Title:
Attachment nozzle for removal of residue
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A nozzle for attachment with a vacuum for the purpose of removing debris from holes drilled into a structure comprising: a frontal piece an anterior piece, the frontal piece comprises a tip end and a bottom end, the tip end comprises a collecting orifice, perforated orifices, and bristles; the bottom end comprises an interfacing orifice; the anterior piece comprises of a top end and a bottom end, the top end interfaces with the frontal piece and the bottom end interfaces with the vacuum cleaner; the bottom end comprises of a release valve and a vacuum interface.



Inventors:
Spann, Jared (San Luis Obispo, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/444796
Publication Date:
12/06/2007
Filing Date:
05/31/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47L9/06
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MULLER, BRYAN R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BILL & MARY LOU INC. (SAN FRANCISCO, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A nozzle for attachment with a vacuum for the purpose of removing debris from holes drilled into a structure comprising: a frontal piece an anterior piece, the frontal piece comprises a tip end and a bottom end, the tip end comprises a collecting orifice, perforated orifices, and bristles; the bottom end comprises an interfacing orifice; the anterior piece comprises of a top end and a bottom end, the top end interfaces with the frontal piece and the bottom end interfaces with the vacuum cleaner; the bottom end comprises of a release valve and a vacuum interface.

2. The nozzle of claim 1 further comprising a sleeve, the sleeve is comprised of a plurality of bristles radiating outwards from the sleeve.

3. The nozzle of claim 1 wherein the frontal piece and the anterior piece is composed of plastic.

4. The nozzle of claim 1 wherein the frontal piece and the anterior piece is composed of a metal.

5. The nozzle of claim 1 wherein the frontal piece and the anterior piece is composed of a polycarbonate material.

6. The nozzle of claim 1 wherein the frontal piece is telescoping.

7. The nozzle of claim 1 wherein the frontal piece further comprises a button and the anterior piece further comprises a mating orifice, the button is biased in an upwards position and engages with the mating orifice.

8. A right angle nozzle for attachment with a vacuum for the purpose of removing debris from holes drilled into concrete comprising: a first piece and a second piece, the first piece is comprised of bristles, perforated orifices, central orifice, and attachment orifice; the second piece is comprised of a first chamber and a second chamber; the first chamber and the second chamber are perpendicular with each other; the first chamber is affixed with the first piece and the second chamber is affixed with the vacuum cleaner.

9. The right angle nozzle of claim 8 further comprising a release valve, the release valve is incorporated into the second piece.

10. The right angle nozzle of claim 8 further comprising a sleeve, the sleeve is comprised of a plurality of bristles radiating outwards from the sleeve.

11. The right angle nozzle of claim 8 wherein the frontal piece and the anterior piece is composed of plastic.

12. The right angle nozzle of claim 8 wherein the first piece is telescoping.

13. The right angle nozzle of claim 8 the first piece further comprises a button and the second piece further comprises a mating orifice, the button is biased in an upwards position and engages with the mating orifice.

14. A plastic nozzle for attachment with a vacuum for the purpose of removing debris from holes drilled into concrete comprising: a frontal piece an anterior piece, the frontal piece comprises a tip end and a bottom end, the tip end comprises a collecting orifice, perforated orifices, a sleeve and bristles; the sleeve is comprised of a plurality of bristles radiating outwards from the sleeve; the bottom end comprises an interfacing orifice; the anterior piece comprises of a top end and a bottom end, the top end interfaces with the frontal piece and the bottom end interfaces with the vacuum cleaner; the bottom end comprises of a release valve and a vacuum interface.

15. The plastic nozzle of claim 14 further comprising a button and the anterior piece further comprises a mating orifice, the button is biased in an upwards position and engages with the mating orifice.

16. The plastic nozzle of claim 15 wherein the frontal piece is telescoping.

17. The plastic nozzle of claim 16 wherein the second end further comprises a first chamber and a second chamber, the first chamber and the second chamber form a right angle with each other.

18. The plastic nozzle of claim 17 wherein the bristles are composed of nylon.

19. The plastic nozzle of claim 18 wherein the bristles are composed of polypropylene nylon.

20. The plastic nozzle of claim 19 wherein the sleeve is composed of aluminum.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to the construction industry, and more particularly relates to accessories related with concrete, masonry, and similar materials.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

One of the principal materials used in any construction project is concrete. Concrete is cost effective, moldable to virtually any shape desirable, scaleable, and simple to use and implement. Moreover, its intrinsic compressive strength is virtually unmatched.

However, whereas concrete can be compressed with great force, its tensile strength is only negligible by comparison. For this reason concrete must be compositely strengthened with steel reinforcing bars (or “rebar”) to resist tensile forces. The use of rebar acts as an internal skeleton by which the concrete can congeal around and bond with. Anchor bolts are generally used to affix vertical walls with concrete slabs or foundations, or to affix horizontal framing to vertical concrete or masonry walls; whereas rebar is generally used to connect concrete slabs, walls or foundations with other concrete elements.

The importance of anchor bolts may be most readily illustrated in an earthquake. In the event of an earthquake the vertical walls of a structure resisting the forces are swayed horizontally in-plane. This movement, in turn, creates great tension between the interface of the ends of the walls with the concrete. Without the anchor bolts the wall would quickly detach from the concrete slab and may potentially result in the collapse of the structure.

In order to securely affix an anchor bolt (or “rod”) between a dry (existing) concrete slab and a wall, a hole is drilled into the concrete slab. This hole is sized to fit with the anchor rod. After the concrete slab is drilled, all of the residue must be removed from the hole in order to enable an epoxy (or “adhesive”) material to adhere with both the concrete and the anchor rod. Once the residue is removed an adhesive is injected into the hole to glue the anchor in place permanently.

When there is residue within the hole when the anchor rod is placed into the hole, the bond-strength between the epoxy and the anchor rod/concrete is weakened. The residue limits the ability of the epoxy to bond the anchor rod with the concrete.

Performance tests have shown that the anchorage load levels between properly drilled and cleaned holes and holes with concrete residue can decrease as much as 37%. Similar studies using analogous materials without adhesives report similar findings.

These test results reveal profound implications. First, the general strength between interconnected concrete slabs, foundations or walls may be weakened by up to 37% if the hole is not thoroughly cleaned. If these concrete elements were to detach from each other, then their failure could result in unsafe conditions. Or, in an alternative scenario, the general anchorage strength of an anchor bolt and a wall of a structure may become more likely to separate from each other if the holes are not thoroughly cleaned. This can lead to the roof and/or floors collapsing under the weight of the structure.

Unfortunately, the process of thoroughly cleaning a hole is cumbersome and time consuming. According to the ACI and manufacturers of epoxy adhesives, in order to thoroughly clean a hole, one must blow the hole with compressed air, wash it with water and a bristle brush, and then blow the hole until it is dry. Depending upon the size of the hole and the type of surface of the hole (the ACI recommends a rough surface as opposed to smooth surface) this can be very labor intensive.

Furthermore, oftentimes when remodeling an existing structure by adding a new wall or room, the process of blowing the hole out is complicated by its surroundings. In the event that the structure is an on-going business with customers, expensive furniture, food, etc., all of the contents of the building must be covered with a plastic tarp to prevent the concrete dust from being deposited onto the items in the structure. Consequently, this may require the whole business or residence to be vacated until the process is complete. This may entail losing a substantial amount of revenue as well as the significant inconvenience which will inexorably entail.

Another problem which may also accrue as a result of this process is the concomitant man hours which will add to the cost of the project. Since more time may be spent upon covering the interior of a structure with tarp and other cleanup duties than actually drilling the hole this process appears very inefficient and costly.

Another issue with the installation of anchor bolts or rebar into concrete using epoxy is that use of its code-based design strength is dependent upon the holes being cleaned of all residue. Certain manufacturers may issue reduction values for unclean holes based on testing, however by code, if the anchor is to be used, then the hole must have been cleaned out. If a hole is not cleaned out, then typically the anchor must be physically pull-tested to ensure adequate strength, and subsequently adding significant cost. Upon pull-testing, if the installation fails prior to reaching the required strength, then the hole must be re-drilled and the installation redone, however use of the original hole is not guaranteed, depending upon any collateral damage from the testing. Complete cleaning of the hole may in effect be considered mandatory.

Another problem associated with the removal of concrete residue is the deleterious effects which may arise from breathing concrete dust. Concrete dust is a known carcinogen and may lead to lung cancer, prostate cancer, stomach cancer, and cancer of the lip. For this reason, some manufacturers of concrete recommend the use of OSHA, MSHA, or NIOSH approved respirators. In addition, it is also recommended that users wear impervious gloves, boots, and clothing to protect skin from contact with the concrete dust and shower shortly thereafter.

Although most people who regularly work with concrete are aware of the health hazards associated with breathing in concrete dust, other people nearby may not be aware of these health risks and may not take adequate precautions such as using a mask. Moreover, the concrete dust particles are so fine that they may be suspended in the air for a substantial amount of time.

Yet another problem associated with the removal of concrete is the fact that the widely accepted procedures with which to remove concrete dust from a hole are inadequate to completely remove all of the concrete dust from the hole. The ACI recommends that the hole be blown with compressed air, washed with water and a bristle brush, and then blown until it is dry. However, no matter how fastidious one approaches these procedures concrete residue will invariably remain especially when the hole is in a vertical orientation.

Therefore, what is clearly needed in the art is a method and apparatus for cleaning a hole in concrete. Such a method and apparatus should streamline this process by decreasing the amount of time for thoroughly cleaning the hole while preserving the anchorage strength of the rebar or the anchor bolts with the concrete. This apparatus and method should also limit the amount of exposure of dust particles with those who are tasked for the removal of the same. Moreover, this apparatus and method should also result in stronger buildings and homes due to a more solid bond between concrete and their attendant reinforcement structures.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to streamline the process of residue removal, primarily in concrete holes. This is accomplished with a nozzle apparatus adaptable for use with a vacuum cleaner. The nozzle apparatus incorporates bristles on the anterior end.

The nozzle apparatus in some preferred embodiments may be shaped in a right angle orientation. In other preferred embodiments, various points of the nozzle apparatus may be made to be telescoping thereby having a scaleable length.

The nozzle apparatus accumulates residue through the collecting orifices and through the perforated orifices. The collecting orifice is located on the distal end of the nozzle apparatus whereas the perforated holes are located along the shaft of the nozzle apparatus.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

According to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a unique apparatus and method is used to clean holes which are drilled into concrete. These holes in concrete are formed in order to insert either rebar, anchor bolts or other similar articles. The apparatus is used in conjunction with any garden-variety vacuum. However, in more industrial applications it is recommended that the user accompany the present invention with a wet/dry vacuum canister for best results. The present invention is described in enabling detail below.

FIG. 1 illustrates a preferred embodiment of the present invention. Nozzle apparatus 100 consists of a frontal piece 101 an anterior piece 102, and a vacuum interface 126. The frontal piece consists of a tip end 103 and a bottom end 104. The tip end comprises a collecting orifice 105, perforated orifices 106, and bristles 107. The bottom end comprises an interfacing orifice 125. The Anterior piece comprises a top end 108 and bottom end 109, the top end interfaces with the frontal piece and the bottom end interfaces with the vacuum interface. The bottom end comprises a vacuum interface 126.

The frontal piece and the anterior piece detach from each other at the detachment point 112. This means of attachment and detachment can embody practically any method with which one skilled in the art will readily discern. An exemplary example may be dovetailing pieces which fit with each other and create an interference fit. Another means may be with a spring loaded button which affixes with a cooperating orifice along the mating part. And yet another exemplary means may be a tapped end and a cooperating threaded end. The possibilities are endless. For this reason, the scope of the present invention should not be construed as limiting the means of joining the frontal piece with the anterior piece.

Bristles are used for the purpose of jarring debris within the concrete hole which may adhesively stick to the walls of the hole. In some preferred embodiments the bristles may be incorporated directly into the structure of the frontal piece. And in other preferred embodiments, the bristles may retrofit the frontal piece through use of a sleeve. Sleeve is comprised essentially of a cylinder of bristles which radiate from the center. When a sleeve is used, the sleeve is simply placed over the frontal piece. Sleeve may be sized such that an interference fit is created by the friction between the frontal piece and the sleeve. Sleeve may also be affixed with the frontal piece through an infinite number of means which will readily be self-evident to one skilled in the art.

Bristles in some preferred embodiments may be comprised of nylon short trim or any other nylon compose bristle. Moreover, practically any grade of bristle may be used with the present invention. For example, a nylon short trim bristle with a fiber diameter of 0.003 or 0.005 may be expedient for use with the present invention. However, it is not intended to suggest that only nylon short trim bristles are within the scope of the present invention. There abound a vast array of different bristles of various lengths and fiber diameters which may be equally expedient for use with the present invention. For this reason, the present invention is not limited to the type of bristles, fiber diameter, or length of bristle.

Moreover, in some preferred embodiments the bristles may be affixed with the frontal piece by way of Velcro®, (a Trademarked material). In this particular embodiment, bristles may be directly affixed with a layer of hooks or loops material which will hereafter be referred to as bristle layer. This layer is mated onto another layer of hooks or loops material hereafter referred to as frontal piece layer. On the opposite side of the frontal piece layer is an adhesive layer. Adhesive layer is placed onto the surface of the frontal piece. Therefore, after the frontal piece layer is affixed with the frontal piece the bristle layer may be detachably engaged with the frontal piece. And afterwards, if the user desires to apply another grade of bristle to the hole, the user may simply unwrap the bristle layer from the frontal piece and wrap the frontal piece with the desired bristle grade. An example of this product is manufactured by 3M Brushlon Products® (a Trademarked product).

The frontal piece may be made of practically any material. Plastic, metal, wood, etc. may all prove to be expedient for use with the present invention. Moreover, in some preferred embodiments the frontal piece may be telescoping. FIG. 5 illustrates a preferred embodiment with a frontal piece 201′ which is telescoping. The purpose of a telescoping frontal piece would be for deep holes and for easier packaging.

Perforated orifices are used in order to allow for debris to enter into the chamber of the present invention and thereafter into the vacuum cleaner. The perforated orifices need only be large enough to accommodate concrete debris as well as other debris typically encountered in these processes. It should be noted that main orifice 114 is also another conduit for the debris as well.

It should also be noted here that frontal piece in some embodiments may be disposable. The reason for this is that over time the bristles may wear thin and lose their natural rigidity. Another reason is that the frontal end will be subjected to more wear and tear than the anterior piece. However, it is not intended to suggest that the present invention is circumscribed in scope such that the frontal end is disposable. In some other preferred embodiments the frontal end may not be disposable.

Moreover, it should also be noted that the present invention may be accompanied with a panoply of various sized and shaped frontal pieces. The purpose behind the use of different sized frontal pieces is that one may encounter holes which are idiosyncratic in their size, shape, and orientation. For instance, a relatively shallow hole may require a similarly short frontal piece. A relatively long hole may require a proportionally long piece. Some pieces may incorporate a more durable, longer style of bristle for the beginning of removing dust from the hole. And as one progresses, a finer frontal piece may be used for the purpose of removing trace residue around the shaft.

Release valve is used for the purpose of the possibility of the present invention becoming clogged with debris. In this case, the release valve will allow for ambient air to enter. This allowance of ambient air may protect the vacuum from over-exertion and also may help protect the present invention itself.

The release valve may be formed by a panoply of different methods and structures. For this reason, the present invention should not be construed as limiting its scope to a particular release valve. Moreover, other preferred embodiments may not necessarily require the use of release valve. Therefore, the present invention should not be construed to be limiting to the necessity of a release valve.

FIG. 2 illustrates another preferred embodiment of the present invention. Right angle nozzle 200 consists of a first piece 201 and a second piece 202. The first piece is comprised of bristles 203, perforated orifices 204, central orifice 205, and attachment orifice 206. The second piece is comprised of a first chamber 207 and a second chamber 208. The first piece and the second piece are angled such that they are perpendicular with each other. The first chamber is affixed with the first piece and the second chamber is affixed with the vacuum cleaner. And in some preferred embodiments the second chamber may further incorporate an ambient valve.

The right angle nozzle is used primarily when one must vacuum a hole which is in close proximity with a wall or column. The angle of the right angle nozzle facilitates easier vacuuming under these circumstances.

It will be apparent to the skilled artisan that there are numerous changes that may be made in embodiments described herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. As such, the invention taught herein by specific examples is limited only by the scope of the claims that follow.