Title:
Flip pack
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A fishing flip pack is described that consists of a detachable bag from a user worn flip pack harness. The flip pack harness and the bag are connected at a position that allows the user to access items in the bag and allow the user to easily manipulate a fishing rod.



Inventors:
Matschke, Brent Alden (Santa Monica, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/473643
Publication Date:
12/27/2007
Filing Date:
06/23/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
224/637, 224/645
International Classes:
A45C15/00; A45F3/04; A45F4/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
HELVEY, PETER N.
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Law Office of J Curtis Edmondson (Hillsboro, OR, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A flip pack assembly, said flip pack assembly comprising: a bag, said bag comprising a bag top part, a bottom part and a chamber; a back shoulder strap, said back shoulder strap having a first end and a second end; a front shoulder strap, said front shoulder strap having a first end and a second end; and a waist strap, said waist strap having a first end and a second end; and means for connecting the top part of said bag to said back shoulder strap; and means for connecting said first end of said waist strap with said second end of said waist strap; and means for connecting said first end of said back shoulder strap with said waist strap; and means for connecting said first end of said front shoulder strap with said waist strap; means for connecting said second end of said front shoulder strap and said second end of said second shoulder strap; such that a harness is created.

2. The flip pack assembly as in claim 1 wherein said bag further comprises rings proximately mounted on the exterior of the bag.

3. The flip pack assembly as in claim 1 wherein said bag further comprises pockets proximately mounted on the exterior of the bag.

4. The flip pack assembly as in claim 1 wherein said chamber has one access point, the area of said access point expanded or limited by a string.

5. The flip pack assembly as in claim 1 wherein said means for connecting the second end of said front shoulder strap and the second end of said second should strap is a buckle.

6. The flip pack assembly as in claim 1 wherein said means for connecting the second end of said front shoulder strap and the second end of said second should strap is a velcro.

7. The flip pack assembly as in claim 1 wherein said means for connecting said first end of said waist strap with said second end of said waist strap is a buckle.

8. The flip pack assembly as in claim 1 wherein said means for connecting said first end of said waist strap with said second end of said waist strap is velcro.

9. The flip pack assembly as in claim 1 wherein a plurality of tubes are proximately mounted approximately near the connecting point of said back shoulder strap to said waist strap.

10. The flip pack assembly as in claim 1 wherein said tubes are dimension to hold a handle of the fishing rod.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a device for holding articles in general, and to aid in fishing from a surfboard in particular.

2. Discussion of the Related Art

Backpacks are a practical and efficient way to carry items. A typical backpack consists of a sack and two straps that loop over each shoulder. Variations of this design are numerous, insofar that the, sack may be integral or have holes (e.g. a child carrier). Likewise, the materials used for the sack and straps vary greatly from cloth to synthetic materials.

Within this broad range of backpack designs are those that improve the ability to transport items while fishing. It is not unusual for an individual to desire a backpack for storing tackle, caught fish, and food. Also, the backpack may have attached cylinders for carrying fishing rods.

In some situations, such as when one is fishing from a small kayak or surfboard, the backpack may be the only way to efficiently carry items. Other ways to carry items, such as crates attached to the kayak or surfboard, interfere with the normal operation of the craft.

U.S. Pat. No. 1,198,202 (Sep. 12, 1916) to Drinkard, describes a harness like fishing device having two shoulder straps, and a body strap that wraps around the chest and the belt. The belt has receptacles for carry lunch, tackle, etc. A holder is also provided for a fishing rod.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,526,535 (Jun. 18, 1996) to Dobrzenski, describes a fishing vest with hinged pockets, three pockets attached to each of the front two panels and a pocket placed at the rear of the vest.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,619,819 (Apr. 15, 1997) to Hauschild, describes a carrying case that may be wrapped around a fisherman's waist for carrying tackle, etc. It is adjustably held around the waist by and loop material such as VELCRO.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,797,232 (Aug. 25, 1998) to Kirstner, et. al describes fishing gear and rod holder that is attachable to the chest strap of a wader of the bib of bib overalls.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,975,393 (Nov. 2, 1999) to Bellamy describes a fishing rod carrying backpack having a rod-holding member in the bottom of the backpack Bellamy employs snap together buckles for fastening the backpack around the wearer.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,471,103 (Oct. 29, 2002) to Frese, et. al. describes a device for carrying fishing rods.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,659,316 (Nov. 9, 2003) to Fleming, et. al. describes a quiver with tubes for carrying items, including fishing rods.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,869,146 (Mar. 22, 2005) to Gollahon depicts a fishing pole harness.

US Patent Application Publication 20030051388 (Mar. 20, 2003) to Barnes describes a personal, back mounted, multi-rod carrier.

US Patent Application Publication 20030193390 (Sep. 13, 2003) to Smith provides for a fishing gear vest holder. The holder includes straps attached to a waist belt.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The preferred embodiment of the present invention describes a flip pack assembly that provides for a bag mounted on a user worn harness. The harness includes one strap over the shoulder in which a bag is attached approximately at the top of the shoulder position. The person can manipulate the bag by “flipping” it from front to back. This change of position allows a surfer the ability to paddle out prone on a surfboard with the bag portion lying on the back of the surfer, and then by flipping the bag forward the surfer can easily access the contents of the bag.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a front view of the preferred embodiment of the flip pack.

FIG. 2 is a rear view of the preferred embodiment of the flip pack.

FIG. 3 is a front view of the preferred embodiment of the flip pack as worn by a person.

FIG. 4 is a side view of the preferred embodiment of the flip pack as the user grabs the fishpole restraint.

FIG. 5 is a back view of the flip pack assembly with the bag removed.

FIG. 5A is a schematic view of the flip pack as worn on the person.

FIG. 5B is a close up view of the bag portion of the flip pack.

FIG. 5C is a close up view of the buckle connection of the flip pack.

FIG. 5D is a close up view of the fishing pole inserted into the fish pole tubes.

FIG. 5E is a close up view of the connection between the bag portion of the flip pack and the belt.

FIG. 6 is a back view of the flip pack as worn by the person.

FIG. 7 is a front view of the flip pack assembly with the bag attached in the fishing position.

FIG. 8 is a front view of the flip pack assembly worn by the person in the paddling position.

FIG. 9 is a back view of the flip pack assembly as worn by the user depicting the strap.

FIG. 10 is a back view of the flip pack assembly as worn by the user demonstrating the “flipping” of the pack from front to back.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

While describing the invention and its embodiments various terms will be used for the sake of clarity. These terms are intended to not only include the recited embodiments, but also all equivalents that perform substantially the same function, in substantially the same manner to achieve the same result.

Preferred Embodiment—Flip Pack

FIG. 1 is a front view of the preferred embodiment of the flip pack. The major components of the flip pack consists of a backpack 10, a bag 50, and a connecting strap 30 between the backpack 10 and the bag 50.

The components of the backpack 10 are two shoulder straps 16′, 16″, a fabric cavity 18, a fishpole tube 12, a fishpole tube connector 14, a fishpole restraint 20, a bag connector 30, waist straps 60, 62 with waist strap interlocking connectors 64,66, and a backpack interconnect 56. The backpack 10 is attached to the two shoulder straps 16′, 16″ at opposite sites such that the shoulder face outwards from the bag and are proximately opposite from one another. The top part of the straps 16′, 16″ are joined at the upper part of the backpack 10 and the lower part of the straps 16′, 16″ are joined at the lower part of the backpack 10. The straps 16′, 16″ are made from either a flexible or adjustable material and may be sized to comfortable loop around the arms of a person and yet draw the backpack 10 into close proximity of the back of the person. Likewise the waist straps 60, 62 and the waist strap interconnects 64,66 draw the backpack 10 towards the person. Connected to the bag is a fishpole tube 12 which is attached via the fishpole tube connector 14. The fishpole tube connector 14 may be made of a flexible and elastic material allowing the tube to be pulled away from the bag 10 with sufficient force by a person, but with enough force to support a lightweight fishing rod. The fishpole restraint 20 is a piece of elastic material dimensioned such that it may be easily inserted into a ring of a rod. One end of the fishpole restraint 20 will have the ability to attached and detach from the bag 10. The bag connector 30 may be made of a flexible material of sufficient length to allow the bay

The components of the bag 50 is a pouch for holding materials, a bag interconnect 52, and a bag connector 30. The pouch may be made from permeable or impermeable materials. The bag interconnect 52 is attached to the bottom of the bag 50. The top of the bag 50 is connected to a bag connector 30 which is joined at the top of the backpack 10.

The backpack interconnect 56 is of sufficient length to attach to the bag interconnect 52 such that the bag 50 may be joined so that the bag 50 overlays the backpack 10. Alternately the bag 50 may be joined so that the bag 50 overlays the front of the person (not shown).

Now referring to FIG. 2 which depicts a rear view of the flip pack. The rear view shows the orientation of the shoulder straps 16′, 16″ and the waist strap 60,62 and waist strap connectors.

Now referring to FIG. 3 which depicts a view of the flip pack as worn by a person 80. As demonstrated, the bag 50 may be orientated in front of the person 80. The flip pack is of a size that approximates the front of an individual. The size of flip pack should not be so excessive as to interfere with the normal movement of a fishing rod 70.

Now referring to FIG. 4 which depicts a view of the flip pack with fishing pole 70 inserted into the fishpole tube 12 (not shown). The shoulder straps 16′, 16″ (not shown) support the bag 50. The fishpole restraint is looped through the ring to attached to the shoulder strap 16′.

Alternate Embodiment—Flip Pack with Harness

Now referring to FIG. 5. FIG. 5 depicts a rear view of the flip pack assembly 10. The flip pack assembly consists of a bag 100, a back shoulderstrap 130, a waist strap 140, and a front shoulder strap 160. The bag 100 is connected to the back shoulder strap 130 at a point that is between each end of the back shoulder strap 130. One end of the back shoulder strap 130 is connected to the waist strap 140 at a point between each end of the waist strap 140. Also connected to the waist strap 140 is a front shoulder strap 160.

Now referring to FIG. 5A, a schematic depiction is shown of the interconnection between each of the aforementioned components as are worn on the individual. The back shoulder strap 130 is connected to the front shoulder strap 160 using a cinch type connector. Likewise the waist strap 140 loops around the waist of the person to connect upon itself with a cinch type connector. The bag 100 is attached approximately at the shoulder point on the back shoulder strap 130. This creates a harness like structure which encircles the user.

Now referring to FIG. 5 and FIG. 5B a detailed view of the bag 100 is shown. The bag 100 consists of a bag fastener 112, tackle pockets 114, tool clip on ring 116, and a bag drawstring 118.

The bag 100 may be made of any permeable or impermeable material although an impermeable material is preferable for use in the aquatic environments. The bag 100 dimensions are approximately the size of a sack that spans the portion of the adult back. The bag 100 can be hollow in the interior or provided with a number of interior pockets or compartments for storing items. Access to the inside of the bag 100 is via a bag hole 119 on one end of the bag 100. A pair of drawstrings 118 may be used to expand or reduce the size of the bag opening.

External to the bag 100 a number of tackle pockets 114 may be placed for external access to items. Likewise a series of tool clip on rings 116 may also be placed on the side of the bag 100. At the base of the bag 100 is a bag fastener 112 that may consist of a pair of lines or lanyards. On the other side of the bag 100, immediately above the bag drawstring 118 is a length of material used to affix the bag to the back shoulder strap 130.

Now referring back to FIG. 5 and FIG. 5C. The back shoulder strap 130 consists of a pair of pole straps 132, one or more fishpole tubes 134, a connection point to the waist strap 140, and a tapered end 138 for inserting into the shoulder buckle 162. As shown in detail in FIG. 5C the tapered end 138 overlays the front shoulder strap 160 and is held in place by compression with a shoulder buckle 162.

Now referring to FIG. 5 and FIG. 5D. A fishpole 133 is shown inserted into the fishpole tubes 134. The fishpole 133 is held into place by the pole straps 132.

Now referring back to FIG. 5 and FIG. 5E. The bag fastener 112 on the bag 100 is connect to the waist strap 140 via a waste bag fastener 136. This secures the bag 100 during operation.

Now referring back to FIG. 5, the waist strap 140 has a waist buckle 142 and a tapered end 144. During operation the tapered end is looped around and inserted underneath the waist buckle 142 to form a loop. The loop can be cinched down on the waist of the user to form a permanent connection.

Likewise the front shoulder strap 160 loops around to connect to the back shoulder strap 130 to form a loop across the shoulder of the user. A shoulder buckle 162 forms a compression connection as depicted earlier in FIG. 5A.

Now referring to FIG. 6 which depicts a rear view of the flip pack in use. The waist strap 140 loops around the waist of the person. Two fishpole tubes 134 are located at the base of the back shoulder strap 130 where it meets the waist strap 140. Pole straps 132 are located at the top of the back shoulder strap 130.

Now referring to FIG. 7 which depicts a front view of the flip pack in use in the “fishing position”. The bag 100 is in front of the person and secured to the waist strap 140 by the bag fastener strap 112. Visible are the tackle pockets 114 and the clip on rings 116. A draw string 118 expands and restricts access to the internal part of the bag 100. The term “fishing position” generally refers to when the individual needs access to the interior of the flip pack from the front (e.g. where the individual can look down into the flip pack). This term is not meant to be construed in the restrictive sense that the individual must be fishing.

Now referring to FIG. 8 which depicts the same front view the flip pack in use in the “paddling position”. The bag 100 is in back of the person. Without the bag in front the person is able to lie more comfortable on a flat surface, such as, a surfboard. Likewise movement of the arms in front of the person is less restricted.

Now referring to FIG. 9 which depicts the rear view of the flip pack in use in the “paddling position”. The bag 100 is secured to the waist strap 140 via the bag fastener 136. The term “paddling position” is likewise not meant to construed in the limiting sense, rather, simply denotes when the bag 100 is lying on the back of the person.

Now referring to FIG. 10 which demonstrates the movement of the bag 100 of the flip pack from the “fishing position” to the “paddling position. Here the person uncouples the bag fastener 136 from the waist 140. The person then lifts the bag from the “fishing position” over the top of the shoulder to the “paddling position. In most cases the bag drawstring 118 will be cinched to prevent items internal to the bag 100 from falling out due to gravity.

The method of moving the bag 100 from front to back provides a practical means for accessing items while fishing, but having comfort while paddling. Alternate embodiments could allow a bag that may be detached from the back shoulder strap 130 so that it may be interchanged with different types of bags or carried separately as a purse.

Individual components of the preferred embodiment and the alternate embodiment may be interchanged. For example, the lanyard tie on the alternate embodiment may be used in lieu of the bag and backpack interconnect system of the preferred embodiment.