Title:
Fabric For Three-Dimensional Design Preparation
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A fabric for three-dimensional design preparation which can afford sharp and extremely fine line-like concaves of 1 mm or less in width or smooth curvilinear concaves is provided by a three-dimensional design preparing process using ink jet printing for example. The fabric is a pile fabric comprising a pile portion and a ground weave portion, wherein a single fiber size of pile yarn which constitutes the pile portion is 0.05 to 3.5 dtex, the pile is distributed uniformly at a proportion of 2% to 20% per unit area on the pile surface side, and in a vertical section of the pile fabric, the ratio of the area of the pile yarn relative to the sectional area of a 50% portion of an average entire pile height from the pile surface side is 40% to 60%.



Inventors:
Kubota, Harukazu (Fukui, JP)
Tsutsui, Masaya (Fukui, JP)
Suzuki, Yukari (Fukui, JP)
Application Number:
11/659753
Publication Date:
02/07/2008
Filing Date:
04/07/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
139/391, 156/240
International Classes:
D03D3/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
JUSKA, CHERYL ANN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DILWORTH & BARRESE, LLP (WOODBURY, NY, US)
Claims:
1. A pile fabric for three dimensional design preparation, comprising a pile portion and a ground weave portion, wherein the size of a single fiber as a constituent of a pile yarn which constitutes the pile portion is 0.05 to 3.5 dtex, the pile yarns are distributed uniformly, the total of sectional areas of the pile yarns is 2% to 25% per unit area on the pile surface side, and in a vertical section of the ground weave portion of the pile fabric, the ratio of the area of the pile yarns relative to the sectional area of a 50% portion of an average entire pile height from the pile surface side is 40% to 60%.

2. A fabric for a three-dimensional design preparation as set forth in claim 1, wherein a total outer periphery length of sections of single fibers which constitute the pile yarn per square inch on the pile surface side is 6.3 to 22.5 m.

3. A fabric for three-dimensional design preparation as set forth in claim 1, wherein an average pile height of the pile fabric is 0.5 to 3.0 mm.

4. A fabric for three-dimensional design preparation as set forth in claim 1, wherein the pile portion of the pile fabric comprises polyester fiber.

5. A method of producing a three-dimensionally designed fabric, comprising the step of subjecting the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation described in claim 1 to ink jet printing with use of ink containing a fiber decomposer.

6. A method of producing a three-dimensionally designed fabric as set forth in claim 5, wherein the pile portion of the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation comprises polyester fiber and the fiber decomposer is selected from the group consisting of guanidine salts, phenols, alcohols, and alkaline compounds.

7. A fabric for three-dimensional design preparation as set forth in claim 2, wherein an average pile height of the pile fabric is 0.5 to 3.0 mm.

8. A method of producing a three-dimensionally designed fabric, comprising the step of subjecting the fabric for three-dimensionally design preparation described in claim 7 is subjected to ink jet printing with use of ink containing a fiber decomposer.

9. A method of producing a three-dimensionally designed fabric, comprising the step of subjecting the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation described in claim 2 to ink jet printing with use of ink containing a fiber decomposer.

10. A method of producing a three-dimensionally designed fabric, comprising the step of subjecting the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation described in claim 3 to ink jet printing with use of ink containing a fiber decomposer.

11. A method of producing a three-dimensionally designed fabric, comprising the step of subjecting the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation described in claim 4 to ink jet printing with use of ink containing a fiber decomposer.

12. A method of producing a three-dimensionally designed fabric as set forth in claim 11, wherein the pile portion of the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation comprises polyester fiber and the fiber decomposer is selected from the group consisting of guanidine salts, phenols, alcohols, and alkaline compounds.

13. A method of producing a three-dimensionally designed fabric as set forth in claim 8, wherein the pile portion of the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation comprises polyester fiber and the fiber decomposer is selected from the group consisting of guanidine salts, phenols, alcohols, and alkaline compounds.

14. A method of producing a three-dimensionally designed fabric as set forth in claim 9, wherein the pile portion of the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation comprises polyester fiber and the fiber decomposer is selected from the group consisting of guanidine salts, phenols, alcohols, and alkaline compounds.

15. A method of producing a three-dimensionally designed fabric as set forth in claim 10, wherein the pile portion of the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation comprises polyester fiber and the fiber decomposer is selected from the group consisting of guanidine salts, phenols, alcohols, and alkaline compounds.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a fabric for three-dimensional design preparation and more particularly to a fabric suitable for three-dimensional design preparation using ink jet printing.

BACKGROUND ART

Recently, in the field of interior trim materials for vehicles and homes, the demand for a fabric having a three-dimensional design, i.e., a concave/convex design, on a surface thereof has been increasing on the ground that such a fabric is superior in point of design and gives a high-grade feeling. Heretofore, for forming a three-dimensional design on the fabric surface there have been adopted a method of forming a three-dimensional design physically and a method of forming such a design chemically.

As examples of the physical method there are mentioned embossing and welding. However, the fabric formed with a three-dimensional design physically involves problems such as hardening of texture and flattening of the fabric.

As to the chemical method, in JP 47-23709B there is disclosed a method wherein screen-printing or rotary printing is performed using a printing paste with a chemical mixed therein, the chemical functioning to shrink fibers or reduce the weight of the fibers. However, in the method using such screen printing or rotary printing, the printing paste with the chemical mixed therein is low in its permeability into the fabric because the viscosity thereof is high, and when using it for a pile fabric, the chemical does not reach the inner part of pile, with a consequent fear that a three-dimensional design may not be formed in a satisfactory manner. Moreover, it is difficult to control the amount of the printing paste to be applied to the fabric and it has so far been impossible to form, for example, minute concave portions such as extremely fine lines.

For solving this problem, in JP 10-298863A is disclosed a method wherein ink jet printing is used to apply the chemical for shrinking or reducing the weight of fibers. According to this method, unlike screen printing and rotary printing, there is no restriction on design and the amount of the chemical to be applied can be controlled at a one pixel level in a resolution of 45 to 1440 dpi. Therefore, the depth and width of a three-dimensional design can be adjusted freely and a minute three-dimensional design, e.g., it has become possible to form a concave with an extremely fine line or a curvilinear concave by changing the depth of a three-dimensional design stepwise.

However, in the case of ink jet printing, since the chemical is discharged from a small nozzle, it is necessary to lower the viscosity of ink which contains the chemical lest there should occur clogging of the nozzle. The ink jet printer which is in wide use is for ink of a low viscosity type of about 1 to 10 cps, so when the chemical is applied to a fabric, there has been a fear of strike-through of the chemical up to the ground weave without being held by pile yarn, not affording the desired three-dimensional effect, in comparison with the printing paste (usually 3000 to 15000 cps in viscosity) used in screen printing or rotary printing.

For solving such a problem, in JP 63-31594B is disclosed a method wherein a compound selected from among water-soluble polymers, water-soluble salts and water-insoluble inorganic fine particles is applied as an ink retaining agent to a fabric and thereafter ink jet printing is performed. With this method, there is obtained a certain effect for the prevention of strike-through of ink and chemical, but the use of a certain fabric makes it difficult to retain the chemical in the pile portion in an amount sufficient to form a three-dimensional design, thus giving rise to the problem that it is impossible to form a minute three-dimensional design.

OBJECT OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to solve the above-mentioned problems and provide a fabric suitable for the preparation of a three-dimensional design, particularly the preparation of a three-dimensional design by ink jet printing, which can afford a fine and sharp three-dimensional design, for example, a sharp, extremely fine line-like concave having a width of 1 mm or less or a concave formed by a smooth curved line.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Having made earnest studies for achieving the above-mentioned object, the present inventors found out that the above-mentioned object could be achieved by using a fabric satisfying specific conditions.

In a first aspect of the present invention there is provided a pile fabric for three-dimensional design 2C preparation, comprising a pile portion and a ground weave portion, wherein the size of a single fiber as a constituent of a pile yarn which constitutes the pile portion is 0.05 to 3.5 dtex, the pile yarns are distributed uniformly, the total of sectional areas of pile yarns is 2% to 25% per unit area on the pile surface side, and in a vertical section of the ground weave portion of the pile fabric, the ratio of the area of the pile yarns relative to the sectional area of a 50% portion of an average entire pile height from the pile surface side is 40% to 60%.

In the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation according to the present invention it is preferable that the total outer periphery length of sections of single fibers which constitute the pile yarn per square inch on the pile surface side is 6.3 to 22.5 m.

In the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation according to the present invention it is preferable that an average pile height of the pile fabric be in the range of 0.5 to 3.0 mm.

In the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation according to the present invention it is preferable that the pile portion of the pile fabric be formed by a polyester fiber.

In a second aspect of the present invention there is provided a method of producing a three-dimensionally designed fabric wherein the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation is subjected to ink jet printing with use of ink containing a fiber decomposer.

EFFECT OF THE INVENTION

The fabric for three-dimensional design preparation according to the present invention, when subjected to the conventional three-dimensional design preparation, can afford a fine and sharp design, e.g., a sharp and extremely fine line-like concave of 1 mm or less in width or a smooth curvilinear concave.

EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

A detailed description will be given below about the fabric for three-dimensional design according to the present invention.

In connection with the preparation of a three-dimensional design with use of a chemical which causes constituent fibers of a pile yarn to decrease in weight or shrink by decomposition, particularly three-dimensional design preparation using ink jet printing, the present inventors have noticed it important that a chemical in an amount sufficient to remove the pile yarn be retained in only portions to be recessed, in order to form sharp and extremely fine line-like concaves of 1 mm or less in width or form curvilinear concaves by changing the concave depth stepwise. From this standpoint the present inventors have found out that the amount of the chemical retained in the fabric can be improved and a sharp three-dimensional design can be formed in three-dimensional design preparation, especially in three-dimensional design preparation using ink jet printing, by satisfying the following conditions. The size of a single fiber as a constituent of a pile yarn which constitutes a pile portion is 0.05 to 3.5 dtex. The pile yarns are distributed uniformly in a proportion of 2% to 20% per unit area on the pile surface side. In a vertical section of the pile fabric as a pile fabric, the ratio of the area of the pile yarns relative to the sectional area of a 50% portion of an average entire pile height from the pile surface side is 40% to 60%.

As examples of fabrics employable in the present invention, mention may be made of known pile fabrics such as those having cut piles, e.g., double raschel, moquette, sinker pile, pall tricot, and wire moquette, and those having raised piles, e.g., velveteen. But the pile fabrics having cut piles are preferred in that pile can be arranged precisely.

The fabric for three-dimensional design preparation according to the present invention is a pile fabric comprising a pile portion and a ground weave portion, and the size of a single fiber as a constituent of a pile yarn which constitutes the pile potion is 0.05 to 3.5 dtex. If the single fiber size is smaller than 0.05 dtex, the fiber decomposition of the chemical is strong and there is a fear that it may become difficult to control the three-dimensional design, while if the single fiber size is larger than 3.5 dtex, the efficiency of the fiber decomposition of the chemical is low and there is a fear that a satisfactory three-dimensional design may not be obtained.

Particularly, it is preferable that the single fiber size be in the range of 0.2 to 2.2 dtex. With a pile yarn falling under this size range, the pile yarn becomes tapered due to the fiber decomposition and the pile yarn shape differs between convex and concave, so that the fabric concerned has changes in touch and texture.

The pile yarns (the total of sectional areas of pile yarns) are distributed uniformly in a proportion of 2% to 25% per unit area on the pile surface side. If the proportion of the pile yarns (the total of sectional areas of pile yarns) per unit area is less than 2%, it may be impossible to retain the chemical-containing ink in a satisfactory manner, while if the said proportion exceeds 25%, it may become impossible to effect knitting. By distributed uniformly is meant that the pile yarns are distributed throughout the whole of the fabric without substantial unbalance.

The ratio X (%) per unit area of the total of sectional areas of pile yarns is calculated in accordance with the following equation (1):
X=(3.1×10−5×D×c×W)/ρ (1)

    • D average dtex number of the pile yarn
    • c number of piles in well direction per inch
    • w number of piles in course direction per inch
    • ρ average specific gravity of the pile yarn

In a vertical section of the pile fabric, the ratio of the area of the pile yarns relative to the sectional area of a 50% portion of an average entire pile height from the pile surface side is 40% to 60%.

If this ratio is lower than 40%, the chemical retaining capacity in the upper pile yarn portion is deteriorated, with the result that there easily occurs strike-through of the applied chemical and it becomes difficult to obtain a sharp three-dimensional design. If the ratio in question exceeds 60%, the texture becomes hard and the weight increases, with a likelihood that knitting and weaving may become difficult.

This ratio is calculated in the following manner.

As shown in FIG. 1, an electromicrograph of a vertical section of the fabric is taken. In the sectional photograph thus taken, the portion from the pile yarn tip to a 50% portion of an average pile height from the pile surface side was read into a personal computer by means of a scanner, then the pile yarn portion and the other portion were binarized. The ratio Y of a pile yarn-occupied portion A per unit area B was determined in accordance with the following equation (2):
Y(%)=A/B×100 (2)

    • A entire pile yarn portion in the sectional photograph of the pile yarns
    • B 50% portion from the surface of the pile yarn section

By satisfying these conditions simultaneously there is obtained a smooth curved line in case of forming a curvilinear concave. The concave formed by a smooth curved line as referred to herein indicates one obtained by changing the amount of a fiber decomposer stepwise to change the depth of the three-dimensional design in the section of the fabric. Thus, since the depth of the three-dimensional design is not constant but is changed, whereby there occurs light/shade gradation at random and hence there is obtained a cubic effect from any angle.

It is preferable that the total outer periphery length of sections of single fibers which constitute the pile yarn per square inch on the pile surface side be 6.3 to 22.5 m. If the total outer periphery length in question is smaller than 6.3 m per square inch, the chemical may not be retained to a satisfactory extent, and if it is larger than 22.5 m per square inch, it is difficult to effect knitting and the texture of the fabric becomes hard, with a consequent likelihood of an increase of cost.

As shown in FIG. 2, the total outer periphery length of sections of single fibers indicates the total of outer periphery lengths of sections of single fibers which constitute the pile yarn present per square inch on the pile surface side.

The larger the total outer periphery length of single fibers which constitute the pile yarn per unit area, the larger the surface area of the pile yarn per unit area and hence the larger the area of receiving ink containing a fiber decomposer and discharged by ink jet printing, so that the amount of the chemical retained in the fabric becomes larger. As a result, it becomes possible to retain a required amount of the chemical in the portion where the pile yarn is to be removed, without strike-through of the chemical, and hence possible to form a sharp three-dimensional design.

There is a tendency that the larger the total outer periphery length of single fibers which constitute the pipe yarn per square inch, the higher the pile yarn density per unit area. Consequently, not only the strike-through of the chemical is prevented but also it is possible to obtain concaves of a sharp shape. In the case where the amount of the fiber decomposer applied is changed stepwise to form a curvilinear three-dimensional design, a smoother curved line can be obtained.

The fiber to be used in the present invention to constitute the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation may be suitably selected from among semisynthetic fibers and synthetic fibers. These fibers may be used each alone or in combination. Above all, such synthetic fibers as polyester fibers, polyamide fibers and polyacryl fibers are preferred in that their preparation can ensure a uniform front end section and the single fiber thickness can be adjusted. The use of polyester fibers is particularly preferred in point of physical properties and durability such as strength and color fastness to light.

The sectional shape of single fibers which constitute the pile yarn is not specially limited, but deformed sections such as multi-leaf section and polygonal section are preferred. This is for the following reason. A comparison between a circular section and a deformed section at the same size shows that the deformed section is the longer in the outer periphery of section and the larger the yarn surface area, resulting in the amount of the chemical retained being improved.

The type of yarn is not specially limited, but it is preferable that a crimped yarn be contained such as false twist finished yarn or spun yarn. This is because, in comparison with grey yarn of the same size, the proportion of the pile yarn in sectional area becomes higher and the amount of the chemical retained is improved.

In the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation according to the present invention it is preferable to use a pile yarn with a total fiber size in the range of 33 to 900 dtex, more preferably 84 to 600 dtex. If the total fiber size is smaller than 33 dtex, the density of the pile yarn per unit area becomes lower and a three-dimensional design of a sharp shape or of a smooth curvilinear shape may not be obtained. If the total fiber size exceeds 900 dtex, the pile yarn spacing becomes larger, with a consequent likelihood of deterioration in appearance grade such as tipping of pile.

It is preferable that the single fibers which constitute the pile yarn be formed by the same size of fibers. The fiber removability by the fiber decomposer differs depending on the fiber size. Therefore, when the pile yarn is constituted using two or more types of yarns different in the single fiber size, the yarn large in fiber size is more difficult to be removed by the fiber decomposer than the yarn small in fiber size and therefore concaves of a smooth shape may not be obtained.

It is preferable that an average pile height in the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation according to the present invention be 0.5 to 3.0 mm, more preferably 1.0 to 2.0 mm. If the average pile height is smaller than 0.5 mm, the difference in height between concave and convex becomes 0.5 mm or less even at most, so that a smooth curvilinear concave having a stepped change in depth is not obtained and there is obtained only a fabric for three-dimensional design preparation poor in appearance. If the average pile height is larger than 3.0 mm, the pile loft maintain-ability and shape retaining property of the pile yarn are poor and there is a fear that a sharp, extremely fine line-like three-dimensional design or a smooth curvilinear three-dimensional design may not be obtained.

From the standpoint of attaining a high chemical retaining capacity and forming a smooth curvilinear concave portion it is preferable that the density of the pile yarn used in the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation according to the present invention be in the range of 2.0×105 to 1.0×106 dtex/in2, more preferably 5.0×105 to 1.0×106 dtex/in2. If the pile yarn density is lower than 2.0×105 dtex/in2, there is a fear that there may occur strike-through of the chemical because the pile yarn spacing becomes large. Moreover, in case of forming a curvilinear three-dimensional design by adjusting the depth of the same design stepwise, the same design may not become a smooth curvilinear shape. Further, if the pile yarn density is higher than 2.0×106 dtex/in2, there is a fear that the knitting and weaving properties may be deteriorated.

As to dyeing, drying, raising and shearing processes for the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation according to the present invention, there may be adopted conventional methods. There is no special limitation and appropriate processes may be adopted as necessary. It is preferable that the raising and shearing processes be followed by a brushing process. By performing the brushing process, the pile yarns are raised while having a certain directionality and the shape of the resulting concaves is smooth, affording a fabric superior in appearance grade.

For the prevention of blotting of the chemical and ink and the prevention of strike-through it is preferable that the fabric be treated beforehand with a pretreating solution containing an ink receptor to form an ink receptor layer beforehand in the fabric. As main examples of the ink receptor there are mentioned such sizes as sodium alginate, carboxymethyl cellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, methyl cellulose, and starch. Above all, carboxymethyl cellulose is preferred which is superior in chemicals resistance and alkali resistance. Where required, pH adjustor, light resistance improver, antioxidant, and antireductant may be mixed into the pretreating solution. For applying the ink receptor there may be adopted a known method such as coating method, screen method, or dip/nip method.

By thus applying the ink receptor to the fabric, the ink retaining capacity is further improved.

The fibers are disintegrated to form a three-dimensional design by applying the ink containing a fiber decomposer to the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation by ink jet printing.

As examples of the fiber disintegrator applied there are mentioned phenols and alcohols in the case of acetate fiber as a semisynthetic fiber, guanidine salts, phenols, alcohols, and alkaline compounds, e.g., alkali metal hydroxides, and alkaline earth metal hydroxides, in the case of polyester fiber as a synthetic fiber, phenols and alcohols in the case of polyamide fiber, and phenols in the case of polyacryl fiber. Particularly, weak acid salts of guanidine are preferred in that the resulting three-dimensional effect is outstanding and that they are superior in point of environmental conservation and safety.

The concentration of the fiber decomposer contained in the ink is preferably in the range of 10 to 35 wt %, more preferably 15 to 30 wt %. If it is lower than 10 wt %, the fibers cannot be decomposed to a thorough extent and it may be impossible to form a satisfactory three-dimensional design. If the concentration in question exceeds 35 wt %, there occurs a precipitate within the ink, causing the clogging of nozzle, because of approach to the solubility limit in water, with a consequent fear that it may become impossible to ensure a stable discharge of ink over a long time.

It is preferable that the ink be applied in the range of 10 to 100 g/m2 to the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation. If the amount of ink applied is smaller than 10 g/m2, it may become impossible to form a satisfactory three-dimensional design, and if it exceeds 100 g/m2, the ink blots and the three-dimensional design formed may be inferior in sharpness.

The amount of the fiber decomposer to be applied to the fabric for three-dimensional design preparation is preferably in the range of 1 to 30 g/m2. If it is smaller than 1 g/m2, it may become difficult to form a satisfactory three-dimensional design. An amount exceeding 30 g/m2 is a larger amount than the amount necessary for forming a three-dimensional design and therefore results in not only an increase of cost but also causing the problem that a certain fabric used is perforated.

The viscosity of the ink is preferably 1 to 10 cps, more preferably 1 to 5 cps, at 25° C. If the ink viscosity is lower than 1 cps, discharged ink droplets break up during flying and the three-dimensional design formed tends to be inferior in sharpness. If the ink viscosity exceeds 10 cps, the discharge of ink from the nozzle tends to become difficult because the viscosity is high.

Preferably, the ink is formed by dissolving the fiber decomposer in water. This is preferred in point of a stable discharge of ink being ensured over a long time. For allowing the fiber decomposer to be dissolved stably in water, the addition of urea into the ink is preferred. Likewise, for the prevention of air clogging in the nozzle, it is preferable to incorporate into the ink a polyhydric alcohol or a polyhydric alcohol derivative or an ethylene oxide-added surfactant.

After the application of the fiber decomposer and heat treatment, it is preferable to perform soaping for the purpose of removing the ink receptor, unfixed dye, and decomposed fiber pieces, which remain adhered onto the fabric, from the fabric. As a soaping method there is used, for example, a conventional reduction cleaning method using hydrosulfite, surfactant and soda ash.

The fabric thus having gone through the three-dimensional design preparation in the above manner is superior in appearance grade, having sharp and extremely fine line-like concaves of 1 mm or less in width or smooth curvilinear concaves.

EXAMPLES

The present invention will be described below by way of working examples thereof.

Fabrics for three-dimensional design preparation formed were evaluated for the following items:

<Cubic Effect>

    • ◯ . . . distinct difference in height between concave and convex
    • Δ . . . indistinct difference in height between concave and convex
    • x . . . no difference in height between concave and convex
      <Smoothness of Curvilinear Concave>
    • ◯ . . . no stepped portion based on a difference in height is recognized in curvilinear concaves
    • Δ . . . a slight stepped portion based on a difference in height is recognized in curvilinear concaves
    • x . . . a distinct difference based on a difference in height is recognized in curvilinear concaves
      <Fine Line Expression>
    • ◯ . . . 1.0 mm fine lines are expressed clearly

Δ . . . 1.0 mm fine lines are expressed as discontinuous lines

    • x . . . 1.0 mm fine lines cannot expressed at all (Examples 1-3 and Comparative Examples 1-4)

Example 1

Tricot knit fabric was obtained using a 3 Bar 28 G tricot knitting machine and using a polyester false twist finished yarn of 84 dtex/36 f (single fiber size 2.3 dtex) as pile yarn. The fabric thus obtained was set at 190° C. for 1 minute, then dyed at 130° C. and dried, thereafter subjected to full-cut raising by means of a card clothing raising machine, then subjected to a brushing process, and subsequently set at 190° C. for 1 minute, to afford a fabric for three-dimensional design preparation wherein the pile yarn when finished was distributed uniformly at a proportion of 4.0% per unit area on the pile surface side and which had an average pile height of 1.0 mm, a knitting density of 59 courses/in, 36 wells/in, a total outer periphery length of single fiber sections constituting the surface pile yarn of 7. 0 m/in2, and a pile occupancy area of section of 48%.

Carboxymethyl cellulose was applied to the fabric in an amount of 2 g/m2 to form an ink receptor layer and a fiber decomposer was applied under the following conditions:

<Fiber Disintegrator Formulation>
Guanidine carbonate25parts
Water73parts
Propylene glycol2parts

<Conditions for Ink Jet Printing>
Printeron-demand serial scan type ink
jet printer
Nozzle dia.50μm
Driving Voltage100V
Frequency5KHz
Resolution360dpi

<Three-Dimensional Design>

Three-dimensional designs of FIGS. 3 and 4 of 1. 0 mm fine line in width were prepared.

Printed fabric was dried, then subjected to a wet heat treatment at 175° C. for 10 minutes, thereafter washed and dried, followed by brushing. The resultant three-dimensionally designed fabric was evaluated as in Table 1.

Example 2

Double raschel knit fabric was obtained using a 28 G double raschel knitting machine and using composite yarn (250 dtex/144 f, single fiber size 1.74 dtex) consisting of polyester gray yarn and false twist finished yarn as pile yarn. The fabric thus obtained was center-cut, then subjected to brushing, thereafter set at 190° C. for 1 minute, dyed at 130° C. and dried, to afford a fabric for three-dimensional design preparation wherein the pile yarn when finished was distributed uniformly at a proportion of 9.3% per unit area on the pile surface side and which had an average pile height of 1.2 mm, a knitting density of 52 courses/in, 32 wells/inch, a total outer periphery length of single fiber sections constituting the surface pipe yarn of 19.1 m/in2, and a pile occupancy area of section of 56%.

Then, in the same way as in Example 1 an ink receptor layer was formed in the fabric thus obtained and the fabric was subjected to a three-dimensional design preparing process. The resultant three-dimensionally designed fabric was evaluated as in Table 1.

Example 3

Moquette fabric was obtained using a double velvet weaving machine of 23 reed wings/in and using a pre-dyed woolly polyester yarn of 167 dtex/72 f (single fiber size 2.32 dtex) as pile yarn. The fabric was subjected to shearing and conditioning, then set at 190° C. for 1 minute, to afford a fabric for three-dimensional design preparation wherein the pile yarn when finished was distributed uniformly at a proportion of 6.9% per unit area on the pile surface side and which had an average pile height of 1.5 mm, a weaving density of 80 warps/in and 23 wefts/inch, a total outer periphery length of single fiber sections constituting the surface pile yarn of 12.2 m/in2, and a pile occupancy area of section of 54%.

Then, in the same way as in Example 1 an ink receptor layer was formed in the fabric thus obtained and the fabric was subjected to a three-dimensional design preparing process. The resultant three-dimensionally designed fabric was evaluated as in Table 1.

Comparative Example 1

Double raschel knit fabric was obtained using a 28 G double raschel knitting machine and using polyester gray yarn of 84 dtex/36 f (single fiber size 2.3 dtex) as pile yarn. The fabric thus obtained was center-cut, then subjected to brushing, thereafter set at 190° C. for 1 minute, dyed at 130° C. and dried, and subsequently set at 190° C. for 1 minute, to afford a fabric for three-dimensional design preparation wherein the pile yarns when finished were distributed uniformly at a proportion of 3.4% per unit area on the pile surface side and which had an average pile height of 1.4 mm, a knitting density of 53 courses/in, 34 wells/in, a total outer periphery length of single fiber sections constituting the surface pile yarn of 6.0 m/in2, and a pile occupancy area of section of 35%.

Then, in the same way as in Example 1 an ink receptor layer was formed in the fabric thus obtained and the fabric was subjected to a three-dimensional design preparing process. The resultant three-dimensionally designed fabric was evaluated as in Table 1.

Comparative Example 2

Tricot knit fabric was obtained using a 3 Bar 28 G tricot knitting machine and using composite yarn (167 dtex/24 f, single fiber size 7.0 dtex) consisting of polyester gray yarn and false twist finished yarn as pile yarn. The fabric thus obtained was set at 190° C. for 1 minute, dyed at 130° C. and dried, thereafter subjected to full-cut raising by a card clothing raising machine, then subjected to brushing, and set at 190° C. for 1 minute, to afford a fabric for three-dimensional design preparation wherein the pile yarns when finished were distributed uniformly at a proportion of 8.1% per unit area on the pile surface side and which had an average pile height of 0.3 mm, a knitting density of 55 courses/in, 37 wells/in, a total outer periphery length of single fiber sections constituting the surface pile yarn of 7.8 m/in2, and a pile occupancy area of section of 55%.

Then, in the same way as in Example 1 an ink receptor layer was formed in the fabric thus obtained and the fabric was subjected to a three-dimensional design preparing process. The resultant three-dimensionally designed fabric was evaluated as in Table 1.

Comparative Example 3

A double raschel knit fabric was obtained using a 28 G double raschel knitting machine and using polyester false twist finished yarn (56 dtex/24 f) obtained by doubling and twisting six island yarns divided from sea type yarn (island component: sea component=60:40, 36 divisions) as pile yarn. The fabric thus obtained was center-cut, then subjected to conditioning, thereafter set at 190° C. for 1 minute, then reduced in weight at 90° C., subsequently dyed at 130° C. and dried, and set at 190° C. for 1 minute, to afford a fabric for three-dimensional design preparation wherein the pile yarns when finished were distributed uniformly at a proportion of 7.4% per unit area and which had an average pile height of 0.6 mm, a knitting density of 52 courses/in, 32 wells/in, a total outer periphery length of single fiber sections constituting the surface pipe yarn of 43.8 m/in2, and a pile occupancy area of section of 53%.

Then, in the same way as in Example 1 an ink receptor layer was formed in the fabric thus obtained and the fabric was subjected to a three-dimensional design preparing process. The resultant three-dimensionally designed fabric was evaluated as in Table 1.

Comparative Example 4

Double raschel knit fabric was obtained using a 22 G double raschel knitting machine and using highly crimped polyester yarn of 84 dtex/36 f (single fiber size 2.3 dtex) as pile yarn. The fabric thus obtained was center-cut, subjected to conditioning, then set at 190° C. for 1 minute, dyed at 130° C. and dried, and thereafter set at 190° C. for 1 minute, to afford a fabric for three-dimensional design preparation wherein the pile yarns when finished were distributed uniformly at a proportion of 1.7% per unit area on the pile surface side and which had an average pile height of 1.2 mm, a knitting density of 40 courses/in, 23 wells/in, a total outer periphery length of single fiber sections constituting the surface pile yarn of 3.2 m/in2, and a pile occupancy area of section of 41%.

Then, in the same way as in example 1 an ink receptor layer was formed in the fabric thus obtained and the fabric was subjected to a three-dimensional design preparing process. The resultant three-dimensionally designed fabric was evaluated as in Table 1.

TABLE 1
Smoothness of
CurvilinearExpression of
Cubic EffectConcaveFine Line
Example 1
Example 2
Example 3
ComparativeΔXX
Example 1
ComparativeXXX
Example 2
ComparativeXX
Example 3
ComparativeΔXX
Example 4

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an explanatory diagram showing a pile yarn occupancy area in an upper 50% portion of a vertical section of fabric;

FIG. 2 is an explanatory diagram showing an outer periphery of a pile yarn section;

FIG. 3 is an explanatory diagram showing an example of a three-dimensional design obtained by ink jet printing; and

FIG. 4 is an explanatory diagram showing another example of a three-dimensional design obtained by ink jet printing.

In the drawings, the numeral 1 denotes a fabric for three-dimensional design preparation, numeral 2 denotes a pile yarn, numeral 3 denotes a single fiber as a constituent of the pile yarn, numeral 4 denotes an outer periphery of a single yarn, numeral 5 denotes a concave, numeral 6 denotes a convex, the reference mark A denotes an overall pile yarn length, and the reference mark B denotes a sectional area of an upper 50% portion of the pile yarn.