Title:
Credit card debt management card game
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A game comprising a set of cards for teaching credit card debt management. The set of cards carry indicia thereon to signify that they are either credit card debt or cash. Players are dealt seven cards each, and then in turn draw from either the remaining cards in the deck or the card that is on the top of the discard pile, if there is one. The drawn card may then be substituted for a card in the player's hand. The player completes his/her turn by discarding a card to maintain seven cards in hand. The game is won by accumulating one credit card debt card and six cash cards, wherein the cash cards add up to the same, or greater than, the credit card debt card amount, within a grace range, such as, for exemplary purposes only, $200.00.



Inventors:
Glass, Mechel (Fayetteville, GA, US)
Application Number:
11/449121
Publication Date:
12/13/2007
Filing Date:
06/08/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/292
International Classes:
A63F1/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20080018048Plastic jigsaw puzzle structureJanuary, 2008Chiu
20070018392Game for a hot tub, bath, or poolJanuary, 2007Good et al.
20070035088Method and apparatus for game playFebruary, 2007O'neill
20040046317Tabletop game with reflective or light transmitting surfaceMarch, 2004Oister et al.
20040100021Wrist-mounted card game deviceMay, 2004Chang et al.
20030025268Slot machines for the seeing impairedFebruary, 2003Allen
20060066056Device to count strikesMarch, 2006Wiblin
20050067778Game table with rotationally convertible table facesMarch, 2005Tsai
20020145255Electronic multi-format video poker gamesOctober, 2002Rudolph
20020105139Intellectual matching toy and method of manufacturingAugust, 2002Ficinski et al.
20070045952Interactive game including partially concealed game piecesMarch, 2007Jones



Primary Examiner:
PIERCE, WILLIAM M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WILLIAMSON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW, LLC (ATLANTA, GA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A credit card debt management card game comprising: credit card debt cards depicting an amount of credit card debt thereon; and cash cards depicting an amount of cash thereon, wherein said amount of credit card debt is compared to said amount of cash to determine a game winner.

2. The credit card debt management card game of claim 1, wherein said credit card debt cards comprise an interest rate thereon.

3. The credit card debt management card game of claim 1, wherein said compared amounts of credit card debt and cash are respectively determined from a value of one of said credit card debt cards and a total of the values of six of said cash cards.

4. The credit card debt management card game of claim 3, wherein said total of said six cash cards is within a grace range of said value of said one credit card debt card.

5. The credit card debt management card game of claim 1, further comprising a calculator.

6. A method of learning to reduce credit card debt, said method comprising the steps of: playing a game of cards, wherein said game of cards comprises credit card debt cards depicting an amount of credit card debt thereon and cash cards depicting an amount of cash thereon; and comparing said amount of credit card debt to said amount of cash to determine a game winner.

7. The method of claim 6, wherein said step of playing further comprises the steps of: calculating interest based on said amount of credit card debt; and adding said interest to said amount of credit card debt.

8. The method of claim 6, wherein said step of playing further comprises the step of: selecting a grace range.

9. The method of claim 6, wherein said step of playing further comprises the step of: utilizing a calculator.

10. The method of claim 6, wherein said step of playing further comprises the steps of: determining said amount of credit card debt from one of said credit card debt cards; and determining said amount of cash from a total of values of six of said cash cards.

11. The method of claim 10, wherein said step of playing further comprises the step of: drawing a card from a pile selected from the group consisting of unseen cards and discarded cards.

12. The method of claim 11, wherein said step of playing further comprises the step of: a player replacing a selected card in the player's hand with said drawn card.

13. The method of claim 12, wherein said step of playing further comprises the step of: discarding said selected card from said hand.

14. A card game playing method comprising the steps of: playing a game of cards having credit card debt cards depicting an amount of credit card debt and cash cards depicting an amount of cash; calculating interest based on said amount of credit card debt; and adding said interest to said amount of credit card debt.

15. The card game playing method of claim 14, further comprising the steps of: determining said amount of credit card debt from one of said credit card debt cards; and determining said amount of cash from a total of values of six of said cash cards.

16. The card game playing method of claim 15, wherein said step of playing further comprises the step of: selecting a grace range.

17. The card game playing method of claim 16, wherein said step of playing further comprises the step of: winning said game by obtaining a total difference amount of said amount of credit card debt less than said amount of cash, wherein said total difference is not greater than said grace range.

18. The card game playing method of claim 17, wherein said step of playing further comprises the step of: drawing a card from a pile selected from the group consisting of unseen cards and discarded cards.

19. The card game playing method of claim 18, wherein said step of playing further comprises the step of: a player replacing a selected card in the player's hand with said drawn card.

20. The card game playing method of claim 19, further comprising the step of: utilizing a calculator to calculate each of said amounts and said interest.

Description:

COPYRIGHT NOTICE AND LIMITED AUTHORIZATION

A portion of the disclosure of this patent document contains material which is subject to copyright protection. The copyright owner has no objection to the facsimile reproduction by anyone of the patent document or the patent disclosure, as it appears in the Patent and Trademark Office patent file or records, but otherwise reserves all copyright rights whatsoever.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates generally to an apparatus and method for learning to manage credit card debt. More particularly, the present invention is directed to a card game that is utilized to teach game players credit card debt management, wherein credit card debt is paid off to achieve freedom from debt and win the game.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention arose out of a need for a device and method to enable the teaching of credit card debt management to consumers. Credit card debt is a significant portion of debt accumulated by individuals, many of whom allow credit card debt to surpass their ability to service that debt.

At present, there are various games available that involve teaching debt and asset accumulation. However, many such games possess inherent disadvantages when compared to the present invention:

U.S. Pat. No. 6,106,300 to Kiyosaki et al. teaches a game for learning financial skills with investment goals and liability goals. The game has cards to determine effects of play. The game uses real-life situations, but is geared toward children. Generation of passive income in excess of expenses is the goal. Cash flow management is a requirement. The game uses everyday life expenses that one might incur. While liabilities are part of the game, the generation of passive income is the principal purpose, and credit card debt, and the reduction thereof, is not part of the play of the game. Furthermore, the game is geared toward children who, typically, do not have the debt management concerns of the average adult in real debt situations.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,032,957 to Kiyosaki et al. teaches a game, based on personal financial wealth accumulation. The game is geared to more high-end sophisticated players, involving franchises, business purchases, and the like. Each player also has a profession. There are two stages of play; moving to the second stage is based on passive income exceeding personal expenses. Although the Kiyosaki et al. '957 patent has geared the game toward adults, it requires a high level of financial sophistication to play, and is, again, geared to generation of passive income, instead of debt reduction.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,826,878 to Kiyosaki et al. teaches much the same game as the '957 patent and has the same limitations.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,788,235 to Thomas teaches a business related board game with the goal of purchasing businesses. Purchases can be made jointly between the players, or individually. The game is quite specific to business environment simulation, rather than debt management. The goal of the game is wealth accumulation. As such, the Thomas '235 patent does not relate to credit card debt, but rather to the acquiring of businesses.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,407,207 to Stanford teaches a game that simulates lifetime events as one progresses through the different ages of life, wherein the game terminates at a predetermined age, and is essentially based on business acquisitions and job categories. Borrowing is an integral part of the game. The Stanford '207 patent is geared toward the purchasing and operation of a business, but offers no means to learn credit card debt management.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,071,135 to Campbell teaches financial management principles, mainly the buying and selling of stock, personal expense management and income from salary, wherein the game is based on a starting age. The game is played on calendar year quarters with the object to build the greatest net worth. Loans between players are permitted. Campbell '135 also deals with the handling of spectacular financial events such as floods and earthquakes, while building wealth through playing the lottery or other means. It does not enable the learning of credit management principles, however.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,955,616 to Ingalls teaches a game involving education, family, business, political and financial events of life. Achieving a predetermined balance determines the winner. The game involves savings account building. Although the game principles of Ingalls '616 focus on reaching an adequate asset level to go into retirement, it fails to offer an opportunity to learn credit card debt management.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,890,843 to Chauve teaches a game involving geographical locations, gambling, travel and sporting events. While this game has cards called “credit cards”, they are cards that are drawn by a player that involve various credit situations unrelated to typical credit card transactions.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,522,407 to Hatherley teaches financial board game with political scenarios that, collectively, simulate a free market economy. The attainment of loans is an important factor in the game. Hatherley '407 is geared toward corporate takeovers and political factors and does not enable learning of credit card debt management.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,440,397 to Butner teaches taxation principles and tax laws, not credit card debt management. The game ends after a specified period, with the winner being the one with the most money.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,053,157 to Cowan teaches a game to accumulate a minimum level of total assets and achieve zero liability balance, wherein some real life situations are a part of the game. However, the game of Cowan '157 does not utilize credit cards, nor does it enable the learning of management of credit card debt.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,807,739 to Henley teaches a game involving stock, real estate, loans and insurance, with the object to build equity. The game ends when a player declares bankruptcy. The end result of the game of Henley '739 being apposite the risks of not managing debt, demonstrates a need for a means for learning debt management skills, but does not facilitate the goal of learning to manage credit card debt.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,375,466 to Juranovic teaches a method using cards for learning economics including debt management in a non-competitive game geared to the business world. The focus is on business transactions and it does not relate to credit card debt or real-life situations.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,224,381 to Culberson et al. teaches an apparatus for educating children, particularly special-needs children, about money. The game focuses on expense, but does not involve debt.

While some or all of the above referenced patents may well be used for learning about debt and asset accumulation, they fail to adequately teach management of credit card debt and are overly complicated.

Therefore, it is readily apparent that there is a need for a credit card management card game that teaches players to make wise choices in managing their credit card debt, and further assists in teaching mathematical principles.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Briefly described, the present invention overcomes the above-mentioned disadvantages and meets the recognized need for such a device by providing a credit card debt management card game for teaching credit card debt management, the game comprising a set of cards. The set of cards carry indicia thereon to signify that they are either credit card debt or cash. Players are dealt seven cards each, and then in turn draw from either the remaining cards in the deck or the card that is on the top of the discard pile, if there is one. The drawn card may then be substituted for a card in the player's hand. The player completes his/her turn by discarding a card to maintain seven cards in hand. The game is won by accumulating one credit card debt card and six cash cards, wherein the cash cards add up to the same amount as the credit card debt card, within a grace range over the credit card amount, such as, for exemplary purposes only, $200.00. In an alternate embodiment, the players compute interest on their credit card debt card, add that to the amount on the credit card debt card and then utilize the new number for the amount that must be paid off via the cash cards. In a further alternate embodiment, the players may utilize a calculator during play of the game.

By recognizing the amount of their debt and striving to obtain cash cards that equal the amount of their debt, players gain knowledge of debt management that they can carry over into their daily lives. The players further may selectively gain knowledge of the effects of interest on credit cards.

According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention in its preferred embodiment is a credit card debt management card game and method of play thereof to teach the management of credit card debt. The game comprises credit card debt cards that have an amount of credit card debt depicted thereon and cash cards that have an amount of cash depicted thereon. The players hold seven cards each. To win there must be one credit card debt card and six cash cards. The amount of credit card debt as depicted on the credit card debt card is compared to the amount of cash totaled from the cash cards in order to determine a game winner. Interest may be calculated according to a rate depicted on the credit card debt card by multiplying the rate by the amount on the credit card debt card and adding the interest to the amount on the credit card debt card.

Cards are drawn from either a draw pile of new cards or a discard pile. Players may replace cards in their hands with the drawn card, discarding the selected card from said hand.

A grace range may be selected and a calculator may be utilized to calculate interest or to total the values of card or to compare the amount of cash with the amount of debt. The game is won by obtaining an amount of cash the same as, or greater than, the amount of credit card debt, wherein the difference is not greater than the grace range.

More specifically, the present invention is a card game packaged in a box with rules, and the credit debt cards and cash cards. The credit debt cards have depicted thereon indicia representative of the debt value, an interest rate and a description of how debt was incurred, such as, for exemplary purposes only via a purchase. The cash cards have thereon indicia depicting their cash value.

Players select a dealer. The cards are extracted from the box and the rules are consulted as necessary. Play commences with one of players shuffling the cards, and with the players selecting a dealer and a grace range, such as, for exemplary purposes only, $200.00. It will be recognized by those skilled in the art that any amount may be selected to comprise the grace range as desired by the players. While any amount may be selected for the grace range, an amount of $100.00 is preferred for advanced play.

The grace range is utilized to determine the winner of the game. Following shuffling, the players decide whether to utilize calculators for play. The dealer then deals seven cards to each player, to include dealer, and places the remaining cards face down in a draw pile. If the players have chosen to utilize interest, it is calculated. Alternately, the players may decide not to utilize interest. Subsequently, the first player to the left of dealer begins play.

The current player determines whether there are adequate cards remaining in the draw pile, and, if so, draws a card from either the draw pile or the discard pile. The current player subsequently either replaces a card in his/her hand with the drawn card, and discards the replaced card or alternately discards the drawn card without replacement of any cards in his/her hand.

At any time, any player adds their cash cards in hand and compares the total to their single credit debt card, if they hold one. If a player has a hand with six (6) cash cards that equal or exceed their single (1) credit debt card within an amount corresponding to the chosen grace range, then that player has the ability to win if it is currently their turn. If the totals differ by more than the grace range, or is less than the credit debt card amount, the game continues to next player, who again decides from which pile to draw a card.

If it is not a player's turn but they have the correct total, they must wait until it is their turn. Once a player on their current turn has achieved the required total within the grace range or less, the player then lays down their hand and declares themselves as the winner.

In an alternate embodiment of the present invention, players can utilize calculators to total their cash cards for comparison to their credit debt card. In a further alternate embodiment of the present invention, players can decide to include calculation of interest based on the total value of their credit debt card. The interest is calculated based on the rate depicted on the credit debt card. Once the interest is added, the total is then compared to the sum of their cash cards and with the grace range to determine whether they have won.

The game teaches individuals how to eliminate their credit card debt, by showing player how to pay off their credit card debt via accumulation of a matching dollar amount represented by summing cash cards.

Accordingly, a feature and advantage of the present invention is its ability to teach adults and children how to manage their credit card debt.

Another feature and advantage of the present invention is its ability to teach calculation of interest on credit card debt.

Still another feature and advantage of the present invention is its ability to be utilized by educational facilities or by individuals.

Yet another feature and advantage of the present invention is that it is simple to manufacture and of low cost.

Yet still another feature and advantage of the present invention is that it can be utilized to teach the benefits of paying down credit card debt.

A further feature and advantage of the present invention is that it assists individuals to learn to relieve themselves of debt.

Yet still a further feature and advantage of the present invention is that it is suitable for children or adults.

An additional feature and advantage of the present invention is that it is fun to play.

Yet an additional feature and advantage of the present invention is that it is suitable for from two to six players.

These and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent to one skilled in the art from the following description and claims when read in light of the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention will be better understood by reading the Detailed Description of the Preferred and Selected Alternate Embodiments with reference to the accompanying drawing figures, in which like reference numerals denote similar structure and refer to like elements throughout, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of game participants playing a credit card debt management card game according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a top view of cards utilized for playing a credit card debt management card game according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a flowchart of game play of a credit card debt management card game according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 4 is a continuation of the flow chart of FIG. 3.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED AND SELECTED ALTERNATIVE EMBODIMENTS

In describing the preferred and selected alternate embodiments of the present invention, as illustrated in FIGS. 1-4, specific terminology is employed for the sake of clarity. The invention, however, is not intended to be limited to the specific terminology so selected, and it is to be understood that each specific element includes all technical equivalents that operate in a similar manner to accomplish similar functions.

Referring now to FIGS. 1-4, the present invention in a preferred embodiment is credit card debt management card game 10 preferably comprising container 20, rules 30, credit debt cards 40 and cash cards 50.

Credit debt cards 40 preferably comprise debt value 500, interest (rate) 520 and description of how debt was incurred (purchase) 530. Cash cards 50 preferably comprise cash value 510.

Players P, one of whom is selected as dealer D, preferably conduct a game utilizing credit debt cards 40 and cash cards 50. Cards 40, 50 are preferably extracted from box 20 and rules 30 are preferably consulted as required, wherein rules 30 are set forth hereinbelow as TABLE I.

TABLE I
© 2003, 2006 Mechel Glass
Paid Off!
Game Instructions Ages: 10-Adult/Players: 2–6
Contents:
Paid Off Game Instruction Sheet
100 Game Cards composed of 90 Cash Cards and 10 Credit
Cards
The 10 Credit Cards:
$4,000 Balance at 26% interest for Debt accumulated new
wardrobe needed for work.
$5,000 Balance at 16% interest Debt accumulated for latest
computer system for home office.
$7,000 Balance at 8.9% interest Debt accumulated for
payment of home entertainment center.
$8,000 Balance at 12% interest Debt Accumulated for payment
of a used car.
$9,000 Balance at 22% interest Debt accumulated for
vacation, 2 week trip to the islands.
$10,000 Balance at 10% interest Debt accumulated for
consumer debts. Various expenditures over the past 4 years.
$12,000 Balance at 13.9% interest Debt accumulated for
purchase of new bedroom furniture.
$15,000 Balance at 18% interest Debt accumulated for
hospital bills after insurance was canceled.
$20,000 Balance at 6% interest Debt accumulated for house
payments after being laid off for 9 months.
$30,000 Balance at 15% interest Debt accumulated for home
improvements. New kitchen remodel.
The 90 Cash Cards:
Six cards$50.00
Eight cards$100.00
Nine cards$200.00
Five cards$250.00
Five cards$300.00
Ten cards$400.00
Five cards$500.00
Six cards$600.00
Six cards$800.00
Eight cards$1,000.00
Four cards$1,500.00
Six cards$2,000.00
Five cards$3,000.00
Four cards$5,000.00
Three cards$10,000.00
Object:
The object of the game is to be the first person to end the
game with enough cash to pay off your credit card without
going over the grace range amount of $200.00.
Set Up:
Shuffle all cards together in the deck.
Deal out 7 cards to each player.
Place the remainder of the deck face down as a Draw pile.
Next to it will be the Discard pile.
Play goes clockwise, starting left of the dealer.
How to Play:
Each player will decide based upon their hand if they want
to pull from the Deck or pick up the top card in the
Discard pile to exchange it with a card already in their
hand. Each player should have 7 cards in their hands at
all times. If you run out of cards during game play,
shuffle the Discard pile and continue play.
The first person with one credit card and six cash cards
whose total equals the amount of their credit card within
the grace range of $200.00 wins the game. Be the first
person to yell out Paid Off! Then lay all your cards down
on the table for all the other players to calculate your
amounts to ensure you really have Paid Off your credit
card.
Example of a Winning Hand
A winning hand is one credit card that shows a balance of
$4,000.00. The other six cash cards with various amounts
$1,000.00, $1,500.00, $500.00, $.800.00, $50.00, and
$200.00. This is a winning hand! The player has 7 cards.
One is a credit card and the other six add up to the
balance of that credit card without going over the $200.00
grace range amount. Their total is $4,050.00. This is
enough to pay off their credit card!! If their six cash
cards equal $4,250.00, this is not a winning hand because
it is over the $200.00 grace range. If the six cash cards
equal only $3,950.00, this is also not a winning hand.
IMPORTANT:
You can only win during your turn at play. If you have a
winning hand and do not discover it until after your turn
has passed, you cannot yell out ‘Paid Off!’ until it's your
turn again. You must hold your cards. In this case,
someone ahead of you still has the opportunity to win the
game until you have control of the game again.
You cannot exchange cards with other players at the table
it must be pulled from the deck or picked up from the top
of the Discard pile. Some players have found they never
get a credit card during the entire play of the game. This
may occur from time to time. Play another round of Paid
Off and see what happens.
For Advanced Players Only:
Start the game by deciding to pay off the interest due on
the credit cards as well as the balance amounts to win the
game. For example, say you have a $12,000 credit card in
your hand. The interest rate on that credit card is 13.9%.
This means you must calculate your interest payment
correctly, and ensure your cash cards add up to the
$12,000.00 plus the interest payment to win the game. In
this example, you will calculate $12,000.00 * .139 = $1,668.00
for a total of $13,668.00. Which means you need
to have cash cards that add up to at least $13,700.00 since
the smallest cash card is $50.00 or you could have a
maximum of $13,900.00. Remember you can win with an amount
over the value of the credit card plus interest within a
range up to $200.00, but you can't win this particular hand
with cash cards that equal $13,650.00 this will not be
enough to pay off your credit card and interest. You may
want to have a calculator or scratch paper available to
calculate your interest amounts. The game should have a
steady pace of play, but not too fast. There is no time
limit on your turn; however, be mindful that other players
will not want to wait for you to add on your calculator
when it is your turn. Players can implement a penalty rule
of their own at the beginning of the game if players are
taking too long during their turn.
For Even More Advanced Players:
Play the game with the
interest due, a reduced grace range to $100.00 over the
balance, and no calculators!
Strategy Tips:
Keep an idea on what amount you have in
your hand at all times. Then look for a particular cash
card that will help you get the amount you need to pay off
that credit card. This will prevent you from having to add
up your totals each time it's your turn. Calculators may
be used during game play but they should not hold up the
pace of the game. Calculate your interest plus balance at
the start of the game. If other players know what cards
you are looking for they may strategize to prevent laying
down specific cards you may need to win the game.
© 2003, 2006 Mechel Glass

Play of the Game

Referring now more particularly to FIGS. 3-4, play 100 preferably commences in step 110 with one of players P shuffling cards 40, 50 and with players P preferably selecting dealer D and grace range 600, such as, for exemplary purposes only, $200.00. Grace range 600 is preferably utilized as described hereinbelow to determine the winner of the game.

Subsequent to step 110, players P preferably decide in step 120 whether to utilize calculators 80 for play. Dealer D then preferably deals via step 130 seven cards 90 to each player P, to include dealer D and preferably places the remaining cards 40, 50 faces down in draw pile 60 in step 140. If players P have chosen to utilize interest 520, path 160 is selected and interest 520 is calculated in step 180. Alternately, if players P have decided not to utilize interest, calculation of same is bypassed via path 170. Subsequently first player P to the left of dealer D preferably begins play in step 190.

Players P preferably determine whether there are adequate cards 40, 50 remaining in draw pile 60 via step 200. If there are adequate cards 40, 50, player P preferably selectively follows path 250 and draws card 40, 50 from draw pile 60 in step 240 or follows path 260 and draws card 40, 50 from discard pile 70 via step 270. Player P subsequently preferably selectively replaces card 40, 50 in hand 90 with drawn card 95 via step 280 and follows path 290, preferably discarding the replaced card 40, 50 in step 310, or alternately follows path 300 and preferably discards drawn card 95 via step 320 without replacement of any cards 40, 50 in hand 90.

At any time, any player P preferably adds cash cards 50 in hand 90 via step 330 and preferably compares the total to any credit debt card 40 in hand 90 via step 340. If player P has hand 90 comprising six (6) cash cards 50 that equal or exceed in amount a single (1) credit debt card 40 within grace range 600, then player P has the ability to win and player P preferably follows path 350 via step 370 to verify whether it is still player P's turn. If the totals differ by more than grace range 600, or if the total of cash cards 50 is less than credit card 40, the game preferably continues via path 360 and play preferably advances in step 380 to next player P, who returns to step 200.

If it is not still player P's turn, path 400 is preferably followed and player P must wait via step 410 until it is his/her turn. Once a player on their current turn has achieved the required total within grace range 600 or less, player P preferably follows path 390 and lays hand 90 down in step 420 declaring themselves as the winner.

In an alternate embodiment of the present invention, players can utilize calculator 80 to total their cash cards 50 for comparison to their credit debt card 40.

In a further alternate embodiment of the present invention as noted above in step 150, players can selectively total the value of their credit debt card 40, plus interest 520 depicted thereon, and then require that the result equal the sum of their cash cards 50 within grace range 600.

In yet another alternate embodiment of the present invention, more than one credit debt card 40 can be retained in player P's hand. In this alternate embodiment, two or more credit card debt cards 40 are totaled and compared to the total value of cash cards 50.

In still another alternate embodiment of the present invention, credit card debt management card game 10 could be rendered in computer form, and, as such, could also comprise a game for a solitary player, or alternately interactively between players located at different computers. In such fashion, credit card debt management card game 10 could be conducted cross-country or across countries. In the latter case, family member players could conduct games online to include a player stationed abroad with the military or other ex-patriot activities. Online game playing could also be utilized in a teaching mode, wherein players are part of a credit counseling group, wherein the players can play together online as part of their group activities.

In still a further alternate embodiment of the present invention, it is envisioned that credit card debt management card game 10 could be played as a competition, either against other players or against a computer.

The foregoing description and drawings comprise illustrative embodiments of the present invention. Having thus described exemplary embodiments of the present invention, it should be noted by those skilled in the art that the within disclosures are exemplary only, and that various other alternatives, adaptations, and modifications may be made within the scope of the present invention. Merely listing or numbering the steps of a method in a certain order does not constitute any limitation on the order of the steps of that method. Many modifications and other embodiments of the invention will come to mind to one skilled in the art to which this invention pertains having the benefit of the teachings presented in the foregoing descriptions and the associated drawings. Although specific terms may be employed herein, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation. Accordingly, the present invention is not limited to the specific embodiments illustrated herein, but is limited only by the following claims.