Title:
LOW PROFILE SUPPORT PANEL FOR A DOCK SEAL
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A dock seal, such as a head seal mountable above a doorway of a loading dock, includes a compressible body with a support panel. The compressible body can conformably seal against the rear edge of a vehicle's enclosed trailer as the vehicle backs the trailer up against the seal. The support panel provides relatively dense structure for mounting the seal to the wall of a building. Compared to the horizontal distance that the compressible body projects from the wall, the support panel is ultra-thin to avoid consuming compressible space between the wall and the rear of the trailer. In some cases, a flexible panel suspends the compressible body and its support panel from the wall such that the flexible panel allows the dock seal to move relative to the wall.



Inventors:
Ashelin, Charles J. (Dubuque, IA, US)
Hoffmann, David J. (Peosta, IA, US)
Application Number:
11/557351
Publication Date:
05/08/2008
Filing Date:
11/07/2006
Assignee:
RITE-HITE HOLDING CORPORATION (Milwaukee, WI, US)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
248/585
International Classes:
E04B2/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
KATCHEVES, BASIL S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HANLEY, FLIGHT & ZIMMERMAN, LLC (CHICAGO, IL, US)
Claims:
1. A dock seal mountable adjacent to a doorway of a wall and being adapted to seal against a vehicle at a loading dock, the dock seal comprising: a compressible body comprising a front compressible body and a rear compressible body, the rear compressible body is interposed between the wall and the front compressible body when the dock seal is mounted to the wall; and a support panel interposed between the front compressible body and the rear compressible body, the support panel is more dense than the front compressible body.

2. The dock seal of claim 1, further comprising an adhesive bonding the compressible body to the support panel.

3. The dock seal of claim 2, wherein the support panel includes a plurality of holes in which the adhesive is disposed.

4. The dock seal of claim 1, further comprising an intermediate compressible body, wherein the intermediate compressible body is interposed between the support panel and the front body.

5. The dock seal of claim 1, wherein the compressible body is resiliently compressible between the support panel and the vehicle when the dock seal seals against the vehicle, the compressible body has a forward surface that generally faces the vehicle when the vehicle is at the loading dock, the compressible body has a rear surface that generally faces the support panel, the forward surface and the rear surface define a compressible projection therebetween when the vehicle is spaced apart from the dock seal, the support panel is a substantially rigid member that has a forward-most point that generally faces away from the wall when the dock seal is mounted to the wall, the support panel has a rearward-most point that generally faces the wall when the dock seal is mounted to the wall, the forward-most point and the rearward-most point define a panel projection therebetween, the panel projection divided by the compressible projection defines a projection ratio that is less than 2%.

6. The dock seal of claim 5, wherein the projection ratio is between 0.5% and 1.5%.

7. The dock seal of claim 1, wherein the support panel is movable relative to the wall when the dock seal is mounted to the wall.

8. The dock seal of claim 1, wherein the dock seal is horizontally elongate and lies above the doorway when the dock seal is mounted to the wall.

9. The dock seal of claim 1, further comprising a flexible panel attached to the support panel and mountable to the wall such that the support panel is movable relative to the wall when the dock seal is attached to the wall via the flexible panel.

10. A dock seal mountable to a wall above a doorway and being adapted to seal against a vehicle at a loading dock, the dock seal comprising: a compressible body that is horizontally elongate when the dock seal is mounted to the wall above the doorway; and a support panel interposed between the compressible body and the wall when the dock seal is mounted to the wall, the support panel is stiffer than the compressible body; and a flexible panel attached to the support panel and mountable to the wall such that the support panel is movable relative to the wall when the dock seal is attached to the wall via the flexible panel.

11. The dock seal of claim 10, wherein the support panel is stiffer than the flexible panel.

12. The dock seal of claim 10, further comprising an adhesive bonding the compressible body to the support panel.

13. The dock seal of claim 12, wherein the support panel includes a plurality of holes in which the adhesive is disposed.

14. The dock seal of claim 10, further comprising a rear compressible body, wherein the rear compressible body is interposed between the support panel and the flexible panel.

15. The dock seal of claim 10, wherein the compressible body is resiliently compressible between the support panel and the vehicle when the dock seal seals against the vehicle, the compressible body has a forward surface that generally faces the vehicle when the vehicle is at the loading dock, the compressible body has a rear surface that generally faces the support panel, the forward surface and the rear surface define a compressible projection therebetween when the vehicle is spaced apart from the dock seal, the support panel is a substantially rigid member that has a forward-most point that generally faces away from the wall when the dock seal is mounted to the wall, the support panel has a rearward-most point that generally faces the wall when the dock seal is mounted to the wall, the forward-most point and the rearward-most point define a panel projection therebetween, the panel projection divided by the compressible projection defines a projection ratio that is less than 2%.

16. The dock seal of claim 15, wherein the projection ratio is between 0.5% and 1.5%.

17. The dock seal of claim 10, wherein the dock seal is horizontally elongate and lies above the doorway when the dock seal is mounted to the wall.

18. A dock seal mountable adjacent to a doorway of a wall and being adapted to seal against a vehicle at a loading dock, the dock seal comprising: a compressible body; and a substantially rigid support panel interposed between the compressible body and the wall when the dock seal is mounted to the wall, the support panel is more dense than the compressible body, the compressible body is resiliently compressible between the support panel and the vehicle when the dock seal seals against the vehicle, the compressible body has a forward surface that generally faces the vehicle when the vehicle is at the loading dock, the compressible body has a rear surface that generally faces the support panel, the forward surface and the rear surface define a compressible projection therebetween when the vehicle is spaced apart from the dock seal, the support panel has a forward-most point that generally faces away from the wall when the dock seal is mounted to the wall, the support panel has a rearward-most point that generally faces the wall when the dock seal is mounted to the wall, the forward-most point and the rearward-most point define a panel projection therebetween, the panel projection divided by the compressible projection defines a projection ratio that is less than 2%.

19. The dock seal of claim 18, wherein the compressible body comprises a resiliently collapsible frame.

20. The dock seal of claim 18, wherein the compressible body is made of foam.

21. The dock seal of claim 18, wherein the projection ratios is between 0.5% and 1.5%.

22. The dock seal of claim 18, wherein the compressible body has a body density and the support panel has a panel density, the body density divided by the panel density defines a density ratio that is less than 3%.

23. The dock seal of claim 18, wherein the compressible body has a body density and the support panel has a panel density, the body density divided by the panel density defines a density ratio that is less than 1%.

24. The dock seal of claim 18, wherein the compressible body has a body density and the support panel has a panel density, the boy density divided by the panel density defines a density ratio that is less than the projection ratio.

25. The dock seal of claim 18, further comprising an adhesive bonding the compressible body to the support panel.

26. The dock seal of claim 25, wherein the support panel includes a plurality of holes in which the adhesive is disposed.

27. The dock seal of claim 18, further comprising an intermediate compressible body, wherein the intermediate compressible body is interposed between the support panel and the compressible body.

28. The dock seal of claim 18, wherein the support panel is movable relative to the wall when the dock seal is mounted to the wall.

29. The dock seal of claim 18, further comprising a flexible panel attached to the support panel and mountable to the wall such that the support panel is movable relative to the wall when the dock seal is attached to the wall via the flexible panel.

30. The dock seal of claim 29, wherein the support panel is stiffer than the flexible panel.

31. The dock seal of claim 29, further comprising a rear compressible body, wherein the rear compressible body is interposed between the support panel and the flexible panel.

32. The dock seal of claim 18, wherein the compressible body is horizontally elongate and lies above the doorway when the dock seal is mounted to the wall.

Description:

FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE

The subject disclosure generally pertains to loading dock seals and more specifically to a unique support panel for such a seal.

BACKGROUND OF RELATED ART

When an exterior doorway of a building is used as a loading dock for vehicles, such as trucks and tractor/trailers, the perimeter of the doorway often includes a dock seal. Dock seals close off gaps that would otherwise exist between the exterior face of the building and the back end of the trailer. Dock seals allow cargo from the rear of the trailer to be loaded or unloaded while dockworkers and the cargo are protected from the weather. Usually two side seals run vertically along the lateral edges of the doorway, and a top or head seal runs horizontally along the doorway's upper edge; however, additional seals can also be used.

A typical dock seal comprises a resiliently compressible foam core supported by a rigid backer, such as a wood plank or a formed metal plate. The foam core and backer are normally encased within a fabric outer cover. Sealing is provided by backing the trailer up against the seal so that the seal compressively conforms to the rear shape of the trailer. The foam core provides the necessary compliance and resilience to repeatedly conform to the shape of various trailers; the outer cover protects the foam core from dirt, water and wear; and the backer provides solid structure for mounting the seal to the wall and for supporting the foam core so that the foam core does not twist and roll within the fabric cover.

Due to the trailer's wheel suspension, adding or removing cargo and/or driving a forklift on and off the trailer bed can cause the rear of the trailer to repeatedly rise and lower a few inches. Although the incidental movement can be a problem, most dock seals are sufficiently wear resistant to tolerate such movement.

A more serious problem, however, can occur after a tractor backs its trailer up against the dock seal, and the trailer is subsequently unhitched from the tractor while the trailer is still up against the seal. The front end of the unhitched trailer might then be set back down on the trailer's landing gear or temporarily rehitched onto a special tractor (yard jockey or yard mule) designated specifically for shuffling trailers around the loading dock area. Hitching and unhitching the front end of the trailer can cause the entire trailer to tilt about its rear wheels. The resulting seesaw action produces substantial up and down movement at the rear end of the trailer, which can cut and abrade the dock seal.

Moreover, when the front end of the trailer is raised, which tilts the rear end of the trailer downward, the upper rear edge of the trailer can dig deeply into the dock's head seal. When the front end of the trailer is subsequently lowered, the trailer's rear edge can pry the head seal upward.

In some cases, the trailer's rear edge digs into the seal so deeply that the edge catches the seal's backer and pries the head seal off the wall. This particularly tends to happen with relatively thick backers that are made intentionally thick to provide the foam core with ample support. If the backer is too thin, however, or omitted entirely in order to prevent the trailer's rear edge from catching the backer, the foam core may tend to roll and twist within the outer fabric cover. Thus, it can be difficult to design a backer with a thickness that addresses both problems.

SUMMARY

In some embodiments, a dock seal comprises a compressible body reinforced by an ultra-thin support panel.

In some embodiments, the thickness of the support panel is less than 2% of the compressible body's thickness.

In some embodiments, the thickness of the support panel is 0.5-1.5% of the compressible body's thickness.

In some embodiments, the support panel is a substantially flat piece rather than a formed sheet metal pan with flanges. As a flat piece, the support panel's material thickness is substantially equal to its panel projection, which maximizes the compressible projection of the dock seal.

In some embodiments, a flexible panel couples a dock seal and its support panel to a wall such that the flexible panel allows the seal and its support panel to move relative to the wall, wherein the movement is in a direction that is generally perpendicular to the seal's length.

In some embodiments, a support panel is embedded within a compressible body so that the support panel can be readily bonded in place.

In some embodiments, a dock seal includes a front compressible body for sealing against a vehicle and a rear compressible body for sealing against a building wall.

In some embodiments, the compressible body of a dock seal comprises a collapsible frame supporting a pliable cover.

In some embodiments, the support panel of a compressible body includes a series of holes that facilitates bonding the panel in place.

In some embodiments, a dock seal includes a front compressible body for sealing against a vehicle, a rear compressible body for sealing against a building wall, and an intermediate compressible body that helps in bonding a support panel and the rear compressible body to the front compressible body.

In some embodiments, the dock seal includes a compressible body and a support panel, wherein the relative densities and relative projections of the body and the panel are within a specific novel range such that the dock seal is particularly tolerant of deep gouging and prying by a vehicle pressing up against the seal.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a vehicle backing to a loading dock that includes a novel dock seal.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1 but showing the vehicle backed up against the dock seal.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional end view of a head seal and a lateral seal with a vehicle approaching the seals.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional end view similar to FIG. 3 but showing the upper rear edge of the vehicle pressing into the dock seal.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional end view similar to FIG. 4 but showing the upper rear edge of the vehicle prying the head seal upward.

FIG. 6 is front view of a head seal with portions cut away to reveal the seal's inner construction.

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional end view similar to FIG. 3 but showing an alternate design.

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional end view similar to FIGS. 3 and 6 but showing another design.

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional end view similar to FIGS. 3, 6, and 7 but showing yet another design.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of another dock seal with portions cut away to show its inner construction.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 10 but showing both ends of the seal.

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional side view of the dock seal of FIGS. 10 and 11 but showing the seal in a compressed state.

FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 12 but showing the seal in its expanded state.

FIG. 14 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1 but showing a dock seal with an alternate shape.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view similar to FIGS. 1 and 14 but showing an alternate embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIGS. 1 and 3 show a vehicle 10, such as a trailer of a truck, backing up to a loading dock 12. Loading dock 12 is basically a doorway 14 or an opening in a wall 16 of a building and may be associated with a dock leveler 18, bumpers, and other items that facilitate loading and unloading of the vehicle's cargo. One such item in particular, which is the subject of this disclosure, is a compressible dock seal 20. Dock seal 20 may comprise a head seal 22 and/or two lateral seals 24, which are shown in a relaxed position in FIGS. 1 and 3.

When vehicle 10 is backed up against dock seal 20, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 4, head seal 22 and lateral seals 24 can help close the air gap that might otherwise exist between the outer face of wall 16 and an upper edge 26 and lateral edges 28 of the rear of vehicle 10. Although much of the gap near a lower rear edge 30 of vehicle 10 is usually blocked off by an extendable lip of dock leveler 18, it is conceivable for dock seal 20 to also include a lower seal 32 for more complete sealing.

It is not unusual for vehicle 10 to press its rear edges 26 and 28 tightly against dock seal 20. If these edges subsequently move up and down due to vehicle 10 being loaded and unloaded of cargo, or the vehicle's trailer tilts due to the front end of the trailer being hitched or unhitched, then the trailers' rear edges 26 and 28 might dig deeply into seal 20. In some cases, the vehicle's upper rear edge 26 might pry head seal 22 upward from its position of FIG. 4 to a pried-up position of FIG. 5. This is a common occurrence when using a yard jockey at a loading dock.

With a yard jockey, a typical operating sequence would be: 1) a yard jockey lifting the front end of the trailer (thus lowering the trailer's rear edge); 2) the yard jockey forcing the trailer's upper rear edge deeply into the dock's head seal (FIG. 4); and 3) the yard jockey subsequently lowering the front end of the trailer down upon the trailer's landing gear. As the front end of the trailer descends, the trailer's upper rear edge pries the head seal upward (FIG. 5).

To prevent damaging seal 20 under such conditions, head seal 22, lateral seals 24, and/or lower seal 32 can be of a construction that tolerates extreme compression, translation, rotation and/or distortion. This can be accomplished by supporting dock seal 20 with something other than a conventional backer; which is usually relatively thick and consumes volume that could otherwise be used for resilient compression and distortion. If a conventional backer of standard thickness were used to support the compressible portion of the seal, there is less room available for compression. In some cases, the support member is fastened to wall 16 with structure that allows some relative movement between seal 20 and wall 16. Although an example will be described with reference to head seal 22, the same seal design may also apply to lateral seals 24 and perhaps lower seal 32.

Referring to FIGS. 3-6, head seal 22 comprises a compressible body 36, encased within a flexible protective cover 38. The term, “compressible body” refers to any structure than can resiliently return to its normally expanded shape after being compacted by an external force, such as the force exerted by vehicle 10. Examples of compressible body 36 include, but are not limited to, a foam block or a collapsible mechanism. In a current example, compressible body 36 comprises a front compressible body 40 and a rear compressible body 42. Alternatively, compressible body 36 may comprise only front compressible body 40 with rear compressible body 42 being omitted. Rear compressible body 42, however, can improve the sealing between head seal 22 and the face of wall 16. Rear compressible body 42 might also help in fastening a support panel 44 to front compressible body 40, wherein support panel 44 provides suitable structure for fastening head seal 20 to wall 16.

Although the actual design of head seal 22 may vary, in a current example, support panel 44 is sandwiched between compressible bodies 40 and 42. Referring to FIG. 6, adhesive 46 bonds bodies 40 and 42 together where the two bodies 40 and 42 come in contact with each other through a series of holes 48 in panel 44 and in an area 50 surrounding an outer perimeter 52 of support panel 44. Adhesive 46 may also provide some bonding directly between support panel 44 and the facing surfaces of compressible bodies 40 and 42.

Even though it is conceivable and well within the scope of the disclosure to bond or otherwise attach support panel 44 directly to compressible body 40 and omit compressible body 42, such a design does not work quite as well as having support panel 44 interposed between two bondable bodies. If compressible body 40 is not firmly attached to support panel 44 (due to body 42 being omitted, due to the support panel being too pliable, and/or due to panel 44 and body 40 being of different materials that are not readily bonded by a common adhesive), compressible body 40 might move relative to panel 44 and roll within cover 38. With the addition of compressible body 42, it has been found that bodies 40 and 42, being of a similar material, can be readily bonded to each other to firmly capture support panel 44.

In a current example, compressible bodies 40 and 42 are made of a class L24 open-cell polyurethane foam; however, other foams and compressible or collapsible structures are well within the scope of the disclosure. Cover 38 can be any appropriate material including, but not be limited to, HYPALON, canvas duck, rubber impregnated fabric and coated nylon fabric. Support panel 44 can be made of metal, plastic or some other material that is substantially thinner and denser than front compressible body 36.

To mount head seal 22 to wall 16, any suitable fastener 54 can be used to fasten support panel 44 directly to the face of wall 16 or used to fasten support panel 44 to one or more flexible panels 56, which in turn are mounted to wall 16 via another fastener 58. When vehicle 10 pries upward against seal 22, as shown in FIG. 5, flexible panel 56 allows seal 22 to pivot or move relative to wall 16. Flexible panel 56 can be made of any appropriately flexible material including, but not limited to, ⅛-inch HMW polyethylene.

To maximize the compressibility of head seal 22, support panel 44 is much thinner than front compressible body 40. When in the relaxed state of FIG. 3, front compressible body 40 has a forward surface 60 and a rear surface 62 that define a compressible projection 64 therebetween. Support panel 44 has a thickness or panel projection 66 defined by the distance between a forward-most point 68 and a rearward-most point 70 on panel 44. To provide head seal 22 with extreme compressibility, seal 22 should have a projection ratio of less than 2%, wherein the projection ratio is defined as panel projection 66 divided by compressible projection 64. Best results are achieved when the projection ratio is between 0.5% and 1.5%.

Also, head seal 22 may have a density ratio of less than 3%, wherein the density ratio is defined as density of front compressible body 40 divided by the material density of support panel 44. Even better results are achieved when the density ratio is less than 1%. For an optimum combination of the projection ratio and the density ratio, the density ratio is may be less than the projection ratio. For a current example, compressible projection 64 is about 8 to 23 inches, panel projection 66 is about ⅛ inch, front body 40 has a density of about 1.5 pounds per cubic foot (24 kg/m3), and support panel 44 has a material density of about 480 pounds per cubic foot when made of steel or about 58 pounds per cubic foot when made of HMW polyethylene.

To facilitate manufacturability, a slightly modified head seal 72 can be made as shown in FIG. 7. In this case, seal 72 includes an intermediate compressible body 74 interposed between support panel 44 and front body 40. Compressible bodies 40, 42 and 74 can all be made of the same material or can be made of different materials. Adhesive 46 can bond bodies 40, 42 and 74 together. Once assembled, seal 72 functions basically the same as seal 22.

In other embodiments, shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, a head seal 76 comprises a resiliently compressible foam core 78 with an integral skin 80. Skin 80 is denser than core 78 so that skin 80 can provide seal 76 with a protective cover as well as serve as a support panel 82 in the form of flanges that lie generally parallel to wall 16. Support panel 82 can be used for mounting seal 76 to wall 16 via a conventional fastener 84 and a metal bar 86 (FIG. 8) or via a channel 88 that includes slots for receiving support panel 82 (FIG. 9). Bar 86 and channel 88 may extend fully or partially along the length of seal 76. Dimensions 90 and 92 represent the seal's compressible projection and panel projection, respectively. Seal 76 has the general shape of a parallelogram to make seal 76 more compliant in response to vertical motion of vehicle 10. This same shape can be applied to dock seal 20 as well.

FIGS. 10-13 illustrate a dock seal 94 (e.g., head seal, lateral seal or lower seal) that includes a hollow compressible body 96 connected to a support panel 98. Dimensions 100 and 102 (FIG. 13) represent the seal's compressible projection and panel projection, respectively. Compressible body 96 comprises a protective pliable cover 104 that is supported and held taut between two collapsible frame mechanisms 106.

In this particular example, each mechanism 106 includes a generally rectangular frame 108 (or some other suitable shape) with a generally U-shaped brace 110. The actual shapes of frame 108 and brace 110 may vary. Rotatable couplings 112 pivotally connect both legs of brace 110 to intermediate points on frame 108. A central section 114 of brace 110 can pivotally rotate within one or more anchors 116 that are fixed relative to wall 16. Frame 108 includes a section 118 that can both slide and pivot within a slot 120 defined by a track member 122. The pivotal connections at anchors 116 and couplings 112, and the combination pivotal/sliding connection at slot 120 allow frame 108 and brace 110 to move between the positions shown in FIGS. 12 and 13.

To help hold cover 104 taut, an elastic member 124 held in tension pulls an outer edge 126 of each frame 106 towards each other. Examples of elastic member 124 include, but are not limited to, a latex tube, a neoprene cord, helical spring, elastic strap, and the like. Elastic member 124 can be attached to frame 108 in any suitable manner. A similar elastic member 128 can be used for holding cover 104 to support panel 98, while a peripheral lip 130 on cover 104 can provide sealing between wall 16 and dock seal 94.

In some cases, elastic member 124 can be used for urging the dock seal to its expanded position. In other cases, however, where edge 126 moves in a generally linear motion between its positions of FIGS. 12 and 13 (i.e., moves in a direction that is substantially perpendicular to wall 16), an additional elastic member or tension spring 132 may be needed to urge dock seal 94 to its expanded position.

Even though various head seals and lateral seal have been shown as generally straight elongate members, it is well within the scope of the disclosure to provide similarly constructed dock seals of other shapes and designs. Instead of one long member, for instance, head seals 22 and 76 can be comprised of two or more shorter segments that are mounted end-to-end to create an elongate seal assembly of a desired length.

In other cases, as shown in FIG. 14, a head seal 134 includes lateral segments 136 that extend downward toward two lateral seals 138. In this example, the dock seal assembly does not include a bottom seal. A pliable cover 140 extending downward from segments 136 and overlapping lateral seals 138 can cover the gap between seals 134 and 138. Such a design helps prevent upper edge 26 of vehicle 10 from digging in between the upper end of a lateral seal and the lower adjoining surface of a generally straight head seal.

As an alternative to the embodiment of FIG. 14, FIG. 15 shows a way of providing additional compressibility at an upper end 142 of a lateral seal 144. Although seal 144 includes a support panel 146 of standard thickness, panel 146 does not extend to the very top of seal 144. In this example, a head seal 148 can be of any design including, but not limited to, the designs of FIGS. 3, 7, 8 and 9.

Although the invention is described with respect to various examples, modifications thereto will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art. The scope of the invention, therefore, is to be determined by reference to the following claims: