Title:
ROTARY SCRUB BRUSH
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A non-abrasive rotary scrub brush for cleaning rough or porous surfaces that are susceptible to damage by the use of abrasive or chemical cleaning, such as the non-skid surfaces of boats. The scrub brush consists of a flexible, circular base and a plurality of bristle tufts that are individually attached, extending from the base. The base is flexible and non-marring. Any number of polymers could be used, including a thermoplastic elastomer, thermoplastic polymer, or thermoset polymer to form the base using injection molding. The base consists generally of a first side(top) and a second side(bottom). The top side having a means to attach a drive unit, the bottom side having the bristle tufts extending from it. The bristle tufts can be made from filaments that are produced from natural or synthetic materials. The bristle tufts are positioned in either a random or ordered pattern on the second side.



Inventors:
Mcconnell, Richard George (Harrison Twp, MI, US)
Application Number:
11/468945
Publication Date:
03/06/2008
Filing Date:
08/31/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A46B7/08
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KARLS, SHAY LYNN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
RICHARD G. MCCONNELL (HARRISON TWP, MI, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A non-abrasive rotary scrub brush to assist with cleaning surfaces, such as, but not limited to, the non-skid finishes of boats, without causing damage to said surface, comprising: a generally circular base having a top side and a bottom side, the top side being generally flat, or gently curved, the bottom side being generally flat, providing the mounting surface for the bristle tufts.

2. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the base is molded from, or coated with, a non-marring material such as thermoplastic elastomer, or other material that provides similar properties, to avoid damage to adjacent surfaces during use.

3. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the base has a diameter from 2.0 to 10.0 inches (5.08 to 25.4 cm).

4. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the base has a means to attach said brush to a drive device on the top side.

5. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the base has bristle tufts attached to and extending from the bottom side.

6. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the base has bristle tufts attached to and extending from the bottom side and outside edge.

7. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the bristle tufts are inserted into said base after said base is molded.

8. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the bristle tufts are attached by mechanical means, adhesive, or friction.

9. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the bristle tufts are inserted into the mold of said base and are enjoined during the molding process.

10. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the bristle tuft filaments are straight.

11. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the bristle tuft filaments are crimped.

12. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the bristle tuft filaments have a random or patterned shape formed into them.

13. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the filaments are made from a plastic or polymer material, metal, wood, or a natural fiber, or from a combination thereof.

14. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the bristle filaments have a density of approximately 225 to 3225 filaments per in2 (35 to 500 filaments per cm2).

15. The rotary scrub brush of claim 1 wherein the bristle tufts are arraigned in a random or patterned order.

Description:
This Application is for a provisional Utility Patent

This invention was created without any Federally sponsored research or development funding.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The dilemma of cleaning surfaces such as non-skid on boats has been around for many years. Grime, encrusted dirt, and oxidation have always been a challenge for boat owners. Some chemical cleaners have been developed to solve this problem, but they may be hazardous to work with, have an undesirable affect on adjacent surfaces, or may be harmful to the environment. Many types of scrub brushes have been manufactured, both hand held and pole mounted, that can be used to clean boats. While some of these brushes may accomplish the cleaning of non-skid, the amount of physical effort required often prohibits their use on large areas. There are some industrial grade rotary brushes available, but they are either too large, abrasive, or do not have a high enough bristle filament density to effect a thorough cleaning.

One example of such a brush is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,698,057, “Scrub brush with integral handle,” (Varga et al.) In Varga et al., a pole-mounted brush is disclosed.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,081,958, “Scrub brush having knuckle protector” (Van Staagen), discloses a scrub brush that is typical of the hand held style of scrub brush available.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,438,728, “Rotary Brush with segmented fiber sections,” (Kubes et al.), discloses a rotary brush assembly, particularly a rotary brush used in conjunction with floor maintenance machines.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,431,971, “Abrasive Brush,” (Nagafuchi et al.), discloses yet another abrasive rotary brush.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,915,436, “Molded Brush,” (Johnson et al.), discloses a rotary brush, particularly the unitary molding of a brush body with its bristles. Also revealed is the inclusion of abrasive particles in the bristles. Also disclosed by Johnson is a bristle density of about 5 to 30 bristles/cm2.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,440,557, “Brush Filaments,” (Naghibi et al.), discloses brush filaments in a variety of shapes and designs that can be incorporated into a brush to improve performance.

It is seen that there is a need to provide scrub brush that is capable of cleaning large areas, can be attached to a portable drive unit, has a dense bristle filament count, and has a backing that does not mar fiberglass, gelcoat, or other adjacent surfaces.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention entails a scrub brush that includes a base, a means to attach the brush to a portable drive unit on the top, and a plurality of bristle filaments extending down from the bottom, or the bottom and edge. In one embodiment, the top side of the base has a threaded hole, or threaded insert, to attach to a drive unit. In another embodiment the top side has a threaded stud. In yet another embodiment, the top side may be generally flat and attached to the drive unit using a “hook and loop” type fastener.

One aspect of the present invention is a base that is either made out of, or covered with a material that will not mar adjacent surfaces.

Another aspect of the present invention is the use of pre-manufactured bristle filaments.

Another aspect of the present invention is that the bristle filaments are arraigned in tufts that contain multiple filaments.

Another aspect of the present invention, the bristle tufts are inserted into a previously molded base. The attachment means of the bristle tufts to the base is either mechanical (i.e. staples), adhesives (i.e. glue), or friction.

Another aspect of the present invention the previously made bristle tufts are inserted into the base mold before the base unit is created, thus creating a “molded in” bristle tuft.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a bottom perspective view of the rotary scrub brush.

FIG. 2 is a top perspective of the first embodiment of the rotary scrub brush.

FIG. 3 is a side elevation view of the base in the preferred embodiment.

FIG. 4 is a side elevation view of the base in another embodiment.

FIG. 5 is a side elevation view of the base in yet another embodiment.

FIG. 6 is a bottom elevation of the base showing one pattern of bristle tuft mounting holes.

FIG. 7 is a bottom elevation of the rotary scrub brush after the bristle tufts have been inserted.

FIG. 8 is a side sectional view of the bristle tufts and mounting holes in the preferred embodiment.

FIG. 9 is a side sectional view of the bristle tufts and mounting holes in another embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF INVENTION

As previously described, the present invention is a rotary scrub brush, which is generally denoted in the drawings as 11. Scrub brush 11 includes a base 12, and bristle filaments 13, extending from the base 12 as shown in FIG. 1.

The Base:

It is preferred that base 12 have a diameter of between 5.08 to 25.4 cm (2.0 to 10.0 inches), different sizes may be produced for different needs.

The base 12 should be molded from a material that is pliable and non-marring, preferably a type of thermoplastic elastomer using injection molding. A person knowledgeable in the art will be able to better determine the appropriate material.

The base 12 will have a means to attach the scrub brush 11 to a drive unit on the top side as shown in FIG. 2. In the preferred embodiment base 12 would have a threaded hole 14, as shown in FIG. 3. This threaded hole 14 could be achieved by means of a molded in insert. In another embodiment, base 12 would have a threaded post 15 as shown in FIG. 4. In yet another embodiment base 12 would have a generally flat top 16 to allow the use of a “hook and loop” type of fastener as shown in FIG. 5.

In the preferred embodiment the bottom side of the base 12 will have guide holes 17, as shown in FIG. 6 and FIG. 8., to accommodate the bristle tufts 18. In another embodiment the guide holes 17 may extend up the sides of base 12 as shown in FIG. 9. The guide holes may be arranged in a random or patterned order. The guide holes 17 may be drilled after base 12 is molded, or an injection mold might contain the guide holes 17.

The Bristles:

The bottom side of base 12 will have bristle filaments 13 extending from it as shown in FIG. 1. The bristle filaments will be arranged into bristle tufts 18. The bristle tufts 18 are inserted into guide holes 17 in the bottom side of base 12 to form the working surface as shown in FIG. 7. The density of the bristle filaments 13 should be 35 to 500 filaments per cm2 (225 to 3225 filaments per in2). The bristle filaments 13 can be made from a plastic or polymer material, metal, wood, or a natural fiber, or from a combination thereof, a person knowledgeable in the art could determine the best material for a specific application. The bristle filaments 13 may be straight, crimped, or one of many designs that are available from sources such as DuPont as revealed in U.S. Pat. No. 6,440,557. The length of bristle tufts 18 can vary depending on the performance of the scrub brush desired. The bristle tufts 18 may be attached to the base 12 by mechanical means such as a staple, using some type of adhesive, or by using a small pilot hole 17 and letting friction hold the bristle tuft 18 in place.

The present invention has now been described with reference to several embodiments thereof. The foregoing detailed descriptions and examples have been given for the clarity of understanding only. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that changes can be made in the embodiments described without departing from the scope of the invention