Title:
Golf stretching apparatus and method
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An exercise apparatus provides a golf stretching exercise which includes trunk rotation exercise, chest expansion exercise, lower body stretch exercise, golf swing simulation exercise, hamstring and calf muscle exercise and latisimus muscle exercise thereby reducing the risk of injury to the user as a result of the golf game. The exercise apparatus is mounted in a support frame which is portable and which includes an umbrella.



Inventors:
Schwartz, Stanley (New York, NY, US)
Kovant, Ari (Port Washington, NY, US)
Duffie, John (Media, PA, US)
Brown, Mark (Oyster Bay, NY, US)
Application Number:
11/711566
Publication Date:
03/06/2008
Filing Date:
02/27/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/142
International Classes:
A63B21/22
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LONG, ROBERT FRANKLIN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BERNARD MALINA, ESQ. (New York, NY, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A golf stretching apparatus comprising a support frame and trunk rotation exercise means with said trunk rotation exercise means mounted on said support frame.

2. A golf stretching apparatus as claimed in claim 1 wherein said trunk rotation exercise means comprises: a member, with said support member mounted on said frame; a seat, with said seat mounted on said support member; arm rest means, with said arm rest means rotationally mounted on said support member and connected to said seat for rotation in a horizontal plane relative to said support member.

3. A golf stretching apparatus as claimed in claim 1 wherein said arm rest means comprises: a pair of elongated, spaced apart arm rest portions, each having a first end portion and a second end portion, and a connecting portion with said connecting portion connecting said first end portions of said arm rest portions, with said connecting portion rotationally mounted on said support member.

4. A golf stretching apparatus as claimed in claim 1 further comprising a pair of handle portions mounted, one each, on said second ends of said arm rest portions.

5. A golf stretching apparatus as claimed in claim 3 wherein said rotational mounting of said connecting portion is in generally vertical alignment with said seat.

6. A method of performing a trunk rotation exercise comprising the steps of: sitting on a seat; grasping, one with each hand, a pair of handles rotationally mounted on a frame for rotation in a generally horizontal plane; rotating the trunk in a first direction while grasping said handles and maintaining the arms and hands in a generally horizontal plane; rotating the trunk in a second direction while grasping said handles and maintaining the arms in a generally horizontal plane; placing the forearms one above the other on a bar which is pivotally mounted for rotation in a generally vertical plane with the left elbow first rotated in a generally downward direction than in a generally upward direction followed by the right elbow rotated in a generally downward direction than in a generally upward direction; standing proximate to a rotationally mounted bar having a left end and a right end and grasping the left end of the bar with the right hand and simultaneously grasping the right end of the bar with the right hand; rotating the right hand in a vertically downward direction while rotating the left hand in a generally upward direction, and then rotating the right hand in a generally upward direction while rotating the left hand in a generally downward direction; standing between a pair of vertical bars with each bar mounted on a frame for rotation in a generally horizontal plane; grasping said vertical bars, one each, with the hands, and rotating said vertical bars by maintaining said grasp and simultaneously rotating said bars in opposite rotational directions outwardly relative to the torso and inwardly relative to the torso; and pushing in a downward direction on a handle connected by a cable to a bar; resting a user's foot on said bar whereby continued downward force on said handle raises said bar thereby raising said user's foot and stretching the hamstring muscles.

7. A golf stretching apparatus comprising: a support frame; trunk rotation exercise means disposed on said support frame; latisimus and oblique muscle stretching means disposed on said support frame; hamstring and calf muscle stretching means disposed on said support frame; chest expansion exercise means disposed on said support frame; horizontal bar exercise means disposed on said support frame; and golf swing exercise means disposed on said support frame.

8. A method for performing a golf stretching exercise comprising the steps of: sitting on a seat; grasping, one with each hand, a pair of handles rotationally mounted on a frame for rotation in a generally horizontal plane; rotating the trunk in a first direction while grasping said handles and maintaining the arms and hands in a generally horizontal plane; rotating the trunk in a second direction while grasping said handles and maintaining the arms in a generally horizontal plane; placing the forearms one above the other on a bar which is pivotally mounted for rotation in a generally vertical plane with the left elbow first rotated in a generally downward direction than in a generally upward direction followed by the right elbow rotated in a generally downward direction than in a generally upward direction; standing proximate to a rotationally mounted bar having a left end and a right end and grasping the left end of the bar with the right hand and simultaneously grasping the right end of the bar with the right hand; rotating the right hand in a vertically downward direction while rotating the left hand in a generally upward direction, and then rotating the right hand in a generally upward direction while rotating the left hand in a generally downward direction; standing between a pair of vertical bars with each bar mounted on a frame for rotation in a generally horizontal plane; grasping said vertical bars, one each, with the hands, and rotating said vertical bars by maintaining said grasp and simultaneously rotating said bars in opposite rotational directions outwardly relative to the torso and inwardly relative to the torso; and pushing in a downward direction on a handle connected by a cable to a bar; resting a user's foot on said bar whereby continued downward force on said handle raises said bar thereby raising said user's foot and stretching the hamstring muscles.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCES

Benefit is claimed from Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/840,964, filed Aug. 30, 2006.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed generally to the field of exercise apparatus and more particularly, to a golf stretching apparatus.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

While golf is generally considered to be a low-level physical activity without the possibility of injury, according to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, there is a potential risk of golfers suffering serious injuries to the elbow, spine, knee, hip or wrist while golfing. The United States Consumer Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System estimates there were 38,038 golf-related injuries in 2003. As a result, there is continued interest in the use of exercise equipment to provide training and thereby reduce the incidence of injury.

The prior art related to exercise equipment includes the following U.S. and foreign patents.

U.S. Patent Application No. 2004/0009853A1 to Smith for a Device for Performing Leg and Foot Stretching Exercises shows a vertical support having handles at its upper portion and a plurality of leg support members which are adjustably mounted on the vertical support. The leg support members enable a user to perform leg and foot stretching exercises while holding onto the handles.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,967,610 to Lin for a Chair With Swivel Seat and Backrest shows a chair having arm rests with the chair mounted on wheels. The outer ends of the arm rest include handles which can be grasped by a user to rotate his or her torso relative to the floor.

U.S. Patent Application Publication No. U.S. 2005/0065064A1 to Liso et al. shows an Exerciser Having Rotatable Seat Device shows a pair of foot supports which are rotatably mounted on a base and a seat which is also rotatably mounted on the base. The foot supports are connected to the seat via cables to enable a user seated on the seat to perform rotation of the user's hips by direct leg action.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,537,184 B2 to King for a Swing Exerciser shows a device which includes a handle and a flexible cord which moves a resistance trolley in a generally vertical track. The device is intended to allow a user to swing the handle and overcome the resistance of the trolley to strengthen muscles associated with hitting a golf ball.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,261,868 to Pryer, Jr., et al., for an Exercise Device, shows an apparatus which includes a horizontal seat rest and a support member which can be gripped either by the user's hands or legs. The apparatus also includes a back support which is movable between a first vertical position and a second position forming an acute angle with the vertical.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,565,002 to Rawls, et al. for an Exercise Apparatus shows a device for performing Kyak paddling exercises. The device includes a seat and a Kyak paddle-like handle which is connected to a series of vertically mounted weights. The weights and a brake provide selected resistance to movement of the paddle-like handle.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,050,871 to Douglas, et al., for an Energy Absorbing, Exercising and Training Machine shows a device which includes a pair of vertical members which support a horizontally mounted flywheel. The flywheel is rigidly connected to a harness and a user positioned in the harness transmits his or her motion to the flywheel thereby encountering the resistance to motion caused by the inertia of the flywheel.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,803,876 to Hickman for a Kyak Exercise Simulator shows a device which includes a seat and a pivotally mounted rod. The rod may be grasped by a user to perform generally circular motions simulating paddling a Kyak.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,013,013 to Wolf for a Golf Exerciser, shows a device which includes a base and an axial shaft coupled to the base. The axial shaft includes a resistance device which opposes the motion of a user during the simulation of a golf swing.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,682,465 B2 to Hawthorne, for a Swing Training and Exercising Apparatus, shows a device which includes a swing arm which is attached to a resistance device. The swing arm enables a user to simulate a golf swing while being subjected to resisting forces.

U.S. Patent Publication No. 2005/0014571A1 to Varner for an Exercise and Golf, Baseball and Other Sport Training Apparatus, shows a device which includes a base platform, a vertical support, and a rotating swing arm. The rotating swing arm is connected to a grip and to a resistance device. The user can grasp the swing arm and perform a simulated golf swing by rotating the swing arm against the force of the resistance device.

U.S. Design Pat. No. D254,143, to deBock, for a Physical Exerciser, shows a device which includes a vertical framework which is directed to vertical stretching of the user's body.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,579,214 B2 to Crump, for a Golfing Exercise Machine, shows a device which includes a vertical frame which supports a series of pulleys and cables. The cables are connected to a stack of weights and the resistance caused by the lifting of the weights is transferred by the cables to a hand-held bar for performing golf swing related exercises.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,558,502 B2 to Cluff, for a Muscle Training and Development Device, shows an apparatus which includes rods which are connected to one or more stretchable tubes. An attachment device connects the stretchable tube to a stationary object that provides resistance and support. The degree of resistance may be altered by varying the quantity of stretchable tubes.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,640,525, to Proctor, for a Frictional Resistant-Type Exercise Machine with Waist Level-Mounted Oscillatable Handgrips, shows an apparatus in which a vertical member supports a resistance element and a handlebar which can be moved from a normally horizontal position to a tilted position in order to perform oscillating motion type of exercise.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,726,608 B1 to Hsu for a Swingable Exercise Device shows a base which supports a seat and a vertical rod. The vertical rod includes a swinging unit on which a C-shaped handle is mounted. When force is applied to the swinging unit resistance is encountered thereby providing a swinging type of exercise.

German Patent No. DE 3718643A1 to Danisch, for a Training Device shows an apparatus in which a user places his/her foot in a vertical frame which includes a resistance element. As the user's foot is lifted, resistance is encountered thereby providing a training exercise.

Despite the developments of the prior art, there still remains a need for an effective apparatus for performing specific stretching exercises related to golf. In particular, the prior art exercise machines are designed to build muscle strength and train muscles to improve the user's golf game but are not designed to stretch specific muscles for the purpose of avoiding injury resulting from the golf game.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The primary object of the present invention is to provide a golf stretching apparatus which is capable of stretching, prior to golfing, specific muscles used while golfing thereby reducing the risk of injury to the user as a result of the golf game.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a golf stretching apparatus which provides effective trunk rotation exercise.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an effective chest expansion exercise.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an effective lower back stretch exercise.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a golf swing simulation.

Another object of the present invention is to provide hamstring and calf muscle exercise.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an effective latisimus and oblique muscle exercise.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a golf stretching apparatus which is portable.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a golf stretching apparatus which provides protection from the sun or rain.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a golf stretching apparatus which is capable of reliable long-term operation.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a golf stretching apparatus which provides a method for accomplishing an effective stretching exercise for the game of golf.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a golf stretching apparatus which has individual exercise stations for the exercise of specific muscle groups.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a golf stretching apparatus which comprises a relatively small number of component parts each of which can be manufactured economically resulting in a relatively low overall cost.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages of the present invention will appear more clearly hereinafter.

In accordance with the present invention, there is provided a golf stretching apparatus containing equipment designed to stretch different muscles used while golfing.

The first area of the apparatus provides trunk rotation exercise. The equipment in the first area consists of a stationary seat and rotating horseshoe apparatus which is grasped and rotated by the user from side to side.

The trunk rotation exercise is designed to create differential (i.e., differing degrees of rotation) between the axes of the hips and shoulders. Upper and lower abdominal muscles, rhomboid and latisimus muscles, upper legs and hips are all stretched.

The trunk rotation exercise also allows golfers to make a full and fluid backswing, getting their backs turned away from the target, while their hips undergo a minimum of rotation. This action is the primary source of power in a golf swing, and allows players to deliver the clubhead down the target line for an effective golf swing.

The second area of the apparatus provides chest expansion and lower body stretch exercise. The equipment in the second area consists of an extended base at ground level, the vertical handles that rotate freely, and the horizontal bars across the frame. The user stands with his back facing the machine, grasps the vertical handles, and simultaneously rotates both handles. The vertical handles are designed to “open up” the chest thereby promoting good athletic posture and combating “golfer's hunchback.” The exercise also helps to allow for effective rotation, back and through, and to retain proper posture throughout the golf swing.

The golfer can also attain an effective lower body stretch by standing and facing the apparatus and placing his leg on the horizontal bars on this side to effectively stretch the gluteus maximus, quadriceps, and groin muscles.

The apparatus also has a swing-simulating component. A golf club grip which is suspended from an elastic band is gripped and pulled by the golfer thereby stretching the latisimus muscles on both sides of the body. The benefits derived are a fuller turn back and turn through during the swing, more fluid action with an easier tempo, and ultimately, more power and greater distance.

The third area of the apparatus provides a hamstring and calf exercise. The third area includes a pull-down cable with a foot hammock at the end and stationary foot pedals that assists with maximum calf stretch.

The golfer places his foot in the foot hammock and pulls down on the pull-down cable, thereby raising his leg. The exercise is intended to provide a maximum stretch to the hamstring muscles of both legs. In addition to promoting spinal health by relieving pressure on the lower back, this allows golfers to retain an athletic flexion and balance in the lower body while the upper body turns back and through during the golf swing. This leads directly to the proper sequencing of the forward golf swing, thereby reducing the risk of injury as a result of the golf game.

The fourth area provides latisimus and oblique stretching exercise. The equipment in the fourth area consists of a free-spinning turnkey apparatus shaped like a vertical “T-bar” that has hand holds on either side. The golfer grasps the hand holds on each side of the “T-bar” and rotates it from side to side.

This exercise is designed to promote length and full extension in the thick muscles of the trunk and torso. Additionally, the shoulders, upper arms, forearms and hands get an excellent stretch.

These ranges of motion promote a fluid swing with an easier rhythm, maximum swing arc, as well as creating the maximum available “lag” in the pre-impact position.

The various portions of the apparatus in combination provide an effective stretching of the various muscles used in golf including upper and lower abdominal muscles, rhomboid and latisimus muscles, upper leg muscles, hip muscles, chest muscles, lower body muscles, oblique muscles, trunk muscles, shoulder muscles, upper arm muscles and hand muscles.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Other important objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an overall perspective view of a golf stretching apparatus made according to the present invention with selected items removed for clarity of illustration;

FIG. 2 is a front fragmentary elevation view taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary top plan view taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side elevation view partially in section taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary plan view taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary elevation view partially in section taken along the line 6-6 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary schematic view of the apparatus taken generally along the line 7-7 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary perspective view taken along the line 8-8 of FIG. 1 showing the trunk rotation assembly in use with a user shown in broken lines;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary perspective view taken along the line 8-8 of FIG. 1 similar to FIG. 8-8 showing the assembly in use;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary perspective view similar to FIGS. 8 and 9 showing the assembly in use;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary elevation view taken generally along the line 6-6 of FIG. 1 showing the chest expansion exercise assembly in use;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary perspective view taken along the line 12-12 of FIG. 1 showing the horizontal bars of the apparatus in use;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary perspective view similar to FIG. 13 showing the apparatus in use;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary perspective view taken along the line 14-14 of FIG. 1 showing the apparatus in use;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary perspective view similar to FIG. 14 showing the apparatus in use;

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary perspective view similar to FIG. 14 showing the apparatus in use and showing an alternate exercise position;

FIG. 17 is a fragmentary perspective view similar to FIG. 16 showing the apparatus in use;

FIG. 18 is a fragmentary perspective view similar to FIG. 16 showing the apparatus in continued use;

FIG. 19 is a fragmentary perspective view of the hamstring and calf muscle exercise assembly of FIG. 7 in use;

FIG. 20 is a fragmentary perspective view similar to FIG. 19 showing the apparatus in use; and

FIG. 21 is a fragmentary perspective view of the apparatus in use during a golf swing exercise.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

With reference to the drawings, there is shown in FIG. 1 a golf stretching apparatus 10 made in accordance with the present invention which includes a support frame 12.

The support frame 12 includes a base 14 which includes a pair of spaced apart generally parallel base members 16, 18 which are connected by an end transverse member 20 and an intermediate transverse member 22.

A pair of angularly disposed members 24, 26 project from the member 18. The angularly disposed members 24, 26 converge forming the general configuration of a truncated triangle. The outer ends 28, 30 of the angular disposed members 24, 26 are connected by a plate 32.

Wheels 34, 36 are mounted on the ends 38, 40 of the base members 16, 18 to facilitate transportation of the apparatus 10.

In accordance with the present invention, the following exercise assemblies are mounted on the support frame 12 as will be described presently:

A trunk rotation exercise assembly 100, a chest expansion exercise assembly 200, a lower body exercise assembly 300, a golf swing simulation assembly 400, a hamstring and calf muscle exerciser assembly 500, and a latisimus and oblique muscle stretching assembly 600.

The trunk rotation exercise assembly 100 includes a vertical shaft 102 which projects upwardly from the plate 31. As is best shown in FIG. 2, a support collar 104 is mounted on the shaft 102 and the position of the support collar 104 on the shaft 102 is secured by a set screw 106. A pivot sleeve 108 is rotatably mounted on the shaft 102 with the pivot sleeve 108 resting on the support collar 104. A generally circular seat 110 is centrally mounted on the upper end 112 of the vertical shaft 102.

A horizontal member 114 projects from the pivot sleeve 109 and the end 116 of the horizontal member 114 is connected to a vertical member 118. The upper end 120 of the vertical member 118 is connected to a generally U-shaped or horseshoe-shaped member 120. The ends 122, 124 of the arm rest portions 126, 128 of the U-shaped member 120 include vertical handles 130, 132.

The U-shaped member 120 rotates about the vertical shaft 102 and the axis of rotation of the U-shaped member 120 is in general alignment with the vertical shaft 102 and the seat 110 thereby providing a key feature of the trunk rotation exercise assembly 100.

As shown in FIGS. 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, rotation of the trunk rotation assembly 100 in the directions shown by the arrows 136, 138 in FIG. 3 creates differential or differing degrees of rotation between the axes of the hips and shoulders of the user. The upper and lower abdominal muscles, rhomboid and latisimus muscles are stretched. In addition, the upper legs and hips are also stretched. This allows golfers to achieve a full and fluid backswing with the golfers getting their back turned away from the target while their hips remain quiet with a minimum of rotation. This mode of rotation is the primary source of power in a golf swing and allows a golfer to move the clubhead down along the target line for an effective golf swing.

The angular members 24, 26 allow the user's feet to rest on the ground in a convenient manner while using the apparatus 10.

FIGS. 2, 3, 8, 9 and 10 show the process for using the trunk rotation assembly 100 which includes the steps of:

    • sitting on the seat 110;
    • grasping the handles 130, 132, one with each hand; and
    • rotating the user's trunk while grasping the handles 130, 132 thereby maintaining the user's arms and hands in a horizontal plane and rotating the user's trunk about an imaginary axis which lies along the vertical shaft 102 and which passes generally through the center of the seat 110.

The apparatus 10 includes the chest expansion exercise assembly 200 and a lower body stretch exercise 300 assembly. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 6, the chest expansion exercise assembly 200 includes a pair or vertical handles 202, 204 which are rotationally mounted one each on shafts 206, 208 which are connected to the vertical members 42, 44. As is best shown in FIG. 6, the handles 202, 204 are of extended length and have horizontal end portions 210, 212, 214, 216 which are connected to the vertical sleeves 218, 220 which are mounted on the shafts 206, 208. The shafts 206, 208 are connected to the vertical members by plates 222, 224, 226, 228.

FIG. 11 shows the process for using the chest expansion exercise assembly 200 which includes the steps of:

    • grasping the vertical handles 202, 204 with the hands and rotating the handles 202, 204 outwardly in the direction shown by the arrows 230, 232 in FIG. 112 and then rotating the handles 202, 204 inwardly in the directions shown by the arrows 234, 236 in FIG. 11.

The apparatus 20 also includes a pair of generally parallel horizontal bars 302, 304 which are connected between the vertical members 42, 44 and which form part of the lower body stretch apparatus 300. The base member portions 306, 308 extend beyond the vertical members 42, 44 and together with the transverse member 20 serve to define an area 312 in which the user places his or her feet when using the assembly 300.

FIGS. 12, 13 show the use of the lower body stretch apparatus 300. The user grasps the horizontal bar 302 and performs the lower body stretch.

The golf swing exercise assembly 400 is best shown in FIGS. 1 and 21 and includes a handle 402 which simulates the grip portion of a conventional golf club. The upper end 404 of the handle 402 is connected to a filament 406 which in turn is connected to a tension spring 408. The spring is connected to the support frame 12 via the member 54. The golf swing exercise assembly 400 enables a user to simulate the action of a golf swing without the need for an actual golf club.

As shown in FIGS. 1, 7, 19 and 20 and shown substantially in FIG. 2, the hamstring and calf muscle exercise assembly 500 includes a horizontal handle 504 which includes vertical portions 506, 508. The ends 510, 512 of the vertical portions 506, 508 are connected to bearings 514, 516 each of which rides on a pair of first vertical shafts 518, 520. The first vertical shafts 518, 520 project upwardly from member 16 of the support frame 12.

A second pair of vertical shafts 522, 524 is provided with the second pair of vertical shafts 522, 524 disposed proximate one each to the first vertical shaft 518, 520. Bearings 526, 528 ride, one each, on the shafts 522, 524 and are connected to and portions 530, 532 of the bar 534 which functions as a foot hammock foot rest in a manner which will be presently described.

The bearings 526, 528 are connected to cables 544, 546. The cables 544, 546 run over pulleys 552, 554 and have ends 556, 558 connected to the bearings 514, 516 respectively. The pulleys 552, 554 are supported by support members 560, 562. Pushing downwardly on the handle 504 causes the cables 544, 546 to lift the bar 534. Pushing downwardly on the bar 534 lifts the handle 504.

The downward direction is indicated by the arrow 564 in FIG. 7 while the upward direction is indicated by the arrow 566.

The process for stretching the hamstring muscles is shown in FIGS. 19 and 20 and includes the steps of:

    • pushing downwardly on the handle 504 while one foot is supported by the bar 534 with downward force on the handle 504 lifting the bar 534 and thereby stretching the hamstring muscles;
    • lowering the foot thereby raising the handle 504; and
    • repeating the above steps with the other foot supported by the bar 534.

As is shown in FIGS. 19 and 20 during use, the apparatus 500 provides a maximum stretch for the hamstring muscles of both legs in addition to promoting spinal health of the user by relieving pressure on the lower back thereby allowing golfers to retain an athletic flexion and balance in the lower body while the golfer's upper body turns back and through the golf swing. The apparatus 10 thus results in the proper sequencing of the forward golf swing.

As shown in FIGS. 1, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18, the latisimus and oblique muscle stretching exercise assembly 600 is mounted on a transverse member 604 which is connected to vertical members 46 and 48. The assembly 600 includes a vertical shaft 606 which is adjustably mounted in housing 608. The vertical position of the shaft 606 relative to the housing 608 may be adjusted using the setscrew 610. The upper end 612 of the shaft 606 is connected to the horizontal tube 614. A horizontal shaft 618 is rotationally mounted in the tube 614 and is retained by collars 620, 622. An elongated handle 624 is connected to the end 626 of the horizontal shaft 618. Block 626 forms a part of the connection between the housing 608 and the transverse member 604.

As shown in FIGS. 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, the apparatus 600 promotes length and full extension in the relatively thick muscles of the user's trunk and torso which include the latisimus, rhomboid, upper and lower oblique abdominal and spinal erector muscles. In addition, the apparatus 600 provides an effective stretch for the shoulders, upper arms, forearms and hands.

The apparatus 600 thus improves the user's range of motion and promotes a fluid golf swing with an easier rhythm with maximum swing arc as well as creating the maximum available lag in the pre-impact position.

FIGS. 1 and 15 show a process for using the apparatus 600 which includes the steps of:

    • standing proximate to the rotationally mounted elongated handle 624;
    • grasping the first end 636 of the handle 624 with the right hand;
    • grasping the second end 638 of the handle 624 with the right hand; and
    • rotating the handle 624 first in the directions shown by the arrows 620 and then in the direction shown by the arrows 642.

FIGS. 16, 17 and 18 show another process for using the apparatus 600 which includes the steps of:

    • placing the user's forearms one above the other on the rotationally mounted elongated handle 624; and
    • rotating the handle 624 first in the direction shown by the arrows 628, 630 and then in the directions shown by the arrows 632, 634 as is shown in FIG. 16.

The various portions of the apparatus in combination provide an effective stretching of the various muscles used in golf including upper and lower abdominal muscles, rhomboid and latismus muscles, upper leg muscles, hip muscles, chest muscles, lower body muscles, oblique muscles, trunk muscles, shoulder muscles, upper arm muscles and hand muscles.

The foregoing specific embodiment of the present invention as set forth in the specification herein is for illustrative purposes only. Various deviations and modifications may be made within the spirit and scope of this invention, without departing from a main theme thereof.