Title:
Removable, reusable, washable liner for use with various types of head gear
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A lining for use under head gear—such as baseball hats, top hats, helmets, cowboy hats, hard hats, beanies, stocking caps, etc.—comprised of two layers, one specifically for comfort, in both softness and breathability, and a second specifically for the filtering of salt, dirt, oils, particulate matter and other undesirable constituents contained in the sweat of the wearer. The two layers are each comprised of four roughly equal pieces of an isosceles triangular shape that are stitched together to form a half-dome. The two layers are then stitched together along the bottom circumference of said dome two form a single half-dome comprised of two individual layers. The two layers employ their relative absorbency to transport moisture from the head of the wearer and into the lining. The outer layer employs its maximal surface area to filter and store the sweat of the wearer, while maintaining breathability. Together the two layers form a lining that both protects the head gear from stains, discoloration, premature wear and odors, maximizing the effective lifespan of the head gear, while also maximizing for the wearer comfort both in terms of fit and breathability, maximizing the effective value of the head gear for the wearer.



Inventors:
Campbell, Douglas A. (Phoenix, AZ, US)
Wheeler, Christopher (Scottsdale, AZ, US)
Application Number:
11/777270
Publication Date:
01/17/2008
Filing Date:
07/12/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
2/181
International Classes:
A42C5/02; A42C5/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MORAN, KATHERINE M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Doug Campbell (Phoenix, AZ, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A removable, washable, reusable liner for use with head gear specifically designed for the absorption and filtration of sweat for the express purpose of preventing: the formation of stains and odors, premature wear, and stiffening of the materials in the head gear; comprising: a. An inner layer made of a soft, thin, breathable and very absorbent fabric; b. An outer layer made of a breathable and absorbent fabric; c. Aforementioned inner and outer layers joined in such a manner as to create a single half dome unit.

2. A liner according to claim 1, wherein said outer layer is comprised of a woven fabric with loops of thread arching from the surface of one face of the fabric in order to maximize the surface area of one face said outer layer

3. A liner according to claim 1, wherein said outer layer is comprised of a woven fabric with a smooth face in order to minimize the surface area of one face of said outer layer

4. A liner according to claim 1, wherein said outer layer is comprised of a fabric in accordance with both claims 2 &3

5. A liner according to claim 1, wherein the maximized surface area face, according to claim 2, is attached to said inner layer in such a manner that the maximized surface area face abuts against said inner layer, and such that the minimized surface area face does not abut against said inner layer, but instead faces outward, away from said inner layer

6. A liner according to claim 1, wherein said inner layer is comprised of a fabric that is slightly more absorbent than the fabric of said outer layer in order to encourage movement of moisture away from the head of the wearer and into the liner, while discouraging the movement of moisture from the liner into the head gear.

7. A liner according to claim 1, wherein said inner layer is comprised of a fabric that has less volume for storage of moisture than the fabric of said outer layer in order to encourage movement of moisture away from the head of the wearer and into the liner, while discouraging the movement of moisture from the liner into the head gear.

8. A removable, washable, reusable liner for use with head gear specifically designed for the absorption and filtration of sweat for the express purpose of preventing: the formation of stains and odors, premature wear, and stiffening of the materials in the head gear; comprising: a. An inner layer made of a soft, thin, breathable and very absorbent fabric; b. An outer layer made of a breathable and absorbent fabric, woven in such a manner as to maximize surface area on one side of the fabric, and minimize surface area on the other side of the fabric; c. Aforementioned inner and outer layers joined in such a manner as to place the maximized surface area face of the outer layer against the less comfortable face of the inner layer, effectively limiting the increased surface area to the hidden inside of the liner

9. A liner according to claim 8, wherein the maximized surface area face is attached to said inner layer in such a manner that the maximized surface area face abuts against said inner layer, and such that the minimized surface area face does not abut against said inner layer, but instead faces outward, away from said inner layer

10. A liner according to claim 8, wherein said inner layer is comprised of a fabric that is slightly more absorbent than the fabric of said outer layer in order to encourage movement of moisture away from the head of the wearer and into the liner, while discouraging the movement of moisture from the liner into the head gear.

11. A liner according to claim 8, wherein said inner layer is comprised of a fabric that has less volume for storage of moisture than the fabric of said outer layer in order to encourage movement of moisture away from the head of the wearer and into the liner, while discouraging the movement of moisture from the liner into the head gear.

12. A liner according to claim 8, wherein said outer layer is comprised of a fabric in accordance with both claims 2 &3

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This patent application is pursuant to and claims the benefits of U.S. Provisional Utility Patent Application, No. 60/807,338, filed Jul. 13, 2006.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Instant Invention

The instant invention relates generally to head gear such as hats, caps, helmets, hard hats, beanies, stocking caps, and any other removable head gear where the wearer may benefit from absorption and filtration of sweat to prevent the formation of stains and odors, premature wear, stiffening of fabric, etc.

The instant invention relates more specifically to a removable, washable, and reusable liner for use under various types of head gear to absorb sweat with the express purpose of filtration of dirt, salt, oils, particulate matter or any other undesirable constituents of human sweat, specifically as a means of preventing the formation of stains and odors, thereby extending the effective life span of the aforementioned head gear, while also improving comfort versus wearing the head gear by itself, thus increasing the effective value of the head gear for the wearer.

2. Description of Related Prior Art

Human beings, as endothermic mammals, use the mechanism of sweating—specifically the evaporation of said sweat—as one of a plurality of methods for maintenance of proper body temperature. Human sweat, however, contains many undesirable constituents including, but not limited to, dirt, salt, oil and other particulate matter. These undesirable constituents are the cause of several maladies with respect to head gear including, but not limited to, stains, odors, premature wear, stiffening of the materials resulting in decreased comfort and itching, and other problems that reduce the effective life span and comfort of the head gear. In order to avoid such problems it is desirable to absorb the aforementioned sweat—to prevent it from reaching the head gear—and to filter out the undesirable constituents of human sweat—to prevent formation of stains & odors, premature wear, etc.

Whereas the related prior art discloses various methods for the absorption of sweat, none relate specifically to the filtration of the undesirable constituents of sweat including dirt, salt, oil and other particulate matter.

    • a. Whereas the related prior art focuses on methods of absorbing sweat from the crown and forehead of the wearer, none employ a whole-head solution to maximize the storage of sweat to prevent penetration of sweat into the head gear.
    • b. Whereas the related prior art employ a moisture barrier to prevent liquids from reaching the head gear, none use the relative absorbancy of the layers of the liner to prevent moisture from reaching the head gear.
    • c. Whereas the related prior art employ a moisture barrier to prevent moisture from reaching the head gear, the instant invention does not, effectively allowing for the evaporation of clean, filtered sweat, helping to facilitate and maintain the natural thermoregulatory processes of the wearer.
    • d. Whereas the related prior art disclose methods employing disposable, single-use liners, the instant invention is specifically designed to be washed and reused, thus reducing waste and investment on the part of the wearer.

The instant invention responds to the above issues, surpassing and improving upon prior art in the following ways:

    • a. The instant invention is designed to filter out the undesirable constituents of human sweat in addition to the absorption of sweat.
    • b. The instant invention employs a whole head solution in order to maximize the storage of sweat to prevent moisture penetration into the head gear.
    • c. The instant invention utilizes the relative absorbancy of the two layers in order to prevent moisture from reaching the head gear.
    • d. The instant invention avoids the use a water proof or wind proof moisture barrier:
      • i. because such barriers tend to increase sweating, effectively defeating the purpose of such a liner;
      • ii. in order to maximize breathability to facilitate the evaporation of sweat, thereby supporting the wearer's natural thermoregulatory processes.
    • e. The instant invention is designed to be removable, washable and reusable to reduce waste and investment on the part of the wearer.
    • f. The instant invention is designed to increase the effective value of the head gear by extending the effective life span of the head gear and by improving the effective comfort of the head gear for the wearer

U.S. Pat. No. 5,920,910 (Calvo)

Whereas Calvo discloses a multi layer sweat band:

    • a. the resultant invention is only a band for use along the crown of the wearer.
    • b. the sweat band is for use specifically with ball caps that have a built in sweat band.
    • c. the sweat band employs cotton terry—with pile on both sides—and not French terry—with pile on one side only
    • d. the sweat band employs vinyl plastics as a moisture barrier

U.S. Pat. No. 5,025,504 (Benston)

Whereas Benston discloses an absorbent liner:

    • a. the resultant invention is only a band for use along the crown of the wearer;
    • b. the resultant invention is disposable.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,578,736 (Dootson)

Whereas Dootson discloses an absorbent liner:

    • a. the resultant invention is only a band for use along the crown of the wearer;
    • b. the resultant invention is disposable.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,502,156 (Wishman)

Whereas Wishman discloses an absorbent liner:

    • a. the resultant invention employs synthetic fibers such as polypropylene fabric;
    • b. the resultant invention employs a non-woven fabric structure;
    • c. the resultant invention employs a moisture barrier.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,203,810 (Alemany et al.)

Whereas Alemany, et al., disclose a method for odor prevention:

    • a. the resultant invention employs active odor control through addition of chemical, acids, etc;
    • b. the resultant invention does not employ filtration of undesirable constituents of sweat;
    • c. the resultant invention is only a pad and not a band or liner.

U.S. Pat. No. 7,043,761 (Epling)

Whereas Epling discloses a two layer liner for use with head gear:

    • a. the resultant invention is specifically for thermal regulation and makes no mention of stains, odors, filtration, etc.;
    • b. the resultant invention employs synthetic fibers;
    • c. the resultant invention employs a moisture barrier that is both water proof and wind proof.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,058,210 (Tivis)

Whereas Tivis discloses a sweat liner for use with hard hats:

    • a. the resultant invention is only designed for absorption of sweat;
    • b. the resultant invention is disposable;
    • c. the resultant invention is only designed for use with hard hats;
    • d. the resultant invention is only a band for use along the crown of the wearer.

SUMMARY

The invention is a lining comprised of two layers so that a layer of soft, highly absorbent, and breathable material—such as silk—rests on the head of the wearer, and so that another layer of absorbent, breathable material with loops of thread arching away from the fabric on one side—such as cotton terry—rests on top of the silk. These two layers allow for increased comfort versus wearing the head gear by itself and allow for the wicking away of sweat, water and other liquids from the head of the wearer and into the lining.

The inner layer of the liner wicks sweat away from the surface of the wearer's head. As this layer becomes saturated with sweat, the sweat then moves into the outer layer of the liner, where it is filtered and stored.

The outer layer of the liner has extra loops of thread arching off the surface of one side of the fabric. These loops maximize the surface area of the fabric allowing for greater filtration ability as the sweat moves into the body of the fabric. Additionally, these loops also maximize the amount of sweat that the outer layer can hold to prevent moisture transfer into the head gear.

The two layers of the liner are such that they are both very absorbent, with the inner layer being slightly more absorbent than the outer layer. These absorption rates serve to facilitate transfer of moisture from the head of the wearer and into the lining. The more absorbent inner layer wicks moisture away from the head. The less absorptive outer layer is still more absorptive than the head of the wearer to move moisture from the inner layer and into the outer layer. The inner layer is also more absorptive than most head gear so that if the outer layer becomes saturated, then the relative absorbency of the layers encourages moisture to move back into the inner layer of the liner instead of into the head gear.

The liner filters out the dirt, oils, salt and other particulate matter contained in the sweat of the wearer in order to prevent stains, discoloration, premature wear and odors from forming in the body of the head gear, increasing the effective lifespan of the head gear.

The liner is also soft, comfortable and breathable in order to increase the comfort level of the wearer when compared with wearing the head gear alone, increasing the effective value of the head gear for the wearer.

The liner is removable, washable and reusable, so that the wearer may wear the lining between their head and the head gear to increase comfort and prevent damage to the head gear, and then remove the lining and wash it for reuse.

The liner is constructed such that both layers are breathable in order to allow for the evaporation of the water contained in the wearer's sweat as well as support the wearer's natural thermoregulatory processes.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 (bottom view) shows the view of the lining looking into the underside of the lining, showing mainly the inner layer, the stitching connecting the individual panels of the inner layer, the stitching connecting the inner and outer layers and a view along the circumference of the outer layer where it attaches to the inner layer.

FIG. 2 (top view) shows a view of the lining looking down from the top, showing mainly the outer layer, the stitching connecting the individual panels of the outer layer, and the stitching connecting the inner and outer layers.

FIG. 3 (side view) shows a side view of the lining showing mainly the outer layer, the stitching connecting the individual panels of the outer layer, and a view along the circumference of the outer layer where it attaches to the inner layer.

FIG. 4 (side view cut away) shows a cut away view of the lining to expose the layered nature of the lining, showing the outer layer—and highlighting the loops on the hidden side of that outer layer—as well as the inner layer, the stitching connecting the individual panels of the inner layer, the stitching connecting the inner and outer layers.

FIG. 5 (back of filter layer) shows the hidden, inner side of the outer layer indicating the loops of thread arching away from and returning to the surface of the fabric.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The liner is constructed of two layers, built separately, then joined along their respective circumferences. The following refers to all figures simultaneously, as the numerical references indicate the same features of the liner in each figure.

The two layers [2 &3] are each built separately of four roughly equal pieces of fabric of a nearly isosceles triangular shape such that the four combine along their equal edges [4] to form a half-dome. The two layers are then stitched together along the circumference of their respective half-dome shapes [5] to form a single half-dome constructed of two layers joined at their respective circumferences.

The inner layer [2] should be made of a soft, comfortable, slightly elastic and breathable fabric—such as ‘stretch silk’ or other weave designed to have a slight elasticity, or a silk-like fabric that contains some small portion of another elastic material. This inner layer must be very absorbent in order to actively wick sweat away from the head of the wearer, but must be thin and breathable enough in order to encourage passage of the sweat into the outer layer. This inner layer should be constructed as detailed above and should be made slightly smaller than the outer layer (in both circumference and depth) so that it will fit neatly inside the outer layer without any necessary bunching or stretching.

The outer layer [3] should be made of an absorbent, breathable and slightly elastic fabric—such as ‘stretch french terry’ or other weave designed to have a slight elasticity, or a natural fiber (e.g. cotton, linen, etc.) that contains some small portion of another elastic material. This outer layer must be maximally absorbent in order to absorb sweat from the inner layer, while being less absorbent than the inner layer to discourage flow of sweat from the outer layer into the head gear. The outer layer should be made of a woven fabric with loops of thread arching out from the surface of one side of the fabric [6] to maximize the surface area for filtration and to maximize the overall volume for storage of absorbed sweat. This outer layer should be constructed as detailed above and should be made slightly larger than the inner layer (in both circumference and depth) so that the inner layer will fit neatly inside of the outer layer without any necessary bunching or stretching.

The stitching [4 &5] will preferably be made of a ‘natural’ fiber—such as cotton, linen, etc.—in order to maintain breathability, but may be made of any suitable thread so as to hold together the pieces of the lining through repeated wash and wear cycles.

Reasonable alterations, changes, variations, etc. may be made during the construction of the instant invention so long as those alterations, changes, variations, etc. do not stray from the intent, spirit and scope of the following claims. Thus, it must be assumed that this invention includes all such embodiments that fall under the scope of those claims