Title:
Gemstone Setting Arrangement and Method for Setting a Gemstone
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Disclosed is a gemstone setting arrangement in which a gemstone includes a groove disposed proximal a culet of the gemstone. The gemstone setting arrangement further includes a setting having a culet seating portion and a girdle retaining portion. A setting abutting portion of the groove engages a gemstone abutting portion of the culet seating portion. Translation and rotation of the gemstone relative to the setting are inhibited. Also disclosed is a method for setting a gemstone.



Inventors:
Gutierrez, Rafael (Chicago, IL, US)
Application Number:
11/420174
Publication Date:
01/24/2008
Filing Date:
05/24/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A44C17/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LAVINDER, JACK W
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Bishop Diehl & Lee, Ltd. (Schaumburg, IL, US)
Claims:
1. A gemstone setting arrangement comprising: a gemstone having an obverse face, a girdle portion, a culet, and a pavilion portion; a setting having a girdle retaining portion and a culet seating portion, the girdle retaining portion engaging said gemstone proximal said girdle portion relative to said culet, said culet of said gemstone being seated in said culet seating portion; said culet seating portion comprising an obverse face portion and an edge, said edge defining a gemstone abutting portion; said gemstone including a groove in said pavilion portion, said groove being proximal said culet relative to said girdle portion, said groove having a setting abutting portion, said setting abutting portion engaging said gemstone abutting portion of said culet seating portion, whereby said gemstone is inhibited from moving with respect to said setting.

2. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said pavilion portion having a boundary that generally decreases in the direction of the culet.

3. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said setting abutting portion comprising a wall having a generally planar wall surface, said obverse face of said gemstone being generally planar and generally defining a table plane, said wall surface of said setting abutting portion generally defining a plane that is approximately normal with respect to said table plane.

4. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said groove having a terminal obverse point, said terminal obverse point being disposed at a distance along said pavilion portion that is greater than 75% of the distance between said girdle portion and said culet.

5. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said groove having a terminal obverse point, said terminal obverse point being disposed at a distance along said pavilion portion that is greater than 85% of the distance between said girdle portion and said culet.

6. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said girdle retaining portion comprising first and second channel retaining portions.

7. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said gemstone comprising a diamond.

8. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said gemstone comprising a diamond including at least fifty-eight facets.

9. (canceled)

10. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said setting comprising gold.

11. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said setting comprising silver.

12. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said setting comprising platinum.

13. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said setting comprising palladium.

14. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said setting comprising titanium.

15. A method for setting a gemstone, comprising: providing a gemstone, said gemstone having an obverse face, a girdle portion, a culet and a pavilion portion, said gemstone including a groove in said pavilion portion, said groove being proximal said culet relative to said girdle portion and having a setting abutting portion; providing a setting having a girdle retaining portion and a culet seating portion; positioning said gemstone relative to said setting such that said setting abutting portion engages a gemstone abutting portion of said culet seating portion; and causing said girdle retaining portion to engage said gemstone proximal said girdle portion to thereby inhibit said gemstone from moving with respect to said setting.

16. A method according to claim 15, further comprising: providing a gemstone that does include said groove; and cutting said groove into said gemstone.

17. A gemstone setting arrangement comprising: a gemstone having an obverse face, a girdle portion, a culet, and a pavilion portion; a setting having a girdle retaining portion and a culet seating portion, the girdle retaining portion engaging said gemstone proximally said girdle portion relative to said culet, said culet of said gemstone being seated in said culet seating portion; said culet seating portion comprising a gemstone abutting surface, said gemstone including a groove in said pavilion portion, said groove being proximal said culet relative to said girdle portion, said groove having a setting abutting portion, said setting abutting portion engaging said gemstone abutting surface of said culet seating portion, whereby said gemstone is inhibited from moving with respect to said setting.

18. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 17, said girdle retaining portion opposing said gemstone abutting surface.

19. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 17, said setting abutting portion comprising a wall having a generally planar wall surface, said obverse face of said gemstone being generally planar and generally defining a table plane, said wall surface of said setting abutting portion generally defining a plane that is approximately normal with respect to said table plane.

20. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, further comprising at least a second gemstone.

21. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, said girdle retaining portion having a first portion relatively proximal to said culet seating portion and a second portion relatively distal to said culet seating portion, said second portion presenting a setting portion obverse face, said setting portion obverse face being disposed at a distance from said culet seating portion that is less than the distance of said gemstone obverse face from said culet seating portion towards a direction normal to said gemstone obverse face.

22. A gemstone setting arrangement according to claim 1, wherein said gemstone includes only a single groove proximal said culet portion.

23. A gemstone setting arrangement comprising: a gemstone having a girdle, a culet, and a pavilion portion between said girdle and said culet; and a setting having a girdle retaining portion and a culet seating portion, said girdle retaining portion engaging said gemstone proximal said culet; said gemstone including a groove in said pavilion portion, said groove being proximal said culet relative to said girdle, said gemstone engaging said culet seating portion at said groove, whereby said gemstone is inhibited from moving with respect to said setting.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention is in the field of jewelry design and manufacture, and in preferred embodiments is in the field of setting of gemstones, such as natural and synthetic diamonds and other gemstones.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Gemstone jewelry comprises at least one gemstone retained in a setting, the combination being known as a setting arrangement. Numerous gemstone setting arrangements are known in the art. Conventionally, a so-called “solitaire” setting arrangement includes a base and a plurality of protruding gemstone retaining prongs extending therefrom, the prongs forming a retainer or “cage” for a gemstone. The setting is typically made from one or more metals, such as gold, silver, or platinum. Another conventional form of gemstone setting arrangement is known as a “channel set” arrangement. The general form of such arrangement is illustrated generally in FIGS. 1 and 2, with a particular example of same being shown as the pendant illustrated in FIG. 3A. As seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, the gemstone 20 is secured near its girdle by first and second channel portions 21, 22 on one channel retainer 23, and by first and second channel portions 24, 25 on a second opposing channel retainer 26, which are formed as a part of the setting. Thus, as exemplified with respect to the pendant shown in FIG. 3, a plurality of diamonds may be set in various ways and on various locations on an article of jewelry, so long as each diamond is secured via two channel retainers in each portion of the setting.

Another prior art arrangement, known colloquially as an “invisible setting” arrangement, is shown in FIG. 3B. As seen, the setting includes plural gemstones arranged such that the portion of the setting between the gemstones is not visible from the obverse face of the gemstones. In such settings, the gemstones are set by cutting notches into the gemstones proximal the girdle portions of each gemstone, and providing the setting with tabs that engage the notches.

Many other settings arrangements and methods for setting a gemstone have been heretofore described. Examples of such heretofore described settings and methods can be found in U.S. Pat. No. 5,848,539 (Ouzounian, assignor to Gem Information Center, Inc.); U.S. Pat. No. 5,419,159 (Muller); U.S. Pat. No. 6,584,804 (Freedman, et al., assignor to Volare, LLC); and U.S. Pat. No. 6,782,715 (Ruth), among many others.

The invention seeks to provide, in its preferred embodiments, a gemstone setting arrangement that is different from the heretofore described conventional “solitaire” and “channel-set” arrangements.

THE INVENTION

The invention provides a gemstone setting arrangement and methods for setting a gemstone, as defined by the appended claims. In preferred embodiments, the gemstone setting arrangement includes a gemstone having, inter alia, a girdle portion and culet. In accordance with the invention, the gemstone is retained by a setting. The gemstone includes a groove that is disposed relatively proximal to the culet of the gemstone and that engages a gemstone abutting portion of a culet seating portion of the setting. The setting also includes a girdle retaining portion that engages the gemstone relatively proximal to the girdle. Preferably, the girdle retaining portion is disposed in an opposed position with respect to the gemstone abutting portion.

A method for setting a gemstone is also provided. The method comprises providing a gemstone and a setting and securing the gemstone with respect to the setting, the gemstone including a groove proximal the culet.

Further details concerning the preferred embodiments of the invention are set hereinbelow and in the drawings and appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of a conventional channel set diamond arrangement.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the conventional channel set diamond arrangement illustrated in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3A is a front elevation of a prior art pendant, illustrating four diamonds each set in a conventional channel set setting arrangement.

FIG. 3B is a top plan view of a prior art “invisible setting” arrangement.

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view partially cut away, of a diamond setting arrangement in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the arrangement illustrated in FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a rear elevation, enlarged with respect to FIGS. 4 and 5, of a portion of the diamond that forms a portion of the arrangement illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5, and particularly illustrating the groove and culet portion of the diamond.

FIG. 7 is a side elevation of the portion of the diamond shown in FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a top plan view of the culet seating portion of the setting of the arrangement illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5, enlarged with respect to FIGS. 4 and 5.

FIG. 9 is a side elevation of the arrangement shown in FIG. 4, enlarged with respect to FIG. 4 and particularly illustrating a portion of the diamond including the groove and culet and the culet seating portion of the diamond seating portion of the setting.

FIG. 10 is a further enlarged side elevation of a portion of the arrangement illustrated in FIG. 4.

FIG. 11 is a top plan view illustrating a portion of the arrangement shown in FIG. 4 and being cut away in the plane of line 11-11 in FIG. 9.

FIG. 12 is a top plan view illustrating a portion of the arrangement shown in FIG. 4 and being cut away in the plane of line 12-12 in FIG. 9.

FIG. 13 is a front elevation of an article of jewelry prepared in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention, the article taking the form of a pendant with four diamond setting arrangements, the arrangements including four diamonds and a commonly shared setting.

The terms “top,” “front,” and other terms signifying direction or orientation are not intended to be limiting, but are used with reference to the orientation of the setting arrangement illustrated in the figures. In practice, the arrangement may be orientated omnidirectionally, and plural gemstones may be set in different orientations in a single piece of jewelry. The dimensions shown on the Figures are not necessarily intended to represent actual or relative dimensions. In practice the absolute and relative sizes of the gemstone and setting may differ from those shown.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The invention is described with respect to a natural diamond, but it should be understood that the teachings of the present invention are not limited thereto, and that any gemstone setting arrangement may be prepared in accordance with the invention. For instance, the invention may be employed in connection with rubies, sapphires, synthetic diamonds, or other suitable precious or semiprecious gemstones. Likewise, the invention is depicted herewith with respect to a Round Brilliant Cut 58-facet diamond, but it should be understood that diamonds or other gemstones of any suitable shape, regardless of number of facets, may be incorporated into the present invention.

With reference to FIG. 4, the arrangement 30 includes a diamond 31 and a setting 32. As is conventional, the diamond 31 includes a crown 33, an obverse face in the form of a table facet 34, a culet 39, a pavilion 36, and a girdle 37. The pavilion has a portion 35 proximal the culet 39. The crown 33 includes the table facet, star facets, bezel facets, and upper girdle facets, while the pavilion includes pavilion facets, lower girdle facets, and a culet. Any suitable form of culet and girdle are deemed to be encompassed by the invention, and thus, for instance, the girdle may be itself faceted, or polished, or matted, while the culet may comprise a point or a small facet.

With reference to FIGS. 4 and 5, the setting, in the illustrated embodiment, includes a girdle retaining portion 40 and a culet seating portion 41. The setting may be fashioned from any suitable material, typically pure or alloyed gold, silver, platinum, titanium, or palladium, or a combination of the foregoing, and may be composed from a monolithic piece of metal or other material or from plural conjoined pieces that have been welded or otherwise secured together. It is contemplated that the setting will be in many cases comprise a single portion of a larger setting for multiple stones; in such case, plural stones may share a single setting. As illustrated particularly in FIG. 4, the culet seating portion 41 of the setting 32 engages the diamond 31 relatively proximally the culet 39 while the girdle retaining portion 40 engages the diamond 31 relatively proximal the girdle 37.

As illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7, the diamond 31 includes a groove 45 that is disposed relatively proximal to the culet 39 relative to the girdle 37 (not shown in FIGS. 6 and 7). Preferably, the terminal obverse point 46 of the groove 45 (i.e., the terminal point along the pavilion) is disposed along the pavilion at a distance that is greater than 75%, preferably greater than 85%, of the distance between the girdle portion and the culet of the diamond. As seen, the groove 45 includes a setting abutting portion 48 that, in the illustrated embodiment, comprises a wall having a generally planar wall surface 49 (illustrated in FIG. 6). In accordance with the illustrated embodiment, the wall surface defines a plane that is approximately normal with respect to the table plane 50 (illustrated in FIG. 5). In practice, it is contemplated that the wall surface 49 and table facet 34 will not be perfectly planar or disposed exactly normal to each other, in light of imperfections in the diamond or in the faceting process. Accordingly, in preparing a diamond and setting, it is contemplated that the planes may be approximated.

With reference to FIGS. 6 and 7, the setting abutting portion 48 of the groove 45 in the illustrated embodiment includes a portion of the groove that extends in the direction of the culet and away from the obverse face of the diamond and that, in light of the decreasing boundary of the pavilion in this direction, presents a surface against which the gemstone abutting portion of the culet seating portion may abut.

With reference to FIGS. 8-10, the culet seating portion 41 comprises an obverse face portion 51 and a depending portion that comprises a gemstone abutting portion 52 (shown in FIGS. 9 and 10). The setting abutting a portion 48 of the groove 45 abuts and engages the gemstone abutting portion 52 of the culet seating portion 41, which opposes the girdle retaining portion. In the illustrated embodiment, as best shown in FIG. 8, the culet seating portion takes the form of a rectilinear block having a bore in the shape of a right circular cylinder. The diamond thus engages the culet seating portion at only a portion of the gemstone abutting portion at the groove, and otherwise at the portion 35 of the pavilion that is proximal the culet. In practice, the culet seating portion need not be so shaped, and it is contemplated that the culet seating portion may be irregularly shaped or may present a square or flush gemstone abutting portion. So long as the culet seating portion can serve to perform the function as described herein, the particular configuration of the culet seating portion is not critical. In practice, a preferred diameter for the bore is approximately 0.5 mm.

With further reference to FIGS. 4 and 5, the setting 32 includes a girdle retaining portion 40, which, as described hereinabove, engages the diamond proximal the girdle 37. In the illustrated embodiment, the girdle retaining portion 40 comprises first and second channel portions 53, 54 (shown in FIG. 4) which cooperate to secure the gemstone to the setting. Again, the particular configuration of the girdle retaining portion is not critical, and thus, for instance, prongs or other fasteners may be employed.

When a diamond set in a setting as heretofore described, the engagement of the gemstone abutting portion and setting abutting portion inhibits rotation of the diamond about rotational axis 55 (illustrated in FIGS. 9 and 11-12) relative to the setting.

Additionally, with reference to FIG. 5, the channel retaining portion inhibits rotation of the diamond about rotational axes 56, 57 (which are in the plane of the obverse face). Similarly, translation along any of the three axes 55, 56, 57 (shown variously in FIGS. 5, 9, and 11-12) relative to the setting is inhibited. It is seen that the diamond is biased against the culet seating portion and against the girdle retaining portion, and thus the diamond 30 is thus affixed with respect to the setting 31.

To prepare an arrangement as described hereinabove, a diamond having a groove as shown in FIG. 6 is provided. The diamond is positioned with respect to a setting having a culet seating portion such that the culet of the diamond is seated therein. Subsequently, using conventional techniques, the girdle retaining portion is positioned to secure the diamond with respect to the setting.

In an optional part of the invented method, the invention may encompass cutting a faceted gemstone to incorporate the groove as illustrated. Generally, the gemstone should be cut using a conventional jewelers' diamond cutting wheel, which is brought into contact by moving the diamond with respect to the wheel parallel to axis 55 of the diamond, and optionally moving the diamond with respect to the wheel transversely parallel to axis 56 to provide a groove with a uniform wall dimension.

Other embodiments are possible. For instance, the gemstone may be imparted with plural grooves.

When the foregoing teachings are followed, it is possible to prepare articles of jewelry that differ in appearance from conventional solitaire and channel set-arrangements. For instance, with respect to FIG. 13, the pendant depicted therein, includes four diamonds 60 each in an arrangement having a commonly shared setting 61, which in the illustrated embodiment, is a monolithic 18K gold setting. When secured to a chain via a bail and worn about the neck, the diamonds appear to “float” on top of the setting 61, and, while a second channel member optionally could be employed, there is no need for a second channel member as required by the conventional channel set arrangement of the prior art.

It is thus seen that the invention provides a setting arrangement that differs from conventional solitaire and channel set arrangements and from conventional invisible setting arrangements.

All methods described herein can be performed in any suitable order unless otherwise indicated herein or otherwise clearly contradicted by context. The use of any and all examples, or exemplary language (e.g., “such as”) provided herein, is intended to illuminate the invention and does not pose a limitation on the scope of the invention unless otherwise claimed. No language in the specification should be construed as indicating any non-claimed element as essential to the practice of the invention. This invention includes all modifications and equivalents of the subject matter recited in the claims appended hereto as permitted by applicable law. Moreover, any combination of the above-described elements in all possible variations thereof is encompassed by the invention unless otherwise indicated herein or otherwise clearly contradicted by context.