Title:
Spiked Barrier
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A low-harm spiked barrier for a structure such as a fence is disclosed which has a base having spikes. The spikes are spaced apart by a distance less than that required to obtain a finger grip or a foothold on the base between the spikes. The spikes are slightly rounded so the spikes will not likely cause permanent injury and the spikes also provide a psychological deterrent if someone attempting to scale the structure on which the spiked barrier is mounted.



Inventors:
Scheirs, John (Edithvale, AU)
Application Number:
11/747521
Publication Date:
11/29/2007
Filing Date:
05/11/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B1/72
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
FERENCE, JAMES M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
JRG Attorneys at Law (MONTEREY, CA, US)
Claims:
1. A spiked barrier for mounting on a structure, comprising: a base for attachment to the structure; and a plurality of spikes extending from the base in side-by-side disposition, the spikes being spaced apart by a distance less than that required to obtain a finger grip or obtain a foothold on the base between the spikes.

2. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 1, wherein the base includes an attachment device for facilitating attachment of the base to the structure.

3. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 2, wherein the attachment device comprises one or more openings for receiving a fastener to connect the base to the structure.

4. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 2, wherein the attachment device is a recess formed in or by the base for facilitating attachment of the base to the structure.

5. A spiked barrier as defined claim 1, wherein the spikes are conical and have a large diameter bottom end adjacent the base and an apex remote from the base, the apex being rounded.

6. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 5, wherein the spikes are pyramid shaped with a square or triangular base or are talon or thorn shaped.

7. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 1, wherein the spikes are hollow.

8. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 1, wherein some of the spikes extend from the base to a height that is different to a height to which other spikes extend.

9. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 1, wherein the spikes are arranged in side-by-side disposition in at least one generally straight line.

10. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 1, wherein the spikes are arranged in side-by-side disposition in two or more lines of spikes provided on the base.

11. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 1, wherein the base comprises an angled section having a first portion and a second portion arranged transverse to the first portion with each portion having at least one line of spikes.

12. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 10, wherein the base is cylindrical.

13. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 10, wherein the cylindrical base has central passage or is solid.

14. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 1, wherein the base comprises a first portion and two downwardly inclined portions arranged one on each side of the first portion, the first portion having two rows of spikes and each inclined portion having one row of spikes.

15. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 14, wherein the base further comprises a substrate having three portions which match the contour of the first and two downwardly inclined portions and at least one further portion arranged at an angle with respect to each downwardly inclined portion to form an open octagonal configuration in transverse cross-section.

16. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 15, wherein the free ends of the further portions are provided with a bead.

17. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 1, wherein the base is of U-shaped configuration and curved in transverse cross-section with a single line of spikes being arranged on the base.

18. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 1, wherein the base is of substantially cylindrical form defining a cap and the spikes are arranged in circular lines on the cap.

19. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 1, wherein the base is in the form of a substantially flat plate having a first face and a second opposite face, the spikes extending from the first face, some of the spikes being of different height to others of the spikes, and at least one of the first face and second face having at least one groove which forms a web to enable one part of the spiked barrier to pivot relative to another part of the spiked barrier.

20. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 19, wherein the at least one groove comprises a plurality of first grooves extending in a first direction and a plurality of second grooves extending in a direction transverse to the first direction.

21. A spiked barrier for mounting on a paling fence or thin perimeter structure, comprising: a base having a first portion, and a second portion arranged transverse with respect to the first portion; a plurality of spikes extending from the first portion and the second portion in side-by-side disposition; and attachment openings for securing at least one of the first portion or second portion to the fence or structure so that the first portion is arranged on top of the fence or structure and the second portion extends substantially parallel to the plane of the fence or structure.

22. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 21, wherein the first and second portion include openings for receiving fasteners to secure the base to the fence or structure.

23. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 21, wherein the spikes are conical and have a large diameter bottom end adjacent the base and an apex remote from the base, the apex being rounded.

24. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 21, wherein the spikes are pyramid shaped with a square or triangular base or are talon or thorn shaped.

25. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 21, wherein the spikes are hollow.

26. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 21, wherein some of the spikes extend from the base to a height that is different to a height to which other spikes extend.

27. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 21, wherein at least two lines of spikes are arranged in the first portion and one line of spikes is arranged on the second portion.

28. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 21, wherein the spikes are spaced apart by a distance less than that required to obtain a finger grip on the spiked barrier.

29. A spiked barrier for a pool fence which has a plurality of uprights with pairs of adjacent uprights being joined by a U-shaped transition, said spiked barrier comprising: a base having a substantially U-shaped configuration which matches the U-shaped transition of the fence; a plurality of spikes on the base projecting outwardly from the base; and a curved recess formed in or by the base for locating on the U-shaped transition section to attach the spike barrier to the U-shaped transition section.

30. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 29, wherein the spikes are conical and have a large diameter bottom end adjacent the base and an apex remote from the base, the apex being rounded.

31. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 29, wherein the spikes are pyramid shaped with a square or triangular base or are talon or thorn shaped.

32. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 29, wherein the spikes are hollow.

33. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 29, wherein some of the spikes extend from the base to a height that is different to a height to which other spikes extend.

34. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 29, wherein the recess is defined by the base by forming the base with a U-shaped configuration in transverse cross-section.

35. A spiked barrier, comprising: a base having an upper base component and a substrate; a plurality of spikes located on the base component in side-by-side disposition; and the substrate defining a hollow structure to facilitate connection of the spiked barrier to a structure.

36. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 35, wherein the substrate is an open octagonal shape in transverse cross section and the upper component has three portions which match the contour of three of the sides of the octagonal substrate.

37. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 35, wherein the substrate is circular in transverse cross-section and the component is part circular in transverse cross-section.

38. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 35, wherein the spikes are conical and have a large diameter bottom end adjacent the base and an apex remote from the base, the apex being rounded.

39. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 35, wherein the spikes are pyramid shaped with a square or triangular base or are talon or thorn shaped.

40. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 35, wherein the spikes are hollow.

41. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 35, wherein some of the spikes extend from the base to a height that is different to a height to which other spikes extend.

42. A barrier element for a post, comprising: a cap having a top and a depending side wall; and a plurality of spikes arranged in side-by-side disposition on the cap.

43. A barrier element as defined in claim 42, wherein the top is contoured to match the contour of the top of the post.

44. A barrier element as defined in claim 42, wherein the spikes are arranged in a plurality of circular arrays on both the top and the skirt.

45. A barrier element as defined in claim 42, wherein the spikes are conical and have a large diameter bottom end adjacent the base and an apex remote from the base, the apex being rounded.

46. A barrier element as defined in claim 42, wherein the spikes are pyramid shaped with a square or triangular base or are talon or thorn shaped.

47. A barrier element as defined in claim 42, wherein the spikes are hollow.

48. A barrier element as defined in claim 42, wherein some of the spikes extend from the base to a height that is different to a height to which other spikes extend.

49. A spiked barrier for mounting on a structure, comprising: a plate having a first face and an opposite second face; a plurality of spikes extending from the first face; a plurality of grooves in one of the first and second face extending in a first direction; a plurality of grooves in one of the first and second face extending in a direction transverse to the first direction; and the grooves defined in webs to facilitate pivoting of one part of the barrier element relative to another part of the barrier element.

50. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 49, wherein the spikes are hollow.

51. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 49, wherein some of the spikes extend from the base to a height that is different to a height to which other spikes extend.

52. A spiked barrier as defined in claim 49, wherein the second face has shallow grooves for receiving glue to facilitate gluing of the spike barrier to the structure.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims benefit of Australian provisional application no. 2006902483 filed on 11 May 2006 and entitled “SPIKED BARRIER”. The Australian provisional application is incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a low-harm spiked barrier for mounting on a structure such as a fence, wall or other barrier to deter human intruders and also to prevent animals from walking on the structure or climbing over the structure.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The use of deterrent security elements on barriers is known and can comprise coiled barb wire, straight lengths of barb wire, embedded glass or other sharp objects and pointed spikes. In general, such elements are designed to prevent humans from scaling and crossing a barrier by causing injury to the person should the person attempt to scale the barrier. In most instances, these types of barrier elements are successful in preventing people from scaling the barrier.

However, the above types of elements generally do not prevent animals such as cats, possums, etc. from scaling the structure or walking along the top of the structure.

Thus, whilst such barriers are suitable for preventing people from scaling and crossing the structure, they often do not prevent animals from scaling the structure or walking along the top of the structure.

Furthermore, most barriers to prevent intrusion or the like are specifically designed and installed having regard to the environment or nature of the region which is to be secured. Thus, this generally does not lend itself to mass production of security elements which can be used in different environments or the mass production of a specific type of element for use with structures of the same environment type.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The object of a first aspect of the invention is to provide a low-harm barrier which provides a deterrent to people scaling a structure and also animals from walking along the top of the structure or scaling and crossing the structure without any significant degree of likely injury to the person or animal.

The invention in a first aspect may therefore be said to reside in a spiked barrier for mounting on a structure, comprising:

    • a base for attachment to the structure; and
    • a plurality of spikes extending from the base in side-by-side disposition, the spikes being spaced apart by a distance less than that required to obtain a finger grip or obtain a foothold on the base between the spikes.

Because of the disposition and spacing of the spikes, a person is unlikely to be able to obtain a good grip on the top of the structure to facilitate scaling and crossing the structure and therefore is deterred from any attempt to scale the structure. Since the deterrent is due to preventing a good grip which would facilitate scaling of the structure, the deterrent is such that it is unlikely to cause any significant injury to a person. Furthermore, because the spikes are so spaced, animals are equally unlikely to be able to obtain a good footing between the spikes, thereby preventing an animal from scaling and crossing the structure or walking along the top of the structure, again without causing injury to the animal.

Preferably the base includes an attachment device for facilitating attachment of the base to the structure.

The attachment device may simply be one or more openings for receiving a fastener to connect the base to the structure.

In other embodiments the device may be a recess formed in or by the base for facilitating attachment of the base to the structure.

Preferably the spikes are conical and have a large diameter bottom end adjacent the base and an apex remote from the base, the apex being rounded.

However, in other embodiments the spikes may be of pyramid shape (with either a square or triangular base) or talon or thorn shaped.

Preferably some spikes extend from the base to a height that is different to a height of other spikes extending from the base.

The different height of spikes ensures that pressure is not evenly distributed over a body part in contact with spikes, thereby reducing the “bed of nails” effect. The result is greater discomfort to a person or animal attempting to scale a structure fitted with the spiked barrier.

The rounding of the apex further reduces any likelihood of serious injury, should someone attempt to scale the structure so that again the deterrent is provided by the spacing of the spikes and the inability to obtain a good grip or footing.

In one embodiment the spikes are arranged in side-by-side disposition in at least one generally straight line. However, in more preferred embodiments, two or more lines of spikes are provided on the base.

In one embodiment the base comprises an angled section having a first portion and a second portion arranged transverse to the first portion with each portion having at least one line of spikes.

In another embodiment the base comprises a cylindrical base. The cylindrical base may have a central passage or may be solid.

In a still further embodiment the base comprises a first portion and two downwardly inclined portions arranged one on each side of the first portion, the first portion having two rows of spikes and each inclined portion having one row of spikes.

In this embodiment the base further comprises a substrate having three portions which match the contour of the first and two downwardly inclined portions and at least one further portion arranged at an angle with respect to each downwardly inclined portion to form an open octagonal configuration in transverse cross-section.

Preferably free ends of the further portions are provided with a bead.

In a still further embodiment the base is of U-shaped configuration and curved in transverse cross-section with a single line of spikes being arranged on the base.

In a still further embodiment the base is of substantially cylindrical form defining a cap and the spikes are arranged in circular lines on the cap.

In one embodiment of the invention the base is in the form of a substantially flat plate having a first face and a second opposite face, the spikes extending from the first face, some of the spikes being of different height to others of the spikes, and at least one of the first face and second face having at least one groove which forms a web to enable one part of the spiked barrier to pivot relative to another part of the spiked barrier.

In this embodiment the spikes are hollow.

In this embodiment the at least one groove comprises a plurality of first grooves extending in a first direction and a plurality of second grooves extending in a direction transverse to the first direction.

An object of a second aspect of the invention is to provide a spiked low-harm barrier for use with a paling type fence or other relatively thin fence or perimeter structure.

This aspect of the invention may be said to reside in a spiked barrier for mounting on a paling fence or thin perimeter structure, comprising:

    • a base having a first portion, and a second portion arranged transverse with respect to the first portion;
    • a plurality of spikes extending from the first portion and the second portion in side-by-side disposition; and
    • attachment openings for securing at least one of the first portion or second portion to the fence or structure so that the first portion is arranged on top of the fence or structure and the second portion extends substantially parallel to the plane of the fence or structure.

Preferably both of the first and second portion include openings for receiving fasteners or adhesive to secure the base to the fence or structure.

Preferably the spikes are conical and have a large diameter bottom end adjacent the base and an apex remote from the base, the apex being rounded.

However, in other embodiments the spikes may be of pyramid shape (with either a square or triangular base) or talon or thorn shaped.

Preferably some spikes extend from the base to a height that is different to a height of other spikes extending from the base.

The different height of spikes ensures that pressure is not evenly distributed over a body part in contact with spikes, thereby reducing the “bed of nails” effect. The result is greater discomfort to a person or animal attempting to scale a structure fitted with the spiked barrier.

Preferably at least two lines of spikes are arranged on the first portion and one line of spikes is arranged on the second portion.

Preferably the spikes are spaced apart by a distance less than that required to obtain a finger grip on the spiked barrier.

An object of a third aspect of the invention is to provide a spiked barrier element for use on a pool fence.

This aspect of the invention may be said to reside in a spiked barrier for a pool fence which has a plurality of uprights with pairs of adjacent uprights being joined by a U-shaped transition, said spiked barrier comprising:

    • a base having a substantially U-shaped configuration which matches the U-shaped transition of the fence;
    • a plurality of spikes on the base projecting outwardly from the base; and
    • a curved recess formed in or by the base for locating on the U-shaped transition section to attach the spike barrier to the U-shaped transition section.

Preferably the spikes are conical and have a large diameter bottom end adjacent the base and an apex remote from the base, the apex being rounded.

However, in other embodiments the spikes may be of pyramid shape (with either a square or triangular base) or are talon or thorn shaped.

Preferably some spikes extend from the base to a height that is different to a height of other spikes extending from the base.

The different height of spikes ensures that pressure is not evenly distributed over a body part in contact with spikes, thereby reducing the “bed of nails” effect. The result is greater discomfort to a person or animal attempting to scale a structure fitted with the spiked barrier.

Preferably the recess is defined by the base by forming the base with a U-shaped configuration in transverse cross-section.

A further aspect of the invention provides a spiked barrier, comprising:

    • a base having an upper base component and a substrate;
    • a plurality of spikes located on the base component in side-by-side disposition; and
    • the substrate defining a hollow structure to facilitate connection of the spiked barrier to a structure.

In one embodiment of the invention the substrate is an open octagonal shape in transverse cross section and the upper component has three portions which match the contour of three of the sides of the octagonal substrate.

In another embodiment the substrate is circular in transverse cross-section and the component is part circular in transverse cross-section.

Preferably the spikes are conical and have a large diameter bottom end adjacent the base and an apex remote from the base, the apex being rounded.

However, in other embodiments the spikes may be of pyramid shape (with either a square or triangular base) or are talon or thorn shaped.

Preferably some spikes extend from the base to a height that is different to a height of other spikes extending from the base.

The different height of spikes ensures that pressure is not evenly distributed over a body part in contact with spikes, thereby reducing the “bed of nails” effect. The result is greater discomfort to a person or animal attempting to scale a structure fitted with the spiked barrier.

An object of a further aspect of the invention is to provide a barrier element for a post.

This aspect of the invention may be said to reside in a barrier element for a post, comprising:

    • a cap having a top and a depending side wall; and
    • a plurality of spikes arranged in side-by-side disposition on the cap.

Preferably the top is contoured to match the contour of the top of the post.

Preferably the spikes are arranged in a plurality of circular arrays on both the top and the skirt.

Preferably the spikes are conical and have a large diameter bottom end adjacent the base and an apex remote from the base, the apex being rounded.

However, in other embodiments the spikes may be of pyramid shape (with either a square or triangular base) or are talon or thorn shaped.

Preferably some spikes extend from the base to a height that is different to a height of other spikes extending from the base.

The different height of spikes ensures that pressure is not evenly distributed over a body part in contact with spikes, thereby reducing the “bed of nails” effect. The result is greater discomfort to a person or animal attempting to scale a structure fitted with the spiked barrier.

The invention also provides a spiked barrier for mounting on a structure, comprising:

    • a plate having a first face and an opposite second face;
    • a plurality of spikes extending from the first face;
    • a plurality of grooves in one of the first and second face extending in a first direction;
    • a plurality of grooves in one of the first and second face extending in a direction transverse to the first direction; and
    • the grooves defined in webs to facilitate pivoting of one part of the barrier element relative to another part of the barrier element.

Preferably the spikes are hollow.

Preferably the second face has shallow grooves for receiving glue to facilitate gluing of the spike barrier to the structure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Preferred embodiments of the invention will be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a spike barrier according to one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a front view of the embodiment of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side view of the embodiment of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a view of the embodiment of FIG. 1 illustrating how the barrier element would be attached to a paling type fence;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a second embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a front view of the embodiment of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of the embodiment of FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a front view of a still further embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a view of the embodiment of FIG. 8 showing attachment to a pool fence;

FIG. 10 is a side view in cross-section of a still further embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 11 is a plan view of the embodiment of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a side view in cross-section of the embodiment of FIG. 10 on a post;

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of the embodiment of FIG. 10;

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of a still further embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 15 is a plan view of the embodiment of FIG. 14;

FIG. 16 is a cross-sectional view of part of the embodiment of FIG. 14;

FIG. 17 is an exploded view of a still further embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 18 is a cross-sectional view of the embodiment of FIG. 17;

FIG. 19 is a plan view of the embodiment of FIG. 17;

FIGS. 20 and 21, 22 and 23, and 24 and 25 are drawings showing different spike shapes, with each pair of drawings comprising a side view and a cross-sectional view along the line shown in the side view.

FIG. 26 is a perspective view of a still further embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 27 is a perspective view from beneath the embodiment of FIG. 26;

FIG. 28 is a plan view of the embodiment of FIG. 26;

FIG. 29 is a cross-sectional view along the line A-A of FIG. 28; and

FIG. 30 is a view of the spiked barrier of the embodiment of FIG. 26 applied to a brick fence.

FIG. 31 is a view of the spiked barrier of the embodiment of FIG. 26 applied to an uneven surface on a brick fence.

FIG. 32 is a view of the spiked barrier of the embodiment of FIG. 26 applied to a curved surface on a brick fence.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

With reference to FIGS. 1 to 4, one embodiment of a spiked barrier 10 is shown which comprises a base 12 formed from an angled section having a first portion 14 and a second portion 16 arranged at a 90° angle to the first portion 14. The portions 14 and 16 have holes 18 for receiving fasteners such as nails or screws to secure the barrier 10 to a structure such as a paling fence shown in FIG. 4. Alternatively, an adhesive may be used to fasten the spiked barrier 10 to a structure. Adhesion is improved by allowing adhesive to flow into the holes 18 and to cure.

In FIG. 4, nails or screws can be located through the openings 18 shown in FIG. 4 so that the portion 16 is vertical and the portion 14 is horizontal. If desired, the barrier 10 can be arranged in the other orientation with the portion 14 vertical and the portion 16 horizontal.

The portion 14 and the portion 16 have a plurality of spikes 20 arranged in side-by-side relationship. The portion 14 has two lines of spikes 20 and the portion 16 one line of spikes 20.

In the preferred embodiment the spikes 20 are conical in shape having a large diameter base which sits flush with the portions 14 and 16 and a rounded apex 22 which is rounded off or flat so as to prevent the spikes 20 from piercing an animal or person.

The spikes 20 are arranged in close disposition with one another so that the space between spikes 20 is not sufficient for a person to gain a comfortable grip on the barrier 10 or for an animal to obtain a solid footing. If a person does attempt to grip the spikes this will cause discomfort but not serious injury. Thus, the spikes 10 prevent people from gaining a grip and animals from gaining a foothold on the barrier 10 so that people are deterred from scaling the fence or other structure with which the barrier 10 is used and animals are prevented from also scaling the fence or walking along the top of the fence.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 1, 2, and 4 the spikes 20 are of height h1 of about 13.5 mm and have centres which are spaced apart in the longitudinal and transverse direction d1 by about 13 mm. The apex 22 of the spikes 20 on the portion 16 are preferably spaced below the plane of the portion 14 by a distance d2 of about 8.5 mm. Similarly, the apex of the row of spikes on the portion 14 and adjacent the portion 16 are spaced from the plane of the portion 16 by a distance d3 of about 8.5 mm. Preferably the portions 14 and 16 are formed from material of thickness t of 3 mm.

In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the barrier 10 is formed from plastics material. However, in other embodiments the barrier could be formed from other material such as metal.

In this embodiment and in the other embodiments to be described hereinafter, the close disposition of the spikes 20 not only prevents people from gaining a grip or animals, such as cats and possums, from gaining a foothold on the barrier 10 to prevent and deter scaling the fence and crossing the barrier element, but also the appearance of the spikes tends to result in a psychological deterrent to someone attempting to scale the fence.

In this embodiment and also in the embodiments to be described hereinafter, high visibility fluorescent pigments can be added to the barrier 10 to make the barrier 10 highly visible or phosphorescent pigments can be used so that the barriers are luminescent at night to ward off potential intruders.

FIGS. 5 to 7 show a second embodiment of the invention in which base 30 is formed as a cylindrical hollow tube and has six rows of spikes 20 projecting outwardly from the base 30. As is best shown in FIG. 7, the spikes 20 are quite blunt, having flattened apexes forming lands 93 which have a diameter of about 1.2 mm. As also shown in FIG. 7, radial lines L through the centre of the spikes 20 are angled at 60° with respect to one another.

In this embodiment the base 30 is attached to the structure by locating a rod or other element through the hollow base 30.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 5 to 7 the spikes are the same size as that described with reference to FIGS. 1 to 4.

FIG. 8 shows an embodiment which is specifically adapted for use with a pool fence formed from uprights which are joined by a curved transition in a loop design. Although such pool fences are specifically designed to keep young children from entering a pool enclosure unsupervised, they are generally constructed from powder-coated tubular steel onto which the child can get a toehold to climb. This combined with the child's high strength to weight ratio means that many young children are often able to scale a pool fence. The curved portion at the top of the fence provides a convenient handle to facilitate climbing.

Thus, FIGS. 8 and 9 show a still further embodiment of the invention which is adapted for use with steel pool fencing. In this embodiment, the barrier 10 has a base 40 in the form of a U-shaped member as shown in FIG. 8. The base 40 is curved or semi-circular in transverse cross-section, as best seen in FIG. 9, to define a recess 41. At least one row of spikes 20 are provided on the base 40. The base 40 is applied to the top of the fence, as is best shown in FIG. 9, by locating the recess 41 of the base 40 over the U-shaped transition 42 which joins pairs of uprights 44 of the fence 43 so that the U-shaped base grips onto the transition 42. Since the base 40 is formed from resilient plastic or metal material, the recess 41 can snap over the U-shaped top 42 to facilitate holding the barrier 10 in place on the U-shaped top 42 of the fence 43.

The spikes 20 are spaced apart on the straight leg portions 40a of the base 40 by a distance d4 of 10.2 mm. The spikes 20 on the rounded part 40b of the base 40 are spaced apart by an angle of 9.47° defined by radial lines L as shown in FIG. 8. Preferably the bottoms of the cones 20 are spaced apart by a distance d5 of about 1.1 mm.

The embodiment of FIGS. 10 to 13 is specifically designed for use with posts of, for example, a chain-linked fence.

Thus, FIGS. 10 to 13 show a further embodiment in which the barrier is in the form of a cap 50 having a top 51 and a skirt 52 for locating on a post 45 of, for example, a chain-linked fence. The cap 50 has a plurality of circular arrays of spikes 20, as is best shown in FIGS. 11 and 13.

In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 11 to 13 the spikes 20 are defined by a central spike in the middle of the top 51, a circular array of spikes 20 about the middle spike 20 and a circular array of spikes on the skirt 52.

As best seen in FIG. 10, the circular array of spikes 20 about the central spike 20 are angled with respect to the vertical and horizontal.

The cap 50 may be at least one hole (not shown) for receiving a nail or screw to secure the cap 50 to the post 45.

The configuration of the cap 50 may be the same as the top of the post 45 so that the cap 50 snugly fits onto the post 45. Again, the cap 50 may be so designed that it is a snap fit onto the post 45 to facilitate securing and retainment of the cap 50 on the post 45.

FIGS. 14 to 16 show a still further embodiment of the invention in which the base 60 is formed of three portions 61, 62 and 63 with the portion 61 being substantially horizontal when the barrier is in use and the portions 62 and 63 being outwardly inclined with respect to the portion 61 and also downwardly inclined with respect to that portion 61. The base 60 sits on a substrate 70 which has portions 71, 72 and 73 which generally match the portions 61 to 63. An inwardly inclined and downwardly extending portion 75 extends from the portion 71 and an inwardly inclined and downwardly extending portion 76 extends from the portion 73. The free ends of the portions 75 and 76 are provided with rounded beads 81.

Again the portions 61 and 72 may be provided with holes 82 to receive nails or screws to secure the barrier 10 to a structure.

As is clearly seen in FIGS. 14 to 16, the portion 61 carries two lines of spikes 20 and the portions 62 and 63 have one line of spikes 20.

FIGS. 17, 18 and 19 show a still further embodiment of the invention which is somewhat similar to the embodiment of FIGS. 14 to 16 in that the barrier comprises a base formed by a base component 90 and a substrate 91. In this embodiment the substrate 91 is a hollow tube of circular cross-section and the base 90 is semi-circular having a radius which matches the radius of the substrate 91 so the component 90 can sit on the substrate 91 as shown in FIG. 18.

As clearly shown in FIGS. 18 and 19, this embodiment has five lines of spikes 20 with the spikes having radial lines passing through their centres which form an angle of about 37.5°.

As in the embodiments of FIGS. 5 to 14, the spikes 20 are flattened at their apex to form lands 93 which have a diameter of about 1.2 mm.

FIGS. 20 to 25 are side views and cross-sectional views showing different spike shapes which can be used in embodiments of the invention. FIGS. 20 and 21 show a triangular pyramidal shape, FIGS. 22 and 23 show a square pyramidal shape, and FIGS. 24 and 25 show a talonoid or shark tooth shape. Although not illustrated, the spikes 20 may have a thorn shape.

With reference to FIGS. 26 to 32 a still further embodiment of the invention is shown.

In this embodiment the spiked barrier comprises a plate 110 having a first face 112 and an opposite second face 114. The first face 112 has spikes 20. Again the spikes are not completely sharp and are slightly blunted to cause some discomfort but no permanent injury to someone gripping the spiked barrier 105.

The spikes 20 are arranged in a plurality of rows 120a, 102b, 120c, 120d, 120e, and 120f. The spikes in the rows 120b and 120e are higher than the spikes in the other rows. This prevents an even distribution of pressure over a person or animal touching the spiked barrier 105 thereby not allowing the “bed of nails effect” to happen in which pressure is evenly distributed over all of the spikes 20.

As is shown in FIGS. 27 and 29 the spikes 20 are hollow in this embodiment rather than solid as in the earlier embodiments. This therefore reduces material and also enables the spiked barriers 105 to be nested together for efficient storage and transportation. Additionally, adhesive will flow into the hollow cavities formed inside the spikes 20 to contact an inner wall of the spikes 20. Such contact with the adhesive improves fastening of the plate 110 to a structure.

As best shown in FIG. 27 the second face 114 includes grooves 130 which extend in a first direction and grooves 131 which extend in a second direction transverse to the first direction and preferably perpendicular to that direction.

The grooves 130 and 131 form hinge webs as is best shown in FIG. 29 so that one part of the spiked barrier 105 can pivot relative to another part for the purpose which will be described in more detail hereinafter.

As shown in FIG. 27 the second face 114 also includes shallow grooves 135 which are arranged in “X” patterns which form recesses for receiving glue to facilitate gluing of the spiked barrier 105 on top of a fence.

As shown in FIG. 28 the spiked barrier 105 may also have through holes 140 so that nails or other fasteners can be used to also facilitate securement of the spiked barrier to a structure should that be desired. Alternatively, an adhesive 150 may be used to fasten the spiked barrier 105 to a structure, such as a brick wall shown in FIG. 30. Adhesion is improved by allowing adhesive to flow into the holes 140 and hollow cavities formed within the spikes 20 to increase the area of surface contact between the spiked barrier 105 and the adhesive 150.

As shown in FIG. 30 the spiked barriers 105 are intended for use with a brick B fence or like structure and are preferably adhered to the brick fence by applying glue 150 and then seating the spiked barrier 105 in place so the glue is accommodated in the shallow grooves 135 and also to some extent in the hollow spikes 20. The glue 150 in FIG. 30 is shown with an exaggerated layer thickness to show that the glue 150 pushes into the hollows of the spikes 20, the grooves 130 and 131 and the shallow grooves 135.

As shown in FIG. 31 if the brick B is somewhat irregular the spiked barrier 105 can be bent about the grooves 130 and webs 133 to accommodate the shape of the brick B. Similarly if the brick is irregular in shape in a longitudinal direction the spiked barrier 105 can pivot about the grooves 131 and their corresponding webs 133.

The spiked barrier 105 is adhered to the irregular or uneven surface of the brick B by glue. However, the glue is omitted from FIG. 31 in order to demonstrate more clearly the bending of webs 133 so the plate 110 conforms to the irregular surface of brick B.

Furthermore, if the brick wall or other structure is deliberately curved or of some other shape the ability to bend the spiked barrier 105 about webs 133 enables parts of the spiked barrier 105 to pivot relative to other parts to match the contour of the structure. For example, a curved brick cap 170 on a wall, as shown in FIG. 32, is able to be covered with spikes 20 by bending the webs 113 of the plate 110 to match the curvature of the brick cap 170.

The spiked barrier is adhered to the curved brick cap 170 by glue. However, the glue is omitted from FIG. 31 in order to demonstrate more clearly the bending of webs 133 so the plate 110 conforms to the curved surface of brick cap 170.

In the embodiments where the spikes are conical, the spikes preferably have a cone angle ranging from 45° to 85° with the most preferred being about 75°. This provides different heights to the spikes which can be used.

The spikes 20, preferably in alternating rows, are higher than the spikes 20 in the other rows to prevent an even distribution of pressure over a person or animal in contact with the spiked barrier thereby not allowing the “bed of nails” effect to happen in which pressure is evenly distributed over all of the spikes.

The spacing of the spikes in the preferred embodiments is preferably in the range of 8 mm to 17 mm, with a range of 11 mm to 13 mm being the most preferred.

The spiked barrier of the embodiments described previously can be used in a number of different environments and, in particular, in areas where vandalism or theft is likely as well as in environmentally sensitive areas where an inoffensive appearance is important. Examples include commercial and industrial sites, schools, vehicle parking areas, domestic, sports areas, as well as water reservoirs and utilities.

The embodiments of FIGS. 14 to 17 lend themselves to fences which have particular moulded or profiled top rails.

The spiked barrier strip of the preferred embodiments thus provide an effective barrier and hindrance against intruders—whether animal or human. Any intruder trying to climb over the structure on which the barrier is secured will find it difficult to grasp or place the body weight onto the spikes.

The advantages of the embodiments of the invention are:

(a) they provide an effective barrier and deterrent to the incursion of unwanted intruders

(b) they create an easy-to-maintain and easy-to-install intruder deterrent which requires no special skill or tools to install;

(c) provide an affordable intruder deterrent of relatively simple construction;

(d) help maintain a safe environment for a person on their own property;

(e) help protect domestic pets from harm caused by wild animals and pests.

(f) flexibility to attach to a wide range of wooden paling widths and steel panel fencing.

(g) help to keep (climbing) children within the property

(h) help to (climbing) pets within the property

(i) prevent children scaling pool fences.

The embodiments of FIGS. 5 to 7 and 17 to 19 which are mountable on a rod or the like, are able to rotate on the rod, therefore making it even more difficult for a person to obtain a grip or for an animal to gain a foothold because the barrier will tend to rotate as soon as any load is applied to it.

Since modifications within the spirit and scope of the invention may readily be effected by persons skilled within the art, it is to be understood that this invention is not limited to the particular embodiment described by way of example hereinabove.

In the claims which follow and in the preceding description of the invention, except where the context requires otherwise due to express language or necessary implication, the word “comprise”, or variations such as “comprises” or “comprising”, is used in an inclusive sense, i.e. to specify the presence of the stated features but not to preclude the presence or addition of further features in various embodiments of the invention.