Title:
Wound suction peg apparatus
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An apparatus is provided for placement in a wound to treat and promote healing of the wound by suctioning unwanted fluids and debris from the wound. The apparatus includes a suction head peg made of multi-fibered material that is softenable in the human body by body fluids. A membrane and cuff are included for attachment to the body, and a suction tube is in operable communication with the suction head peg and a suction pump to provide suction at the suction head peg. While the stiffened peg is capable of insertion into the body, it is designed to soften in fluid such as the body fluids with which the peg comes into contact after insertion into the wound or abscess. This softening allows the peg to change shape and conform to the shrinking wound or abscess cavity as material is suctioned therefrom.



Inventors:
Watson, Richard L. (McPherson, KS, US)
Application Number:
11/807631
Publication Date:
02/07/2008
Filing Date:
05/30/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A61M27/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20060041230Over-the needle peel-away sheath catheter introducerFebruary, 2006Davis
20060247581Threaded rod and nut assemblyNovember, 2006Pedersen et al.
20040078018Body conforming absorbent garment and methods for the use and manufacture thereofApril, 2004Gompel et al.
20100030149BREAST MARKERFebruary, 2010Carr Jr.
20090192438Use of Iontophoresis or Electrotherapy and Ultrasound to Deliver Melanin for Skin RejuvenationJuly, 2009Jones
20080234610FACIAL WETTING APPARATUSSeptember, 2008Summers
20060047269Urethral sealing method and deviceMarch, 2006Reever et al.
20070287964HYPODERMIC NEEDLE TIP PROTECTORDecember, 2007Asbaghi et al.
20080275395MRI-Compatible Temperature-Sensing CatheterNovember, 2008Asbury et al.
20090093785Environmental DetectorApril, 2009Brown et al.
20090163871TIP SHIELD WITH GRIPPING SURFACES AND GUARD FEATURESJune, 2009Burkholz et al.



Primary Examiner:
ANDERSON, CATHARINE L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KINETIC CONCEPTS, INC. (Troy, MI, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A wound suction apparatus for suctioning fluid and debris from a wound cavity, the apparatus comprising: a suction tip comprised of a fibrous material having sufficient stiffness to penetrate tissue covering the wound cavity and susceptible to softening in the presence of fluid; and a cuff enclosing the suction tip within the wound cavity; and a suction line in fluid communication with the fibrous suction tip.

2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the suction tip has a peg shape having a longitudinal axis along which is disposed a channel.

3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein the suction tip further comprises a plurality of apertures in fluid communication with the channel.

4. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising: a channel disposed along a longitudinal axis of the suction tip; a pump; and wherein the suction line includes a first end connected to the pump and a second end connected to the channel.

5. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein the suction tip further comprises a plurality of apertures in fluid communication with the channel.

6. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising: a channel disposed along a longitudinal axis of the suction tip; a vacuum pump; and wherein the suction line includes a first end connected to the vacuum pump and a second end connected to the channel.

7. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising: a flange covering the cuff; a connector attached to the flange; a pump; and a suction line having a first end connected to the vacuum pump and a second end connected to the connector.

8. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the fibrous material has sufficient stiffness due to the presence of a stiffening agent, the stiffening agent adapted to soften in the presence of fluid.

9. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the fibrous material has sufficient stiffness due to the presence of a stiffening agent, the stiffening agent adapted to dissolve in the presence of fluid.

10. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the fibrous material has sufficient stiffness due to the presence of a starch.

11. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the fibrous material has sufficient stiffness due to the presence of a complex carbohydrate.

12. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the fibrous material has sufficient stiffness due to the presence of a gelatin.

13. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the fibrous material is comprised of silicone fibers.

14. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the fibrous material is comprised of Teflon fibers.

15. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the fibrous material is comprised of plastic fibers.

16. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising: a stiffening agent applied to the fibrous material, the stiffening agent adapted to soften in the presence of fluid; a channel disposed along a longitudinal axis of the suction tip; a pump; and wherein the suction line includes a first end connected to the pump and a second end connected to the channel.

17. The apparatus of claim 1, further comprising: a stiffening agent applied to the fibrous material, the stiffening agent adapted to soften in the presence of fluid; a channel disposed along a longitudinal axis of the suction tip; a pump; wherein the suction line includes a first end connected to the pump and a second end connected to the channel; and wherein the fibrous material is comprised of fibers selected from a group consisting of silicone fibers, Teflon fibers, and plastic fibers.

18. A system for suctioning fluid and debris from a wound cavity, the system comprising: a suction tip comprised of a fibrous material; a means for stiffening the fibrous material sufficient to penetrate tissue covering the wound cavity; a means for softening the fibrous material in the presence of fluid; and a means for securing the suction tip in the wound cavity.

19. The system of claim 18, further comprising: a means for drawing fluid from the wound cavity through the suction tip; and a means for connecting the suction tip to the means for drawing fluid.

20. A method for treating a wound cavity, the method comprising: inserting a fibrous peg into the wound cavity; softening the fibrous peg in the wound cavity; connecting the fibrous peg to a conduit; and withdrawing fluid through the fibrous peg into the conduit.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of and priority to U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/803,716, filed Jun. 2, 2006, which is hereby incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

Applicants' invention relates generally to a device in the wound healing arts. More particularly, it relates to a novel wound healing apparatus having a multi-fibered peg for acting a suction head for removing excess fluid from a wound.

2. Description of Related Art

A wound cavity, such as a seroma, is sometimes created in human flesh after the removal of a bulk of tissue during surgery or other invasive trauma to the body. Such interior cavities commonly develop after the surgery is completed and the skin is closed. A need exists for a system and method that will treat these cavities, and like wound and abscess cavities such as those that arise due to infection.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to an apparatus for placement in a wound to treat and promote healing of the wound by suctioning unwanted fluids and debris from the wound. The apparatus preferably comprises a suction head peg made of multi-fibered material that is softenable in the human body by body fluids.

The device has a head unit that is designed to be placed on the patient's body, generally over the wound area. The head unit is anticipated to take a number of forms, but in a first embodiment is comprised of a membrane and cuff for attachment to the body, a suction tube in operable communication with a suction pump (or communicable with a suction pump), and the peg, which is in operable communication with the suction tube. The suction tube may be removably attachable to the remainder of the head unit via a connector. A suction line is continuous through the suction tube, the peg, and the remainder of the head unit, and the suction line provides the operative communication for the components.

The peg is made from a stiffened material that is capable of being inserted through the epidermal, scar, scab, and other tissue that can close or cover a wound or abscess. While the stiffened peg is capable of insertion, it is designed to soften in fluid such as the body fluids it comes into contact with after insertion into the wound or abscess. This softening allows the peg to change shape and conform to the shrinking wound or abscess cavity as material is suctioned therefrom. This conforming actions helps limits the unwanted penetration by a peg that does not soften and conform into the good tissue surrounding the wound/abscess cavity.

The suction tube, or tubes, serve as conduits to remove fluids from the wound, preferably under the power of a suction device to which the tubes are connected outside the body. The peg acts as the tip of that suction apparatus. During the healing process, the suction tube serves as a conduit to remove excess fluid from the wound through the suction tube. Preferably, the suction tube is connected to a suction device such as a vacuum pump (not shown) outside the body to facilitate removal of excess fluid from the cavity.

The present apparatus and method may be used with animals as well as humans.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side view of a first embodiment of the present invention deployed into a wound cavity;

FIG. 2 is a top view of a second embodiment of the present invention deployed into a wound cavity; and

FIG. 3 is a side view of a second embodiment of the present invention deployed into a wound cavity.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

In the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments, reference is made to the accompanying drawings which form a part hereof, and in which is shown by way of illustration specific preferred embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. These embodiments are described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention, and it is understood that other embodiments may be utilized and that logical mechanical, structural, and chemical changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. To avoid detail not necessary to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention, the description may omit certain information known to those skilled in the art. The following detailed description is, therefore, not to be taken in a limiting sense, and the scope of the present invention is defined only by the appended claims.

Referring to the figures, FIG. 1 illustrates an embodiment of the present invention inserted into a wound abscess cavity. The membrane and cuff make up a part of the head unit and sit on the surface of the body, with the peg, or suction tip, inserted through the skin layer and into the abscess cavity. The peg is hollow and has one or more apertures or pores. The apertures and pores are in communication with the suction line through the head unit. Suction applied through the peg pulls body fluids and debris in the abscess cavity into the peg pores or apertures and through the suction line, draining the abscess cavity.

The initial insertion of the peg is facilitated due to the peg being stiffened. This stiffening of the peg may be a natural characteristic of the material used in the manufacture of the peg, or it make be induced through the use of a stiffening agent applied to the peg. The stiffening agent is anticipated to be a starch, complex carbohydrate, or gelatin, but other substances that exhibit the necessary stiffening in air and softening in fluid characteristics may be used as well. An anticipated alternative is that a flexible peg could be used in conjunction with the stiffening agent, and the stiffening agent be one that simply dissolves in the presence of fluids leaving the flexible peg in the abscess, rather than the stiffening agent itself softening.

FIG. 2 shows the present invention with a flange and connector that allows for the attachment of the suction tube. The cuff and membrane can be attached to the skin in a variety of ways such as a strap or adhesives, or they may simply sit on top of the skin and allow the peg to hold the unit in place.

FIG. 3 shows the present invention with the suction tube disconnected from the connector. The peg is anticipated to be made from a multi-fibered material that provides enough stiffness to allow the peg to puncture the tissue and debris over the abscess cavity. It also provides the apertures necessary to allow for suction of the fluid and debris in the wound to be suctioned into the suction line. The peg is anticipated to be hollow along its longitudinal axis to allow for communication with the suction line. Although there are many materials that the peg could be fashioned from, some of those that are anticipated to be used are silicone, Teflon, plastic, and like fibers or meshes.

As persons of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate, materials may be used in lieu of or in addition to the above described peg and stiffening agent in accordance with the present invention.

Although the invention has been described with reference to specific embodiments, this description is not meant to be construed in a limited sense. Various modifications of the disclosed embodiments, as well as alternative embodiments of the inventions will become apparent to persons skilled in the art upon the reference to the description of the invention. It is, therefore, contemplated that the appended claims will cover such modifications that fall within the scope of the invention.