Title:
Software mediated and enabled word game
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A software mediated and enabled word game comprising the steps of turning a plurality of letter tiles upside down with each letter tile having a single letter on one side thereof. The software then randomly determines which player goes first, and each player then draws a single letter tile until each player can form a three letter word composed of a plurality of letters. Points are scored for the first player to form a word. The players then take turns guessing the word that another player has by making a guess of a three letter word with each guess responded to by the answer ‘odd’ or ‘even’ corresponding to either an odd or even number of correct letters guessed respectively. Points are scored for the player who correctly guessed the word.



Inventors:
Daniel, David D. (Paicines, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/520071
Publication Date:
03/13/2008
Filing Date:
09/13/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/292
International Classes:
A63F1/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
PIERCE, WILLIAM M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
JEFFREY HALL (SANTA CRUZ, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A software mediated and enabled game methodology for use on a computer, hand-held device, game console or the like, comprising the steps of: using software to digitally illustrate a plurality of letter tiles upside down; randomly determining which player goes first, and each player then selecting a single letter tile until each player can form a word composed of a plurality of letters; and taking turns guessing said word that another player has by making a guess of a word with each guess responded to by the answer ‘odd’ or ‘even’ corresponding to either an odd or even number of correct letters guessed respectively.

2. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 1, wherein said guessing is first initiated by said player who first formed a word followed in turn by the player positioned to the players left.

3. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 1, wherein said word formed from a plurality of letters is a three letter word.

4. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 1, wherein said word formed from a plurality of letters is a four letter word.

5. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 1, wherein said word formed from a plurality of letters is a five letter word.

6. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 1, wherein said word formed from a plurality of letters is a six letter word.

7. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 1, wherein said word formed from a plurality of letters is a seven letter word.

8. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 1, wherein said players keep records and scores by marking a score pad.

9. The game of claim 1, further including the step of continuing play after a player has correctly guessed said word with a next round of play wherein a word is formed that is one letter longer than said word in the prior round of play.

10. A software mediated and enabled game playing method, comprising the steps of: using software means to digitally illustrate a plurality of letter tiles turned upside down, each letter tile having a single letter on one side thereof; randomly determining which player goes first, and each player then drawing a single letter tile until each player can form a three letter word composed of a plurality of letters; taking turns guessing said word that another player has by making a guess of a three letter word with each guess responded to by the answer ‘odd’ or ‘even’ corresponding to either an odd or even number of correct letters guessed respectively; continuing play after a player has correctly guessed said word with a next round of play wherein a word is formed that is one letter longer than said word in the prior round of play, and scoring points for the player who correctly guessed the word.

11. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 10, wherein said guessing is first initiated by said player who first formed a word followed in turn by the player positioned to the players left.

12. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 10, wherein said word formed from a plurality of letters is a four letter word.

13. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 10, wherein said word formed from a plurality of letters is a five letter word.

14. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 10, wherein said word formed from a plurality of letters is a six letter word.

15. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 10, wherein said word formed from a plurality of letters is a seven letter word.

16. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 10, wherein said game is played on a computer.

17. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 10, wherein said game is played on a game console.

18. The software mediated and enabled game of claim 10, wherein said game is played on a hand-held device.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of Invention

This invention relates to games, and more particularly to a software mediated and enabled game for play on a computer, game console, handheld device, or the like, where the object of the game is to guess your opponent's word and score the most points.

2. Description of the Related Art

Heretofore a wide variety of word games have been proposed and implemented for entertainment, diversion, fun and educational purposes. The present invention is a software mediated and enabled word game for play on a computer, game console, handheld device or the like, and is related to the word game disclosed by the present inventor in U.S. Pat. No. 6,422,562. The object of the game is to guess your opponent's word or computer generated word and score the most points. The game is entertaining, fun, and educational, and may be played by children, adolescents, and/or adults.

The present invention provides a novel software mediated game methodology where, after each player enters their name the order of play is randomly decided by the game software. Each player takes turns drawing tiles to form a three letter word. The game software then automatically arranges the letters into a three letter word, or other length word as determined during game set-up. Points are scored for being the first to form a word. Once each player has a three letter word, guessing begins. The player who has had a word formed first by the game software starts the guessing phase. Each player takes turns in trying to guess their opponent's word. This is done by making a guess of a three letter word to the other player. For two or more players your opponent is randomly selected by the game software. For one player, the opponent is the computer or other programmable device. Each guess is responded to by your opponent with the answer of ‘odd’ or ‘even’. ‘Odd’ means that one or three letters match. ‘Even’ means that zero or two letters match. Letters preferably must match exactly and be in the same position. The game software keeps track of the guesses of the players. With each turn players use their previous results to make better guesses until someone guesses their opponents word. An opponent does not have to admit that the word has been guessed until the player asks “Is that the word?”. This preferably takes place on the same turn. At that time the opponent must answer “yes” or “no”. However, if the word has not been guessed, the player making the guess will lose a turn, or points will be lost depending on the version of play. Once a word has been guessed, this ends the round. The player that guessed the word will be awarded points. All other players score zero. Play then continues in the next round as before but with the exception that everyone draws letter tiles until a four letter word can be formed. The winner of the first round goes first. Again, the player who forms their word first will be awarded points. This player also preferably makes the first guess in this new round. Players continue all the way up to seven letters or until game is called. At that time the player with the most points is the winner.

Accordingly, it is the primary object of this invention to provide a novel and unique software mediated and enabled word guessing game which is entertaining, fun, and educational. It is a further object of this invention to provide a game which may be played and enjoyed by both children, adolescents, and adults.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will be set forth in the description which follows, and in part will be obvious from the description, or may be learned by practice of the invention. The objects and advantages of the invention may be realized and obtained by means of the instrumentalities and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a software mediated and enabled word game comprising the steps of using software to digitally illustrate a plurality of letter tiles upside down or otherwise covering the letter side of the tiles on a computer screen, hand held device, game console, or any other device capable of operating the software. Each letter tile has a single letter on one side thereof. The game software automatically and randomly chooses which player goes first, and each player then draws a single letter tile until each player can form a three letter word. The players then take turns guessing the word that another player has by making a guess of a three letter word with each guess responded to by the answer ‘odd’ or ‘even’ corresponding to either an odd or even number of correct letters guessed respectively. Points are scored for the player who correctly guessed the word. The play may continue with increasing lengths of words up to seven letters in length.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated in and constitute a part of the specification, illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention and, together with a general description given above and the detailed description of the preferred embodiment given below, serve to explain the principles of the invention.

FIG. 1 is a flow chart showing the preferred software mediated and enabled game methodology, according to the invention.

FIG. 2 is a flow chart of another embodiment of the software mediated and enabled word game methodology, according to the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Reference will now be made in detail to the present preferred embodiments of the invention as illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

In accordance with the present invention, there is provided a software mediated and enabled word game for entertainment, fun and educational purposes, comprising the steps of using software to digitally illustrate turning a plurality of letter tiles upside down with each letter tile having a single letter on one side thereof, randomly determining which player goes first, and each player then selects a single letter tile until each player can form a three letter word. The players then take turns guessing the word that another player has by making a guess of a three letter word with each guess responded to by the answer ‘odd’ or ‘even’ corresponding to either an odd or even number of correct letters guessed respectively. Points are scored for the player who correctly guessed the word. The play may continue with longer words for each subsequent round up to seven, or play may be stopped at any time.

The game is preferably played by two or more players of any age, but is well suited for those 8 years of age and above. The object of the game of this invention is to guess your opponent's word and score the most points. The game may be played using game CD's DVD, or other software medium which may be utilized on any computer, game console, computer with dual screens, hand held device or any other hardware capable of handling the particular software medium.

Preferably the CD, DVD or other software medium is placed into the computer, game console, or other device capable of operating the software. Alternately, the game software may be downloaded from a web site.

As seen in FIG. 1, the present invention provides a novel software mediated game methodology where, after each player enters their name the order of play is randomly decided by the game software. The game software digitally illustrates turning a plurality of letter tiles upside down, 10, or simply having the tiles appear face down initially in game play. By face down or upside down it is meant that the face of the tile with a letter thereon is shown so that the letter cannot be seen. Each player takes turns drawing tiles to form a three letter word 12. The game software then automatically arranges the letters into a three letter word, or other length word as determined during game set-up. If desired, a letter bracket may be used for the players to hold and position their letter tiles. Points are scored for being the first to form a word. Once each player has a three letter word, guessing begins. The player who has had a word formed first by the game software starts the guessing phase. Each player takes turns in trying to guess 14, their opponent's word. This is done by making a guess of a three letter word to you opponent. For two or more players your opponent is randomly selected by the game software. For one player, the opponent is the computer or other programmable device. Each guess is responded to by your opponent with the answer of ‘odd’ or ‘even’. ‘Odd’ means that one or three letters match. “Even” means that zero or two letters match. Letters preferably must match exactly and be in the same position. The game software keeps track of the guesses of the players. With each turn players use their previous results to make better guesses until someone guesses their opponents word. An opponent does not have to admit that the word has been guessed until the player asks ‘Is that the word?’. This preferably takes place on the same turn. At that time the opponent must answer ‘yes’ or ‘no’. However, if the word has not been guessed, the player making the guess will lose a turn, or points will be lost depending on the version of play. Once a word has been guessed, this ends the round as points are scored 16. The player that guessed the word will be awarded points. All other players score zero.

As seen in FIG. 2, play may continue in the next round as before but with the exception that everyone draws letter tiles until a four letter word can be formed 15. The winner of the first round goes first. Again, the player who forms their word first will be awarded points. This player also preferably makes the first guess in this new round. Players continue all the way up to seven letter or until game is called. At that time the player with the most points is the winner.

Preferably, for playing the game the tiles shown on screen of a computer, game console, hand held device or the like comprise a plurality of tiles each of which has a letter of the alphabet shown thereon. The tiles are preferably lettered in proportion to their use in the English language. Of course, if the game is to be provided in other languages, such as Spanish, German, or Japanese, for example, the number of a particular lettered tile would correspond to use of that particular letter in the subject language. Preferably, each tile is shown as an approximately one inch by one inch size, however, variations in both size, dimensions, and configurations are contemplated. For example, the tiles may be digitally illustrated as round, rectangular, oval, or any other geometric configuration.

In FIG. 2, a flow chart of another embodiment of the software mediated and enabled game playing method is shown comprising the steps of using software means to digitally illustrate turning a plurality of letter tiles upside down, 10, each letter tile having a single letter on one side thereof. The software then randomly determines which player goes first 12, and each player then draws a single letter tile until each player can form a three letter word composed of a plurality of letters. Preferably, points are scored for being the first player to form a word. Each player then takes turns guessing the word that another player has by making a guess of a three letter word with each guess responded to by the answer ‘odd’ or ‘even’ corresponding to either an odd or even number of correct letters guessed respectively 14. In this embodiment, the play continues after a player has correctly guessed the word with the next round of play wherein a word is formed that is one letter longer than the word in the prior round of play, 15, and then points are scored 16, for the player who correctly guessed the word.

Preferably, scoring 15, is done by awarding points for two phases of the game. The first phase is the draw. For example, 5 points may be awarded the first player to form a word. The second phase is the guessing phase. Preferably, points are awarded in a reverse graduated scale. The scale may start, for example, at 25 and drops with the number of guesses made. However, the points available never goes to zero. For example, if a player should guess an opponents word on the first guess, that player would be awarded the maximum of 25 points. The minimum points awarded no matter how many guesses are needed, could for example be set at 5 points. Of course different point schedules may vary on the set up options chosen, and may be adjusted according to the difficulty of the level achieved. Preferably, during the guessing phase a set number of points, for example 5, are also deducted, depending on the version of play, if a player should ask ‘Is that the word?’ and receive the answer ‘no’. A score pad may be shown for marking and keeping scores and records

The game may be played with three letter words every round if desired. Or, it may be played with as few as two letter words, or as many letters as the players choose. The game may be played without a penalty of a lost turn or lost points if desired, and different point scaling may be used if desired. The game software may, in some embodiments, be allowed to control selected parts of the game, such as scoring, time permitted per player turn, length of word, and the like.

An example of game play once the players begin to play would be, if a player's opponent has the word ‘car’. The player then guesses a word say, ‘bat’. The player's opponent would then answer with the response ‘odd’. Since one letter is the same and in exactly the same location, and one is an odd number, then the correct reply is ‘odd’. Using the same word as before, ‘car’, suppose the guess is made of ‘bar’. Now two letters are the same and in exactly the same location. Now, the response would be ‘even’, since two is an even number.

The game methodology may be made available using any number of game making softwares. For example, these might include but are not limited to such game making software as Macromedia's Director, Macromedia's Flash, Macromedia's Dreamweaver, Adobe's Premiere Pro, and the like. Additionally, the game may be created from scratch using any number of computer languages. These include but are not limited to, such languages as Basic, C, C2, and the like. It may also be made available in a any number of formats which will make it available for play at a website or between players over the Internet.

As is evident from the above description, herein and additional advantages and modifications will readily occur to those skilled in the art. The invention in its broader aspects is, therefore, not limited to the specific details, representative apparatus and illustrative examples shown and described. Accordingly, departures from such details may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the applicant's general inventive concept