Title:
Carrier for personal electronic and communication devices
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A (1) personal electronic device carrier that can be designed to carry a multitude of different personnel electronic devices, writing material, maps, small books, notepads and keys. A universal strap assembly (2), with shoulder strap pad (13) and velcro loops for belt attachment that can be configured to support the personnel electronic device carrier (1) as a shoulder holster type carrier (FIG. A,B,C,D,E) or support the carrier across the chest of the user (FIG. A,B,F,G,H)



Inventors:
Nowacki, Joseph Michael (Lawrenceville, NJ, US)
Long, Joseph John (Voorhees, NJ, US)
Application Number:
11/483716
Publication Date:
01/10/2008
Filing Date:
07/10/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
224/605
International Classes:
A45C13/30; A45F3/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LARSON, JUSTIN MATTHEW
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
JOSEPH M. NOWACKI (LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ, US)
Claims:
1. A carrier for personal electronic and communication devices, comprising of: a personal device carrier which can be configured to carry personal radios, disc players, cell phones, two way handheld radios and global positioning devices, writing material, maps, small books, notepads and keys.

2. a strap system which crosses in front of the user across the top of the shoulder and connecting to the back of the carrier, velcro loops on the back of the carrier whereby (a) the user has the option of carrying different types of personal electronic devices in order to make the devices more accessible to the user, (b) a strap system allowing the user to be more physically active with their personal electronic device, (c) an alternate strap system allowing the user to carry personal electronic devices in more conventional way much the same way a person would carry a purse.

Description:

BACKGROUND

I. Field of Invention

The invention relates to the field of shoulder holsters for carrying personal electronic and communication devices such as personal radios and disc players, cell phones, two way hand-held radios and global positioning system devices. This invention is an improved way of carrying personal radios and disc players, cell phones, two-way hand-held radios and global positioning system devices.

II. Description of Prior Art

Shoulder holsters are conventionally used to carry pistols and their ammunition. As personal electronic devices, cellular phones and other communication devices have evolved it is only fitting they be carried in a way convenient for the user. The holster-type holder for electronic communication equipment attempted to fill this market niche but does not seem versatile enough to meet market demand.

Personal electronic devices and cell phones are here to stay much like the automobile, airplane, television and computers. Cell phones and their contemporaries such as small two-way hand-held radios and GPS's are a part of society. The aesthetics of carrying a cell phone are important to the user as actually using the phone for its intended need. The suggested improved carrier is ideal for sports minded users such as runners, hikers and anyone requiring the freedom of a device not wrapped around their waist.

Because the communication device carrier is specific to personal electronic devices, cell phones, two way hand-held radios and GPS's, design latitudes are greatly altered from traditional firearms shoulder holster systems. The strap system holding the carrier is smaller and lighter and the carrier itself is lighter because it does not have to accommodate a bulky heavy pistol. The design of existing pistol carriers does not accommodate modem communication devices. Examples of previous firearm shoulder holsters and shoulder straps are described in U.S. Pat. No. 1,037,717 granted to Audley, U.S. Pat. No 1,781,162 granted to Clark, U.S. Pat. No. 2,396,118 granted to Ohlemeyer and U.S. Pat. No. 2,037,132 granted to Hoyt. The aforementioned carriers may be fine for carrying pistols but are not appropriate for carrying items of less weight such as cell phones and their contemporaries.

An example of a previously patented holster for carrying electronic communication equipment is: “holster type holder for electronic communications equipment” U.S. Pat. No. 5,358,159 granted to Audley. The submission for Audley's patent was on Jun. 7, 1993 Audley employs a strap system that can be attached to the waistline or free hanging. The waistline attachment method of Audley's patent does not seem to be a comfortable configuration because it wraps around the back of the neck of the user after a sling wraps completely around the left arm accommodating a receptacle for a cell phone carrier and its clip as it is described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,358,159. The actual holster for carrying the cell phone, pager described and listed as part of the claim (1) of U.S. Pat. No. 5,358,159 does not have a flap to go over the top of the cell phone or pager to keep it in place when not in use. If the communication case is made out of “flexible” material without a cover, to hold the device in place, as described in Audley's patent, then the cell phone or pager could foreseeable part company with the carrying case if it were tipped and not held strait up. Auydley's carrying case as described in his patent is at a vertical angle with the body when mounted in his shoulder holster system making the cell phone or pager difficult to grasp when worn.

In conclusion I am not aware of a shoulder holster carrier for personal electronic devices, cell phones, hand-held two-way radios or GPS's that is aesthetically pleasing, holds cell phones, two way hand-held radio or GPS's securely in place and is ergonomically more correct for the user than what is currently patented.

SUMMARY

This invention, an improved personal electronic device carrier offering two methods of use. Method one is the conventional shoulder holster carrier type in which the strap wraps from the back of the user to the opposite side of the neck then across the front of the user to connect to the front of the carrier. The carrier has buckles attach to it allowing the strap to pass through them so the user may adjust the strap system for the desired use.

In method two lower end of carrier being even with waist line and attached to the belt by two Velcro loops, located on the backside of the carrier. The carrier simply wraps from the back of the user to the opposite side of the neck then across the front of the user to connect to the front of the carrier. The carrier has buckles attached to it allowing the strap to pass through them so the user may adjust the strap system for their desired use.

The carrier is made of durable fabric, expandable, creased and sewn and can be made to accommodate different size cell phones and personal electronic devices. Further advantages will become apparent from the study of the following description and the accompanying drawings.

DRAWINGS

FIG. A is a perspective front view of the carrier with the straps adjusted to be worn as a shoulder holster type carrier, or across the chest of the user.

FIG. C is a left side view of the carrier being worn as a shoulder holster type carrier.

FIG. D is a forward view of the carrier being worn as a shoulder holster type carrier.

FIG. E is a back view of the carrier being worn as a shoulder holster type carrier.

FIG. B is a perspective back-side view of the carrier with the straps adjusted to be worn across the chest of the user, or a shoulder holster type carrier.

FIG. F is a left side view of the carrier being worn across the chest of the user.

FIG. G is a forward view of the carrier being worn across the chest of the user

FIG. H is a rear view of the carrier being worn across the chest of the user.

FIG. I is a front view of carrier and its dimensions.

FIG. J is a back side view of carrier and its dimensions.

FIG. K is the main pocket flap and its dimensions.

REFERENCE NUMERALS

1. Personnel electronic device carrier

2. Universal strap assembly

3. Rear strap retainer

4. Forward strap retainer

5. Loops with Velcro for belt attachment

6. Rear carrier buckle

7. Forward carrier buckle

8. Main pocket carrier

9. Secondary pocket carrier (expandable)

10. Main pocket flap (expandable)

11. Secondary pocket flap

12. Velcro Strip

13. Shoulder strap pad

14. Belt

15. Hidden pocket

DESCRIPTION

FIG. A is perspective taken from the front view of the carrier with the strap adjusted to worn as a shoulder holster. Carrier 1 is connected to buckles 6 and 7. Strap 2 is looped through strap crossover retainer and looped through rear buckle 6 and forward buckle 7. The excess of the adjusted ends of strap 2 is folded into rear strap retainer 3 and forward strap retainer 4. Main pocket carrier 8 is covered by main pocket cover 10 having Velcro 12 to hold pocket cover to carrier. The optional secondary pocket carrier 9 is, to the rear of the main pocket, covered by secondary pocket cover 11 having Velcro to hold pocket cover to carrier. A Velcro strip 12 secures the opening to the hidden pocket located at the top of the carrier.

FIG. C. is left side view of the carrier being worn in the shoulder holster configuration. Carrier 1 sits under the arm of the user leaving the main pocket 8 with pocket cover 10 easily accessible to the user. Secondary pocket 9 sits just behind pocket 8.

FIG. D. is a front view of the carrier being worn in the shoulder holster configuration. Strap 2 (see FIG. D) wraps over the opposite shoulder of the user (in this view the opposite shoulder is the right shoulder) and crosses back to the other arm (in this view the other arm is the left arm) to connect to the carrier through forward buckle 7 and rear buckle 6 not seen in this figure.

FIG. E. is a back view of the carrier being worn as a shoulder holster type carrier. Carrier 1 is connected to strap 2 by the way of rear buckle 6. Strap 2 (see FIG. E) loops from rear buckle 6 over the top of opposite shoulder (in this view opposit shoulder is right shoulder) and connects with forward buckle 7 not shown in this figure.

FIG. B. is a back side view of the carrier with the strap adjusted to be worn in the shoulder holster configuration. Carrier 1 is connected to strap 2 at forward buckle 7 and rear buckle 6 of the carrier. The excess of strap 2 is tucked into rear strap retainer 3 and forward strap retainer 4. In this configuration Velcro loops are attached to the belt.

FIG. F is a left side view of the carrier being worn on the left side of the waistline and the strap across the chest of the user. Carrier 1 sits at waist level of the user. Strap 2 connects at rear buckle 6 to loop around the opposite shoulder of the user (in this view the opposite shoulder is the right shoulder), crosses the front of the user to connect to forward buckle 7 of carrier 1.

FIG. G is a front view of the carrier being worn on the left side of the waistline and the strap across the chest of the user. Carrier 1 sits at waist level of the user. Strap 2 connects at front buckle 7 to loop around the back of the user from the opposite shoulder (in this view the opposite shoulder is the right shoulder) to connect to rear buckle 6 not shown in this view. The excess of strap 2, connected through forward buckle 7, is gathered at forward strap retainer 4.

FIG. H is a rear view of the carrier being worn on the left side of the waistline and the strap across the chest of the user. Carrier 1 sits at waist level of the user. Strap 2 connects to rear buckle 6 to loop around the front of the user from the opposite shoulder (in this view the opposite shoulder is the right shoulder) to connect to front buckle 6 not shown in this view. The excess of strap 2, connected through rear buckle 6, is gathered at rear strap retainer 3.

FIGS. I, J and K are dimensions and measurements of the carrier

OPERATION

In operation there are two ways of wearing the carrier. One way of wearing the carrier is as a shoulder holster as depicted in FIGS. A, B,C, D and E. The Second way of wearing the carrier is simply across the chest as depicted in FIGS. A,B, F, G and H. In both configurations a personal radio, disc player, cell phone, two way hand-held radio, global positioning device and note pads can be easily accessed by the user.

In the shoulder holster configuration the user is given the freedom to carrier the aforementioned personal electronic devices with ease and security. The shoulder holster configuration is especially useful for someone on the go such as joggers, police officers, and hikers and alike because the device being carried is off the waist of the user, or attached to the lower end to the belt. In the shoulder holster configuration the user simply lifts flap 10 or 11 allowing access to the desired articles within the carrier.

An alternate method of using the carrier is to simply adjust front buckle 7 and rear buckle 6 for a comfortable fit across the chest. The alternate method may be useful for someone who needs to carry a personal electronic device but does not feel comfortable wearing the carrier as a shoulder holster. In the alternate method the wearer uses the carrier the same way as in the shoulder holster configuration by lifting flap 10 or 11 allowing access to the desired articles within the carrier.