Title:
UV and flame resistant textile polymer yarn
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present invention describes a UV, flame-resistant, polymeric coreless or hollow yarn or fiber, formed with either primary resins or recycled or regrind thermoplastics that is useful for completing a warp or weft in a woven or knitted web or mesh that can be used for decorative wall coverings, window panels or shades, upholstery, draperies, building panels, apparel and the like. The yarn may be transparent, translucent, colored or multicolored.



Inventors:
Glew, Charles A. (Pawcatusk, CT, US)
Kowalski, Libby (New York, NY, US)
Application Number:
11/803699
Publication Date:
12/06/2007
Filing Date:
05/15/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
D02G3/00
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Primary Examiner:
SYKES, ALTREV C
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
GUERRY LEONARD GRUNE (VIRGINIA BEACH, VA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A UV, flame resistant, polymer yarn comprising a hollow core portion.

2. The polymer yarn of claim 1, wherein said polymer yarn comprises polymers that may be poly-vinyl chlorides (PVC's), acrylates, polycarbonates, or PETG resins and wherein said polymer yarn and polymers comprising said yarn may comprise formed polymeric sheets.

3. The polymer yarn of claim 2, wherein said polymer yarn is comprised of either regrind polymer or recycled polymer.

4. The polymer yarn of claim 1, wherein said hollow portion is located essentially concentrically within said polymer yarn.

5. The polymer yarn of claim 1, wherein said hollow portion may vary in diameter from 0.001″-0.015″ longitudinally within said polymer yarn and wherein a preferred diameter of 0.009″.

6. The polymer yarn of claim 1, wherein said polymer yarn provides an outside diameter of 0.020″-0.125″ with preferred average outside diameters of 0.060″, 0.040″, 0.024″ or 0.020″.

7. The polymer yarn of claim 1, wherein said polymer yarn includes a wall thickness of at least 0.008″, preferably 0.010″.

8. The polymer yarn of claim 1, wherein said yarn is comprised of coreless, solid filaments.

9. The polymer yarn of claim 6, wherein said outside diameter may be non-uniform and either symmetrically or asymmetrically shaped including flat, twisted, or irregular.

10. The polymer yarn of claim 1, wherein said polymer yarn may be transparent, translucent, tinted, colored or opaque.

11. The polymer yarn of claim 1, wherein said polymer yarn may be used coreless or constructed with a core material or with both said coreless or said core material.

12. The polymer yarn of claim 1, wherein said polymer yarn may be woven, non-woven or knitted with synthetic or natural materials as warp or weft.

13. The polymer yarn of claim 12, wherein said polymer yarn is woven, non-woven or knitted and may be a portion or the entirety of a wall covering, window shade or panel track, upholstery, drapery or encapsulated into a building panel.

14. The polymer yarn of claim 12, wherein said woven, non-woven, or knitted polymer yarn may be open to the environment or encapsulated between resin panels or translucent resin panels or translucent or transparent laminate building materials of any composition such as polycarbonate or acrylic resin and wherein said yarn may also be a natural yarn.

15. The polymer yarn of claim 12, wherein said woven, non-woven, or knitted polymer yarn is a structural mesh of said polymer yarn that may be bonded by heat to said warp and weft or wherein each strand of yarn may also be bonded to another strand of yarn.

16. The polymer yarn of claim 14, wherein said woven or knitted polymer yarn complies with NFPA 701 large scale drapery test fire ratings for woven or knitted polymer building or decorative materials.

17. A method of producing UV, flame resistant, polymer yarn comprising a hollow core portion, wherein producing of said polymer yarn is by one of several methods including extrusion, spinning by using a metering pump and spinneret assembly, or spinning and drawing, or pultrusion, or a combination of any of these methods or like methods.

18. The method according to claim 17, wherein said polymer yarn comprises polymers that provide for UV and fire resistant brominated and chlorinated polymers including flame resistant polyvinyl chlorides (PVC's) or PETG resins and the like.

19. The method according to claim 17, wherein said hollow core portion of said yarns is located essentially concentrically within said polymer yarn.

20. The method according to claim 17, providing said hollow portion may vary in diameter from 0.001″-0.015″ longitudinally within said polymer yarn and wherein there is a preferred diameter of 0.009″.

21. The method according to claim 17, wherein said polymer yarn provides an outside diameter of 0.020″-0.125″ with preferred average outside diameters of 0.060″, 0.040″, 0.024″ or 0.020″.

22. The method according to claim 17, wherein said polymer yarn provides a wall thickness of at least 0.008″, preferably 0.010″.

23. The method according to claim 21, wherein said outside diameter provides a non-uniform and either symmetrically or asymmetrically or irregular cross-sectional shape and wherein said outer diameter along a horizontal length may include bumpy, thick or thin sections.

24. The method according to claim 17, wherein said polymer yarn may be transparent, translucent, tinted, colored or opaque.

25. The method according to claim 17, wherein said polymer yarn may be used coreless, solid, or constructed with a core material or with both said coreless or said core material.

26. The method according to claim 17, wherein said polymer yarn may be woven, non-woven or knitted with synthetic or natural materials as warp or weft.

27. The method according to claim 26, wherein said polymer yarn is woven, non-woven or knitted and provides a portion or the entirety of a wall covering, window shade or panel, upholstery, drapery or building panel.

28. The method according to claim 27, wherein said woven or knitted polymer yarn may be open to the environment or encapsulated between transparent or translucent thermoplastic panels such as polycarbonate or acrylic or translucent or transparent laminate building materials of any composition and wherein said yarn may also be a natural yarn.

29. The method according to claim 27, wherein said woven or knitted polymer yarn may be bonded by heat to said warp and weft.

30. The method according to claim 27, wherein said woven or knitted polymer yarn complies with NFPA 701 large scale drapery test fire ratings and including ASTM E-84 regarding flammability and AATCC 16-1998 regarding light fastness for woven or knitted polymer building materials.

31. The method according to claim 17, wherein said extruding provides a UV, flame resistant, polymer yarn comprising a hollow core portion comprising using a tubing die, a tip and die, a spinnerette, or any other known satisfactory extrusion technique known to be capable of producing said polymer yarn.

32. A UV, flame resistant, coreless polymer yarn comprising wherein said polymer yarn comprises a hollow portion and may be used coreless or constructed with a core material or with both said coreless or said core material.

33. The polymer yarn of claim 32, wherein said polymer yarn comprises polymers that may be brominated and chlorinated polymers including flame resistant poly-vinyl chlorides (PVC's), acrylates, or polycarbonates or PETG resins and the like.

34. The polymer yarn of claim 32, wherein said polymer yarn is comprised of either regrind polymer or recycled polymer.

35. The polymer yarn of claim 32, wherein said hollow portion is located essentially concentrically within said polymer yarn.

36. The polymer yarn of claim 32, wherein said hollow portion may vary in diameter from 0.001″-0.015″ longitudinally within said polymer yarn and wherein a preferred diameter of 0.009″ may be utilized.

37. The polymer yarn of claim 32, wherein said polymer yarn provides an outside diameter of 0.020″-0.125″ with preferred average outside diameters of 0.060″, 0.040″, 0.024″ or 0.020″.

38. The polymer yarn of claim 32, wherein said polymer yarn includes a wall thickness of at least 0.008″, preferably 0.010″.

39. The polymer yarn of claim 37, wherein said outside diameter may be non-uniform and either symmetrically or asymmetrically shaped including flat, twisted, or irregular.

40. The polymer yarn of claim 32, wherein said polymer yarn may be transparent, translucent, tinted, colored or opaque.

41. The polymer yarn of claim 32, wherein said polymer yarn may be used coreless or constructed with a core material or with both said coreless or said core material.

42. The polymer yarn of claim 32, wherein said polymer yarn may be woven, non-woven or knitted with synthetic or natural materials as warp or weft.

43. The polymer yarn of claim 42, wherein said polymer yarn is woven, non-woven or knitted and may be a portion or the entirety of a wall covering, window shade or panel track, upholstery, drapery or encapsulated into a building panel.

44. The web structure of the polymer yarn of claim 42, wherein said woven, non-woven, or knitted polymer yarn may be open to the environment or encapsulated between resin panels or translucent resin panels or translucent or transparent laminate building materials of compositions such as polycarbonate or acrylic resin and wherein said yarn may also be a natural yarn.

45. The woven, non-woven, or knitted polymer yarn of claim 42, wherein said woven, non-woven, or knitted polymer yarn is a structural mesh of said polymer yarn that may be bonded by heat to said warp and weft or wherein each strand of yarn may also be bonded to another strand of yarn.

46. The polymer yarn of claim 42, wherein said woven or knitted polymer yarn complies with NFPA 701 large scale drapery test fire ratings for woven or knitted polymer building or decorative materials and including ASTM E-84 regarding flammability and AATCC 16-1998 regarding light fastness for woven or knitted polymer building materials

47. A method of producing UV, flame resistant, polymer yarn comprising a hollow core portion, wherein said production is by one of several methods including extrusion, spinning by using a metering pump and spinneret assembly, or spinning and drawing, or pultrusion, or a combination of any of these methods or like methods.

Description:

FIELD OF INVENTION

This invention relates to the weaving and application of woven hollow polymer yarns for use in products requiring UV (ultraviolet light) and flammability resistance while also providing decorative art.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Natural fibers have been used in the manufacture of weavings, decorative wall hangings and fabric room dividers for many centuries. The casual, informal, and artistic appearance of textiles has made it especially popular for use in public places such as museums, atria and office buildings and in informal settings such as offices, hotels and other establishments. Natural fibers, however, have limited use due to minimal resistance to fire and smoke. Windows, walls and panel applications, space dividers, screens as well as window panels upholstered walls and wall hangings all can be decorated or enhanced with the use of such fibers or yarns if UV (ultraviolet light) and flammability protection could be incorporated into the properties of such fibers and yarns.

Decorative textile hangings, window treatments, wall covering and upholstery fabrics typically comprise a warp yarn, i.e., a yarn running straight through the woven material, and a weft yarn, i.e., a yarn that is woven back and forth through the warp yarn. Numerous styles of weave or knit structures, interlaces, meshes or webs are used in the manufacture of wall hangings, window treatments, drapery, wall covering and upholsters in order to achieve the decorative attributes sought by the designer. The various styles of weave or knit result in a different look, feel, strength and weight of the finished woven or knit product. In a simple weave pattern, the warp yarns are spaced apart and arranged parallel to each other. The weft yarns are woven over and under the alternating warp yarns. Adjacent weft yarns pass on opposite sides of a given warp yarn.

Polymer yarns have been used as well to manufacture tapestries and textile hangings including draperies, window treatments, upholstery and apparel. By way of example, a polymer yarn is known which is constructed as an elongated body, such as of indeterminate length, having a core surrounded by a sheath of polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Foamed PVC material gives greater volume with less material. The outer coating of these fibers or yarns may be formed of other synthetic materials such as polyamides, polyesters and the like. The yarn is typically made in a single step using an extrusion, melt spinning, melt spinning and drawing, or pultrusion or other similar or like process, as is known in the art. Co-extrusion providing a skin or overcoating could also be used to make these products.

Producing polymer yarns may be by one of several methods including extrusion, spinning by using a metering pump and spinneret assembly, or spinning and drawing, or pultrusion, or a combination of any of these methods.

The inner core may include a single filament of polyester or fiberglass, or may include a plurality of polyester or fiberglass filaments bundled to form a single core. The core can also be filled with a polymer to produce a coreless yarn with UV and flame resistant properties.

A coreless yarn is defined as a yarn or thread that is not wrapped around a core. It could be a single strand such as a monofilament or several strands interwoven with no central core yarn or support.

Yarns are fibers or filaments formed into a continuous strand for use in weaving textiles or for the manufacture of thread. A staple fiber such as cotton, linen, or wool, is made into natural yarn by carding, combing (for fine, long staples only), drawing out into roving, and subsequently spinning. Continuous synthetic filaments, such as silk, rayon, and nylon, may be formed directly into synthetic yarn or may be cut into short lengths and prepared like staple fibers.

The polymer yarn being constructed from foamed PVC material, for example, results in a lack of uniformity in the foaming of the PVC material during the extrusion process. This produces a yarn which lacks a uniform cylindrical exterior appearance. The yarn, however, can also have a more uniform exterior shape, as well as other shapes such as square, oval, flat, triangular and the like. Polymer yarns as thus far described are known from U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,704,690, 5,845,970 and 6,179,382; as well as U.S. Design Pat. Nos. 395,171, 474,614 and 409,001; the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.

It is therefore desirable to provide improvements in the manufacture of polymer woven material for use in building decorative and functional textile articles and accessories including, for example, the use of coreless, hollow, fire and UV resistant polymer yarns and complying to the recommended NFPA 701 small and large scale drapery test fire ratings for polymer building materials and including other tests such as ASTM E-84—flammability and AATCC 16-1998—lightfastness.

DESCRIPTION OF PRIOR ART

U.S. Pat. No. 5,141,542 to Fingeat, et. al., and assigned to Filature de la Gosse, S A., describes a fire-resistant textile yarn comprising a core formed from a ply yarn comprising double-threaded-multiple-glass filaments, and fibers wound around the core, wherein at least 33% by weight of said fibers are formed from aramid resin, and the yarn count is between 30-55 tex, the mass ratio of the core is between 10% and 26%, and the fibers are spun without axial twisting around the core.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,967,548 to Fingeat, et. al., and assigned to Filature de la Gosse, S A., describes a fire-resistant textile yarn comprising an inorganic filament core surrounded by fibres formed from at least 50% by weight of aramid resin, wherein the yarn count is between 30-50 tex, the mass ratio of the core being between 10% and 25%, the aramid fibres being spun without axial twisting around this core.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,729,920 to Sayers, et. al., and assigned to Courtaulds Ltd., describes a novelty core yarn consisting essentially of a continuous filamentary glass core provided with a sheath of a roving of modacrylic textile fibers having inherent, built-in flame-resistance and composed of a copolymer selected from the group consisting of acrylonitrile and vinylidene chloride, acrylonitrile and vinyl chloride and acrylonitrile and vinylidene chloride and vinyl chloride.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,670,327 to Weber, John W, and unassigned, describes a yarn comprising a sheath of individually wrapped aramid fibers surrounding and substantially covering a continuous filament core of amorphous silica product containing at least 96% silica and having the thermal performance of a refractory material.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,500,593 to Weber, John W, and unassigned, describes a high temperature resistant fabric comprised of yarns, having a core of high temperature resistant refractory material silica and covering of a second high temperature resistant fiber selected from the group consisting essentially of aramid, phenolic, polyacrylonitrile and polybenzimidazole fibers, and a metallic laminate.

U.S. Patent Application No. 2005/0191923A1 to Schwartz, Larry, and unassigned, describes a woven panel comprising a plurality of polymer first yarns each having an essential core woven together with a plurality of polymer second yarns each having a superficial core forming a woven panel therefrom.

U.S. Patent Application No. 2005/0106974A1 to Schwartz, Larry, and unassigned, describes a woven panel comprising a plurality of elongated first yarns, said first yarns including an outer sheath of a first polymer material surrounding an elongated core of a second material; and a plurality of elongated second yarns, said second yarns including a body of a third polymer material devoid of a region of a material different from said third polymer material, said plurality of first yarns woven together with said plurality of second yarns to form a woven panel. The woven panel wherein said second yarns have an elongated hollow region. The woven panel wherein said coreless yarns have a solid cross-section.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,610,176 to Mauretti, Gerald J, and assigned to Pascale Industries, Inc., describes a method of forming a yarn comprising at least four filaments of a desired material wrapped about one another said filaments drawn from spools in a series is successively wrapped in opposite directions by a further filament as the yarn precursor is drawn through the hollow core of each spool in the series.

Japanese Application Number JP2000178824A2, to Shibuya et. al., and assigned to Uniplas Shiga K K, describes an undrawn monofilament yarn obtained by the quenching and solidification of a thermoplastic synthetic resin extruded by an extrusion molding means is successively and continuously subjected to a water-removing treatment with a water-removing means, a heating and drawing treatment with a heating and drawing means and a crimping treatment with a crimping means to obtain a crimped monofilament yarn having a thickness of 150-500 de.

Japanese Application Number JP2004183118A2, to Ikenaga Hideo., and assigned to Asahi Kasei Fibers Corp., describes a solid knit fabric is composed of a knitted fabric of two layers of the face side and back side and connecting yarns connecting the two layers of the knitted fabric and synthetic fiber monofilament yarns of ≧110 dtex. The knitted fabric on the face side is a dense knit texture formed of a multifilament yarn having ≦35% opening ratio. The ratio of appearance area A of the monofilament yarn of the knitted fabric on the face side to the appearance area B of the multifilament yarn is represented by formula (1), A/B≦0.15 and the relationship between the diameter D of the monofilament yarn and the apparent diameter MD of the multifilament yarn in the same stitch is represented by formula (2), MD/D≧1.2.

Japanese Application Number JP2002105815A2, to Tsumura, et. al., and assigned to Suminoe Textile Co. Ltd., describes a three-dimensional solid knit sheet comprises a three-dimensional solid knit cloth produced with a double raschel knitting machine of 6-18 gauges. The total thickness of yarns constituting the meshes of the obverse and reverse knit cloths, is set at ≧550 dtex. The linking yarn connecting the obverse knit cloth and the reverse knit cloth consists of a monofilament yarn. At least the obverse knit cloth is constituted with a coarse part 20 knitted into a lace stitch texture such as mesh and a dense part knitted at a spatial filling rate of 1.1-6 times that of the coarse part.

Japanese Application Number JP10034778A2, to Torii, et. al., and assigned to Taiyo Kogyo K K, describes a translucent heat insulating material has a structure wherein on both surfaces being coarse of a base fabric which is formed into a solid structure, a synthetic resin film with high translucence, is affixed. The base fabric has a structure wherein top and bottom ground weave which are flat texture woven by making the density of, e.g. mock leno weave or leno weave coarser, are integrated by binding them. by a binding weave. The thickness is normally, e.g. approx. 3-10 mm. Also, for the ground weave and the binding weave, if fire resistance is not required, a monofilament thread made of a synthetic resin with high rigidity, is used, and if fire resistance is required, a vinyl chloride coated glass fiber is used.

Japanese Application Number JP2004232177A2, to Ohara Hiroshi, and assigned to Ohara Hiroshi, describes a decorative material is provided by interlacing a lame thread with a colored assembly thread to be a decorative thread, directly and tightly winding the decorative thread itself or a somewhat thicker decorative thread made by twisting the decorative thread in parallel on the surface of a base material of an article to be decorated, subsequently enclosing and fixing the wound part with a transparent synthetic resin to obtain a decorative material. Or, after tightly winding the decorative thread in parallel on a base material for working, the wound part is temporarily fixed with the transparent synthetic resin to obtain a decorative surface which is separated from the base material and cut into a proper shape. The cut part is adhered to the surface of the base of the article to be decorated; subsequently the adhered cut part is enclosed and fixed with the transparent synthetic resin to form the decorative material.

Japanese Application Number JP2002001853A2, to Kon, et. al., and assigned to Diatex Co Ltd, Toshin Sangyo K K, describes a cloth-like body layer prepared by making flat yarns of a thermoplastic resin intersect each other like warp and weft is formed of a cloth-like body obtained by a method wherein the flat yarns of the thermoplastic resin of a thickness 20-200 μm and a thread width 0.2-8 mm are made to intersect each other with a mesh of 1.6-8 mm and wherein the points of intersection thereof are fusion-bonded. A surface layer of film is fusion-bonded on one side of the cloth-like body so that it is laminated thereon to form a flat surface substantially, and a rear layer film is fusion-bonded on the other side of the cloth-like body, while the part of the mesh of the cloth-like body is brought into close contact with the surface layer film and fusion-bonded thereon to be laminated so that a recess is formed substantially. In this way, the transparency of the whole laminated body is made 75% or above.

Japanese Application Number JP2001081642A2, to Sakai, et. al, and assigned to Nakai Kinshi Kogyo K K, describes This laminated sheet material is obtained by laminating a transparent film assuming an iris pattern directly or through a transparent resin film onto the outside of a resin layer containing a luminous pigment. The laminated sheet is preferably a sheet material prepared by laminating other films to both sides of the resin layer containing the luminous pigment and the resin containing the luminous pigment is preferably an adhesive. A twisted yarn for a woven fabric is preferably obtained by mutually twisting a foil yarn formed by slitting the laminated sheet into narrow width by using a core yarn or without using the core yarn.

Japanese Application Number JP 1291418A2, to Matano, et. al., and assigned to Hagiwara Kogyo K K, describes an ethylene α-olefin copolymer is manufactured by the use of a metallocene catalyst having properties of a melt-flow rate of 0.3-30 g/10 mn, a density of 0.90-0.94 g/cm3, a minimum peak temperature of 80-125° C. by DSC, a molecular weight distribution (Mw/Nn) of 1.8-3.5, and a melt tension of 0.5-4 g. After that, this is woven or knitted by 50-90 wt. % by the use of flat yarn as warp and weft, which is made of resin composition consisting of 10-50 wt. % high density polyethylene with a density of 0.945 g/cm3 so as to form cloth, and finally, an ethylene α-olefin copolymeric layer is laminated on one surface or both surfaces thereof.

Japanese Application Number JP06062682A2, to Washino, et. al., and unassigned, describes The agricultural film is obtained by including an antifogging agent in flexible vinyl chloride resin films in splitting a transparent stretched film into a tape like form, crossing the resultant tapes in the form of lattice at a suitable interval, laminating the crossed tapes between two layers of the flexible vinyl chloride resin films and stretching the laminate in an agricultural greenhouse. The lattice-like material of the flat yarn includes a material having a structure in which the flat yarn such as polyethylene crosses directly or through an adhesive layer and there are parts of opened meshes without any flat yarn and the flat yarn is in the form of the lattice through a thin vinyl chloride film. This film sustains the antifogging performance without sagging thereof during the time of stretching.

Japanese Application Number JP06048785A2, to Yamashita Kiyoaki, and assigned to Tatsumura Bijutsu Oirmono K K, describes a threadlike body and low-melting fiber melting at a relatively low temperature are employed and either is used as weft or warp yarn to construct a woven fabric. The same resin films and as the low-melting fiber are superposed and nipped between two plate members and in the form of a sandwich and heated under a reduced pressure. Thereby, the low-melting fiber and the resin films and are melted while maintaining the pattern formed from the lightweight threadlike body to completely bond the two plate members.

Japanese Application Number JP06033671A2, to Okada Mizuo, and assigned to Mitsubshi Rayon Co. Ltd, describes A curtain texture is formed as a fiber sheet type double-sided lenticular, in which an optical diffusive resin containing styrene bead spheres is melted and spun to a transparent polycarbonate resin, and inter-yarn welded in the outlet of a nozzle by a Barus effect, and yarn having an approximately round cross section is arranged. Consequently, a ray transmittance of the texture thus constituted is improved, optical diffusivity in the horizontal direction is also enhanced, and the whole indoors are irradiated efficiently with mellow light. Accordingly, the directional properties of light and the degree of diffusion can be controlled.

Japanese Application Number JP05057840A2 to Sumi Shozaburo, and assigned to Sumi Shozaburo, describes Decorative knit sheet or ribbon—comprises PET, PVC, or polypropylene resin having evaporated metal membranes or color evaporated membranes formed on both sides. On both sides of synthetic resin film, metallized film is applied and, after that, tricot knitted fabric is also pasted through adhesive so as to make into an integral body in order to provide the decorative knitted fabric sheet concerned. Furthermore, as the case may be, embossing such as sanitizing or the like is applied onto the surface of the ribbon.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,884,754 to Kimura, et. al., and assigned to Kanebo, LTD, describes a hollow filament comprising a filamentary polymer composed of from 50% to 100% by weight of a flame-resistant and anti-fusing cured novolak resin and up to 50% by weight of a fiber-forming thermoplastic synthetic resin selected from at least one of the group consisting of polyamides, polyesters, polyesterethers, polyolefins and polyurethanes, characterized in that the hollow structure continuously extends in the axial direction of the filament, the degree of hollowness thereof being in the range of 10-80%. The filament is described as being partially cured novalak.

US Patent applications 2005016974A1 and 20060021668A1 to Schwartz are for woven panels with or without a hollow core as a strength member for upholstery. The second application 20060021668A1 provides an invention for shaping the polymer yarns and twisting these same yarns followed by removing the heat in order for the panel to retain its shape. The second application is assigned to Sun Isle USA, LLC.

US Patent application 20050042447A1 to Conesa, et. al. , assigned to Chavanoz Industrie, describes coating a natural fiber yarn with a polymer to make a composite yarn.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,673,444 to Yukki, et. al., assigned to Asahi Kasei Kabushiki Kaisha describes a method and use for polymethylene terephthalate monofilament yarns for toothbrushes and the like.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention describes a UV, flame-resistant, polymeric hollow polymer yarn or fiber useful for completing a woven, knitted or non-woven structure or web that can be used for decorative wall coverings, window shades, upholstery, draperies, building panels, clothing, and the like. The yarn may also be solid or coreless in nature.

This invention describes an improvement in polymer yarns for enhancement of building materials including decorative arts, specifically a transparent or translucent polymer yarn that has an essentially concentrically, longitudinal hollow core or solid core portion wherein the polymer yarn contains UV and fire resistant properties that may be used as a coreless or a cored yarn and woven or knitted with synthetic or natural yarns in a warp or weft-like manner.

More specifically a hollow polymer yarn that complies with NFPA 701 large-scale drapery test fire ratings for woven, non-woven or knitted polymer building materials that may be transparent, translucent, tinted, colored or opaque are the subject of this invention. The applications for these yarns include incorporation into building panels for decorative purposes both internal and external to the buildings.

The hollow portion most preferably contains a hole diameter of 0.009″, but may range from 0.001″-0.015″ with a wall thickness of minimally 0.008″, preferably 0.010″.

The UV and flame resistant polymer yarn may be from 0.020″-0.125″ in outside diameter and may be non-uniform, symmetrically or asymmetrically in outside diameter, preferably 60 mil, 40 mil, 24 mil or 20 mil average diameters for compatibility with standard weaving and knitting machines.

The polymer yarn is woven or knitted and may be a portion or the entirety of a wall covering, window shade, upholstery, drapery or building panel.

The yarn may be encapsulated between polyethyleneterephthalate glass (PETG), polycarbonate or acrylic impregnated transparent resin panels or translucent laminate building materials to provide decorative, UV and fire resistant building panels for segregating floor spaces or for aligning with walls or windows or just as decorative items in foyers, on cabinetry, shower doors, and the like.

The woven or knitted yarn may additionally be bonded by heating with synthetic or natural yarns as warp and weft sections and the yarns may be left exposed to the environment.

The polymer yarn may also be solid to provide a similar or same effects as the hollow fiber when placed in a woven, laminated, or non-woven application.

The method of manufacture of yarn can include several different extrusion methods including;

    • a) the use of a tubing die which allows for a standard extrusion instead of a pressure-type extrusion to produce the hollow fibers
    • b) the use of a standard tip and die extrusion technique for a standard extrusion process
    • c) the use of a spinnerette designed to manufacture hollow fibers that are circular or tubular in nature and useful for woven or non-woven applications

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an example of a woven or knitted polymer yarn.

FIG. 2 is an example of a woven polymer yarn encapsulated between two clear resin panels.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an example of a hollow polymer yarn [10] woven between a synthetic yarn [20] or a combination of synthetic and natural yarn [30].

FIG. 2 is an example of a hollow polymer yarn [10] woven between a synthetic yarn [20] or natural yarn [30] encapsulated between two clear panels [40].