Title:
VARIABLE FLOORPLAN SHELTERS FOR PREVIOUSLY UNBUILDABLE TYPES OF LAND
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An innovative variable floorplan shelter for previously unbuildable types of land that allows the freedom to change the sizes and/or the shapes and/or the number of rooms within the shelter utilizing movable walls that offer choice of transparent, translucent or opaque walls for a variety of privacy levels. The innovative new shelter has an enhanced speed of construction based upon mass produced, modular components with over 80% of the components being relatively lightweight allowing the carrying and assembly of components by hand by unskilled labor in a reduced period of time. The new shelter offers the innovative function of being able to add or subtract floor space and/or change the overall shape of that floor space at any time. The new shelter has an option of including a floor/ceiling/utility modular system of pie shaped hollow boxes that connect to the central pole and join with other floor/ceiling/utility modules to form a radial horizontal planes supported at the outer perimeter by the radialy spaced support cables or tension members. Each floor/ceiling/utility module contains a wide range of built in utilities such as water plumbing pipes with water supply valves with fire suppression pipes with fire suppression nozzles, supply ventilation ducts with supply ventilation vents, return ventilation ducts with return ventilation vents, data wiring conduit and data connectors, electrical power conduit with electrical power outlets, flush mounted lighting, female edge connectors and male edge connectors. The variable floorplan shelter for previously unbuildable types of land provides an inexpensive alternative to conventional shelters by creating a system of construction that requires little or no grading, sight leveling, retaining walls or concrete ground pad for reduced cost of building. The first installed major component of the new shelter serves multifunctions as a crane, the main structural element, a multiple component connector, a conduit, a drain, an elevator, a ladder and as a tent post for attachment of a lot sized protective fabric tent for indoor construction. Because the floors and ceilings are flat parallel planes with the main structural supports near the center of each floor, 360 degree view houses are now possible with the option for full privacy on demand. The new shelter has the option for an innovative partial vacuum insulation technology that allows low transfer of heat, cold and sound inside the shelter between rooms and outside the shelter providing weather insulation. The new shelter also makes an efficient, passive heating and cooling system available to reduce heating and cooling utility costs. The new shelter utilizes an infinitely variable wall positioning system that allows the outside walls of the shelter to be moved inward from the edges of the floors and ceilings to create outdoor balconies of any size and/or shape, as well as the ability to reposition interior walls for changing interior space needs.



Inventors:
Sorensen, Bradford Tyler (Manhattan Beach, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/532261
Publication Date:
03/20/2008
Filing Date:
09/15/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04H6/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
HERRING, BRENT W
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BRADFORD T. SORENSEN (MANHATTAN BEACH, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A shelter comprised of a single or a plurality of stiff substantially vertical compression columns rigidly cemented into holes drilled into the bedrock underlying the soil with a plurality of radial cables connected to the top of the stiff vertical compression column/s with the other ends of the cables connected to the outer end of radial compression and bending resistant members of equal or varying length to form a substantially conical radial pattern of cables supporting the ends of the radial compression and bending resistant members perpendicular to the stiff vertical compression column/s and level in relationship to gravity to form a flat radial floor/ceiling plane with additional substantially equal length cables hanging from the outer end of each radial compression and bending resistant member to form a circular array of hanging cables connected to the ends of a second array of radial compression and bending resistant members emanating from a point equidistant down the stiff vertical compression column/s from the first flat radial floor/ceiling plane by the substantially same distance as length of the hanging cables to form a second, of multiple, flat radial floor/ceiling plane/s which results in a set of at least two floor/ceiling planes which are parallel and self supporting to form a framework for the attachment of substantially flat, horizontal, stiff material to the radial compression and bending resistant members to define floor and ceiling surfaces between which a plurality of demountable vertical wall panels may be moved, positioned and removably attached to the floor, ceiling and to other movable vertical panels to form an infinitely variable floor plan shelter.

2. A shelter comprised of a single or a plurality of stiff substantially vertical compression column/s rigidly cemented into holes drilled into the bedrock underlying the soil with a plurality of radial cables connected to the top of the stiff vertical compression column/s with the other ends of the cables connected to the outer ends of modular, interconnected, pie shaped, floor/ceiling units comprised of hollow, tapered, boxes of stiff material containing plumbing, electrical, communications, ventilation and sensor utilities forming a radial array of horizontal modules defining the top horizontal plane with additional substantially equal length cables hanging from the outer end of each radial joist to form a circular array of hanging cables connected to the ends of a second array of said modular, pie shaped, floor/ceiling units connected radially from a point equidistant down the stiff vertical compression column/s from the first flat radial floor/ceiling plane by the substantially same distance as length of the said hanging cables to form, a second of multiple, flat radial floor/ceiling plane/s which results in a set of at least two floor/ceiling planes which are parallel and self supporting to define floor and ceiling surfaces between which a plurality of demountable vertical wall panels may be moved, positioned and removably attached to the floor, ceiling and to other movable vertical panels to form an infinitely variable floor plan shelter.

3. A shelter comprised of demountable, vertical wall panels perpendicular to substantially flat horizontal floor and ceiling planes which are both covered with a hook and loop carpet material into which rows of hooks on the intersecting surfaces of the said vertical wall panels and said hook and loop carpet material on the floor and ceiling planes removably engage to provide a demountable, infinitely variable movement and reattachment of vertical wall panels anywhere between the floor and the ceiling.

4. A shelter comprised of substantially flat floor and ceiling planes with a plurality of vertical wall panels with tooth and hook and loop attachment means that removably attach to provide a demountable infinitely variable movement and reattachment of vertical wall panels anywhere between the said floor and the ceiling.

5. The variable floorplan shelter of claim 1 wherein the plurality of movable vertical panels are comprised of transparent, translucent or opaque wall panels for a variety of privacy levels.

6. The variable floorplan shelter of claim 1 wherein enhanced speed of construction is gained by utilizing mass produced, modular components with a majority of components being relatively lightweight allowing the carrying and assembly of components by hand by unskilled labor in a reduced period of time.

7. The variable floorplan shelter of claim 1 wherein there is provision for an inexpensive alternative to conventional shelters by creating a system of construction that requires little or no grading, sight leveling, retaining walls or concrete ground pad for reduced cost of building.

8. The variable floorplan shelter of claim 1 wherein a single component may serve as a crane, the main structural element of the shelter, a multiple component connector, a conduit, a drain, an elevator, a ladder and as a tent post for attachment of a lot sized protective fabric tent for indoor construction.

9. The variable floorplan shelter of claim 1 wherein a 360 degree view from inside the shelter looking out is facilitated by the use of flat horizontal ceiling and floor surfaces extending from the main structural supports near the center of each floor with thin cables widely spaced apart around the perimeter of each floor resulting in a virtually unobstructed view.

10. The variable floorplan shelter of claim 1 wherein the said moveable vertical panels removably attached to the floor and ceiling includes a plurality of glass panels sealed spaced apart within a frame that has an area of lowered atmospheric pressure between the glass panels which reduces the number of air molecules to transfer heat or cold or sound across the partial vacuum which allows low transfer of heat, cold and sound inside the shelter between rooms and between the inside and outside the shelter providing weather and sound insulation.

11. The variable floorplan shelter of claim 1 wherein an efficient, passive heating and cooling system comprising an attic greenhouse for gathering solar energy and storing such energy in ceramic collectors can be vented throughout the shelter providing heating and an underground conduit having heat sink walls can cool an incoming suction of air into the shelter caused by venting the hot air in the greenhouse out of a roof mounted vent causing a chimney suction convection to reduce heating and cooling utility costs.

12. The variable floorplan shelter of claim 1 wherein an infinitely variable wall positioning system that allows the outside walls of the shelter to be moved inward from the edges of the floors and ceilings to create outdoor balconies of any size and/or shape, as well as the ability to reposition interior walls for changing interior space needs exists.

13. The variable floorplan shelter of claim 1 wherein an infinitely variable floor and ceiling expansion and reduction system that allows the shape and size of the floor and ceiling area planes to be altered to reflect changing floor and ceiling space needs exists. From inside the shelter is now possible with the option for full privacy on demand because the floors and ceilings are flat parallel planes with the main structural supports near the center of each floor.

14. The variable floorplan shelter of claim 1 wherein partial vacuum insulation allows low transfer of heat, cold and sound inside the shelter between rooms and outside the shelter providing weather insulation.

15. The variable floorplan shelter of claim 1 wherein a solar passive heating and underground heat sink cooling system reduce heating and cooling utility costs.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to improvements in the design of shelters which introduce the ability to freely alter the shapes, sizes and number of rooms as well as the overall shape of a floorplan of the shelter to create an infinitely variable floorplan shelter. More specifically the goal of this invention is to create a shelter that can freely change to meet the demands of changing needs over an extended time period. The variable floorplan shelter is designed to be practical, inexpensive and efficient when constructed on the type of land previously considered unbuildable.

Land previously considered unbuildable includes, but is not limited to, very steep hillside locations and/or beach locations and/or building in the ocean and/or building in lakes and/or building on beaches and/or building bridging streams and/or building on eroding hillsides and/or building in wetlands and/or building in sand and/or building on steep solid rock and/or building above other structures using minimal ground contact between other structures and/or building over cliffs and/or building bridging valleys and/or building near earthquake faults and/or building in mud slide areas and/or building in areas where grading or sight leveling are expensive and/or impractical and/or building in extremes of temperature and weather conditions

Shelters in use today are generally planned in advance for the use intended and are built with the overall size of the structure and the layout of the floorplan of the structure being fixed or difficult to efficiently and inexpensively change.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION FUNCTION

Modern lifestyles involve rapidly changing situations and variable shelter needs. The present, “Variable Floorplan Shelters for Previously Unbuildable Types of Land,” invention satisfies the need for quick, inexpensive or free, shelter floorplan changes reflecting changing situations. The present invention provides parallel floor and ceiling planes between which movable perpendicular panels removably attach at their intersections to form and define movable walls attached to and/or sealed to the floor and/or to the ceiling and/or to other movable walls to form an infinitely variable floor plan allowing one shelter to have many different numbers of rooms, sizes of rooms, shapes of rooms and variable overall size and shape of the perimeter of the shelter. An example would be a shelter that houses a family of four people with three bedrooms that also has a need to have a party for 300 people in the shelter and also has the need to have room for 4 extra people to have their own bedrooms after the party. The example shelter would start with a three bedroom floorplan with a kitchen, living room, den, garage, library on rolling shelves, closets on rollers, furniture on rollers, and movable wall panels defining these spaces. The need for having a party for 300 people in the example shelter would be accomplished by detaching the movable wall panels from the floor and the ceiling and moving some of them to the outside perimeter of the shelter floor and ceiling and reattaching them there to define the largest interior space possible to contain the large number of party guests within the shelter. Since most of the interior walls have been moved to the perimeter of the shelter, the rolling furniture, rolling book shelves, rolling closets and other rolling items can be rolled into the garage space and enclosed by other movable wall panels resulting in a single large relatively empty space containing an open kitchen for the maximum amount of space for the large number of guests at the party to stand. Furniture may be rolled out of the garage area to accommodate guest's needs at will. At the end of the example party, when all but the remaining 4 guests leave, the movable walls could be moved inward to form 6 small bedrooms for a total of 7 people to spend the night in. In the morning after all guests have left, the original 3 bedroom shelter layout could be restored.

Typically, steep hillside locations, by their very nature, have excellent views over the surrounding lower areas; however, building on a steep hillside is inherently difficult because of the tendency of the typical shelter placed on the hillside to slide down the hillside. In the past, expensive and time consuming grading and leveling of the hillside land or the building of retaining walls to make it possible to support the weight of a shelter and stop it from sliding down the hillside was undertaken. The present invention makes the process of supporting an infinitely variable floorplan shelter on a steep hillside just as easy as building the present invention on flat land.

REFERENCES CITED
UNITED STATES PATENTS
3953943May 1976O'Sheeran 52/82
4649947March 1987Tury, et al.135/97
4802500February 1998Davis, et al.135/97
5544461August 1996Sommerstein 52/235
5992109November 1999Jonker 52/238

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART

U.S. Pat. No. 5,992,109 to Jonker November 1999 discloses a floor to ceiling demountable wall which utilizes a fastener less connector bar. It is part of a partition wall enclosure system for use in temporary office cubicle construction of individual workspaces.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,544,461 to Sommerstein August 1996 discloses a panel mounting system utilizing hook shaped panel connectors.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,802,500 to Davis, et al. February 1998 discloses a portable collapsible building system of modular construction.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,649,947 to Tury, et al. March 1987 discloses an expandable soft sided shelter resembling a tent with stakes and cross braces.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,953,943 to O'Sheeran May 1976 discloses a prefabricated modular building structure utilizing geometric shapes to create dome structures.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION

The first object of the present invention, generally stated, is the creation of an improved shelter featuring an innovative infinitely variable floorplan that allows the freedom to change the sizes and/or the shapes and/or the number of rooms within the shelter utilizing movable walls that offer choice of transparent, translucent or opaque walls for a variety of privacy levels.

A second object of the present invention is the enhanced speed of construction based upon mass produced, modular components with over 80% of the components being relatively lightweight allowing the carrying and assembly of components by hand by unskilled labor in a reduced period of time.

A third object of the present invention is the function of being able to add or subtract floor space and/or change the overall shape of that floor space at any time.

A fourth object of the present invention is the provision for an inexpensive alternative to conventional shelters by creating a system of construction that requires little or no grading, sight leveling, retaining walls or concrete ground pad for reduced cost of building.

A fifth object of the present invention is the use of a single component that serves multifunctions as a crane, the main structural element of the shelter, a multiple component connector, a conduit, a drain, an elevator, a ladder and as a tent post for attachment of a lot sized protective fabric tent for indoor construction.

A sixth object of the present invention is that a 360 degree view from inside the shelter is now possible with the option for full privacy on demand because the floors and ceilings are flat parallel planes with the main structural supports near the center of each floor. This configuration places only thin cables, spaced relatively far apart, providing the structural support for the structure which leaves huge open relatively unobstructed, floor to ceiling views around the entire perimeter of the structure. Hand rails and gates or clear panels may be added between the cables for the safety of the children and other inhabitants of the structure. Decorative panels may be added to the cables and/or the floor/ceiling/utility modules to create exterior design themes such as, Colonial, Mediterranean, Tudor, Ranch, Scandinavian or other housing design themes.

An additional object of the present invention is the option for an innovative insulation technology allows low transfer of heat, cold and sound inside the shelter between rooms and outside the shelter providing weather insulation.

An additional object of the present invention is an efficient, passive heating and cooling system available to reduce heating and cooling utility costs.

An additional object of the present invention is the infinitely variable wall positioning system that allows the outside walls of the shelter to be moved inward from the edges of the floors and ceilings to create outdoor balconies of any size and/or shape, as well as the ability to reposition interior walls for changing interior space needs.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 is a section view which illustrates one embodiment of the shelter invention in a partially constructed condition located on a steep hillside lot of land.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view which illustrates one embodiment of the shelter invention located on a steep hillside lot of land.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view which illustrates one embodiment of the shelter invention located on a steep hillside lot of land.

FIG. 4 is a perspective bottom view which illustrates a 34 floor/ceiling/utility module which is a single pie shaped component of the radially bisected floors as depicted in one embodiment of the shelter invention.

FIG. 5 is a perspective top view which illustrates a 34 floor/ceiling/utility module which is a single pie shaped component of the radially bisected floors as depicted in one embodiment of the shelter invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 is a section view which illustrates one embodiment of the shelter invention in a partially constructed condition located on a steep hillside lot of land. The 2 shelter consists of a plurality of 1 vertical poles cemented into 3 holes drilled through the soil overlying the bedrock with a plurality of 6 cables or other tension members connected at the upper end to the 1 vertical pole or poles with a 4 cable hook at the 8 top cable anchor points and at the lower end to the 10 compression beam cable anchor points on the 12 compression beams this causes the 6 cables or other tension members to form a conical and or radial array. Additional 7 cables or other tension members extend vertically from floor to floor from 12 compression beams to 16 joist beams creating a 14 vertical cable or other tension member support system for a plurality of floors supported by the 16 joist beams. Each of the 16 joist beams are connected to the 1 vertical poles at one end and to the 14 vertical cables or other tension members along the length of the 16 joist beams or at the other end of the 16 joist beams at the 18 joist beam cable anchor points. Planar 20 floor surfaces and 22 ceiling surfaces are added to the 12 compression beams and to the 16 joist beams. This construction method and components result in an open floor plan shelter structure with a central 1 vertical pole and relatively very thin perimeter 7 vertical cables or other tension members supporting the planar 20 floor surfaces and the planar 22 ceiling surfaces at a consistent distance apart. This consistent distance apart allows the infinitely variable placement of 24 movable window walls anywhere on the floorplan for instant changes of room placement, size and layout at a whim. The 24 movable window walls have 26 lockable connectors that allow the 24 movable window walls to be disconnected from the 20 floor surfaces and 22 ceiling surfaces for movement to desired new locations where they can be removably locked into the 20 floor surfaces and 22 ceiling surfaces to result in an instant, inexpensive, convenient shelter floorplan change. After passing from the top of the 1 pole through the 12 compression beams to 16 joist beams, the 9 cables or other tension members are tied back into the base of the 1 pole at the 25 bottom intersection of the pole and the 28 pole reinforcement collar which strengthens the pole at the point where the 30 ground level and the 32 bedrock meet the pole. This intersection of cables, pole, reinforcement and the bedrock provide a proper support and stiffness for the resistance of the structure to high winds or earthquakes while keeping the relatively light weight pole above the intersection in compression directly in line with its length. The 23 utilities such as water heater and heater equipment are attached to the 1 vertical pole.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view which illustrates one embodiment of the shelter invention in a partially constructed condition located on a steep hillside lot of land. The 2 shelter consists of a plurality of 1 vertical pole/s cemented into 3 holes drilled through the soil overlying the bedrock with a plurality of 6 cables or other tension members connected at the upper end to the 1 vertical pole or poles with a 4 cable hook at the 8 top cable anchor points and at the lower end to the 10 compression beam cable anchor points on the 12 compression beams this causes the 6 cables or other tension members to form a conical and or radial array. Additional 7 cables or other tension members extend vertically from floor to floor from 12 compression beams to 16 joist beams creating a 14 vertical cable or other tension member support system for a plurality of floors supported by the 16 joist beams. Each of the 16 joist beams are connected to the 1 vertical poles at one end and to the 14 vertical cables or other tension members along the length of the 16 joist beams or at the other end of the 16 joist beams at the 18 joist beam cable anchor points. Planar 20 floor surfaces and 22 ceiling surfaces are added to the 12 compression beams and to the 16 joist beams. This construction method and components result in an open floor plan shelter structure with a central 1 vertical pole and relatively very thin perimeter 7 vertical cables or other tension members supporting the planar 20 floor surfaces and the planar 22 ceiling surfaces at a consistent distance apart. This consistent distance apart allows the infinitely variable placement of 24 movable window walls anywhere on the floorplan for instant changes of room placement, size and layout at a whim. The 24 movable window walls have 26 lockable connectors that allow the 24 movable window walls to be disconnected from the 20 floor surfaces and 22 ceiling surfaces for movement to desired new locations where they can be removably locked into the 20 floor surfaces and 22 ceiling surfaces to result in an instant, inexpensive, convenient shelter floorplan change. After passing from the top of the 1 pole through the 12 compression beams to 16 joist beams, the 9 cables or other tension members are tied back into the base of the 1 pole at the 25 bottom intersection of the pole and the 28 pole reinforcement collar which strengthens the pole at the point where the 30 ground level and the 32 bedrock meet the pole. This intersection of cables, pole, reinforcement and the bedrock provide a proper support and stiffness for the resistance of the structure to high winds or earthquakes while keeping the relatively light weight pole above the intersection in compression directly in line with its length.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view which illustrates one embodiment of the shelter invention in a multiple pole and rectangular configuration. The use of multiple poles makes it possible to form any shape or size of shelter such as circular, rectangular, oval, semi-circular or free-form. The 2 shelter consists of a plurality of 1 vertical pole/s cemented into 3 holes drilled through the soil overlying the bedrock with a plurality of 6 cables or other tension members connected at the upper end to the 1 vertical pole or poles with a 4 cable hook at the 8 top cable anchor points and at the lower end to the 10 compression beam cable anchor points on the 12 compression beams this causes the 6 cables or other tension members to form a conical and or radial array. Additional 7 cables or other tension members extend vertically from floor to floor from 12 compression beams to 16 joist beams creating a 14 vertical cable or other tension member support system for a plurality of floors supported by the 16 joist beams. Each of the 16 joist beams are connected to the 1 vertical poles at one end and to the 14 vertical cables or other tension members along the length of the 16 joist beams or at the other end of the 16 joist beams at the 18 joist beam cable anchor points. Planar 20 floor surfaces and 22 ceiling surfaces are added to the 12 compression beams and to the 16 joist beams. This construction method and components result in an open floor plan shelter structure with a central 1 vertical pole and relatively very thin perimeter 7 vertical cables or other tension members supporting the planar 20 floor surfaces and the planar 22 ceiling surfaces at a consistent distance apart. This consistent distance apart allows the infinitely variable placement of 24 movable window walls anywhere on the floorplan for instant changes of room placement, size and layout at a whim. The 24 movable window walls have 26 lockable connectors that allow the 24 movable window walls to be disconnected from the 20 floor surfaces and 22 ceiling surfaces for movement to desired new locations where they can be removably locked into the 20 floor surfaces and 22 ceiling surfaces to result in an instant, inexpensive, convenient shelter floorplan change. After passing from the top of the 1 pole through the 12 compression beams to 16 joist beams, the 9 cables or other tension members are tied back into the base of the 1 pole at the 25 bottom intersection of the pole.

FIG. 4 is a perspective bottom view which illustrates a preferred embodiment 34 floor/ceiling/utility module which is a pie shaped component of the radially bisected floors as depicted in one embodiment of the shelter invention. This 34 floor/ceiling/utility module contains a wide range of utilities such as 36 water plumbing pipes with 38 water supply valves, 40 fire suppression pipes with 42 fire suppression nozzles, 44 supply ventilation ducts with 46 supply ventilation vents, 48 return ventilation ducts with 50 return ventilation vents, 52 data wiring conduit with 54 data connectors, 56 electrical power conduit with 58 electrical power outlets, 60 flush mounted lighting and 62 pass through utility ports.

FIG. 5 is a perspective top view which illustrates a 34 floor/ceiling/utility module which is a single pie shaped component of the radially bisected floors as depicted in one embodiment of the shelter invention. This 34 floor/ceiling/utility module contains a wide range of utilities such as 36 water plumbing pipes with 38 water supply valves, 40 fire suppression pipes with 42 fire suppression nozzles, 44 supply ventilation ducts with 46 supply ventilation vents, 48 return ventilation ducts with 50 return ventilation vents, 52 data wiring conduit and 54 data connectors, 56 electrical power conduit with 58 electrical power outlets, 60 flush mounted lighting and 62 pass through utility ports.

FIG. 6 is a perspective elevation view which illustrates one embodiment of the shelter invention located on a generally flat lot of land. The 2 shelter consists of a 1 vertical pole with a plurality of 6 cables or other tension members connected at one end to the 4 vertical poles in a conical and or radial array at the 8 top cable anchor points and at the other end to the 10 compression beam cable anchor points on the 12 compression beams. Additional 6 cables or other tension members extend vertically from floor to floor from 12 compression beams to 16 joist beams creating a 14 vertical cable or other tension member support system. Planar 20 floor surfaces and 22 ceiling surfaces are added to the 12 compression beams and to the 16 joist beams. This construction method and components result in an open floor plan shelter structure with a central 1 vertical pole and relatively very thin perimeter 7 cables or other tension members supporting the planar 20 floor surfaces and the planar 22 ceiling surfaces at a consistent distance apart. This consistent distance apart allows the infinitely variable placement of 24 movable window walls anywhere on the floorplan for instant changes of room placement, size and layout at a whim. The 24 movable window walls have 26 lockable connectors that allow the 24 movable window walls to be disconnected from the 20 floor surfaces and 22 ceiling surfaces for movement to desired new locations where they can be removably locked into the 20 floor surfaces and 22 ceiling surfaces to result in an instant, inexpensive, convenient shelter floorplan change. After passing from the top of the 1 pole through the 12 compression beams to 16 joist beams, the 6 cables or other tension members are tied to the ground at the 11 ground connectors. This cemented intersection of cables, into the soil and through to the bedrock below provides a proper support and stiffness for the resistance of the structure to high winds or earthquakes while keeping the relatively light weight pole above the intersection in compression directly in line with its length.

FIG. 7 is a perspective elevation view of 24 movable window walls in an (A) movable orientation, a (B) engaged orientation and a (C) locked orientation. In the (A) movable orientation, the 24 movable window wall is shown with the 26 lockable connectors in an open position allowing the wall to be rolled on the 64 roller casters to any position between the 22 ceiling and the 20 floor. Once the 24 movable window wall is in the desired position, the 66 connector compression screws are rotated causing the 26 lockable connectors on the 24 movable window walls to move the 70 floor and ceiling engagement means into a (B) engaged orientation wherein the 70 floor and ceiling engagement means starts to grab the nap of the carpet and form an opposed jaw biting function setting the teeth of the connector into the hook and loop floor and ceiling carpet. Also in the (B) engaged orientation, the 70 floor and ceiling engagement means contact the floor and lift the 64 caster wheels off the floor and fold them inside the wall for hidden storage. In the (C) locked orientation the 66 connector compression screws are rotated to fully move the 26 lockable connectors to become flush with the 24 movable window walls and to cause the 70 floor and ceiling engagement means to grip the nap of the carpet with an opposed jaw biting function locking the teeth of the connectors into the ceiling and floor carpet. In the (C) locked orientation, wind pressure or physical pushing pressure causes the teeth to bite deeper into the carpet causing a secure connection.