Title:
Peek-A-Boo Poker Game
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Embodiments described herein include variations of an electronic video poker game that includes showing all 52 cards of a deck of cards to a player on a screen. The player selects from the onscreen deck of 52 cards. The player is presented with a sneak peek of a determined number of overturned cards while selecting from the onscreen deck. The player proceeds to select cards from the onscreen deck, deciding whether or not to use the sneak peek cards. The player is paid for any 5 card poker hand that is deemed of value in a predetermined paytable. If the player has or has not assembled a 5 card poker hand that is deemed payable, then all the remaining cards are turned over.



Inventors:
Lima, Gregory J. (Westport, MA, US)
Application Number:
11/868405
Publication Date:
04/17/2008
Filing Date:
10/05/2007
Assignee:
Global VR (San Jose, CA, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F1/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
HYLINSKI, STEVEN J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
COURTNEY STANIFORD & GREGORY LLP (San Jose, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method of playing a card game, the method comprising: presenting a player with a deck of 52 cards, wherein a predetermined number of the 52 cards are face up and the remainder of the 52 cards are face down; receiving at least one player input indicating a choice of a card to be placed in a hand field, wherein cards in the hand field make up a hand, and wherein the card can be chosen from the face up cards or the face down cards; and when a complete hand is in the hand field, turning the face down cards face up.

2. The method of claim 1 further comprising: when a complete hand is in the hand field, determining whether the player is to be paid for the hand; and displaying a paid amount to the player.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein the card game is a poker game and wherein the hand comprises five cards chosen by the player.

4. The method of claim 1, wherein the card game is a poker game and wherein the face up cards comprise three face up cards.

5. The method of claim 1, further comprising displaying a paytable to the player that includes a plurality of hands and a pay amount for each hand.

6. The method of claim 1, wherein the card game is an electronic card game and wherein the input is received electronically, comprising the player touching a touch screen to indicate a choice.

7. An electronic video card game system, comprising: a plurality of video poker machines each of which comprises, at least one out put device comprising a monitor configurable to display a video card game; and and at least one input device. a server configurable to store instructions comprising a video card game, wherein the server communicates with the plurality of video poker machines via at least one network, and wherein the instructions, when executed, cause the video card game to be played on the plurality of video poker machines, the video card game comprising, presenting a player with a deck of 52 cards, wherein a predetermined number of the 52 cards are face up and the remainder of the 52 cards are face down; and receiving at least one player input indicating a choice of a card to be placed in a hand field, wherein cards in the hand field make up a hand, and wherein the card can be chosen from the face up cards or the face down cards.

8. The system of claim 7, wherein the plurality of video poker machines is distributed among a plurality of venues.

9. The system of claim 7, wherein the server and the plurality of video poker machines is located at a venue.

10. A computer-readable medium having instructions stored thereon which, when executed by a processor cause a video poker method to be performed, the method comprising: presenting a player with a deck of 52 cards, wherein a predetermined number of the 52 cards are face up and the remainder of the 52 cards are face down; receiving at least one player input indicating a choice of a card to be placed in a hand field, wherein cards in the hand field make up a hand, and wherein the card can be chosen from the face up cards or the face down cards; and when a complete hand is in the hand field, turning the face down cards face up.

11. The computer-readable medium of claim 10, wherein the method further comprises: when a complete hand is in the hand field, determining whether the player is to be paid for the hand; and displaying a paid amount to the player.

12. The computer-readable medium of claim 10, wherein the card game is a poker game and wherein the hand comprises five cards chosen by the player.

13. The computer-readable medium of claim 10, wherein the card game is a poker game and wherein the face up cards comprise three face up cards.

14. The computer-readable medium of claim 10, wherein the method further comprises further displaying a paytable to the player that includes a plurality of hands and a pay amount for each hand.

15. The computer-readable medium of claim 10, wherein the card game is an electronic card game and wherein the input is received electronically, comprising the player touching a touch screen to indicate a choice.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/851,942, titled “Peek a boo poker”, filed Oct. 16, 2006, which is incorporated by reference in its entirety herein.

TECHNICAL FIELD

Embodiments described herein are related to electronic video card games.

BACKGROUND

Electronic card games have been available to be played on screens in venues such as casinos. Various versions of poker are popular electronic video card games, for example. In prior video card games, less than the full deck of 52 cards was shown at one time. This is due at least in part to technical limitations, such as pixel resolution or touch screen resolution.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a diagram of a video poker screen showing a paytable and a complete turned over (face down) deck of cards before the payer places a bet and begins a game.

FIG. 2 is diagram of a video poker screen as it appears when the player makes a bet.

FIG. 3 is a diagram of a video poker screen as it appears when the player is given a peek at several predetermined cards from the deck according to an embodiment.

FIG. 4 is a diagram of a video poker screen as it appears when the player chooses either a peek card or an overturned card to be deposited in the “hand” field according to an embodiment.

FIG. 5 is a diagram of a video poker screen as it appears when the player chooses a second card to be deposited in the “hand” field according to an embodiment.

FIG. 6 is a diagram of a video poker screen as it appears when the player chooses a third card to be deposited in the “hand” field according to an embodiment.

FIG. 7 is a diagram of a video poker screen as it appears when the player chooses a fourth card to be deposited in the “hand” field according to an embodiment.

FIG. 8 is a diagram of a video poker screen as it appears when the player chooses a fifth card to be deposited in the “hand” field according to an embodiment.

FIG. 9 is a block diagram of an electronic gaming system according to an embodiment.

FIG. 10 is a block diagram of an electronic gaming system according to another embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Embodiments described herein include variations of an electronic video poker game that includes showing all 52 cards of a deck of cards to a player on a screen. The player selects from the onscreen deck of 52 cards. The player is presented with a sneak peek of a determined number of overturned cards while selecting from the onscreen deck. The player proceeds to select cards from the onscreen deck, deciding whether or not to use the sneak peek cards. The player is paid for any 5 card poker hand that is deemed of value in a predetermined paytable. If the player has or has not assembled a 5 card poker hand that is deemed payable, then all the remaining cards are turned over.

FIG. 1 is a diagram of what appears on an electronic game screen, before a player begins a game. A paytable 100 is at the top of the screen. The paytable indicates the payout for various hands, such as a royal flush, a straight flush, etc. In the figure, the particular payouts are not shown, but would appear in the blank boxes. The screen is configurable to display any desired predetermined payouts for each respective hand.

The screen of FIG. 1 further displays 52 cards 101 that make up a complete poker deck with each card turned over (face down). Below the deck of cards are display fields for displaying credits the player has won, the current total bet, and the amount paid. At the bottom of the screen are multiple buttons that allow the player to interact with the game. In and embodiment, the buttons include a “CHANGE GAME” button that allows the player to choose a new or different game. The buttons further include a “how to play” button that, when pressed, displays instructions teaching the game. The buttons further include a “DEAL” button which starts the hand, and also allows a processor in the video poker game machine (further described below) to run the draw if the player chooses not to pick the cards from the field. The buttons further include a “BET 1” button that increments the player bet by one, allowing for the player to not play all hands. The buttons further include a “BET 1 ALL” button that increments the bet to one for the maximum amount of hands the game offers. For example the maximum amount of games could be 1, 3, 5, 10, 50, 100, or another amount. The buttons further include a “BET MAX” button that increments the bet to the maximum offered by the machine across the maximum amount of hands.

FIG. 2 is a diagram of what appears on an electronic game screen when a player places a bet. The player places a bet by pressing the “BET 1” button 103. The paytable 104 is then automatically filled with predetermined amounts for each indicated hand.

FIG. 3 is a diagram of what appears on an electronic game screen after the player has placed a bet. The player is able to view several “peek” cards 106 (in this case the eight of hearts, the eight of clubs, and the three of clubs).

The player can either choose the peek cards 106, or any of the overturned cards 107 as shown in FIG. 4. The chosen card (in this case the King of spades) is then deposited into the hand field 108. In an embodiment, the player may choose a card by touching the card on the screen.

As shown in FIG. 5, the player then must select the second card 110 and the second card (in this case the ten of diamonds) will be deposited into the second spot on the field 109.

As shown in FIG. 6 the player then must select the third card 111 and the third card (in this case the eight of hearts) will be deposited into the third spot on the field 112.

As shown in FIG. 7 the player then must select the fourth card 113 and the fourth card (in this case the eight of clubs) will be deposited into the fourth spot on the field 114.

As shown in FIG. 8 the player then must select the fifth card 115 and the fifth card (in this case the two of diamonds) will be deposited into the fifth spot on the field 117.

When the poker hand in the hand field is complete, the player is shown the result of the hand. For example, if the hand is one of the hands in the paytable, the player is paid an amount indicated in the “PAID” area on the lower right of the screen. The screen is then returned to the state shown in FIG. 1.

After the fifth card is deposited, all the remaining, unchosen cards in the 52 card deck are shown to the player. This reassures the player that the content of the deck is as expected.

In various embodiments, the poker game can include multiple fields 102 with one deck of cards. In other embodiments, the multiple fields 102 each contain identical hands as chosen by the player. In yet other embodiments, multiple decks of cards 101 are shown with multiple fields 102, each of which is associated with one of the decks of cards.

FIG. 9 is a block diagram of an electronic gaming system 900 according to an embodiment. System 900 includes a server 902 that hosts and serves the electronic video poker game as described herein. The server 902 can include any known data servers, storage devices and/or processors capable of communicating via a network. The server 902 is coupled to a network 904 that can be a wide area network (WAN), a local area network (LAN), the Internet, or any other network via which the electronic video game data can be efficiently transferred.

Various venues 906, 908, and 910 are coupled to the network 904 for receiving the electronic video poker game from the server 902. Each of the venues 906, 908, and 910 include video poker machines. The video poker machines include display device or monitors that display the game as shown in FIGS. 1-8. The video poker machines also include a processor as known in the art. The video poker machines also include input and output devices for receiving input from a player and generating appropriate output. For example, input devices include buttons for the player to push, and a touch screen the player can touch to select and/or move items displayed. Output devices include the monitor and speakers for outputting auditory information and sound effects.

Venue 906 includes machines 912A and 912B through 912N. Venue 909 includes machines 914A and 914B through 914N. Venue 910 includes machines 916A and 916B through 916N.

One or more of the venues 906, 908, and 910 can be casinos licensed to accept wagers and pay bets. Alternatively, one or more of the venues 906, 908, and 910 can be private homes that purchase the electronic video poker game and play the game privately. In yet another alternative, one or more of the venues 906, 908 and 910 are establishments that provide the electronic video poker game to patrons who do not wager real money when playing the game. Other alternatives are possible.

FIG. 10 is a block diagram of an electronic gaming system 1000 according to another embodiment. System 1000 includes venues 1002, 1004 and 1006. Each of the venues 1002, 1004 and 1006 include a server that stores and serves the electronic video poker game as described herein. Each of the venues 1002, 1004 and 1006 further include video poker machines that display the game as shown in FIGS. 1-8. Venue 1002 includes server 1008 and machines 1010A and 1010B through 1010N. Venue 1004 includes server 1012 and machines 101 4A and 1014B through 1014N. Venue 1006 includes server 1018 and machines 1018A and 1018B through 1018N.

Further variations on the system configurations shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 are also within the scope of the claimed invention.

Unless the context clearly requires otherwise, throughout the description and the claims, the words “comprise,” “comprising,” and the like are to be construed in an inclusive sense as opposed to an exclusive or exhaustive sense; that is to say, in a sense of “including, but not limited to.” Words using the singular or plural number also include the plural or singular number respectively. Additionally, the words “herein,” “hereunder,” “above,” “below,” and words of similar import refer to this application as a whole and not to any particular portions of this application. When the word “or” is used in reference to a list of two or more items, that word covers all of the following interpretations of the word: any of the items in the list, all of the items in the list and any combination of the items in the list.

The above description of illustrated embodiments of the systems and methods is not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the systems and methods to the precise forms disclosed. While specific embodiments of, and examples for, the systems components and methods are described herein for illustrative purposes, various equivalent modifications are possible within the scope of the systems, components and methods, as those skilled in the relevant art will recognize. The teachings of the systems and methods provided herein can be applied to other systems and methods for video card games, not only for the systems and methods described above.

The elements and acts of the various embodiments described above can be combined to provide further embodiments. These and other changes can be made to the systems and methods in light of the above detailed description.

In general, in the following claims, the terms used should not be construed to limit the systems and methods to the specific embodiments disclosed in the specification and the claims, but should be construed to include all systems and methods that operate under the claims. Accordingly, the systems and methods are not limited by the disclosure, but instead the scope of the systems and methods is to be determined entirely by the claims.

While certain aspects of the systems and methods are presented below in certain claim forms, the inventors contemplate the various aspects of the systems and methods in any number of claim forms. For example, while only one aspect of the systems and methods may be recited as embodied in machine-readable medium, other aspects may likewise be embodied in machine-readable medium. Accordingly, the inventors reserve the right to add additional claims after filing the application to pursue such additional claim forms for other aspects of the systems and methods.