Title:
Planer-clad corrugated panel
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention is a flat-faced, or planar-clad, corrugated panel with an interface at opposing side-edges. The interface has an extended-crescent and a planar-member extension making an interface such that a plurality of panels are joined and taken apart from below generally without the use of tools. The aesthetically a uniform and finished appearance of the panels is affected. The upper-surface, having corrugations, sheds water, generally without leaking. A plurality of joined panels can be supported by a grid below.



Inventors:
Burkart, James Alphonse (Reston, VA, US)
Application Number:
11/479695
Publication Date:
01/03/2008
Filing Date:
06/30/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04D1/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
HIJAZ, OMAR F
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
James A. Burkart Jr (Reston, VA, US)
Claims:
1. A shedding panel for use under decks, the apparatus comprising a planar member having corrugations and a flat-face the corrugations having overlapping crescents such the panels can be joined together and taken out of position from below.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application claims benefit of Provisional Application No. 60/696,908 filed Jun. 30, 2005.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Field of the Invention

This invention relates generally to the field of an overhead apparatus for shedding water and debris. Moreover it pertains specifically to such apparatus for shedding rainwater under decks.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention generally comprises a planar-member-clad panel with corrugations, the panel having an interface at its opposing side-edges. The interface comprises extended-crescents, or corrugations, and extended planar-members. The panels are joined together at the interfaces by aligning and pushing the panels together whereby the extended-crescent of one panel is disposed over or under the extended crescent of another panel. The upper-face of the extended-planar member of one panel, having the extended-crescent disposed above, interfaces with the lower-face of the extended-crescent of the other panel, keeping the first panel from lifting up and out of position. The panels can most expediently be taken apart by pushing up at the interface and pulling apart. The joined panels create and upper surface that generally sheds water without leaking. The panels can be installed, joined and taken apart from below, and can be supported from below by a grid or stable apparatus.

The foregoing has outlined, in general, the physical aspects of the invention and is to serve as an aid to better understanding the more complete detailed description which is to follow. In reference to such, there is to be a clear understanding that the present invention is not limited to the method or detail of construction, fabrication, material, or application of use described and illustrated herein. Any other variation of fabrication, use, or application should be considered apparent as an alternative embodiment of the present invention.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION

Accordingly several advantages and objects of the present invention are:

An object of the present invention is to provide an elegant, aesthetically pleasing, functional, efficient-to-make and easy-to-install panel that will overcome the aesthetic deficiencies of plain corrugated panels without adding a lot of weight.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a panel with a side-edge interface that will generally keep enjoined panels from blowing out of place with high-winds.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a planar-clad panel which is stronger than a corrugated panel and can breach greater unsupported spans.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a panel with a covering having low-flame spread characteristic.

It is intended that any other advantages and objects of the present invention that become apparent or obvious from the detailed description or illustrations contained herein are within the scope of the present invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The following drawings further describe by illustration the advantages and objects of the present invention. Each drawing is referenced by corresponding figure reference characters within the “DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION” section to follow.

LIST OF FIGURES

FIG. 1 shows a profile of a planar-member-clad panel or flat-face panel.

FIG. 2 shows a profile of two flat-faced panels interfacing.

FIG. 3 illustrates a method of fixing a planar-member of the invention to a corrugated panel.

FIG. 4 shows a profile of two flat-faced panels disposed over members of a grid support structure.

FIG. 5 shows a profile of two flat-faced panels disposed over members of a grid support structure, the panels being fitted together

FIG. 6 shows a profile of two flat-faced panels disposed over members of a grid support structure, the panels being fitted together while slanting.

FIG. 7 shows a profile of a flat-faced panel with a configuration designed for ease of manufacturing.

FIG. 8 shows a profile of a flat-faced panel disposed over members of Burkart's grid structure.

FIG. 9 shows a profile of the interface of two flat-faced panels disposed over members of Burkart's grid structure.

FIG. 10 shows a profile of two joined flat-faced panels disposed over members of Burkart's grid support structure.

FIG. 11 shows a profile of the interface of two flat-faced panels with single corrugation at edges disposed over members of Burkart's grid support structure, the crescents having a triangular configuration.

FIG. 12 shows a profile of two flat-faced panels with single corrugation at edges interfacing and disposed over members of Burkart's grid support structure, the corrugations having a triangular configuration, where the projection member of the cross-member and the filler of the cross-member are replaced by a stiff-facing.

FIG. 13 shows a profile of two corrugated panels interfacing and disposed over members of Burkart's grid structure, the corrugations having a wave configuration.

FIG. 14 shows a profile of two flat-faced panels interfacing and disposed over members of Burkart's grid structure, the corrugations having a wave configuration.

FIG. 15 shows a profile of a panel having a wave profile.

FIG. 16 shows a profile of a panel having a wave profile and fragmented to illustrate crescent and near portions.

FIG. 17 show the interface of two flat-faced panels where the variance space is masked by trim.

FIG. 18 shows the interface of two flat-faced panels where the planar members are thick.

FIG. 19 shows a top view of an embodiment of Burkart's grid structure.

LIST OF PARTS

  • 3—Corrugated panel with planar-face or a planar-clad corrugated panel
  • 3ab—Corrugated panel
  • 3a—Crescent portion of corrugated panel
  • 3a1—Extended corrugation at panel edge, or lapping corrugation
  • 3a1a—Extended corrugation at panel edge, disposed above
  • 3a1b—Extended corrugation at panel edge, disposed below
  • 3a1r—Rise of crescent
  • 3a1z—Zenith of crescent
  • 3a1f—Fall of crescent
  • 3b—Near portion of corrugated panel
  • 3b6bc—Stiff planar-member
  • 3c—Planar-member
  • 3c1—Extended planar-member at panel's edge.
  • 3d—Affixing means between planar-member and near portion of corrugated panel
  • 3d1—Adhesive caulk as an elastic affixing means
  • 3d2—Adhesive/primer for ABS
  • 4—Overlapping crescents
  • 5—Tolerance space between planar-faces
  • 6—Cross-member
  • 6a—Cross-member slat
  • 6a1—End portion of cross-member slat
  • 6b—Projection of cross-member
  • 6bc—Projection-filler of cross-member
  • 6b1—Hollow of cross-member projection
  • 6c—Cross-member filler
  • 7—Spacer
  • 7a—Spacer-slat
  • 7b—Spacer-filler
  • 7c—Spacer screw
  • 9—Rafter-member
  • 9a—Rafter
  • 9b—Projection from rafter
  • 10—Grid support member
  • 11—high-side ledger
  • 11a—horizontal-member of high-side ledger with upward-face
  • 11b—vertical member of high-side ledger with upstanding-face
  • 12—low-side ledger
  • 12a—horizontal-member of low-side ledger with upward-face
  • 12b—vertical member of low-side ledger with upstanding-face
  • 13—Panel clip
  • 13a—Panel clip fastening means
  • 14—Trim

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention as shown in FIG. 1, generally has a planar-member 3c affixed to a panel having corrugations, or a corrugated-panel 3ab, making a flat-faced corrugated-panel or planar-member-clad corrugated panel 3. Planar-member thickness varies from thin, such as 1/16-inch ABS, or thick such as a 1½-inch thick block panel. The corrugated panel 3ab has two defined portions, a crescent portion, or a crescent, 3a, and a near portion 3b. A near portion generally is that potion of a corrugated panel that is adjacent to, or touching or almost touching, to within about ⅛″ from a planar-member, such that a near portion 3b can be glued, welded, adhered, fixed or otherwise attached to a planar-member 3c. A crescent portion 3a generally forms a crescent, having a rise 3ar, a zenith 3az and a fall 3af. FIG. 16 illustrates crescent and near portions by fragmenting a panel having a wave or sinuous profile, FIG. 15.

The corrugated panels as defined herein generally have at least one near portion 3b, and at least two crescents 3a, of which two crescents 3a1 are disposed one at each of the two opposing side-edges of a panel. These are termed extended-crescents 3a1. The panel in FIG. 1 has six distinct crescent portions 3a and five distinct near portions 3b, the crescents at the two extreme edges being extended-crescents 3a1. Correspondingly, disposed below the extended-crescents 3a1 are extended planar-members 3c1.

In FIG. 2, there are two flat-faced corrugated-panels 3, which are enjoined by disposing the extended-crescent 3a1a of one panel over the extended-crescent of the other panel 3a1b. Planar-members 3c of the two flat-faced corrugated-panels are substantially in the same plane and are separated by a small tolerance-space 5, approximately ⅛-inch. FIG. 4 shows a profile of two flat-face corrugated-panels joined together and supported on a grid support system 10.

FIG. 5 shows two panels that are pre-disposed to being joined together. The planar-member 3c provides an obstacle to joining the panels together The enjoining is most easily accomplished if the panel edges are aligned substantially parallel and shimmered into position. In many situations it is best to elevate the panel edges when joining as is shown in FIG. 6. By elevating the edges, usually by pushing from below, one can take out and install panels, even if the panels are installed in the middle of a set of enjoined and contained panels.

Corrugated panels 3ab for domestic purchase are widely available at home stores and lumber stores and are generally manufactured in lengths of 8-ft, 10-ft and 12-ft and widths of about 25½-inches. The shapes of corrugations are typically sinuous, or wave-like FIG. 13 or trapezoidal FIG. 1 or triangular FIG. 8. Panels made of vinyl, fiberglass, polycarbonate and sheet metal are generally available. Panels in many varieties of widths, lengths, configurations and composition are manufactured for commercial consumption. Metal panels sometimes have a single crescent at each edge. Corrugated panels are available in a variety of materials: plastics such as fiberglass, polycarbonate and vinyl; metals such as aluminum, copper and steel.

Planar-members 3c generally can be made of a great variety of materials such as vinyl, ABS surfacing, fiberglass, metals, woods, canes/reeds and stiffened fabrics. Planar-members 3c can be affixed to the corrugated-panels 3ab by various fastening means 3d such as glues or adhesives, screws, rivets, caulk, welding. The preferred method depends on the material properties and configuration of the subject planar-member and the corrugated-panel. The inventor has found domestically available fiberglass and polycarbonate panels to be sufficient. Vinyl panels are unstable with heat and are more likely to warp. Panel widths generally are about 25.5 inches. When panels are set at 24 inches on center the panels overlap one corrugation, or crescent, at their edges, as in FIG. 2.

The Inventor has found a commercially viable and a suitably durable embodiment of the invention, by affixing ABS sheets to corrugated fiberglass panels using a combination of ABS adhesive and polyurethane sealant caulk FIG. 3. An ABS adhesive is applied as spots 3d2 of approximately 1¼-inch diameter, on the back of 1/16-inch ABS sheeting. Polyurethane sealant caulk is applied, as approximately 1-inch diameter by ¼-inch high blobs 3d1 on the spots 3d2 while they are still wet. A continuously corrugated fiberglass panel is then placed upon the ABS sheet whereupon corresponding proximate-portions 3b of the continually corrugated panel interfaces with the blobs of polyurethane. After curing the result is a flexible, durable, strong affixation of an ABS planar-member 3c to a fiberglass corrugated panel 3ab.

Enjoined sheet-clad corrugated-panels can be supported by the grid-system, which is described by Burkart in the patent application US 2004/0232260 A1, and the Patent No. U.S. Pat. No. 6,279,271 B1. Components of the system are demonstrated in FIGS. 8-14 and FIG. 19. FIG. 19 shows a grid section made up of rafter-members 9, cross-members 6, a high-side ledger 11 and spacers 7. The rafter members run parallel and under the overlapping corrugations 3a1 of panels. The cross-members run substantially perpendicular to and are supported by the rafter members. The cross-members attach to or interface with the rafter-members to make a stable grid. Panels then are supported by the grid. Side views of cross-member to rafter-member connections are shown in FIGS. 8-14. The cross-member has a projected portion 6b, and an end-portion 6a1, which interface with the rafters. The thickness of the projected portions 6b can cause a panel to droop in the mid-span of a cross-member. This is more noticeable in a flat surface of the flat-faced corrugated panel. A solution is shown in FIG. 8. A filler 6c, with a thickness of about 3/16-inch on is attached to the top of each cross-member. The effect is a relatively uniform look with somewhat of a shadow effect. As is shown in FIG. 9, the filler and the projecting portion of the cross-member could be combined into a single physical piece 6bc. For example, if a ⅛-inch thick pvc strip were used for the bracketed 6b, it simply could be elongated to replace the filler.

FIG. 12 shows an embodiment in which the flat-facing 3c or the planar-member 3c6bc replaces the bracket and the filler. A ⅛-inch thick ABS sheet would be strong and stout enough for this task.

The corrugation of the panel is can be rounded, square, or various other configurations. The overlapping of the panels 3a1, as shown in FIGS. 8-14, provide a fixing-means between the panels, not requiring an adhering means between the panels, such as screws or glues. Many panels can be attached in succession. A plurality of panels generally are disposed over and supported by the grid.

It is further intended that any other embodiments of the present invention that result from any changes in application or method of use or operation, method of manufacture, shape, size, or material which are not specified within the detailed written description or illustrations contained herein yet are considered apparent or obvious to one skilled in the art are within the scope of the present invention.





 
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