Title:
Method And System For Providing Adaptable Options For Electronic Gaming
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method and gaming station that provides a toolbar having short-cut tabs that responsively adapt to a wagering state in an electronic or online poker game is provided. The short-cut tabs allow a player to wager in terms of factors such as a pot-size or a minimum wager. The short-cut tabs, and the wagers displayed therein, adapt to a particular context of the game, allowing a player to wager more efficiently during the course of a poker game. In addition, the short-cut tabs may be user-configurable, giving a player desired tabs at specific points of time within a poker game.



Inventors:
Mares, Peter Michael (Sunningdale, ZA)
Wilson, Stephen Anthony (Ballito, ZA)
Application Number:
11/469227
Publication Date:
03/27/2008
Filing Date:
08/31/2006
Assignee:
WATERLEAF LIMITED (Douglas, GB)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F9/24
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
LEE, WEI
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MCDONNELL BOEHNEN HULBERT & BERGHOFF LLP (CHICAGO, IL, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A graphical interface for an electronic poker game, comprising: a toolbar for selecting a wager; and a plurality of short-cut tabs positioned on the toolbar, wherein each of the short-cut tabs represents a wager value, and wherein the short-cut tabs responsively adapt to a wagering state of the game.

2. The interface as in claim 1, wherein the short-cut tabs responsively adapt to a pot value.

3. The interface as in claim 1, wherein the short-cut tabs comprise a wager value representative of at least one of a percentage of a pot value and a fraction of the pot value.

4. The interface as in claim 1, wherein the short-cut tabs responsively adapt to a multiple of a minimum wager value.

5. The interface as in claim 1, wherein the wagering state comprises a pre-flop state and a post-flop state.

6. The interface as in claim 5, wherein in the pre-flop state, the short-cut tabs comprise a short-cut tab representative of a minimum wager value and a short-cut tab representative of a multiple of the minimum wager value.

7. The interface as in claim 6, wherein the short-cut tab representative of the multiple of the minimum wager value comprises an integer multiple of the minimum wager value.

8. The interfaced as in claim 7, wherein in the post-flop state, the short-cut tabs comprise a short-cut tab representative of a fraction of a pot value.

9. The interface as in claim 1, wherein the short-cut tabs are user-configured.

10. A method for graphically presenting selectable wager amounts associated with a poker game that provides a toolbar to a user for selecting wagers, the method comprising: identifying a wagering state associated with the game; generating the short-cut tabs based on the identified wagering state; and displaying the plurality of short-cut tabs on the toolbar.

11. The method as in claim 10, wherein the short-cut tabs are user-configured.

12. The method as in claim 10, wherein the identified wagering state is selected from the group consisting of a pre-flop state and a post flop state.

13. The method as in claim 10, further comprising: generating a first short-cut tab associated with a minimum wager value; and generating a second short-cut tab associated with a multiple of the minimum wager value.

14. The method as in claim 13, wherein the second short-cut tab comprises an integer multiple of the minimum wager value.

15. The method as in claim 10, further comprising generating a first short-cut tab associated with a fraction of a pot value.

16. A gaming station comprising: a monitor that presents to a user a display of game-play corresponding to a poker game, wherein the display further includes a graphical toolbar for selecting a wager, and wherein the toolbar comprises a plurality of short-cut tabs each of which represent a wager value; a processor; and a memory comprising processing instructions executable by the processor to responsively adapt the short-cut tabs to a wagering state of the game.

17. The station as in claim 16, wherein the short-cut tabs are user-configured.

18. The station as in claim 16, wherein the wagering state comprises at least one of a pre-flop state and a post-flop state.

19. The station as in claim 18, wherein the short-cut tabs in the pre-flop state include a minimum wager value and a multiple of the minimum wager value, and wherein the short-cut tabs in the post-flop state include at least one of a percentage of a pot value and a fraction of the pot value.

20. The station as in claim 16, wherein gaming server is coupled to a server via a communication network.

Description:

BACKGROUND

The present disclosure relates to a betting mechanism for wagering in live or online electronic gaming, and more particularly, to a bet slider or toolbar usable by players participating in live or online casinos, poker rooms, and the like.

A live casino refers to a typical brick-and-mortar casino that includes various games providing gambling opportunities to visitors. An online casino refers to a virtual casino where participants can join in various games over the Internet. Both types of casinos offer games that allow a player to wager on the potential outcome of a game.

As an example, one type of game that may be played in electronic and non-electronic forms is the game of poker. Poker, which may be played in a variety of ways, has wagering rules that vary from one game variant to the next. A player may prefer to play one type of poker game over another based on the type of poker game or the particular wagering rules.

In live poker, where a player is situated at a table, a player places chips on the table to indicate his wager. On the other hand, in electronic poker, a player uses a toolbar to place wagers. In one example, the tool bar comprises a bet slider that consists of an infinitely variable slider bar (similar to a vertical or horizontal slider bar in a Microsoft window), and an associated text field. A poker player may select a wager in a game of online poker either by entering a numerical value representing the size of the bet directly into the text field, or by dragging a pointer along the slider bar until the desired bet size appears in the text field. The wager may then be confirmed by selecting or clicking on a bet button.

However, while such bet sliders are useful tools that speed up betting in online poker games, there is an ever-present need to improve the simplicity and convenience of bet sliders, particularly as it is not unheard of for experienced poker players to play multiple instances of online poker simultaneously, sometimes as many as four different instances. The number of simultaneous instances of online poker that a player can play is often limited by the complexity and inefficiency of the bet slider used in the game. Thus, an inefficient bet slider can contribute to a type of cognitive overload, causing a player to delegate too much cognitive effort operating the bet slider, and reducing the amount of attention that could be directed to the poker game itself. Adding to this cognitive overload, are the wagering rules that a player has to keep in mind when moving from one-type of poker game to another.

SUMMARY

Disclosed herein are embodiments of a graphical interface that include an adaptable toolbar, referred to, for example, as a “bet slider.” The toolbar may include a slidebar or other type of graphical input, which allows the user to place a wager in an electronic card game such as poker. The toolbar further includes adaptable short-cut tabs positioned on the toolbar, enabling a user to quickly place a wager. The present disclosure is applicable to conventional video poker games, or any single or multiplayer game in which wagers may be placed via a graphical toolbar. Thus, the present disclosure is applicable to land-based electronic gaming machines at a typical live casino, such as video poker machines connected through a network by a central gaming server, or to online gaming at an online casino.

In one aspect of the disclosure, a graphical interface for displaying game data corresponding to an electronic poker game is presented. The graphical interface includes a toolbar having multiple short-cut tabs positioned on the toolbar. Each short-cut tab is configured to responsively adapt to wagering state of the game, so that during the course of the game, a user can easily select a desired wager using a particular short-cut tab. For example, one wagering state may include a pre-flop state: a state where community cards have yet to be played. Another state may include a post-flop state, which corresponds to a time in the game after a community card has been played. In one wagering state, the short-cut tabs may be configured to adapt to a minimum wager value, or a multiple of the minimum wager value. On the other hand, in another wagering state, the short-cut tabs may be configured to adapt to a pot value. For example, the short-cut tabs may present to a user wager values that are a fraction or a percentage of the pot value.

The short-cut tabs may also be user-configurable. For example, the graphical interface may include an input that allows the user to configure the toolbar to his preference.

In another aspect of the disclosure, a method for graphically presenting adaptable wager amounts associated with a poker game is provided. The method includes identifying a wagering state of the game, generating the short-cut tabs based on the identified wagering state, and displaying the short-cut tabs on a toolbar. Possible wagering states, for example, may include pre-flop and post-flop states; where in each state, the short-cut tabs include at least one of, a minimum wager value, a multiple of the minimum wager value, a pot value, or a fraction or a percentage of the pot value. In addition, the short-cut tabs may also be generated according to a user-configuration.

In yet another aspect of the disclosure, a gaming station is provided. The gaming station includes a monitor, a processor, and a memory. The monitor presents to a user a display of game-play corresponding to a poker game. In addition, the display also presents to the user a graphical toolbar that includes multiple short-cut tabs. The memory includes processing instructions that are executable by the processor to adapt the short-cut tabs to a wagering state of the game. The processing instructions, for example, may be included in a client interface program or downloaded game software. The memory may also include process instructions that allow the user to configure the short-cut tabs. In another example, the gaming station may be coupled through a network to a server, where the server sets up or facilitates an on-line game that includes multiple on-line players.

Other aspects of the present disclosure will become apparent from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate, by way of example, certain principles of described embodiments.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating one example of a gaming station coupled to a server through a communication network.

FIG. 2 is an example of a graphical interface display that includes adaptable short-cut tabs.

FIG. 3 is another example of adaptable short-cut tabs.

FIG. 4 is a flowchart depicting one example of a method of graphically displaying adaptable wager amounts.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present disclosure includes a toolbar for selecting a wager in an electronic poker game, where the toolbar includes context-sensitive short-cut tabs. Thus, by adapting to the context, the toolbar may allow users to rapidly determine and select a wager in a poker game. In one scenario, the toolbar may adapt to a wagering state of the poker game. For instance, in one wagering state, the short-cut tabs may be based on a minimum wager value or a multiple of the minimum wager value. On the other hand, at a different state of the game, the short-cut tabs may be based on a pot value or a fraction or a percentage of the pot-value, for example. In an alternative or additional scenario, a user may configure the short-cut tabs so that the tabs conform to the user's preferences.

Referring now to FIG. 1, one example of a gaming station 100 for providing a graphical toolbar to a user is illustrated. The gaming station includes a monitor 101 and a CPU 102. The CPU 102 is coupled to a server 104 through a communication network 106. The CPU 102 may receive user input and transmit the user input through the communication network 106 (such as the Internet) to the server 104 via a wireline or wireless interface, for example. Thus, the gaming station 100 may be an electronic poker game at a live casino, for example, or a personal computer allowing a user to participate in online poker gaming.

In the form of online gaming, the electronic gaming device 102 is a client workstation and the server 106 is a gaming server remote from the electronic gaming device 102, but linked thereto by the communication network 106, such as the Internet. One or more poker games are then executable by selection from a user. Each poker game offered by an online gaming provider includes a server process, which is executable in the gaming server, and a client process, which is executable in the client workstation. The server process, upon request of the client process, generates one or more random events upon which an outcome of the poker game depends. Such random events can correspond, for example, to the deal of a playing card. The number or rules governing how a particular card or series of cards is played may depend on which particular poker game is being played by the user. The client process, on the other hand, presents to the user a simulation of the poker game being played. The client process also enables the player to place wagers on, and to control the progress of, the poker game, and displays to the player the outcome of the game as a function of the random events generated by the server process.

In order to communicate with the gaming server of the online gaming provider, the client workstation operates under control of a client interface program 108. The client interface program 108 may cause the monitor 101 to display to a user a variety of game selection options. The user is then able to select any one of the games that he wishes to play. When selecting a particular game for the first time, the casino client interface program 108 downloads a game software program from the gaming server. The downloaded game software, for example, may be stored in a memory location on a local storage device, such as a hard disk drive. Once downloaded, the user can then install the game software on the CPU 102. Once the client process for a poker game has been downloaded and installed in this manner, the poker game can be played without the necessity for a further download. It should be understood that a variety of poker games may be downloaded, examples of which include Hold'em, Omaha, and 5-card and 7-card Stud.

The game software also includes instructions that direct a processor (not shown) within the CPU 102 to display a game-play environment on the monitor 101. The game play environment may include graphical icons, which represent various users and are commonly referred to as avitars, and a graphical representation of a poker table. While playing a poker game, for example, the table may display graphical icons representative of cards that are in play and/or are in a user's hand. In addition, the client interface program 108 also includes program instructions that direct the processor to display various input tools on the monitor. Such input tools may include a menu bar and a chat window. The menu bar may facilitate game administration and the chat window may allow a user to “chat” with other users and receive various types of game-play feedback from a dealer, for example. A user may use, for example, a mouse, keyboard, or interactive display to interact with such input tools.

In particular, one type of input tool is a graphical toolbar that allows the user to select and place a wager. For example, a bet slider is a type of toolbar that allows a user to select and confirm a wager that he would like to place during a poker game. Using the bet slider, a user may slide a pointer along a slidebar, and correspondingly increase or decrease his wager selection, depending on the direction that the pointer slides. The user may confirm his wager selection by selecting or clicking on a bet button. In addition, a bet slider may also include a text box, which allows a user to manually enter a preferred wager amount.

FIG. 2 shows a display 200 that includes a toolbar 202 for receiving wagers in an electronic poker game. The display 200 may be displayed on the monitor 101. The display 200 may include a variety of graphical elements. For example, the display 200 also shows a table 204, user icons 205-208, a menu bar 210, and a chat window 212. The toolbar 202, as shown, may be referred to as a bet slider, as the toolbar 202 comprises a slider 214 along with a pointer 216. The toolbar 202 also includes a text box 218 for receiving a text input and a bet button 220 for confirming a selected wager amount. Both the pointer 216 and the text box 218 allow a user to enter a particular wager value. For example, a user may use the slidebar 214 to place a wager of 200 poker chips. Or, for more precision, a user may use the text box 218 to place a wager of 203 poker chips. However, both the pointer 216 and the text box 218 cannot be readily used to select a wager that is defined in terms of various wagering factors, such as the size of a pot, a minimum bet, or a maxim bet. For example, the user might want to make a wager that matches about ⅓ of the pot in a poker game. If the user uses the pointer 218 or the text box 220, he will have to make a calculation as to the current size of the pot, and how many chips would constitute a ⅓ of the pot. Unfortunately, such calculation may avert the user's attention away from the game.

Thus, to enable a user to quickly select a wager, without averting his attention, the toolbar 202 includes adaptable short-cut tabs. The short-cut tabs are tailored so that when the user is in a position to select a wager, he can quickly select and then place a desired wager, such as, for example, three times the minimum allowable bet, without having to run through the calculation himself. For example, in FIG. 2, the toolbar 202 presents to the user 4 short cut tabs: MIN, 2×MIN, 3×MIN, and ALL-IN.

As shown, the display 200 indicates that the users 206-208 have each placed a bet of 50 chips, and it is the user 205's turn to wager. In lieu of using the pointer 216 or the text box 218, the user 205 may use the short-cut tabs to place a wager. The short-cut tabs allow the user to select a minimum wager of 50 chips, or alternatively a multiple of the minimum wager or all of the user 205's chips.

Another aspect of the toolbar 202 is that a user may configure the toolbar 202 to be context specific. That is, the toolbar 20 may adapt the short-cut tabs according to a state of the game, such as a wagering state. For example, in FIG. 2, the display 200 reflects a scenario where the users 205-208 are playing a 7-card Stud poker game in which each of the users 205-208 will eventually share a group of community cards on the table 204. As shown in FIG. 2, each of the users 205-208 has two individual cards that remain hidden from the community of users. Each of the users 205-208 may view their respective individual cards, and accordingly place a wager based on their individual cards. Before the community cards are played, this state of the game is commonly referred to as the pre-flop state. During the pre-flop state, for example, a user may prefer to place wagers with respect to the minimum allowable wager. However, after the pre-flop state, the user may prefer to place wagers with respect to the pot-size or the maximum allowable wager, for example.

FIG. 3 shows the display 200 after the pre-flop state, which may be referred to as the post-flop state. The post-flop state may, in turn, be broken into “flop,” “turn,” and “river” wagering sub-states. In the “flop” wagering sub-state, three community cards have been dealt, in the “turn” wagering sub-state, a fourth community card has been dealt, and in the “river” wagering sub-state, all five community cards been dealt. In FIG. 3, the game is in the “flop” sub-state where the first three community cards have been dealt. The same set of short-cut tabs may be used for all post-flop wagering sub-states. Alternatively, the set of short-cut tabs may adapt to game wagering sub-state by causing different sets of short-cut tabs to be used for each game wagering sub-state.

In the scenario of FIG. 3, the toolbar 202 now includes six short cut tabs: MIN, ¼ POT, ⅓ POT, ½ POT, POT, and ALL-IN. The toolbar 202 allows the user 205 to wager directly in terms of the pot-size. So, for example, if the user 205 wants to place a wager that is about 33% of the pot size, he can select, or “click” the short cut tab corresponding to ⅓ POT, and avoid having to calculate how many chips would constitute a third of the pot.

It is to be noted that a particular set of short-cut tabs may adapt to variety of factors within a given poker game, and is not limited to adapting only to the wagering state. For example, in addition to the wagering state, the display of the short-cut tabs may also be a factor of the variant of poker being played, the number of users playing the game, the pot-size relative to a user's chip count, the pot-size relative to another player's chip count, etc. The number of short-cut tabs provided in a particular wagering state may also vary. For example, in FIG. 2, during the pre-flop state, the toolbar 202 includes four short-cut tabs. In FIG. 3, however, the toolbar 202 includes six short-cut tabs.

The number and type of short-cut tabs to display in a specific context or wagering state may be attributed to, for example, a survey of wagering preferences taken from experienced poker players. It should be understood, however, that a variety of other considerations may be used to determine how the short-cut tabs adapt. The following Table 1 shows some example configurations that a designer may assign to the short-cut tabs of a toolbar.

TABLE 1
Game Type: Hold'em
STATE# of TABSTAB 1TAB 2TAB 3TAB 4TAB 5
Pre-flop4Min. Bet2 × Min. Bet3 × Min. BetAll-in
Post-flop5Min. Bet2 × Min. Bet½ Pot½ ofAll-in
High Chip
Count

In Table 1, the short-cut tabs are designed to adapt to a Hold'em based community card poker game. The tabs adapt to a pre-flop and a post-flop wagering state. The pre-flop wagering state is configured to have four short-cut tabs, where TAB 1 represents a minimum bet, TAB 2 and TAB 3 represent multiples of the minimum bet, and TAB 4 represents all-in. The post-flop state has five tabs, where TAB 1 represents a minimum bet, TAB 2 represents a multiple of the minimum bet, TAB 3 represents a fraction or a percentage of a pot value, TAB 4 represents half of the highest player chip count on the table, and TAB 5 represents all-in. It should be understood that the wager state is not limited to including only a pre-flop and a post-flop state. For example in Hold'em, the post-flop state may be broken into “flop,” “turn,” and “river” wagering states.

Besides the above configurations, a toolbar may also adapt to particular wagering rules in a given poker game. Generally speaking, poker games may be divided into three broad classes insofar as wagering is concerned, namely fixed-limit games, pot-limit games and no-limit games. In fixed-limit games, bets or raises are pre-set, but may vary with the round of betting in the game. In pot-limit poker, bets or raises have a maximum. The minimum allowable raise amount must be at least as much as the previous bet or raise in the same round of betting. The maximum allowable raise is the size of the pot, which is defined as the total of all wagers made on the hand plus the amount that a betting user must first call before raising. In no limit poker, bets or raises have no maximum. A player is allowed to raise by any amount he has funds to cover. The minimum allowable raise must be at least as much as the previous bet or raise in the same round, whereas the maximum wager is limited by the balance of the user's chip or credit account. Generally speaking, a toolbar along with the adaptable short-cut tabs are preferably used in pot-limit and no-limit poker games. Thus, short-cut tabs may be further adaptable to the wagering rules of a particular poker game.

Alternatively, a user may be allowed to configure the short-cut tabs on a toolbar at any point before, after, or during a game, which may assist the user in adapting his game-play strategy to a particular poker game and/or to a particular group of poker players. To configure a toolbar, a user may, for example, use a pull-down menu, a separate program window, or a special button that brings toolbar configuration options to the visible focus of the user. FIGS. 2 and 3, for instance, show a TOOLBAR CONFIGURE option in the pull-down menu 210. By customizing a toolbar to display wagering options, a user may optimize his wagering strategy and thus play more effectively.

It is also to be noted that short-cut tabs could be displayed in intelligent manner so as to prevent the display of any tabs that represent wagers which are not feasible. For example, in pot-limit games, the toolbar will not display an all-in short-cut tab when the pot size is less than the balance of a user's credit account. Further, if the user's credit balance is less than the pot size, the client software will display the all-in tab, but not any tab that corresponds to bet sizes greater than the user's credit balance.

In addition, when a short-cut tab is selected, the value of a text field, such as the text box 218 may be updated. Alternatively, the bet button 220 may automatically display the value of the selected wager. Also, after selection of a short-cut tab, the pointer 216 may automatically move to a position correlative with a value of the wager with respect to a user's total chip count.

FIG. 4 is a flowchart depicting one example of a method for graphically presenting adaptable wager amounts in a poker game. Initially, as shown at block 302, configuration data based on a user wagering preference is received. For example, a game designer may program the factors that the toolbar is to adapt to. Alternatively, client software may provide a user with various short-cut configuration options within a pull-down menu. The user may use the pull-down menu to set up and then confirm these options by selecting or clicking an OK button. In either scenario, the configuration data may be received in a memory of the gaming station and stored therein until the poker game is completed.

Next, the short-cut tab configuration data is used to generate the short-cut tabs, shown at block 304. During the short-cut tab generation, the client software may run a routine that establishes a formula or a template within each tab, using for example, variables and constants that relate to a user's chips, a minimum bet, a pot size, etc. At block 306, the short-cut tabs are displayed along with a toolbar, preferably positioned on or adjacent to a toolbar.

Also included in the flowchart is block 308, which corresponds to a determination of a wagering state of the game. If, for example, the wagering state of a poker game changes, the short-cut tabs are updated to reflect a user's desired configuration that is based on the wagering state. Thus, for example, if a community card is first played in a game, the wagering state may change to a post-flop state. However, if the wagering state remains the same, the short-cut tabs may retain the same configuration.

While present embodiments have been described as they relate to a user configuration, it should be understood that the term user may refer in one sense to a “player” that is playing the game. And in another sense, the term user may refer to a program designer or an administrator of a gaming server. For example, the gaming station may receive user configuration data from the gaming server. The user configuration data may be created by an administrator to create default short-cut tabs within a poker game. These default tabs may serve as a template that may be modified or adapted by a player at a later time. For example, an administrator may set up default short-cut tabs and include program instruction relating to these tabs in the downloadable game software. When a player downloads and installs the game software, he may use these generic tabs, or configure the default tabs to his own preferences.

Since many modifications, variations, and changes in detail can be made to the described embodiments, it is intended that all matters in the foregoing description and shown in the accompanying drawings be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense. Further, it is intended to be understood that the following clauses further describe aspects of the present application.

(1). A graphical interface for an electronic poker game, comprising:

a toolbar for selecting a wager; and

a plurality of short-cut tabs positioned on the toolbar, wherein each of the short-cut tabs represents a wager value, and wherein the short-cut tabs responsively adapt to a wagering state of the game.

(2). The interface as in clause (1), wherein the short-cut tabs responsively adapt to a pot value.

(3). The interface as in clause (1) or (2), wherein the short-cut tabs comprise a wager value representative of at least one of a percentage of a pot value and a fraction of the pot value.

(4). The interface as in clause (1), (2), or (3), wherein the short-cut tabs responsively adapt to a multiple of a minimum wager value.

(5). The interface as in clause (1), (2), (3), or (4), wherein the wagering state comprises a pre-flop state and a post-flop state.

(6). The interface as in clause (5), wherein in the pre-flop state, the short-cut tabs comprise a short-cut tab representative of a minimum wager value and a short-cut tab representative of a multiple of the minimum wager value.

(7.) The interface as in clause (6), wherein the short-cut tab representative of the multiple of the minimum wager value comprises an integer multiple of the minimum wager value.

(8). The interface as in clause (5), (6), or (7) wherein in the post-flop state, the short-cut tabs comprise a short-cut tab representative of a fraction of a pot value.

(9). The interface as in clause (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (7), or (8), wherein the user-configured tabs responsively adapt to at least one of a number of players in a game and a player's chip count.

(10). The interface as in clause (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (7), (8), or (9), wherein the short-cut tabs are user-configured.

(11). A method for graphically presenting selectable wager amounts associated with a poker game that provides a toolbar to a user for selecting wagers, the method comprising:

identifying a wagering state associated with the game;

generating the short-cut tabs based on the identified wagering state; and

displaying the plurality of short-cut tabs on the toolbar.

(12). The method as in clause (11), wherein the short-cut tabs are user-configured.

(13). The method as in clause (11) or (12), wherein the identified wagering state is selected from the group consisting of a pre-flop state and a post-flop state.

(14). The method as in clause (11), (12), or (13), further comprising:

generating a short-cut tab associated with a minimum wager value; and

generating a short-cut tab associated with a multiple of the minimum wager value.

(15). The method as in clause (14), wherein the short-cut tab associated with a minimum wager value comprises an integer multiple of the minimum wager value.

(16). The method as in clause (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), further comprising generating a short-cut tab associated with a fraction of a pot value.

(17). The method as in clause (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), or (16), further comprising generating a short-cut tab associated with at least one of a number of players in a game and a player's chip count.

(18). A gaming station comprising:

a monitor that presents to a user a display of game-play corresponding to a poker game, wherein the display further includes a graphical toolbar for selecting a wager, and wherein the toolbar comprises a plurality of short-cut tabs each of which represent a wager value;

a processor; and

a memory comprising processing instructions executable by the processor to adapt the short-cut tabs to a wagering state of the game

(19). The station as in clause (18), wherein the short-cut tabs are user-configured.

(20). The station as in clause (18) or (19), wherein the wagering state comprises at least one of a pre-flop state and a post-flop state.

(21). The station as in clause (20), wherein the short-cut tabs in the pre-flop state include a minimum wager value and a multiple of the minimum wager value, and wherein the short-cut tabs in the post-flop state include at least one of a percentage of a pot value and a fraction of the pot value

(22). The station as in clause (18), (19), (20), or (21), wherein gaming server is coupled to a server via a communication network.

Various embodiments have been described. Those skilled in the art will understand, however, that changes and modifications may be made to the embodiments described without departing from the true scope and spirit of the present invention, which is defined by the following claims.