Title:
Rotary buffer
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A rotary buffer for buffing and polishing concave surfaces. The rotary buffer includes a malleable cone, a cone shaft, and a mounting shaft. The mounting shaft is configured to be received in a chuck of a rotary power tool. The cone and cone shaft work in conjunction with one another to absorb impact from a surface being buffed and polished and to prevent the rotary buffer from bouncing.



Inventors:
Carrell, Wade Joseph (Lodi, WI, US)
Walters, Albert Daniel (Springboro, OH, US)
Elmer, Gary Michael (Oregon, WI, US)
Application Number:
11/542372
Publication Date:
04/03/2008
Filing Date:
10/03/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
15/230.15, 15/230.18, 15/230.12
International Classes:
B24D13/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
NGUYEN, DUNG V
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MICHAEL BEST & FRIEDRICH LLP (Mke) (MILWAUKEE, WI, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A rotary buffer comprising: a first assembly having a first shaft and a head, the first shaft configured to be received in a chuck of a power tool; a second assembly coupled to the head, the second assembly having a base and a second shaft; a cone coupled to the base and supported by the second shaft; and a buffing pad coupled to the cone.

2. The rotary buffer of claim 1 wherein the cone is constructed of urethane foam.

3. The rotary buffer of claim 1 wherein the cone has a Durometer density of 30-45.

4. The rotary buffer of claim 1 wherein the cone absorbs an impact from a surface being buffed.

5. The rotary buffer of claim 1 wherein the second shaft reduces a deformation of the cone when a force is applied to the cone.

6. The rotary buffer of claim 1 wherein the second shaft reduces a stress on an adhesion point of the cone and the base when a force is applied to the cone.

7. The rotary buffer of claim 1 wherein the rotary buffer rotates at a speed of 100 to 2500 rotations per minute.

8. The rotary buffer of claim 1 wherein the buffing pad is constructed of at least one of twisted wool, natural lambs wool, wool blends, synthetic blends, wool silk blends microfiber, and fiberal wool felt blends.

9. The rotary buffer of claim 1 wherein the second shaft is tapered.

10. The rotary buffer of claim 1 wherein the first assembly is constructed of steel.

11. The rotarty buffer of claim 1 wherein the second assembly is constructed of polypropylene and is over-molded over portions of the first assembly.

12. A buffer for buffing concave surfaces, the buffer comprising: a cone; a buffing pad coupled to the cone and configured to contact a concave surface to be buffed; a mount adapted to receive the cone, the mount including a first shaft configured to support the cone and adapted to reduce stress at an adhesion point; and a second shaft coupled to the first shaft and adapted for insertion into a rotary device.

13. The buffer of claim 12 wherein the cone is adapted to absorb impacts from the concave surface and prevent the buffer from bouncing.

14. The buffer of claim 12 wherein the first shaft is tapered.

15. A method of constructing a rotary buffer, the method comprising: machining a first base including a first shaft and a head; overmolding a mount onto the head, the mount including a second base and a second shaft; curing a cone onto the mount; sewing a buffing material into a backing material to form a buffing pad; and gluing the buffing pad to the cone.

16. The method of claim 15 wherein the cone is constructed of urethane foam.

17. The method of claim 15 and further comprising suspending the second shaft in a liquid urethane foam.

18. A power tool comprising: a chuck; a handle; a rotary driver adapted to translate a received energy into a rotational force at the chuck; and a rotary buffer including a first assembly having a first shaft and a head, the first shaft configured to be received in the chuck, a second assembly coupled to the head, the second assembly having a base and a second shaft, a cone coupled to the base and supported by the second shaft, and a buffing pad coupled to the cone.

19. The power tool of claim 18 wherein the cone is adapted to absorb impacts from the concave surface and prevent the buffer from bouncing.

20. The power tool of claim 18 wherein the second shaft reduces a deformation of the cone when a force is applied to the cone.

21. The power tool of claim 18 wherein the second shaft reduces a stress on an adhesion point of the cone and the base when a force is applied to the cone.

Description:

BACKGROUND

Rotary buffing pads for attachment to air or power tools (e.g., an electric drill) are known in the art. Rotary buffing pads generally are circular and have a relatively large diameter (e.g., 12 inches). The rotary buffing pads are able to polish and buff large, flat surfaces quickly. However, the rotary buffing pads cannot access non-flat surfaces (e.g., small apertures or concave surfaces) such as found on high end automobile wheels. Therefore, these non-flat surfaces must be polished and buffed by hand. What is needed is a rotary buffer capable of buffing non-flat surfaces.

SUMMARY

The present invention relates to rotary buffing and polishing tools.

In one embodiment, the invention provides a rotary buffer including a first assembly, a second assembly, a cone, a buffing pad. The first assembly includes a first shaft and a head, the first shaft configured to be received in a chuck of a power tool. The second assembly is coupled to the head and has a base and a second shaft. The cone is coupled to the base and supported by the second shaft and the buffing pad is coupled to the cone.

In another embodiment the invention provides a buffer for buffing concave surfaces. The buffer includes a cone, a buffing pad coupled to the cone and configured to contact a concave surface to be buffed, a mount adapted to receive the cone, the mount including a first shaft configured to support the cone and adapted to reduce stress at an adhesion point, and a second shaft coupled to the first shaft and adapted for insertion into a rotary device.

In another embodiment the invention provides a method of constructing a rotary buffer. The method comprises machining a first base including a first shaft and a head, overmolding a mount onto the head, the mount including a second base and a second shaft, curing a cone onto the mount, sewing a buffing material into a backing material to form a buffing pad, and gluing the buffing pad to the cone.

In another embodiment the invention provides power tool comprising a chuck, a handle, a rotary driver adapted to translate a received energy into a rotational force at the chuck, and a rotary buffer. The rotary buffer includes a first assembly having a first shaft and a head, the first shaft configured to be received in the chuck, a second assembly coupled to the head, the second assembly having a base and a second shaft, a cone coupled to the base and supported by the second shaft, and a buffing pad coupled to the cone.

Other aspects of the invention will become apparent by consideration of the detailed description and accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side view of a rotary buffer according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the rotary buffer of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3A is a side view of a base of the rotary buffer of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3B is a top view of a base of the rotary buffer of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4A is a side view of a cone mount of the rotary buffer of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4B is a top view of a cone mount of the rotary buffer of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5A is a side view of a deformed cone of the rotary buffer of FIG. 1 when no force is applied to the cone.

FIG. 5B is a side view of a deformed cone of the rotary buffer of FIG. 1 when a force is applied to the cone.

FIG. 5C is a side view of a deformed cone, which does not have a cone shaft, caused when a force is applied to the cone.

FIG. 6 illustrates a buffing pad of the rotary buffer of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 illustrates a shape of the buffing pad of the rotary buffer of FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Before any embodiments of the invention are explained in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and the arrangement of components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the following drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or of being carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology used herein is for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. The use of “including,” “comprising,” or “having” and variations thereof herein is meant to encompass the items listed thereafter and equivalents thereof as well as additional items. Unless specified or limited otherwise, the terms “mounted,” “connected,” “supported,” and “coupled” and variations thereof are used broadly and encompass both direct and indirect mountings, connections, supports, and couplings. Further, “connected” and “coupled” are not restricted to physical or mechanical connections or couplings.

FIG. 1 illustrates a rotary buffer 100 according to one embodiment of the invention. The rotary buffer 100, is able to buff and polish flat surfaces and to buff and polish non-planar surfaces, especially apertures and concave surfaces such as those found on automobile wheels and rims. These types of non-planar surfaces are not accessible by conventional buffing and polishing tools. The rotary buffer 100 is configured for use with an air or power tool (e.g., an electric drill). In addition, the rotary buffer 100 can be operated at high speeds (e.g., 100-2500 rotations per minute) and maintain its shape without producing any wobble. The rotary buffer 100 can be manufactured in different sizes for different applications and can use different buffing materials to obtain different finishes (i.e., a softer material can provide a finer finish).

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of one construction of the rotary buffer 100 illustrated in FIG. 1. The rotary buffer 100 includes a base 105, a cone mount 110, a cone 115, and a buffing pad 120. One construction of the base 105 is illustrated in FIG. 3. The base 105 includes a mounting shaft 125 and a head 130. The base 105 can be constructed out of 1010 steel. Other materials simillar to steel and/or combinations of materials may also be used. The base 105 can be manufactured using a machining or milling process, as well as other suitable processes. The mounting shaft 125 has a diameter compatible with a chuck of a power tool (e.g., ¼ inch diameter). The length of the mounting shaft 125 (e.g., 1.2 inches) is adapted to be supported by the chuck of the power tool and extend a distance beyond an end of the chuck. The head 130 is appropriately sized to support the cone mount 110 and to provide enough strength to enable the cone mount 110 to withstand pivotal and rotational forces encountered during operation. The head 130 includes a diameter larger than the mounting shaft 125 and a thickness roughly similar to the mounting shaft 125. For example, the diameter of the head 130 can be between 0.5 inches and 2.0 inches and the thickness of the head 130 can be between 0.125 inches and 0.5 inches. The head 130 is positioned at least substantially perpendicular to the shaft 125. The shaft 125 intersects the head 130 enabling the shaft 125 to impart rotational force on the head 130 and the head 130 to spin. Although the head 130 and shaft 125 are disussed as separate elements of the base, the base can be constructed as a single integral component.

FIG. 4 illustrates one construction of the cone mount 110. The cone mount 110 is formed by over-molding polypropylene around the head 130 and includes a cone mount base 135 and a cone shaft 140. It is noted that the base 105 and the cone mount 110 can be constructed as a single component. The cone mount 110 can be manufactured by an injection molding or milling process, as well as other suitable processes, and can be constructed of suitable materials such as polypropylene. The cone shaft 140 extends from the combined head 130 and cone mounting base 105 opposite the mounting shaft 125 and can be cylindrical in shape or can be tapered (as shown in FIG. 4). The cone shaft 140 is of a length and thickness and is constructed of materials to provide sufficient pivotal strength for buffing and polishing. For example, the length of the cone shaft 120 can be between 1.4 inches to 2.1 inches and the thickness of the cone shaft 120 where the cone shaft 120 joins the cone mount base 135 can be between 0.25 inches and 0.5 inches. If the cone shaft 140 is too stiff the rotary buffer 100 will bounce during buffing or polishing resulting in ineffective operation and possible discomfort to a user.

The cone mount base 135 has a thickness sufficient to hold the base 105 and a diameter sized to support a size of cone 115 desired. For example, the thickness of the cone mount base 105 can be between 0.25 inches and 0.5 inches. As another example, a diameter of the cone 115 at the cone mount base 105 can be between 1.0 inches and 2.5 inches.

In another construction, the cone mount 110 and cone shaft 140 can be integrally constructed with the base 105. The base 105 can be made larger to replicate the size of the cone mount 110 and the mounting shaft 125 can be extended to form the cone shaft 140.

Because the cone mount 110 is over-molded over the base 105, the base 105 and the cone mount 110 are adhered to remain secured together during operation of the rotary buffer 100. In other constructions, the base 105 and the cone mount 110 can be joined via other means including an adhesive and welding.

In the construction shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the cone 115 is formed and includes a urethane foam. The urethane foam, in liquid form, is poured into a mold. The cone mount 110 is then suspended in the mold such that the cone mount base 135 is in contact with the urethane. The urethane substantially covers at least an edge 145 (illustrated in FIG. 3) of the cone mount base 135. The cone shaft 140 is suspended in the urethane and positioned in the center of the mold, thus createing the cone 115 in its finished form. The urethane is then allowed to cure resulting in a semi-rigid foam. As the urethane cures, it bonds to the cone mount base 135 and cone shaft 140 producing adhesion sufficient to maintain the bond during normal operation of the rotary buffer 100.

In other constructions, the cone 115 is manufactured separate from the cone mount 110. In this construction, an adhesive is applied to the cone mount 110 and the cone shaft 140. The cone 115 is mounted on the cone mount 110 and the cone shaft 140. The base of the cone 115 is substantially equal in diameter to the cone mount. The height of the cone 115 extends a distance beyond an end of the cone shaft 140. For example, the cone 115 can be 2.5 inches high with a 2.125 inch base 105 and a 2.1 inch cone shaft 140 or the cone 115 can be 1.75 inches high with a 1.25 inch base 105 and a 1.4 inch cone shaft 140.

The density of the cone 115 makes the cone 115 malleable and works in conjunction with the cone shaft 140 to absorb impact from the surface being buffed and polished and to prevent bouncing during buffing and polishing. The cone shaft 140 also provides support for the application of pivotal and rotational forces during buffing and polishing. In one construction, the urethane foam of the cone 115 has a Durometer reading of 30 to 45. Other constructions of the cone 115 can have Durometer readings of 25 to 50 or 20 to 55.

FIGS. 5 A-C illustrate the cone shaft 140 and the cone 115 during operation of the buffer 100. FIG. 5A illustrates the shape of the cone 115 when there is no force applied to the cone 115. FIG. 5B illustrates how the cone 115, with a cone shaft 140 inside, deforms when a force is applied as shown generally by the arrow. The dashed lines indicate the shape of the cone 115 with no force applied to illustrate the level of deformity. As shown in FIG. 5B, the cone 115 absorbs the force around the point where the force is applied. The remainder of the cone 115 maintains its shape with no apparent deformity.

FIG. 5C illustrates the deformation of the cone 115 when a force is applied and a cone shaft 140 is not used. The entire cone 115 absorbs the force and becomes deformed. This deformation results in less force being applied to the surface being buffed causing a user to apply additional pressure. The deformity also causes added pressure to be applied to an adhesion point 150 between the cone 115 and the cone mount 110. This added pressure weakens the bond between the cone 115 and the cone mount 110 and eventually leads to failure of the bond between the cone 115 and the cone mount 110. The cone shaft 140 therefore improves the performance of the rotary buffer 100 and extends the life of the rotary buffer 100.

With reference to FIG. 2, the buffing pad 120 is manufactured from a generally flat piece of backing material 160 (FIG. 6). A buffing material 165 is sewn into the backing material 160 and the buffing pad 120 is cut out of the piece of backing material 160 with the sewn-in buffing material 165. Sewing the buffing pad 120 flat provides the ability to achieve higher thread counts per inch. Multiple buffing materials 165 can be sewn into the buffing pad 120 including, but not limited to, twisted wool, natural lambs wool, wool blends, synthetic blends, wool silk blends microfiber, and fiberal wool felt blends. Each material can provide a different buffing surface for different applications.

FIG. 7 illustrates the general shape of the buffing pad 120 after it has been cut out of the flat piece of material. The buffing pad 120 is wrapped around the cone 115 with a long edge 170 wrapping around a base of the cone 115 and a short edge 175 wrapping around a top of the cone 115. The buffing pad 120 is sized such that when the buffing pad 120 wraps around the cone 115, the cone 115 is completely covered, and a first mating edge 180 and a second mating edge 185 meet.

The buffing pad 120 is wrapped around the cone 115 and attached to the cone 115 using an adhesive, such as hot melt glue. The type and amount of hot melt glue used is chosen based on its rate of absorption into the cone 115 and its hardness when dried. The hot melt glue provides sufficient adhesion to ensure that the buffing pad 120 does not separate from the cone 115 during operation. In addition, the hot melt glue cannot be too hard or it may offset the buffering effect of the cone 115. Also, if the hot melt glue is too brittle, it may crack and eventually lead to separation of the buffing pad 120 from the cone 115.

Various features and advantages of the invention are set forth in the following claims.