Title:
Economical tide/wave/swell/wind/solar powered high pressure fluid pump
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An apparatus for pumping and compressing fluids using floats which ride on the tides, swells and waves of the sea lowering an impeller by gravity when the tide falls and discharging fluid through back flow prevention valves above impeller when sea level rises for any reason. Pump will deliver sea water at any selected pressure determined by buoyancy of floats. Increasing buoyancy increases discharge pressure or lift or volume. Sea water pump is open to sea on inlet side when pumping sea water. Sea water seeks its own level rising to sea surface through impeller and back flow prevention valve. When pumping other fluids, pump is not open to sea and connects to fluid sources of supply. The pump is modified to prevent leakage to sea when pumping all other fluids. Fluid volume lift is increased by adding tidal range multipliers to pump and increasing float buoyancy making it possible to deliver greater volumes of fluids each time tide rises.



Inventors:
Davis, Albert H. (New Orleans, LA, US)
Application Number:
11/492162
Publication Date:
01/31/2008
Filing Date:
07/25/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F04B35/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
FREAY, CHARLES GRANT
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Richard C. Litman (Alexandria, VA, US)
Claims:
What I claim as my invention is:

1. A pump apparatus: which uses energy directly from tides, waves, swells, and wind which cause a float riding on the sea to move up ands down vertically and horizontally which is connected by cables to an impeller located in a pump housing which moves up and down in step with the float; where the pump housing is attached to a foundation on the sea bed and is open to sea water on the inlet side of the impeller so when sea water level drops, impeller which has greater density than sea water sinks increasing resultant pressure on under side of impeller causing it to open and allow sea water to enter through an opening to sea and to pass through to top side of the impeller; where when sea water level rises pressure on top side of impeller is higher causing it to close and as impeller rises, it lifts water upward toward a discharge back flow prevention valve which prevents higher pressure sea water from back flowing when sea level falls again; where to opening to sea is covered with a strainer and filter to prevent intake of sea life and debris; where provisions have been made to use a solar powered motorized valve attached to discharge pipe on discharge side of discharge back flow valve to allow high pressure sea water to discharge inlet side of the impeller increasing sea water pressure and forcing any accumulated sea life or debris from the face of filter and screen; that has zero energy costs because it does not use any purchased energy; where the only costs prior to use are design, manufacturing and installation; where the only costs after installation are operation and maintenance; that doesn't require an onsite staff, where maintenance crew requires no special education; where discharge pressure and ability to do work can be increased simply by increasing float buoyancy by adding to length and/or width horizontally and not changing float height. that can: drive turbines to generate electricity on land, at sea, and below sea level; force sea, brackish, fresh waters through reverse osmosis membrane processes to generate potable water; force any other fluids needing cleansing of undesirable elements and foreign matter through reverse osmosis membrane processes producing fluids with desired purity; compress any gaseous fluids including air; deliver nutrient rich sea water to aquaculture farms; deliver nutrient sea water to off shore fisheries; create vacuums; deliver any fluids including colloids from one location to another for use or storage.

2. A impeller in the method of claim 1 comprising: a new use as a hinged multi-blade sliding fluid impeller with linked blades for heavy duty adjustable counterbalance back draft dampers used in the air conditioning industry; a sturdy frame in horizontal position supporting impeller blades shown in partially open positions; linkage ties the blades so they move together; when axle rotates, dampers blades open and close; adjustable counter balance allows for adjustment of sensitivity of blades to pressure changes which cause damper blades to open and close; direction of flow of fluid is up as impeller moves vertically.

3. A modified use of method of claim 1 comprising: all details of claim 1 except deleting opening to sea water with filter and strainer and replacing with an inlet back flow prevention valve so that any liquid and gaseous fluids can be pumped without leakage to sea water; option one which is an addition of pulley spools on a common shaft with pulleys spools inside and outside of the pump housing eliminating the penetration by sliding cables and adding bearings with seals where shaft penetrates pump housing preventing leakage to sea water and outer pulley spools are connected to float by cables which rotate shaft whenever float rises and falls with sea water surface and shaft rotates pulley spools which are connected to impeller causing it to rise and fall whenever shaft rotates; option two which is an addition of pulley spools supported outside pump housing eliminating penetration of pump housing by sliding cables by adding oscillating shafts that do not rotate and are attached to outer circumference of pulley spools with ball joints which flex when the pulley spools rotate creating an oscillating non-rotating motion which is transmitted through the pump housing to pulley spools on a shaft inside the pump housing connected with a ball joint which flexes when the pulley spools rotate shaft creating a rotating motion of pulley spool raising and lowering pump impeller; option two where bearings with Seals are deleted and replaced with spherical oscillating bearings which do not rotate and flexible seals which allow the shafts to oscillate preventing leakage of sea water into pump housing.

4. A modified use of method of claim 1 comprising: combination with a tidal range multiplier using a lever arm for leverage; where available tidal range is only ten feet and a twenty foot tidal range is desirable, a lever arm is used to convert ten foot tidal range to a twenty foot tidal range doubling volume of water lifted during each tide; increasing the buoyancy of float(s) to lift additional weight of water and maintain desired lift or discharge pressure and desired discharge pressure or lift can be increased to any suitable pressure or level by adding more float volume;

5. A modified use of method of claim 1 comprising: combination with a tidal range multiplier using two different size pulleys for leverage: where available tidal range is only ten feet and a twenty foot tidal range is desirable, with a tidal range multiplier using two different size pulleys for leverage: are used to convert ten foot tidal range to a twenty foot tidal range doubling volume of water lifted during each tide; increasing the buoyancy of float(s) to lift the additional weight of water and maintain desired lift or discharge pressure and desired discharge pressure or lift can be increased to any suitable pressure or level by adding more float volume.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Provisional Patent Application of Albert Hamilton Davis, Sr. For Economical Tide/Wave/Swell/Wind/Solar Powered High Pressure Pump consisting of 23 pages of specification, 4 drawing sheets and filing fee of $100.00 paid. Document received 113009 U.S. PTO 60/04373 Article Numbers EQ006883750US Aug. 02, 2005, EQ748959467US.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

(Not Applicable).

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISC APPENDIX

(Not Applicable).

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Field of the Invention

My Economical Tide/Wave/Swell/Wind/Solar Powered High Pressure Fluid Pump invention herein after called pump is generally related to any process or system requiring water under pressure to do work and provide services such as: driving turbines to generate electricity on land, at sea, and below sea level; forcing sea, brackish, fresh waters through reverse osmosis membrane processes to generate potable water; forcing any other fluids needing cleansing of undesirable elements and foreign matter through reverse osmosis membrane processes producing fluids with desired purity; compressing any gaseous fluids including air; delivering nutrient rich sea water to aquaculture farms; delivering nutrient sea water to off shore fisheries; creating vacuums; delivering any fluids including colloids from one location to another for use or storage.

A large number of inventions have been made in an effort to use the immense mechanical energy created, stored temporally and eventually lost to great heat sink of the seas without other benefits.

My pump will do work and provide services and power more efficiently than any other pump invented. without the use of fossil, nuclear, or other costly man prepared fuels.

I searched in USPTO search room, at USPTO site, on internet and local libraries and found no pumps resembling my pump invention using a float lifted by multiple tide forces causing a sliding fluid impeller of new design in a pump housing attached to sea bed to pump any fluids.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A system for pumping fluids by using a float which is driver which rides on tides, swells, waves, and wind on sea moving float, lowering and raising a sliding fluid impeller herein after called impeller as tides, swells and waves rise and fall and as the wind moves the float horizontally causing the impeller to rise and fall. The pump will move fluids over entire tides, swells, waves and wind movements less the depth of submersion of float. Every up movement of sea surface for any reason causes water to discharge through one way discharge backwater valves. When pumping fluids, volume of the float is determined from buoyancy necessary to pump fluid by raising weight of fluids and equipment components which move up and down and overcome resistance to flow. Discharge pressure or lift can be increased to any manageable pressure simply by increasing volume of float over the minimum volume necessary to pump fluids by raising weight of fluids and equipment components which move up and down and overcome resistance to flow in valves and pipes. Only limitation to high pressure is ability of pump equipment to with stand high pressures and only limitation to capacity is the availability of enough space and water depth to install and operate multiple pumps and pumps with larger impeller faces. Water can be lifted to any reasonable elevation or pressure if pump can with stand the pressures produced. Capacity may be increased by increasing impeller face area or creating a farm or farms with multiple floats and impellers. Pump will operate at any manageable depth in any ocean or sea where the tides, swells and waves are adequate to make pump to work. Pump is non-polluting and uses no fossil fuel, nuclear, or man made source of energy. Fuel costs are zero. The only costs are equipment, installation, operation and maintenance. Modified pump will pump any liquid fluids and compress air and any gas. When large volumes of liquids or gases are pumped, piston rings and seals are not necessary because one way valves will not allow back flow. Minimal leakage of fluid at edges of impellers and blades will provide sufficient lubrication. Pump will function as long as equipment is properly operated and maintained. There are no controls, rotating shafts or bearings when pumping sea water and potable water. Pump is modified when pumping many fluids which may contaminate the seas. Impeller shown is a new use for heavy duty adjustable counterbalance back draft dampers used in air conditioning industry. Heavy duty adjustable counterbalance back draft damper designs and materials will be modified so as to be suitable for use in sea water and any fluids pumped when applicable. Dampers will normally be installed in horizontal position set to open upward when pressure on the bottom side exceeds the pressure on top side of movable damper blades. Because specific gravity of metal damper and its accessories will be made greater than specific gravity of water, damper will sink when height of the tides, swells, and waves decreases allowing the damper to move open. As damper falls, fluid will flow from bottom side to top side of damper. When tide is rising, pressure on top side of damper will be greater and force it to shut tight and fluid will be forced upward under pressure to one way discharge back flow valve(s). Back flow valve(s)s in fluid discharge will prevent back flow. Fluids other than sea water will have an additional back flow valve in the fluid intake to the pump. Clearances between impeller and its housing will allow negligible leakage in relation to the total volume of fluid pumped and will serve as lubricant for dampers. Pumps which pump sea water will have no back flow valve on inlet side and will always be open to sea on the inlet side of the impeller. Sea water seeks its own level and will rise through the pump discharge unless otherwise restricted. When fluids other than sea water are pumped, inlet pressure to impeller will be pressure of the fluid available from fluid source. When the impeller rises, fluids will be drawn into to under side of impeller. When pump is used to drive turbines to generate power, turbines can be located at or above sea level or even below sea level. If liquid fluids are used, they must be stored at an elevation above the turbine whereby the weight of the fluid causes adequate fluid pressure to drive turbine and provide required power output. Liquid fluids may be stored anywhere in pressure tanks designed and located to provide desired turbine operating pressure. When air and other gaseous fluids are used, fluids can best be stored just about anywhere in pressure tanks above or below sea level as long as losses in the distribution system are taken into account.

As an example, pump can the used to supply sea water under pressure to turbines used to generate power. Calculations were made on a typical 60 kwh per day home. The results are as follows:

Assumptions
tide range20 ft
water typesea
water lift of tide range70%
fluid pumpedsea water
lifted equipment weight10%
kwh per day required60
system losses (friction, turbine15%
Results
float submersion/minimum height6 ft
sea water lift per tide14 ft
kwh per ft pound4.14313E−07
float internal volume190,149.92 cu ft
float face area31,691.65 sq ft
internal length of float sides178 ft
length of impeller sides27 ft

Impeller inside pump housing will have face dimensions 27 feet long, 27 feet wide and the pump height will be tall enough for a 14 foot lift of impeller per tide for two tides per day. Float minimum internal dimensions will be 178 feet long, 178 feet wide and 6 feet tall.

Assume a load of one megawatt (1,000,000 watts) per day to take care of a small subdivision with about sixteen 60 kwh homes. Assume a farm of four pumps manifolded together to a common supply. Each of four pumps will have an impeller 54 feet long and 54 feet wide and a float 356 feet long, 356 feet wide and 6 feet tall. Pressurized sea water will drive a turbine which will generate one megawatt per day.

Savings resulting from elimination of utility bills according to my monthly bill for electricity and natural gas, will be approximately $200 per month or $2400 per year.

A saving of $2400 per home per year realizes an annual saving 16×$2400=$38,400 per year for one megawatt of power. Payback will depend on the cost of designing, manufacturing, installing and maintaining pump package.

Additional savings can be realized be forcing same water that drives turbines through reverse osmosis equipment to generate potable water. Additional water pressure can be created by adding buoyancy to float. Some sea water can be used to backwash filters and membranes. By passed sea water can have other uses or just returned to the sea.

Tide Range Multipliers can provide leverage which convert natural tide ranges to larger tide ranges using lever arms dual size pulley spools. Volume of fluid lifted during each tide can be doubled, tripled and more making use of small tides more feasible by reducing initial unit cost per kwh of power generated. Additional volume is offset by increase of float buoyancy.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF DRAWINGS

I have included five (5) drawing sheets showing following components:

FIGS. 1A and 1B is overall system views showing interrelationships of pump components. Use only when pumping sea water.

FIG. 2 is a view of a multi-blade impeller showing interrelationships of impeller components.

FIGS. 3A and 3B are FIGS. 1A and 1B pump modified for use with fluids other than sea water.

FIG. 4 is a view of a tidal range multiplier using a lever arm for leverage. See FIGS. 1A and 1B for some lower numbers for description.

FIG. 5 is a view of a tidal range multiplier using two different size pulleys for leverage. See

FIGS. 1A and 1B for some lower numbers for description.

DETAILED DESCRIPTIONS OF INVENTION

I am using the figures FIGS. 1A and 1B, 2, 3A and 3B and 4 and 5 drawings and component numbers to describe and explain interaction of components and operation of systems and to show how my inventions work and benefits.

FIGS. 1A AND 1B SEA WATER PUMP—Also applies to pumping any fluid with some modifications. See FIGS. 3A and 3B and 4 and 5

Edge seals 29 minimize leakage on edges of impeller 28,32; movement path 30, 34 shown for impeller 28, 32; anchor legs 46 in foundation 48 which sets on sea bed 50 support pump housing 22; solar collector 52, (battery, controls, and communications) 54; conduit and conductors 53; to back wash valve 25.

When pumping sea water, pump 22 interior is open to sea through inlet 42, 44. A float 10, 12 rides on high and low tides 14, 16 over tidal range 18 making and releasing tension in cables 20 which raise and lower an impeller 28, 32 inside pump 22. When tide is falling from high tide 14, blades in impeller 28, 32 are pushed open as impeller with an average density greater than water falls by gravity allowing sea water under pressure to move from sea through an open inlet 42,44 and move through the blades in impeller 28, 32 to a discharge back flow prevention valve 24 which prevents back flow. On initial start up of a new pump, sea water will rise through 28, 32 and discharge through back flow prevention valve 24 and pipe 38 to sea level. Water seeks its own level. On any tide rise, blades in impeller 28, 32 will close because pressure on top side of the impeller 28, 32 is higher than pressure on under side. Water can not be compressed. While water above Impeller 28, 32 is being discharged, water is rising on the inlet side of 28, 32 due to sea water pressure. Stop 26 limits rise of the impeller 28 to prevent blocking of discharge of fluid through back flow valve 24. Stop 36 limits fall of the impeller 32 to prevent blocking of intake of sea water opening 42 intake of other fluids through back flow valve 40. On first tide rise, sea water will be raised the same distance as tide range 18 less allowance for submersion as float 10, 12 creates buoyancy. On second tidal rise, sea water will be raised an additional distance equal to tidal range 18 less allowance for submersion as float 10,12 creates additional buoyancy and so on to whatever discharge pressure or elevation is possible with design float 10, 12 volume. Sky's limit as long as float 10, 12 volume can be increased and equipment can built to with stand higher pressures. Volume and weight of water lifted during each rise of a tide is determined by face area of sliding linear impeller 28, 32 and tide range less allowance for float 10, 12 submersion to create buoyancy. Pump 22 discharge pressure is increased by adding volume above that required to lift weight of water and moving lift components of pump 22 to the float 10, 12 resulting in greater buoyancy. There are two tides a day. If tidal range 18 exceeds he design range, he lift volume will increase for that tide if impeller 28, 32 travel space has been allowed for tides above the normal tide range 18. Maximum possible buoyancy occurs whenever the float 10, 12 is completely submerged and pressure will not increase as tide advances higher. The dead weight required to keep pump anchored will equal the uplift force caused by float 10, 12 plus a reasonable safety factor. Any excess float 10, 12 volume above sea level will allow an increase in lift pressure when tides exceed design tide requiring additional anchor dead weight.

Provisions have been made to allow back flow of high pressurized sea water to the screen & strainer 44 that keeps out sea life and debris at water flow inlets 42. When tide is above low tide and not rising, a motorized back flow valve 25 can be opened allowing pressurized sea water to backwash and flush filter and strainer 44 clean. In lieu of back flow valve 25, provisions may be made to lift filter and strainer 44 out, clean or/and replace and re-insert. In this case a spare filter for instant change out will be desirable. There will be no pump cavitation as inlet pressure will always be positive relative to atmospheric pressure.

When using pump to pump sea water under pressure, sea water is generally returned to be sea., however, some of sea water may be diverted to other uses such as reverse osmosis production of potable water, aquaculture farms, aquariums, any type of upwellers and offshore fish farms on land or at sea.

FIGS. 1A and 1B, high pressure sea water can leak from inside pump 22 where the lifting Cables 20 pass through the top of pump 22 housing. Seals 21 should be provided to minimize leakage and assure the highest possible pump efficiency. Only down side is excessive leaking which reduces pump efficiency. Caution, do not use pump 22 as shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B for pumping fluids other than sea and potable water as the leakage of pumped fluids may contaminate sea water at the equipment location. Pump FIGS. 3A and 3B show modifications to prevent leakage when pumping fluids other than water. It may be that at some point, higher discharge pressures will reach the point to where leakage at Seals 21 are excessive and use of pump FIGS. 3A and 3B may be necessary for pumping sea water.

FIG. 2—Hinged Multi-Blade Sliding Fluid Impeller Shown with Linked Blades.

Sliding fluid impeller 28,32 herein after called impeller 28,32 is a new use for heavy duty adjustable counterbalance back draft dampers used in air conditioning industry. A sturdy frame 56 shown in the horizontal position 68 supports impeller blades 58 shown in partially open positions. Linkage 60 ties blades 58 so they move together. When axle 62 rotates, damper blades 58 open and close. Adjustable counter balance 64 allows for adjustment of sensitivity of blades 58 to pressure changes which cause the damper blades to open and close. Direction of flow 70 of fluid is shown on drawing. Single blade impellers may be used.

FIGS. 3A and 3B—Pumping Fluids Other that Sea Water.

FIGS. 3A and 3B show interrelationships of components in FIGS. 1A and 1B modified for use with fluids other than sea water. When liquid fluids other than sea water are pumped, use modified pump FIGS. 3A and 3B. The modified pump operates same as sea water pumps in FIGS. 1A and 1B except as described below. Pump inlet components 42, 44 are not part of the modified pump and the inlet is closed and is replaced by an inlet back flow valve 40 through piping fluid sources. These Fluids do not rise to sea level as a result of sea water pressure. Fluid pressure from sources less friction losses in piping, fittings and equipment will move fluid to some point below or above sea level depending on resultant pressure at inlet to pump 22. FIGS. 3A and 3B modified less discharge pipe, fittings, and equipment friction losses. will increase the pressure from resultant inlet pressure to whatever pressure is required at the point of use. When pumping liquids, the inlet pressure at must always be high enough to avoid cavitation when pumping liquid fluids.

Pumps in FIGS. 3A and 3B are designed so that the pump 22 housing is not penetrated by the cables 20 where leakage of fluids from inside the pump 22 housing to the sea may occur contaminating the sea water. in pump FIG. 3A, four pulley cable spools 73 are mounted on one continuous shaft 74. Two spools 73 are mounted in sea outside pump 22 housing. Two spools 73 are mounted inside 22 housing on discharge side of impeller. When low tide 16 rises, float 10-12 rises, cables 20 outside pump 22 housing are pulled upward causing cables 20 to wrap around spools outside the pump 22 housing lifting impeller and discharging fluid out of pump 22 housing 22 through backwater valve 24. Bearing seals 76 where shaft penetrates pump 22 housing prevents leakage of fluid inside the pump 22 housing to sea water outside the pump 22 housing. Seals 76 prevent leakage of fluid to sea. Edge Seals 87 on perimeter of impeller 28,32 prevent leakage of fluids from above to below the impeller 28, 32. When high tide 14 falls, the Float 10-12 falls and reverse of what happens when float rises occurs.

In FIG. 3B all operations are same as FIG. 3A except bearings with Seals 76 are deleted and replaced with spherical oscillating bearings 78 and flexible seals 80. The oscillating non-rotating shaft 78 to which spools 73 are connected by permanently lubricated ball joints outside pump 22 housing are mounted on individual short shafts supported by spool shaft supports 82. Spools 73 inside the pump 22 housing are mounted on a common shaft 75 supported by shaft supports 82. Spools 73 are connected to oscillating non-rotating shaft 78 with permanently lubricated ball joints. Since the oscillating non-rotating shaft 78 is solidly connected to non-rotating Shaft and the pump 22 housing wall, there is no possibility of leakage unless the flexible seal 80 rips or develops holes. This is not likely because the flexible seal will be very slack and entirely non-stressed. Water pressure on both sides of pump 22 housing will cause flexible seal to cling tightly to the pump 22 housing wall. Life without leakage for flexible seal 80 in FIG. 3B will be considerably longer that of bearing seals 76 in FIG. 3A. Stop 26 limits rise of the impeller 28, 32 to prevent blocking of discharge of fluid through back flow prevention valve 24. Stop 36 limits fall of impeller 28, 32 to prevent blocking of fluid through back flow valve 40. Anchored legs 46 for support of pump 22 housing tied to foundation 48 resting in or on sea bed 50.

FIG. 4 is a View of a Tidal Range Multiplier Using a Lever Arm for Leverage. See FIGS. 1A and 1B for Additional Operation and Performance.

Lever arm column 100 supports lever arm axis bearing 108. Braces 102 tie lever arm columns 100 together. Pump housing 22 is attached to foundation 48 which rests in or on the sea bed 50. When the tide drops, Float 10, 12 moves downward. Assume that available tidal range 18 is ten feet between average high tide 14 and average low tide 16. The economics and design require a twenty foot Tidal Range 18. Leverage can be used to convert ten foot tidal range 18 to a twenty foot tidal range 18 increasing volume of water lifted during each tide. The buoyancy of the float 10, 12 will be increased to lift additional weight of water and maintain desired lift or discharge pressure. In addition, desired discharge pressure or lift can be increased to any suitable level by adding more float 10, 12 volume.

Allowances must be made to account for submersion of float 10, 12. Assume the design causes the float to submerge thirty per cent of the available tidal range 18. Thirty per cent of the tidal range 18 is three feet leaving seven feet for lift. When float 10, 12 rises and the real tidal range is ten feet, the cable 107 pulls the right end of lever arm 104 up seven feet and left end of lever arm 105 falls fourteen feet allowing the weight of the impeller 28, 32 to make it fall 14 feet as it pulls cable 20 downward. As impeller 28, 32 falls, positive pressure on underside of the impeller 28, 32 opens allowing fluid rush through it to top side. When float 10, 12 rises, reverse happens except fluid pressure on the top side of impeller 28,32 is higher than pressure on underside and fluid is pushed upward and discharges through back flow prevention valve 24.

As an example, assume that you want to store sea water at some high elevation (pressure). Assume weight of sea water is 64 pounds per cubic foot (pcf). Converted to pounds per square inch (psig), 64 pcf=0.44444 psig. Divide 1.0 psig by 0.44444=a column of sea water 2.25 feet tall. Assume sea water is used to drive a turbine. One hundred psig is required at turbine. Assume a psig loss of 10% in delivery system. Pump 22 discharge pressure will have to be 110 psig to have 100 psig at turbine. Pressure of 100 psig is equivalent to pumping sea water to 247.5 feet above sea level. To get buoyancy, float 10, 12 must become submerged reducing available lift per tide. Assume 30% loss of lift per tide to account for submersion of float. Available lift per tide is 20 ft. times 70%=14 ft. To obtain lift and volume desired, sea water must be pumped to storage at 247.5 ft. elevation above sea level by two tides a day divided by 2 times 14 ft=approximately 8 days. Pump 22 or pump 22 farm will be sized to deliver full required daily demand by two tides a day every day. When pumping sea water, inlet side of the impeller 10, 12 is open to sea water pressure at pump 22 location.

Impeller 28,32 blades are counterbalanced and function in the same way as back flow preventer 24, 40. Impeller 28,32 is heavier than sea water. When tide goes down, water pressure on the impeller 28, 32 on underside is higher than pressure on top side. Sea water flows to the top side of impeller 28, 32. When tide rises, pressure becomes higher on top side of impeller 28, 32 and impeller 28, 32 closes and water is lifted and discharged through a back flow preventer 38.

FIG. 5 is a View of a Tidal Range Multiplier Using Two Different Size Pulleys for Leverage. See FIGS. 1A and 1B for Additional Operation and Performance.

Drawing shows following to assist reviewer and others a clear understanding of description and operation of pump 22: average high tide 14; average low tide 16; cables connecting float 10, 12 to impellers 28, 32; up and down movement 30 of impeller 28, 32; high pressure fluid discharge; foundation 48; sea bed 50; pulley shaft support column; column brace 102; shaft bearings 108; opening to allow entry of sew water only 42; screen and strainer on sea water inlets to keep out debris and sea life.

When tide drops, float 10/12 moves downward, assume that available tidal range 18 is ten feet. The economics require a twenty foot tidal range 18. Leverage using a large pulley 112 and small pulley 110 can be used to convert ten foot tidal range 18 to a twenty foot tidal range 18 increasing the volume of water lifted during each tide. Buoyancy of float(s) 10, 12 will have to be increased to lift additional weight of water and maintain desired lift or discharge pressure. In addition desired discharge pressure or lift can be increased to any suitable level by adding more float 10, 12 volume.

Allowances must be made to account for submersion of float 10, 12. Assume design causes float to submerge thirty per cent of available tidal range 18. Thirty per cent of tidal range 18 is three feet leaving seven feet for lift. When float 10, 12 rises and the real tidal range 18 is ten feet, cable 107 unravels seven feet of cable from small pulley 110 on shaft 114 to rotate causing large pulley 112 to rotate an equal angle pulling in fourteen feet of cable into pulley 112 spool lifting impeller 28, 32 fourteen feet allowing fluid to enter under side of impeller 32 from intake back flow prevention valve 40 or 42, 44 (FIGS. 1A and 1B) intake and discharge through one way fluid discharge back flow prevention valve 24. When the float 10, 12 rises, reverse happens except fluid pressure on top side of impeller 28, 32 is higher than the pressure on underside and fluid is pushed upward and discharges through back flow prevention valve 24.

As an example, assume that you want to store sea water at some high elevation. Assume weight of sea water is 64 pounds per cubic foot (pcf). Converted to pounds per square inch (psig), 64 pcf=0.44444 psig. Divide 1.0 psig by 0.44444=a column of sea water 225 feet tall. Assume sea water is used to drive a turbine. One hundred psig is required at the turbine. Assume a psig loss of 10% in the delivery system. The pump discharge pressure will have to be 110 psig to have 100 psig at turbine. Pressure of 100 psig is equivalent to pumping sea water to 225 feet above sea level. Pressure of 110 psig is equivalent to pumping sea water to 247.5 feet above sea level. To get buoyancy, float must become submerged reducing the available lift per tide. Assume 30% loss of lift per tide to account for submersion of float. The available lift per tide is 20 ft. times 70%=14 ft. To obtain lift and volume desired, sea water must be pumped to storage at 247.5 ft. elevation above sea level by two tides a day divided by 2 times 14 ft=approximately 8 days. The pump or pump farm will be sized to deliver the full required daily demand by two tides a day every day

When pumping sea water, inlet side of the impeller is open to sea water pressure at pump location.

Impeller blades are counterbalanced and function in same way as back flow preventer. Impeller is heavier than water. When tide goes down, water pressure on underside is higher than pressure on top side. Sea water flows to top side of impeller. When tide rises, pressure becomes higher on top side of impeller and impeller closes and water is lifted and discharged through a back flow preventer.