 at a ninth edge portion 111 to the first load support side 106 of the second block member 24 where it meets the sixth straight surface portion 84a at a facing tenth edge portion 113.

In a like manner, the line segment designated A′ indicates a second distance from the second load support side 56 of the first block member 22 where it meets the fourth convex surface portion 86 at an eleventh edge portion 115, to the second load side 108 of the second block member 24 where it meets the fourth convex surface portion 86a at a facing twelfth edge portion 117.

The line segment B′ indicates the second distance from the second load support side 56 of the first block member 22 where it meets the fourth convex surface portion 86 at a thirteenth edge portion 119, to the load support side 108 of the second block member 24 where it meets the straight surface portion 90a at a facing fourteenth edge portion 121.

The line segment designated C′ indicates the second distance between the second load support side 56 of the first block member 22 where it meets the seventh straight surface portion 90 at a fifteenth edge portion 123, to the second load support side 108 of the second block member 24 where it meets the fourth convex surface portion 86a at a facing sixteenth edge portion 125

The line segment designates D′ indicates the second distance between the second load support side 56 of the first block member 22 where it meets the sixth straight surface portion 84 at a seventeenth edge portion 127, to the second load support side 108 of the second block member 24 where it meets the first straight surface portion 60a at an facing eighteenth edge portion 129.

Line segment E′ indicates the second distance from the second load support side 56 of the first block member 22 where it meets the eighth straight surface portion 94 at a nineteenth edge portion 131, to the second load support side 108 of the second block member 24 where it meets the sixth straight surface portion 84a at a facing twentieth edge portion 133.

As previously mentioned the distances indicated by line segments A, B, C, D and E are all equal. The second distances indicated by line segments A′, B′, C′, D′ and E′ are all equal. As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the second distance indicated by line segments A′, B′, C′, D′ and E′ is greater than the distance indicated by line segments A, B, C, D and E, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 due to the tapers 58, 58a. It is to be understood that the above-described spaced apart relationship between the first and second interior side walls 23, 25 of the first and second block members 22, 24, is maintained along the tapers 58, 58a, adjacent the above-described edge portions.

FIG. 5 shows one of the preferred embodiments of the insulating body 26 in detail. The insulating body 26 has protrusion recesses 130 for receiving the first block protrusion 50 and protrusion halves 50a, such that it may be aligned with and forced into the gap 27, to interlock the insulating body 26 and first and second members 22, 24. The insulating body 26 that has opposed first and second contact walls 146, 148, respectively, such that the first contact wall 146 abuts against the interior side 23 of the first block member 22, and the second contact wall 148 abuts against the interior side 25 of the second block member 24. The insulating body 26 also has opposed first and second end walls 145, 147, respectively, and opposed first and second exposed walls 149, 151. The first and second contact walls 146, 148 are each provided with elevated portions 150 and adjacent recesses 152 that extend longitudinally in the direction of the arrow designated VL in FIG. 6, i.e., the length of the insulation body 26. The recesses 152 are advantageous, because as the molds (not shown) that are used to manufacture the first and second block members 22, 24, wear over time, that is, as more and more first and second block members 22, 24, are made the molds used to make them wear out. As a result, the first block member 22 and the second block member 24 that are made in the molds become thicker as the mold wears out. Thus, the distance between the first and second block members 22, 24, respectively, decreases as the molds wear. The recesses 152 and elevated portions 150 advantageously provide a compression mechanism 153 for the insulating member 26 to compress as the first and second block members 22, 24, respectively, become thicker as the molds used to make them wear out.

FIG. 6 shows the assembled composite concrete masonry unit 20 in detail. As previously mentioned, after the insulation portion 26 has been introduced into the spaced apart first and second block members 22, 24, and the insulation portion 26 are interlocked to form as strong and durable composite concrete masonry unit 20. In addition, after the insulation portion 26 has been interlocked with the first and second block member 22, 24, the distances indicated by line segments A, B, C, D and E are all equal, and the distances indicated by line segments A′, B′, C′, D′ and E′ are all equal which advantageously provides for improved insulating properties of the composite concrete masonry unit 20. The first and second block members 22, 24, respectively, are separated by the distance indicated by line segments A, B, C, D, and E, and are separated by the second distance indicated by line segments A′, B′, C′, D′ and E′. This advantageously decreases the heat transfer through the composite concrete masonry unit 20 after it has been assembled, because there is no easy path for heat transfer through the insulation body 26. In other words, because the lengths of lines segments A, B, C, D and E are all equal, and the lengths of line segments A′, B′, C′, D′, and E′ are all equal, there is no portion or surface of the first and second interior sides 23, 25 of the first and second block members 22, 24, that are significantly closer together to allow for heat transfer. Thus, there is no shortest route through the insulation body 26 for heat to transfer from the first planar side wall 30 to the second planar side wall 32 through the composite concrete masonry unit 20. This advantageously provides for improved insulating capability when compared to a block with no insulation or a block having insulation and concrete portions that are both in close proximity to one another and farther from another. Thus, the composite concrete masonry unit 20 is configured to minimize thermal transmittance coincidental to maximizing structural integrity when assembled into a wall.

The composite concrete masonry units 20 are laid in an row adjacent to one another, as shown in FIG. 4. The next course or layer of composite concrete masonry units 20 is indexed 180° degrees to facilitate stacking in half bond symmetry. The composite concrete masonry units 20 are offset half a block length when stacked on top of one another to form the rows of a wall. Each alternating course is indexed 180 degrees to facilitate down through the wall stacking symmetry of the masonry component, insulating component, as well as the aperture openings 120. In addition, the opening 120 may be filled with grout and rebar may be installed in the structure or building through the openings 120 such that they may be surrounded by grout.

As previously mentioned, in another preferred embodiment, foam-in-place insulation such as polyurethane foam or any other suitable insulation may be used. Foam-in-place comprises injection of foamable compositions that are injected from, for example a dispenser. The compounds once dispensed expand to form, for example, polyurethane. Foam-in-place and its manufacture and use are well known to those having ordinary skill in the art. To assemble the block composite concrete masonry unit 20 with foam-in-place insulation, the first and second block members 22, 24, are initially arranged in their desired spaced relation relative to one another and subsequently held in such relation while the insulating material, in its uncured condition, is directed into the space defined between the first and second block members 22, 24. After filling the space with the foam insulation and allowing it to cure to a hardened condition, any excess insulation can be cut or trimmed away as desired.

It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that while a composite concrete masonry unit invention has been described above in connection with particular embodiments and examples, the invention is not necessarily so limited, and other embodiments, examples, uses, and modifications and departures from the described embodiments, examples, and uses may be made without departing from the composite concrete masonry unit of this invention. All of these embodiments are intended to be within the scope and spirit of the present composite concrete masonry unit invention.