Title:
Ball hitting swing method
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A process for more accurately delivering a hitting device to a ball, including the steps of: positioning straightly the leading or front leg at the start of and during the process until after contact with the ball, pointing and planting the leading or front foot at least partially in the direction from which the ball is traveling, positioning the hands and the hitting device such that the distal end of the hitting device is below the shoulders and the hitting device is held substantially parallel to the ground at the start of the process, delivering the hitting device in the same plane as the ball is traveling, and utilizing rotation of the trunk and hips about an axis to delivering the hitting device to a ball with little or no forward or lateral movement of the body.



Inventors:
Hart, Roger U. (San Diego, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/541592
Publication Date:
12/20/2007
Filing Date:
10/02/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B69/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GRAHAM, MARK S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Eric Hanscom / InterContinental IP (Carlsbad, CA, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A method for swinging a hitting device to hit a ball traveling towards a hitter holding the hitting device from a location away from a hitter holding the hitting device, the method comprising the steps of: a) a first step, comprising providing the hitter in a ready position before swinging the hitting device, the ready position comprising straightening a leading leg of the hitter at the knee to produce a stiff leading leg before commencing a swing with the hitting device, where the stiff leading leg is positioned toward the direction of an incoming ball, and positioning the hitting device below the hitter's shoulders; b) a second step, comprising a swing, which comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of an incoming ball while maintaining the stiff leading leg without moving the stiff leading leg toward the direction of an incoming ball where the hitting device is swung within a swing plane substantially coincident with the movement plane associated with a projected travel path of the incoming ball; and c) a third step, comprising rotating the torso of the hitter about an axis that extends through the hitter's head, through the middle of the hitter's torso, and through the leading leg.

2. A method for swinging a hitting device to hit a ball traveling towards a hitter holding the hitting device from a location away from a hitter holding the hitting device, the method comprising the steps of: a) a first step, comprising providing the hitter in a ready position before swinging the hitting device, the ready position comprising straightening a leading leg of the hitter at the knee to produce a stiff leading leg before commencing a swing with the hitting device, where the stiff leading leg is positioned toward the direction of an incoming ball: b) a second step, a swing, which comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of an incoming ball while maintaining the stiff leading leg; and, c) a third step, comprising rotating the torso of the hitter about an axis that extends through the hitter's head, through the middle of the hitter's torso, and through the leading leg.

3. The method of claim 2, where the first step additionally comprises positioning the hitting-device below the hitter's shoulders.

4. The method of claim 2, where the second step additionally comprises the hitting device being swung within a swing plane substantially coincident with the movement plane associated with a projected travel path of the incoming ball.

5. The method of claim 2, where, the first step additionally comprises positioning the hitting device below the hitter's shoulders, and the second step additionally comprises the hitting device being swung within a swing plane substantially coincident with the movement plane associated with a projected travel path of the incoming ball, and where the hitting device is swung without moving the stiff leading leg toward the direction of an incoming ball.

6. The method of claim 5, where, the first step additionally comprises positioning the hitting device below the hitter's shoulders, and the second step additionally comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of an incoming ball while maintaining the stiff leading leg without moving the stiff leading leg toward the direction of an incoming ball.

7. The method of claim 2, where, the first step additionally comprises positioning the hitting device below the hitter's shoulders, and the second step additionally comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of an incoming ball while maintaining the stiff leading leg without taking a step with the stiff leading leg, and where the hitting device is swung within a swing plane substantially coincident with the movement plane associated with a projected travel path of the incoming ball.

8. The method of claim 2, where, the first step additionally comprises positioning the hitting device below the hitter's shoulders, and the second step additionally comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of an incoming ball while maintaining the stiff leading leg without taking a slide with the stiff leading leg.

9. The method of claim 2, where, the first step additionally comprises positioning the hitting device below the hitter's shoulders, and the second step additionally comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of an incoming ball while maintaining the stiff leading leg without taking a step or a slide with the stiff leading leg.

10. A method for swinging a hitting device to hit a ball traveling towards a hitter holding the hitting device from a location away from a hitter holding the hitting device, the method comprising the steps of: a) a first step, comprising providing the hitter in a ready position before swinging the hitting device, the ready position comprising positioning the hitting device below the hitter's shoulders; b) a second step, a swing, which comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of an incoming ball where the hitting device is swung within a swing plane substantially coincident with the movement plane associated with a projected travel path of the incoming ball; and c) a third step, comprising rotating the torso of the hitter about an axis that extends through the hitter's head, through the middle of the hitter's torso, and through the leading leg.

11. The method of claim 10, where the first step additionally comprises straightening a leading leg of the hitter at the knee to produce a stiff leading leg before commencing a swing with the hitting device, where the stiff leading leg is positioned toward the direction of an incoming ball.

12. The method of claim 10, where the second step additionally comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of an incoming ball, while maintaining the stiff leading leg without moving the stiff leading leg toward the direction of an incoming ball.

13. The method of claim 10, where the first step additionally comprises straightening a leading leg of the hitter at the knee to produce a stiff leading leg before commencing a swing with the hitting device, where the stiff leading leg is positioned toward the direction of an incoming ball, and the second step additionally comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of an incoming ball while maintaining the stiff leading leg without moving the stiff leading leg toward the direction of an incoming ball.

14. The method of claim 10, where the second step additionally comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of an incoming ball while maintaining the stiff leading leg without taking a step with the stiff leading leg.

15. The method of claim 10, where the second step additionally comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of an incoming ball while maintaining the stiff leading leg without taking a slide with the stiff leading leg.

16. The method of claim 10, where the second step additionally comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of an incoming ball while maintaining the stiff leading leg without taking a step or a slide with the stiff leading leg.

17. The method of claim 10, where the first step additionally comprises straightening a leading leg of the hitter at the knee to produce a stiff leading leg before commencing a swing with the hitting device, and where the first step additionally comprises the stiff leading leg positioned toward the direction of an incoming ball, and the second step additionally comprises delivering the hitting device toward the direction of the incoming ball while maintaining the stiff leading leg without moving the stiff leading leg toward the direction of an incoming ball.

Description:

BACKGROUND

Swinging a hitting device, such as a bat, stick, racket, or other elongated device, to hit an object, such as a ball, also called “hitting” or “a swing”, is a process that involves a number of discrete steps. Some of these steps can or must be performed sequentially, while other steps can or must be performed in parallel. If each of the steps, or a combination thereof, is not performed optimally, the outcome will be negatively affected.

The term hitting is defined herein as any condition in which a person, i.e. the “hitter,” uses their hands to swing a device at a ball with the intent to strike the ball. Often the ball follows a trajectory toward the hitter after having been thrown or hit by a person or another device. Examples of this condition are found in the games of baseball, softball, tennis, and cricket. Other such conditions exist. A “great hit” is a desired output, such as a line drive in baseball, and is created by the optimal connection between the hitting device and the ball. This optimal connection occurs when the center line of the bat hits the center line of the ball, producing the result of both the bat and ball, at the instantaneous moment of contact, traveling in the same plane in opposite directions, with the bat reversing the direction of the ball to an exact opposite direction of its travel prior to contact with the bat. In addition to the two dimensional aspects described above with regard to the optimal connection, there is a third dimension to the optimal connection, namely that of the direction of the ball after coming into contact with the hitting device. For example, a great hit in baseball has a directional limit defined by the first and third baselines of the playing field. Other games have similar directional limitation ranges for a desired hit outcome. Although the above information regarding a ‘great hit’ as a desired output of baseball is fully applicable to the game of softball, other games in which the ball hitting swing method is used may have a different desired output and the description of a ‘great hit’ in each will have to be adjusted for that game. For example in the game of tennis, a ‘great hit’ will have top spin on the ball when it leaves the racket. The swing to deliver the optimal connection in that game uses some or all of the same elements for the desired output of that game.

Numerous studies have been conducted and several books written about the mechanics and science involved in the “optimal” swing. However, aside from slight differences in form or stance, conventional hitting or swings tend to be similarly suboptimal. Misconceptions and bad practices are propagated throughout games involving swings, and through time. For example, head movement during a swing can have a substantial adverse impact on the desired output (quality of hit, line drive, etc.). The more movement of a hitter's head, the harder it is for the mind and the rest of the body to deliver the hitting device to the precise location with the right timing to achieve a great hit. Accordingly, conventional swings continue to utilize techniques that, unless changed considerably, will always yield suboptimal results.

Using baseball as an example, recent swing development has been primarily focused on power, i.e. the application of force to the hitting device to a ball. However, more power exerted by a hitter, or at least if power is the primary focus of the swing, typically results in an increase in head movement or other factors that can reduce the accuracy of the swing. This reduced accuracy is exemplified by the increase in the number of strikeouts and lower batting averages of “power” hitters. The correlation between strikeouts and power hitters does not mean that power is not achievable without the increase in strikeouts, but rather that the design of the swing must incorporate elements that eliminate or reduce the detrimental affects of trying to generate power, such as the increased head movement that results in increased strikeouts. In many games, such as baseball and softball, what is important is not so much the power in a swing, but the quality of the swing (producing “great hits”) and the ability to hit the ball to a desired strategic location.

Quality hits include power, but not at the expense of accuracy. Accuracy requires a much higher emphasis on a swing that is simplified and contains no or negligible head movement. Although it is still debatable, time has shown that the players and teams that generate the most hits will win the most games. Accordingly, it would be beneficial to many players and teams to adhere to a hitting technique that increases hitting accuracy, and hence, the player's or team's winning percentage.

Simplification of the swing is advantageous when it contributes to less time required to deliver the hitting device to the ball and more accuracy of the placement of the hitting device to the precise location of the ball at the right timing. Simplifying the swing, if done correctly, can give the hitter more time to assess which balls to swing at and where to place the hitting device for the best quality hit. Starting and delivering the hitting device in the same plane the ball is traveling in is a form of simplification. When the bat starts in or near the plane the ball is in, the hitting process does not require additional steps to bring the hitting device in the plane of the ball. Thus, the mind and body perform less work to deliver the hitting device accurately to the ball. Reduction of head movement is another form of simplification. Head movement has a huge impact on the ability of the hitter to generate higher quality hits. Therefore, the optimal hitting process must incorporate steps that eliminate or reduce head movement.

Quantitatively, a five degree rotation of the head in any of the three dimensions results in about a five inch difference in distance between where the brain may perceive the ball to be compared to its actual position. This misperception can cause the hitter to swing the bat and miss the ball. When combined with the other two dimensions of the spatial relationship, it becomes readily apparent that increased head movement is a crucial detriment to high quality hits. Further, the games of baseball, softball, and other games that use a similar style of hitting process are unique in that there is more penalty for missing by a little than by a lot. For example, in baseball, if a hitter misplaces the bat by as little as ½″, it can result in a “pop-up” or slow “grounder” that are usually much easier to convert to an “out” as compared to a line-drive or high quality hit. In comparison, a poor swing, such as missing the ball by 3″, will typically only result in a “strike”. Therefore, swing process elements that contribute to precision and accuracy of bat placement will result in better quality hits, which, in turn, can make a baseball player a highly successful (and well paid) 0.333 hitter (who gets a hit in one out of every three at bats), and a mediocre minor leaguer or major league utility player who hats 0.250 hitter (one hit in every four at bats).

SUMMARY

This document discloses an improved methodology for a swing that is focused on accuracy. The methodology is directed to delivering a hitting device to a ball based on three main concepts: (1) reduced head movement, (2) the hitting device starting and being delivered in the same plane the plane of travel of the ball, and (3) simplification of the swing, which gives a hitter more time to observe the ball and decide what action to take. To accomplish these three main concepts, the hitter executes many elements that include five main swing positions and elements: 1) leading or front leg is stiff at the start and during the swing until after contact with the ball is completed; 2) the leading or front foot is pointed at least partially in the direction from which the ball is traveling, and does not step; 3) the hands and the bat are held lower than in conventional starting positions, such that the distal end of the bat is positioned below the shoulders, and the bat is held substantially parallel to the ground at the start; 4) the hitting device is delivered in the same plane as the ball is traveling (the ball is typically traveling in a slightly downward plane and thus the hitting device or bat will be traveling in a slightly upward plane in the opposite direction of the plane of travel of the ball); and 5) the swing utilizes rotation of the trunk and hips about an axis, with no or little forward or lateral movement of the body.

The details of one or more embodiments are set forth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features and advantages will be apparent from the description and drawings, and from the claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other aspects will now be described in detail with reference to the following drawings.

FIG. 1 is a side perspective view of a hitter in a ready position for performing the ball hitting swing method in accordance with exemplary embodiments.

FIG. 2 is a back perspective view of a hitter in a ready position for performing the ball hitting swing method in accordance with exemplary embodiments.

FIG. 3 is a front perspective view of a hitter in a ready position for performing the ball hitting swing method in accordance with exemplary embodiments.

FIG. 4 shows the early position of the ball hitting swing method according to exemplary embodiments.

FIG. 5 shows an intermediate position of the ball hitting swing method in accordance with exemplary embodiments.

FIG. 6 shows a later position of the ball hitting swing method in accordance with exemplary embodiments.

FIG. 7 shows another view of the intermediate position of the ball hitting swing method in accordance with the exemplary embodiments.

Like reference symbols in the various drawings indicate like elements.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

This document describes a swinging and hitting technique, embodied in various swing, methods, and processes, that produces an improved swing, thereby maximizing swing quality and desired outputs. The following description relates primarily to the context of the game of baseball and softball, with a baseball or softball bat being the hitting device. However this description is not limited to baseball or any particular kind of hitting device, and can apply equally to many kinds of games and hitting devices. The example illustrated by the following figures is a right-handed hitter. The method is equally applicable to a left-handed hitter, but it should be understood that for a left-handed hitter the various positions and actions are the opposite as are the case, as illustrated here, for a right-handed hitter.

In accordance with various embodiments, the swing method has three main concepts: 1) reduced head movement; 2) the hitting device such as a bat is started, moved and delivered to a ball in the plane of the ball as the ball moves through the air toward the hitter; and 3) the swing process is reduced, and the overall swing is simplified, from conventional swing processes, which gives a hitter more time to see the ball. To accomplish these three main concepts, the hitter executes many elements that include five main swing positions and elements: 1) leading or front leg is stiff at the start and during the swing until after contact with the ball is completed; 2) the leading or front foot is pointed at least partially in the direction from which the ball is traveling, and does not step; 3) the hands and the bat are held lower than in conventional starting positions, such that the distal end of the bat is positioned below the shoulders, and the bat is held substantially parallel to the ground at the start; 4) the hitting device is delivered in the same plane as the ball is traveling (the ball is typically traveling in a slightly downward plane and thus the hitting device or bat will be traveling in a slightly upward plane in the opposite direction of the plane of travel of the ball); and 5) the swing utilizes rotation of the trunk and hips about an axis, with no or little forward or lateral movement of the body.

These concepts, and the associated positions and movements, will now be described in further detail with reference to FIGS. 1-6, which illustrate the techniques described herein with respect to a right-handed hitter. The technique is the same, albeit a mirror image, for a left-handed hitter. FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 show the starting or ready position 10 for the hitter 20. The ready position is a position where hitter 20 is holding a hitting device 40 and is preparing to swing hitting device 40 to hit a ball (not shown) that travels from a location away from the hitter, i.e. where the hitter is waiting for a baseball pitch, for example. The ready position as shown in FIGS. 1, 2, and 3 defines a ready position axis 50, represented by α, that extends down through the hitter's head 22, torso 24, left leg 26 and left foot 28. Alternatively, the ready position axis 50 extends through head 22, torso 24, and between the hitter's left leg 26 and right leg 30, but aligned closer to the hitter's left foot 28 than to the hitter's right foot 32. During a swing, hitter 20 rotates about the ready position axis 50, to minimize movement of head 22, while also simplifying the swing.

FIG. 1 depicts a side view, FIG. 2 depicts a back view, and FIG. 3 depicts a front view of the ready position 10. In accordance with a swing method for hitting a ball, many elements are executed by hitter 20, including five key elements. First, the leading or front leg (shown in FIGS. 1, 2, and 3 as left leg 26) is straight, and hitter 20 pushes against it, which counteracts or prevents lateral or forward movement of the hitter's body during the swing and also keeps the body weight more evenly distributed over both feet. The knee 27 of the leading or front leg 26 is not bent and the foot 28 is pointed at least partially toward the direction from which the ball is coming. This will aid in the hip rotation part of the swing later. Along with the straightened front leg 26 there is no step made with front foot 28 or the straightened front leg 26, to generate no or little lateral or forward movement of the hitter's body and contributes to little or no movement of head 22 and simplification of the swing. Pushing against the straightened front leg 26 with no step being made facilitates a full rotational momentum around axis 50 during the swing, as well as prevents the ‘forward lunging’ caused when the hitter is fooled by a curveball or change-up because the weight is kept more evenly distributed over both feet during the main part of the swing. Straightened front leg 26 remains stiff during the ready position and for most of the swing method thereafter. After contact with the ball is made, straightened front leg 26 can then be bent or released.

Second, the left arm 34 and right arm 36 are bent, and the left wrist 35 and right wrist 37 are cocked backward and positioned as shown (right elbow 38 is down and close to the body/torso, left upper arm 36 is against the left side of torso 24). Right arm 36 and right wrist 37 are positioned differently. Right arm 36 is down and tucked against torso 24. Right wrist 37 is working to get hitting device 40 back and down so it is close to parallel to the horizontal plane 60, represented by an H in FIG. 2. In this way, the bat is ready to be moved forward when hitter 20 rotates the body. That rotation will deliver hitting device 40 in a plane very close to if not in the same plane as the ball. This positioning and method contribute to the simplification of the swing.

Third, right leg 30, the trailing leg, is bent with the knee 31 dipped slightly toward the ground. Fourth, the hips 39 are substantially “closed” but slightly “open” to facilitate both eyes being positioned to clearly see the full view of the pitcher (and allowing for both right and left eye-dominant hitters to have full utilization of both eyes). Fifth, head 22 is slightly cocked to a hitting position (i.e. the position the head will be in when hitting, so that no head movement is necessary during the swing). The slightly cocked head 22 is also part of being in alignment with axis 50 and stays there during the swing until after contact is made.

Additionally, hitting device 40 is positioned and aligned at an angle 70, represented by β as shown in FIG. 3, which is near parallel with the ground 80. For example ±20 degrees from horizontal plane 60, which puts the hitting device in or near an initial plane that coincides with an anticipated trajectory of the ball. This position is significantly lower when compared to current practice and theory, as can be seen by watching any major league game on the television which will feature a wide variety of hitting stances, some of which begin with the bat held completely above the shoulders. In such position, the hitting device can be moved straight forward in the plane associated with angle 70 without having to change planes, as occurs with a traditional swing when the first thing the batter must do upon deciding to swing at a ball is to angle the bat from shoulder level (or in some cases, higher) down toward where he thinks the ball will be at the time his bat crosses the projected trajectory of the ball. The positioning taught by this invention contributes to the simplification of the swing. This allows a hitter more time to watch the pitch before executing rotation of the body around axis 50 for delivery of the hitting device, because the swing movement is more direct toward the ball and takes less time. Preferably, the initial plane is slightly ascending (i.e. −β) relative to the horizontal plane 60 forward from the hitter (i.e. the ball is on a downward trajectory). With more time to watch the ball, the hitter can make a better determination as to whether the ball will be a “ball” or a “strike”, and will have more time to try to deduce what kind of pitch is being thrown, as a curveball will have different movement and will get to the plate in a different manner than a change-up.

The hitting device 40 being swung in the same plane as the ball reduces difficulties of timing. The hitter has more time in which to hit the ball. Aligning the angle of the plane of hitting device 40 swing to that of the ball's trajectory means more time for the hitter to have the bat in the place for a good hit. Conversely, if hitting device 40 is in a plane that only briefly intersects with the plane of the ball, as is the case with most contemporary batters, the time available in which to hit the ball is greatly reduced, and there is a lower probability of hitting the ball which also reduces the quality of hits. Put another way, the optimal connection occurs when the center line of the bat hits the center line of the ball and reverses the direction of the ball to exactly the opposite direction it had been traveling. The greater the angle at which hitting device 40 and the ball intersect seriously reduces the window of time in which to make a good connection with the bat to the ball (which negatively affects “timing”). A very small improvement in the “timing” generates a huge impact on improving the desired results (high quality hits). Keep in mind that the initial alignment and the delivery of the swing plane are part of the simplification of the swing.

FIG. 4 shows the start of the swing in the swing method. The start of the swing is also the start of rotation by hitter 20 around axis 50. Since there is no step forward with the stiff front left leg 26 with unbent knee 27, there is no timing required for the step in the swing process. Hitter 20 will not be fooled by fast vs. off-speed pitches. Hitter 20 also has more time to decide what type of pitch it is and which pitch to swing at. Hitter 20 can then execute the simplified swing process keeping the body weight evenly distributed over both feet. The swing method minimizes unnecessary motions that inhibit effective delivery of hitting device 40 to the ball, and minimizes head movement. These are elements or factors in the simplification of the swing. As shown in FIG. 4, left arm 34 and right arm 36 do not move significantly or change from the ready position shown in FIGS. 1-3. Only hips 39 have started to rotate about the axis 50. The position of the head 22, left arm 34 and right arm 36, and left leg 26 and right leg 30 are kept the same, at least initially.

FIG. 5 shows a mid position of the swing. Hips 39 continue to rotate about the axis 50. Torso 24 starts to also rotate around axis 50. During this mid position, hitter 20 will start to decide to drive the hands toward the ball for a pitched ball the hitter desires to hit. In this case, the arms first unbend, and then the wrists uncock in a timed fashion such that the bat meets the ball just a little in front of the hitter. The palms of the hands are essentially juxtaposed to each other (i.e. leading arm is palm down and other arm is palm up), and the arms are approximately fully extended. In this condition, hitter 20 is in a position to hit the ball.

FIG. 6 illustrates the continuation of the rotation about the axis 50. Stiff front left leg 26 and bent right leg 30 and head 22 are not moved, thereby allowing the batter to concentrate on hitting the ball without additional confounding variables such as adjusting the swing to account for the movement of his head. As the hands reach maximum extension from the body they now start to follow the rotation with the rest of the body around axis 50. In order to maintain or increase the speed of hitting device 40 while keeping hitting device 40 in the plane of the ball, the right hand crosses over the left largely due to the momentum of the barrel of hitting device 40. This also minimizes or eliminates movement of head 22 from the swing. Hitting device 40 is still traveling in a slightly upward plane, which is counter to the projected downward plane of the ball. Stiff front left leg 26 with unbent left knee 27 and left foot 28 are being pushed against as part of the extension of axis 50 which is being rotated around. These forces result in the hitter's body not moving forward. The right leg 30 is bent and downward to drive off of the foot and to keep the swing powerful without significant head movement. The fact that there is little or no head movement in the delivery of a swing results in a better quality hit.

FIG. 7 shows another view of the intermediate position of the swing, focusing on axis 50. Hips 39 continue to rotate about axis 50. Torso 24 starts to also rotate around axis 50. During this mid position, hitter 20 will start to decide to drive the hands toward the ball for a pitched ball the hitter desires to hit. In this case, the arms first unbend, and then the wrists uncock in a timed fashion such that the bat meets the ball just a little in front of the hitter. The palms of the hands are essentially juxtaposed to each other (i.e. leading arm is palm down and other arm is palm up), and the arms are approximately fully extended. In this condition, hitter 20 is in a position to hit the ball.

The speed of hitting device 40 is provided by rotation of the hitter's trunk or torso 24, extension of the arms and hands toward the ball and the ‘uncocking’ of both wrists. When the arms are extended, the wrists are uncocked and the torso is being rotated, the speed of hitting device 40 is also provided by passing the hand of the back arm over the top of the front arm's hand. The timing and combination of these components creates the maximum impact to the ball from the hitting device 40.

In some embodiments, hitting device 40 is positioned at the start of a swing in a plane that is substantially parallel to the ground. The hitter swings hitting device 40 with a rotational motion, with a stiff front leg, without lifting the forward leg and without stepping forward. This keeps the process simple and eliminates or minimizes head movement. With hitting device 40 in or closer to the plane the ball is traveling in and with only a rotational motion, the process is simplified from conventional swing methods to give a quicker and more accurate delivery of the bat to the ball in a shorter amount of time. This gives the hitter more time to assess the location and activity of the ball contributing to improved results by the hitter.

Not all of these steps or elements are required to be executed in one swing to fall within the scope of some embodiments described herein. A method that employs any one of the elements, movements, techniques, or various combinations of them can realize beneficial results. As with many processes or process improvements, the degree of effective execution will significantly affect the outcome (or outputs) being measured. Although a few embodiments have been described in detail above, other modifications are possible. Other embodiments may be within the scope of the following claims.