Title:
Carrier tape and method of wrapping semiconductor devices using the same
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Provided are a carrier tape and a method of wrapping semiconductor devices using the carrier tape. The carrier tape may include a frame tape having perforation portions, and a pocket having a recessed bottom on which the semiconductor device may be received. The stopper may prevent the semiconductor device received in the recessed bottom from escaping from the pocket. The stopper may be capable of being attached/detached into/from the perforation portion. The carrier tape may be recyclable to be more environmentally friendly. In addition, even if a defective portion is generated on the pocket, the corresponding portion may be more easily replaced with a new one. Thus, it may be economically advantageous to use the carrier tape.



Inventors:
Han, Moon-soo (Cheonan-si, KR)
Application Number:
11/907720
Publication Date:
04/17/2008
Filing Date:
10/17/2007
Assignee:
Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B65D85/86
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
PAGAN, JENINE MARIE
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HARNESS, DICKEY & PIERCE, P.L.C. (RESTON, VA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A carrier tape for receiving a semiconductor device, the carrier tape comprising: a frame tape including perforation portions; and a pocket having a recessed bottom, and a stopper that retains the semiconductor device received in the pocket, wherein the pocket is capable of being attached/detached into/from the frame tape.

2. The carrier tape of claim 1, wherein the pocket includes a pair of stoppers facing each other from opposite sides of an opening portion of the pocket.

3. The carrier tape of claim 1, wherein the pocket is removably insertable into the perforation portions.

4. The carrier tape of claim 1 wherein the carrier tape is windable on a reel.

5. The carrier tape of claim 1, wherein the pocket includes a lip portion parallel to the recessed bottom, the lip portion having a constant width on at least a portion of the opening portion of the pocket.

6. The carrier tape of claim 5, wherein the pocket is removably insertable into the perforation portion of the frame tape, and the lip portion is mounted on a peripheral surface of the perforation portion of the frame tape.

7. The carrier tape of claim 1, wherein the stopper is parallel to the recessed bottom, and the stopper is capable of rotating toward the recessed bottom and is incapable of moving toward in an opposite direction of the recessed bottom.

8. The carrier tape of claim 1, wherein the pocket is removably insertable into the perforation portion of the frame tape, and the pocket includes a protrusion at least on a side surface of the pocket that prevents the pocket from escaping from the frame tape.

9. The carrier tape of claim 1, wherein the perforation portions are uniform in size and the pockets have a non-uniform inner space to receive semiconductor devices of various sizes.

10. The carrier tape of claim 1, wherein the pocket includes a lip portion around a periphery of an opening of the pocket.

11. The carrier tape of claim 1, wherein the frame tape includes sprocket holes.

12. The carrier tape of claim 8, wherein the protrusion is parallel to a lip portion that extends from the side surface of the pocket.

13. The carrier tape of claim 8, wherein the protrusion is rounded.

14. The carrier tape of claim 1, further comprising a cover tape covering an opening in the pocket.

15. A method of wrapping semiconductor device using a carrier tape, including a frame tape having perforation portions; and a pocket having a recessed bottom and a stopper that retains the semiconductor in the pocket, the pocket capable of being attached/detached into/from the perforation portion, the method comprising: removably attaching the pocket into the frame tape; and inserting the semiconductor device into the pocket.

16. The method of claim 15, wherein the attaching of the pocket onto the frame tape includes: inserting the pocket into the perforation portion of the frame tape.

17. The method of claim 15, further comprising removing the pocket from the frame tape.

18. The method of claim 17, wherein the removing includes pressing opposing side surfaces of the pocket to separate the pocket from the frame tape.

19. The method of claim 17, wherein the removing includes depressing protrusions that extend from side walls of the pocket.

Description:
This non-provisional U.S. patent application claims the benefit of priority under 35 U.S.C. §119 of Korean Patent Application No. 10-2006-0101026, filed on Oct. 17, 2006, in the Korean Intellectual Property Office, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein in its entirety by reference.

BACKGROUND

When semiconductor chips are assembled as semiconductor packages, various types of wrapping materials may be used to transfer the semiconductor packages to a user safely. Conventionally, carrier tapes or trays may be used as the wrapping materials. The carrier tape protects the semiconductor packages included therein from external shocks, and allows the semiconductor packages to be handled more easily.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing a carrier tape according to the conventional art. As shown in FIG. 1, semiconductor devices may be loaded in pockets 14 that are recessed on a carrier tape 10. Upper portions of the pockets 14 may then be sealed by a cover tape 20. The carrier tape 10 may be wound on a reel 30 and transferred to the user.

The user may withdraw the semiconductor devices from the carrier tape 10 to use the semiconductor packages. To do this, the cover tape 20 may be removed first, and the semiconductor devices included in the pockets 14 withdrawn. In FIG. 1, sprocket holes 12 may be used when the carrier tape 10 is wound/unwound, or when the cover tape 20 is attached/detached.

According to the conventional carrier tape 10, once the cover tape 20 is removed to withdraw the semiconductor devices, it may be impossible to use the cover tape 20 and carrier tape 10 again. As such, the conventional carrier tape may be discarded to become a cause of environmental contamination. Further, even if a defect occurs on only one portion of the plurality of pockets 14 and/or the cover tape 20, the entire carrier tape 10 and/or the cover tape 20 must be discarded.

SUMMARY OF EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS

Example embodiments may provide a carrier tape that may be recyclable so as not to become a cause of environmental contamination. Even when a defect occurs on recesses of a carrier tape, a corresponding part may be easily replaced. Thus, the carrier tape may be more economically and environmentally advantageous over the conventional art.

Example embodiments also may provide a method of wrapping semiconductor devices using the tape carrier.

According to example embodiments, there may be provided a carrier tape for receiving semiconductor devices, the carrier tape may include a frame tape having perforation portions, and a pocket. The pocket may have a recessed bottom, on which the semiconductor device may be received, and a stopper that may prevent the semiconductor device received in the recessed bottom from escaping from the pocket. The pocket may be capable of being attached/detached into/from the perforation portion.

A pair of stoppers facing each other may be disposed on an opening portion of the pocket. The semiconductor device may be separated by moving the stoppers so that the pocket and the carrier tape may be recycled.

The pocket may be inserted into the perforation portion to be attached into the frame tape.

The carrier tape may further include a reel, on which the frame tape may be wound.

A lip portion in parallel with the recessed bottom may be formed on at least a portion of the opening portion of the pocket with constant width. The lip portion may prevent the pocket from penetrating the perforation portion even if the pocket is forcefully inserted into the perforation portion of the frame tape.

The pocket may be removably inserted into the perforation portion of the frame tape, and the lip portion may be mounted on a peripheral surface of the perforation portion of the frame tape.

The stoppers may be disposed in parallel to the recessed bottom to prevent the semiconductor device from escaping from the pocket. The stoppers may be capable of rotating toward the recessed bottom and may be incapable of moving toward the opposite direction of the recessed bottom.

The pocket may be inserted into the perforation portion of the frame tape, and the pocket may include a protrusion at least on a side surface of the pocket for preventing the pocket from escaping from the frame tape.

According to example embodiments, there may be provided a method of wrapping semiconductor devices using a carrier tape, which may include a frame tape having perforation portions, and a pocket. The pocket may have a recessed bottom, on which the semiconductor device may be received, and a stopper that may prevent the semiconductor device received in the recessed bottom from escaping from the pocket. The pocket may be capable of being attached/detached into/from the perforation portion. The method may include attaching the pocket onto the frame tape, and inserting the semiconductor device into the pocket.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above and other features and advantages of example embodiments will become more apparent by being described in detail with reference to the attached drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a carrier tape according to the conventional art;

FIGS. 2A and 2B are perspective views of a frame tape and a pocket according to an example embodiment;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a carrier tape, in which the pocket of FIG. 2B is attached on the frame tape of FIG. 2A, according to an example embodiment;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the carrier tape taken along line IV-IV of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of a pocket according to an example embodiment;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of a pocket according to an example embodiment;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of a pocket illustrating how a protrusion formed thereon prevent the pocket from escaping from the frame tape according to an example embodiment;

FIGS. 8A and 8B are cross-sectional views of protrusions according to an example embodiment; and

FIG. 9 is a perspective view illustrating a method of wrapping semiconductor devices according to an example embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXAMPLE EMBODIMENTS

Example embodiments will now be described more fully with reference to the accompanying drawings. Example embodiments may, however, be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as being limited to example embodiments set forth herein. Rather, example embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will be thorough and complete, and will fully convey the concept of example embodiments to those skilled in the art. In the drawings, the thicknesses of layers and regions are exaggerated for clarity. Like reference numerals in the drawings denote like elements, and thus their description will be omitted.

Detailed illustrative embodiments of example embodiments are disclosed herein. However, specific structural and functional details disclosed herein are merely representative for purposes of describing example embodiments. The example embodiments may, however, be embodied in many alternate forms and should not be construed as limited to only example embodiments set forth herein.

Accordingly, while example embodiments are capable of various modifications and alternative forms, embodiments thereof are shown by way of example in the drawings and will herein be described in detail. It should be understood, however, that there is no intent to limit example embodiments to the particular forms disclosed, but on the contrary, example embodiments are to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the scope of example embodiments. Like numbers refer to like elements throughout the description of the figures.

It will be understood that, although the terms first, second, etc. may be used herein to describe various elements, these elements should not be limited by these terms. These terms are only used to distinguish one element from another. For example, a first element could be termed a second element, and, similarly, a second element could be termed a first element, without departing from the scope of example embodiments. As used herein, the term “and/or” includes any and all combinations of one or more of the associated listed items.

It will be understood that when an element is referred to as being “connected” or “coupled” to another element, it can be directly connected or coupled to the other element or intervening elements may be present. In contrast, when an element is referred to as being “directly connected” or “directly coupled” to another element, there are no intervening elements present. Other words used to describe the relationship between elements should be interpreted in a like fashion (e.g., “between” versus “directly between”, “adjacent” versus “directly adjacent”, etc.).

The terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting of example embodiments. As used herein, the singular forms “a”, “an” and “the” are intended to include the plural forms as well, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. It will be further understood that the terms “comprises”, “comprising,”, “includes” and/or “including”, when used herein, specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps, operations, elements, and/or components, but do not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, operations, elements, components, and/or groups thereof.

It should also be noted that in some alternative implementations, the functions/acts noted may occur out of the order noted in the figures. For example, two figures shown in succession may in fact be executed substantially concurrently or may sometimes be executed in the reverse order, depending upon the functionality/acts involved.

According to example embodiments, there may be provided a carrier tape for receiving semiconductor devices. The carrier tape may include a frame tape having perforation portions, and pockets. Each pocket may include a recessed bottom on which the semiconductor device may be received, and a stopper for preventing the received semiconductor device from escaping from the pocket. The pocket may be capable of being attached/detached into/from the perforation portions.

FIG. 2A is a perspective view of a frame tape according example embodiments, FIG. 2B is a perspective view of a pocket according to example embodiments, and FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a carrier tape according to example embodiments.

Referring to FIG. 2A, the frame tape 100 may include perforation portions 110. The frame tape 100 may optionally include sprocket holes 120 that may be used when the frame tape 100 is wound/unwound. The frame tape 100 may be formed of the same material as that of a conventional carrier tape. However, the frame tape 100 is not limited thereto because there may be no need for the frame tape 100 to be attached to a cover tape. Therefore, a wide variety of materials may be used to form the frame tape 100.

A conventional carrier tape may have various widths according to the sizes of the semiconductor devices that are to be received, and a certain semiconductor device may only be received in a carrier tape having a corresponding width. However, according to example embodiments, the carrier tape 100 semiconductor devices of different sizes may be received by changing pockets 200 (FIG. 2B). The pocket and the frame tape are recyclable and therefore are more environmentally friendly.

Referring to FIG. 2A, the size of perforation portion 110 may be adjusted to correspond to a size of the pocket (not shown) that is attached to the frame tape 100. The perforation portions 110 may be arranged with a predetermined interval therebetween to facilitate automation. The sprocket holes 120 may be fabricated to have various shapes/intervals.

Referring to FIG. 2B, the pocket 200 may include a recessed bottom 210 where the semiconductor device (not shown) may be received, and a stopper 220 that may prevent the semiconductor device from escaping from the pocket 200. In example embodiments, a pair of stoppers 220 facing each other may be disposed on an opening portion of the pocket. The stopper 220 may use a structure familiar to those of skill in the art. However, the structure of the stopper 220 is not limited thereto.

Alternatively, the inner space in the pocket 200 may be adjusted according to the size of the semiconductor device that is to be received in the pocket 200. If the semiconductor device is small, a pocket having smaller inner space may be used to receive the semiconductor device, but still have the same outer appearance of the pocket 200. Therefore, the frame tape 100 may be used to receive semiconductor devices having various sizes to provide a more economical and easily automated alternative to the conventional carrier tape.

To attach the pocket 200 to the frame tape 100, the pocket 200 may be inserted into the perforation portion 110 of the frame tape 100.

In example embodiments, referring to FIG. 2B, the pocket 200 may include a lip portion 230 that may be formed with constant width on at least a part of the opening in parallel with the recessed bottom 210. In FIG. 2B, lip portions 230 may be disposed on facing two sides of the opening of the pocket 200. The lip portions 230 may also be formed on all sides of the opening. The lip portions 230 may prevent the pocket 200 from passing through the perforation portion 110 when the pocket 200 is inserted into the perforation portion 110 of the frame tape 100.

When the pocket 200 is inserted into the perforation portion 110 of the frame tape 100, the lip portions 230 of the pocket 200 may be mounted on peripheral surfaces of the perforation portion 110. Thus, the pocket 200 may be coupled to the frame tape 100. FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing the pocket 200 mounted on the frame tape 100. FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view showing the pocket taken along line IV-IV of FIG. 3. The lip portions 230 of the pocket 200 may be mounted on the peripheral surfaces of the perforation portion 110 of the frame tape 100.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of a pocket 300 according to example embodiments. A stopper 320 of the pocket 300 may be parallel with recessed bottom 310 to prevent the semiconductor device from escaping from the pocket 300. The stopper 320 may rotate toward the recessed bottom (direction A in FIG. 5). However, the stopper 320 may not rotate toward the opposite portion (opposite direction to the direction A in FIG. 5) to prevent the semiconductor device (not shown) received in the pocket 300 from escaping out of the pocket 300. In addition, when the semiconductor device is to be withdrawn, the stopper 320 may be sufficiently rotated in the direction A of FIG. 5 to ensure a sufficient space so the semiconductor device may be withdrawn.

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of a pocket 400 according to example embodiments. The pocket 400 may be inserted into the perforation portion 110 of the frame tape 100. For example, a protrusion 440 may be disposed on at least one side surface 450 of the pocket 400 to prevent the pocket 400 from escaping from the frame tape 100.

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of a pocket showing how the protrusion 440 may prevent the pocket 400 from escaping from the frame tape 100. In FIG. 7, the pocket 400 may be inserted into the frame tape 100. Referring to FIG. 7, lip portions 430 may be mounted on the frame tape 100, and edges of the perforation portion of the frame tape 100 may be inserted between the protrusions 440 and the lip portions 430. Therefore, the escape of the pocket 400 from the frame tape 100 may be prevented by the protrusion 440.

To separate the pocket 400 from the frame tape 100, the edges of the frame tape 100 may be removed from the gap between the protrusion 440 and the lip portion 430. For example, side portions of the frame tape 100 may be extended to both side directions to separate the pocket 400, or both side surfaces 450 of the pocket 400 may be pressed to separate the pocket 400 from the frame tape 100.

FIGS. 8A and 8B are cross-sectional views of a part of a pocket 400 showing examples of the protrusion 440.

Referring to FIG. 8A, an upper edge of a protrusion 440a may be rounded. When the upper edge of the protrusion 440a is rounded, it may be easier to separate the pocket 400 from the frame tape 100.

In FIG. 8B, an end portion of a protrusion 440b may be attached to the side surface 450 of the pocket 400, and the other end of the protrusion 440b may be separated from the side surface 450. For example, as shown in FIG. 8B, the end portion of the protrusion 440b may be attached onto the side surface 450 of the pocket 400 so as to be inclined. If an external force is not applied, the other end of the protrusion 440b may be separated from the side surface 450 of the pocket 400 as denoted by the solid line in FIG. 8B. If an external force is applied toward the center portion of the pocket 400, the protrusion portion 440b may be bent and may be adhered onto the side surface 450 of the pocket 400.

When the protrusion 440b is attached as above, the pocket 400 may be easily inserted into the frame tape 100. After inserting the pocket 400 into the frame tape 100, the other end portion of the protrusion 440b may be separated from the side surface 450 of the pocket 400 to prevent the pocket 400 from escaping from the frame tape 100. When the pocket 400 is to be separated, the other end may be pressed to contact the side surface 450 of the pocket 400 and the pocket 400 may be easily separated from the frame tape 100.

The carrier tape may further include a reel. The reel may be the reel 30 of FIG. 1, but is not limited thereto. When the frame tape 100, in which the pocket 200, 300, or 400 is inserted, is wound on the reel, the carrier tape may be easily handled.

According to example embodiments, there is provided a method of wrapping semiconductor devices using a carrier tape receiving semiconductor devices, which may include a frame tape having perforation portions, and a pocket including a recessed bottom, on which the semiconductor device may be received, and a stopper preventing the semiconductor device from escaping from the pocket, and capable of being attached/detached into/from the perforation portion, the method may include attaching the pocket into the frame tape, and inserting the semiconductor device into the pocket. FIG. 9 is an exploded perspective view illustrating an example method of wrapping the semiconductor device.

Referring to FIG. 9, the pocket 200 may be removably attached into the perforation portion 110 of the frame tape 110 and a semiconductor device 500 may be inserted into the pocket 200. Attaching of the pocket 200 may be performed by inserting the pocket 200 into the perforation portion 110. As described above, the pocket 200 may be inserted until the lip portions of the pocket 200 are mounted on the surface of the frame tape 100.

During insertion of the semiconductor device 500 into the pocket 200, the stoppers 230 may be folded toward the inside of the pocket 200, and then, unfolded. After inserting the semiconductor device 500 into the pocket 200, the stoppers 230 may be arranged in parallel with the recessed bottom of the pocket 200 to prevent the semiconductor device 500 from escaping from the pocket 200.

According to example embodiments, the carrier tape may be recyclable to be more environmentally friendly. Even if a defective portion is generated on the pocket, the corresponding portion may be easily replaced with a new one. Thus, it may be economically advantageous to use the carrier tape of example embodiments.

While example embodiments have been particularly shown and described with reference to the drawings thereof, it will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art that various changes in form and details may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of example embodiments as defined by the following claims.