Title:
Nail Pin Assemblies In Light Gauge Steel
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A lightweight structural steel frame assembly uses nail pins as structural fasteners between structural frame members, such as studs, joists, channels and tracks. The structural frame assembly may be substantially free of screws, rivets or other prior art fasteners known for making structural connections between light gauge steel structural members. Structural steel in the range of about 10 to 30 gauge is used for the light gauge structural steel members, or more preferably, in the range of about 14 to 25 gauge. The nails pins are made of a high-strength, ductile steel formed with a ballistic tip for piercing the steel and may include a knurled shank. The nail pins are arranged in a defined pattern.



Inventors:
Suder, David (Tustin, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/736570
Publication Date:
12/27/2007
Filing Date:
04/17/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B21G3/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
NGUYEN, CHI Q
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
POLSINELLI PC (HOUSTON, TX, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A structural lightweight gauge steel frame assembly, comprising: a first lightweight gauge steel frame member; a second lightweight gauge steel frame member fastened to the first member; and means for fastening the first and second members together, said means including at least one ballistic-pointed nail pin piercing both the first and second members and being free of any riveted fastener and of any threaded fastener.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims priority pursuant to 35 U.S.C. § 119(e) to U.S. provisional application Ser. No. 60/792,493, filed Apr. 17, 2006, which application is specifically incorporated herein, in its entirety, by reference.

BACKGROUND

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to structural light gauge steel assemblies such as used in building construction.

2. Description of Related Art

Structural steel shapes formed from light gauge (e.g., approximately 10-30 gauge) sheet steel are known in the art of building construction. For example, interior non-structural walls are commonly constructed using light gauge structural shapes to which gypsum wall board or other covering materials are fastened using nail pins or screws. Less commonly, buildings incorporate load-bearing structural walls constructed primarily of light gauge structural steel shapes as structural members. Such assemblies provide superior strength, durability, and value for selected installations. In load-bearing assemblies of this type, wall elements are generally fastened to each other using threaded screws or rivets.

Notwithstanding their advantages, structural wall assemblies using light gauge structural steel shapes are subject to certain disadvantages. In some assemblies, reliance on threaded fasteners or rivets leads to longer assembly times. It is desirable to provide a structural steel assembly that maintains the advantages of prior-art assemblies, but that can be assembled more quickly.

SUMMARY

The present invention provides a method for constructing load-bearing structures constructed primarily of light gauge structural steel shapes as structural members. Certain structural steel shapes are joined using by driving specially adapted nail pins through abutting webs of adjacent shapes. The pins essentially replace prior-art threaded or riveted fasteners in the assembly, and can be installed much more quickly than these traditional fasteners. Hence, the entire assembly may be constructed more quickly, without sacrificing its strength or structural integrity.

A more complete understanding of the structural steel assembly, and method of making it, will be afforded to those skilled in the art, as well as a realization of additional advantages and objects thereof, by a consideration of the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment. Reference will be made to the appended sheets of drawings which will first be described briefly.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIGS. 1-45 are scaled side, front and plan views of exemplary nail pin and light structural steel assemblies.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A lightweight structural steel frame assembly uses special nail pins as structural fasteners between structural frame members, such as studs, joists, channels and tracks. The structural frame assembly may be substantially free of screws, rivets or other prior art fasteners known for making structural connections between light gauge steel structural members. Structural steel in the range of about 10 to 30 gauge is used for the light gauge structural steel members, or more preferably, in the range of about 14 to 25 gauge. The nails pins are made of a high-strength, ductile steel formed with a ballistic tip for piercing the steel and may include a knurled shank.

A 0.100 inch diameter gripshank Versapin™ nail pin manufactured by Aerosmith Fastening Systems of Indianapolis, Ind. may be used to fasten light-gauge structural steel members. The nails may be loaded into a suitable nail gun and nailed into opposing parallel sheets of structural members. The nail should have a ballistic tip, so that when the nail is shot out of the gun, the tip uniformly pierces the adjacent parallel sheets. Nail patterns should be arranged so that the primary load on each nail pin is a shear load.

Exemplary configurations of nails and lightweight gauge steel structural members are shown in FIGS. 1-45. FIG. 1 shows an exemplary stud-to-stud or joist-to-joist connection using nail pins. Table 1 below shows details of different structural members fastened according to FIGS. 2-43. A safe working load, maximum applied load, assumptions, and other details are shown or described for each configuration depicted in the figures.

TABLE 1
ReferenceDetailSmith-Emery
NumberNumberTest NumberAttachment Description
114A49-5320g RC-to-14g Stud
214B94-9816g FS-to-14g Stud
314C64-6814g Track-to-14g Stud
414D64-6814g Rim Track-to-14g Stud
514E94-9816g Rim Track-to-14g Stud
614F94-9814g Rim Track-to-lOg FS & 14g Stud
714G94-9816g Rim Track-to-16 FS & 14g Stud
814H.164-8814g Stud-to-14q Stud At Shearwall Joint
914H.264-8814g Stud-to-14g Stud T ical
1014H.364-6814g Joist-to-14 Joist
1114129-3325g RC-to-14g Stud
1216A89-9320g RC-to-16g Stud
1316884-88lOg FS-to-169 Stud
14ISC84-8816 Track-to-lOg Stud
1516D94-9814g Rim Track-to-lOg Stud
1616E84-88lOg Rim Track-to-lOg Stud
17IGF84-8814g Rim Track-to-lOg FS & lOg Stud
1816G84-88lOg Rim Track-to-lOg FS & lOg Stud
1916H.184-8816g Stud-to-lOg Stud At Shearwall Joint
201OH.284-8816g Stud-to-16 Stud I pical
2116H.384-8816g Joist-to-lOg Joist
2216134-3825g RC-to-16g Stud
2318A1-520g RC-to-18g Stud
2418811-1516gFS-to-18gStud
2518C21-2318g Track-to-18g Stud
2618D24-2814g Rim. Track-to-1 Bg Stud
2718E11-15lOg Rim Track-to-18g Stud
281SF11-1514g Rim Track-to-lOg FS & 18g Stud
2918G11-15lOg Rim Track-to-lOg FS & 18g Stud
3018H.121-2318g Stud-to-18 Stud At Shearwall Joint
3118H.221-2318g Joist-to-18 Joist T ical
3218H.221-2318g Stud-to-18g Stud
3318116-2025g RC-to-18g Stud
3420A69-7320g RC-to-20g Stud
3520889-9316 FS-to-20g Stud
362CC69-7320g Track-to-20g Stud
3720049-5314g Rim Track-to-20g Stud
3820E89-93lOg Rim Track-to-20g Stud
3920F89-9314g Rim Track-to-lOg FS & 20g Stud
4020G89-9316g Rim Track-to-lOg FS & 20g Stud
4120N.169-7320g Stud-to-20g Stud At Shearwafl Joint
4220H.269-7320g Joist-to-20g Joist
4320H.269-7320g Stud-to-20g Stud Typical
44201 6-1025g RC-to-20g Stud

FIG. 2 shows a means for fastening a 20 gauge resilient channel to a 14 gauge stud using a 0.100 inch diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail positioned at 20 inches on-center spacing. The fastening means is free of threaded fasteners, rivets, adhesive, or welds, as is true for all fastening assemblies shown in FIGS. 1-43.

FIG. 3 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge flat strap to a 14 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 4 shows a means for fastening a 14 gauge track to a 14 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 5 shows a means for fastening a 14 gauge rim track to a 14 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail spaced at 24 inches on center.

FIG. 6 shows a means for fastening a 14 gauge rim track to a 14 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail spaced at 24 inches on center.

FIG. 7 shows a means for fastening a 14 gauge rim track and a 16 gauge flat stock to a 14 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 8 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge rim track and 16 gauge flat stock to a 14 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 9 shows a means for fastening a 14 gauge stud to a 14 gauge stud at a shearwall joint using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 10 shows a means for fastening a 14 gauge stud to a 14 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 11 shows a means for fastening a 14 gauge joist to a 14 gauge joist using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail spaced at 6 inches on center.

FIG. 12 shows a means for fastening a 25 gauge resilient channel to a 14 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail spaced at 24 inches on center.

FIG. 13 shows a means for fastening a 20 gauge resilient channel to a 16 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail spaced at 24 inches on center.

FIG. 14 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge flat strap to a 16 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 15 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge track to a 16 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 16 shows a means for fastening a 14 gauge rim track to a 16 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 17 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge rim track to a 16 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 18 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge rim track and 16 gauge flat stock to a 16 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 19 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge rim track and 16 gauge flat stock to a 16 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 20 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge stud to a 16 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail at a shearwall joint.

FIG. 21 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge track to a 16 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail spaced at 24 inches on center.

FIG. 22 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge joist to a 16 gauge joist using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 23 shows a means for fastening a 25 gauge resilient channel to a 16 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail spaced at 24 inches on center.

FIG. 24 shows a means for fastening a 20 gauge resilient channel to an 18 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 25 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge flat strap to an 18 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 26 shows a means for fastening a 18 gauge track to a 18 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 27 shows a means for fastening a 14 gauge rim track to an 18 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 28 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge rim track to an 18 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 29 shows a means for fastening a 14 gauge rim track and 16 gauge flat stock to an 18 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 30 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge rim track and a 16 gauge flat stock to an 18 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 31 shows a means for fastening an 18 gauge stud to an 18 gauge stud at a shearwall joint using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 32 shows a means for fastening an 18 gauge joist to an 18 gauge joist using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 33 shows a means for fastening a 25 gauge resilient channel to an 18 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 34 shows a means for fastening a 20 gauge resilient channel to a 20 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 35 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge flat strap to a 20 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 36 shows a means for fastening a 20 gauge track to a 20 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 37 shows a means for fastening a 14 gauge rim track to a 20 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 38 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge rim track to a 20 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 39 shows a means for fastening a 14 gauge rim track and 16 gauge flat stock to a 20 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 40 shows a means for fastening a 16 gauge rim track and 16 gauge flat stock to a 20 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

FIG. 41 shows a means for fastening a 20 gauge stud to a 20 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail at a shearwall joint.

FIG. 42 shows a means for fastening a 20 gauge joist/stud to a 20 gauge joist/stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nails in pairs spaced at 24 inches on center.

FIG. 43 shows a means for fastening a 25 gauge resilient channel to a 20 gauge stud using a 0.100 diameter ballistic pointed gripshank nail.

In a building frame, primary load on the nail pins should be in shear. To measure shear capacities of various configurations, light gauge steel coupons were fastened by a single 0.100 nail pin and tested in shear loading in conformance with AISI Standard CF-92-1, Test Methods For Mechanically Fastened Cold-Formed Steel Connections. Each sample was uniformly loaded to failure, defined as the peak load just before fastener fracture, fastener pull out, or fastener tear our from the base coupon material. Various combinations of 14, 16, 18, 20 and 25 gauge steel coupons were tested. Results are reported in the tables provided below.

TABLE 1
Shear Capacities of a Single Nail Pin Fastener Installed Into Light Gage Steel
Quantity & Configuration
of Steel Base MaterialAverage
Sample/Coupons Connected by A Single Nail Pin2Max. Load,Load,Failure Mode
Test No.114-GA16-GA18-GA20-GA25-GALbs.Lbs.Type3
111637668A
211672A
311677A
411644A
511709A
611353356A, C(25-GA)
711377A, C(25-GA)
811294A, C(25-GA)
911380A, C(25-GA)
1011378A C(25-GA)
1111884890B
1211878B
1311861B
1411936B
1511889B
1611293338A, C(25-GA)
1711349A, C(25-GA)
1811398A, C(25-GA)
1911301A, C(25-GA)
2011351A, C(25-GA)
212690704A
222748A
232675A
24119411026B, C(18-GA)
2511934B, C(18-GA)
26111100B, C(18-GA)
27111125B, C(18-GA)
28111032B, C(18-GA)
2911286301C(25-GA)
3011291C(25-GA)
3111312C(25-GA)
3211305C(25-GA)
3311309C(25-GA)
3411270294C(25-GA)
3511320C(25-GA)
3611284C(25-GA)
3711305C(25-GA)
3811293C(25-GA)
3911112651144B
401111234B
41111920B
421111016A
431111283B
4421974903A
4521878A
4621967A
4721884A
4821811A
4911892907B
5011984A
5111877B
5211955B
5311829B
54219911020B
55211162B
56211000A
5721980A
5821966A
59111958949B
601111060B
61111971B
62111813B
63111945B
64212171218B
6521233B
6621129B
6721313B
6821199B
692514518A
702520A
712530A
722533A
732491A
74129021088A
75121335B
76121015A
7712982A
78121208A
79211054989A
8021989A
8121978A
8221947A
8321976A
842540827A
852889A
862951B
872840B
882914A
8911490736A, C(20-GA)
9011748B
9111795A
9211860B, C(20-GA)
9311789A, C(20-GA)
941111711111A
9511987B
96111147B
97111104B
98111144B
9939611026A
1003994B
10131049B
10231067A
10331058B
10431868868A
10513148148A
106112675675A

1Notes: 1. Unless otherwise noted in the following, the majority of the nail pin fasteners were threaded. The fasteners in Test Nos 104 through 105 had smooth shanks. 2. The 25-GA base material coupons in Sample/Test Nos. 29 through 38 contained corrugations at mid-length. 3. Sample/Test Nos. 74 through 83 were all marked “HELI” when received. 4. All 16-GA coupons contained in Sample/Test Nos. 84 through 103 were stainless steel

2For examples containing a total of three or more base material coupons, the ends of the smallest and largest gage coupons were gripped nto the crosshead of the testing machine while the middle gage coupon(s) served as a ‘filler’ between the two gripped coupons. For similar samples previously described except with two or more of the same gage material, the others served as the ‘filler’.

3Typical Failure More Types: A = Pin fastener pull-out B = Pin fastener sheared C = Base material tear or fastener hole elongated

FIGS. 1-43 describe connections such as may readily be used to construct a building frame from lightweight gauge steel structural members using piercing nail pins and a minimal amount of threaded fasteners or rivets. Nearly all fastening to be completed in a building frame may be accomplished using the depicted means for fastening. Where safe working loads would be exceeded, other fastening methods or structural assemblies may be adapted as known in the art. Care should be taken to conform to the proscribed assemblies depicted in FIGS. 1-43 in constructing the structural frame.

Having thus described a preferred embodiment of nail pin assemblies in light gauge steel and a method for fastening lightweight gauge steel structural members together to construct a building frame. it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that certain advantages of the within system have been achieved. It should also be appreciated that various modifications, adaptations, and alternative embodiments thereof may be made within the scope and spirit of the present invention. The invention is defined by the following claims.