Title:
FIREARM BARREL VIBRATIONAL STABILIZING DEVICE
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Apparatus and method for controlling vibrations of a firearm barrel to increase firing accuracy and shot uniformity. A post is attached to the firearm barrel, and a locking bolt is screwed into the post. In the case of a rifle or similar weapon, the bolt preferably extends through an escutcheon which serves to attach the stock to the barrel.



Inventors:
Fletcher, Kent A. (Espanola, NM, US)
Application Number:
11/752881
Publication Date:
11/29/2007
Filing Date:
05/23/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F41C27/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
WEBER, JONATHAN C
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PEACOCK LAW P.C. (ALBUQUERQUE, NM, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An apparatus for controlling vibrations of a firearm barrel, the apparatus comprising: a post comprising an at least partially threaded interior cavity, said post attached to said barrel at a location for controlling vibrations of said barrel; and a threaded bolt screwed into said cavity, said bolt at least partially securing a firearm stock to said barrel.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said location is approximately a point of maximum vibration of said barrel.

3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said barrel comprises a recess for receiving said post.

4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said post is hard soldered or welded to said barrel.

5. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said post is integrally formed with said barrel.

6. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein a tension of said bolt is adjustable.

7. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said barrel is substantially free to vibrate from approximately said location of said bolt to a muzzle of said barrel.

8. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said bolt comprises a hole for receiving a sling or a sling swivel post.

9. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising an escutcheon for receiving said bolt and securing said stock to said barrel.

10. The apparatus of claim 9 wherein said escutcheon comprises a metal or a hard wood.

11. A method for controlling vibrations of a firearm barrel, the method comprising the steps of: attaching a post comprising an at least partially threaded interior cavity to a firearm barrel at a location suitable for controlling vibrations of the barrel; inserting a bolt through an opening of a firearm stock; and screwing the bolt into the cavity, thereby at least partially securing the stock to the barrel.

12. The method of claim 11 wherein the attaching step comprises welding or hard soldering the post to the barrel.

13. The method of claim 11 wherein the location is approximately a point of maximum vibration of the barrel.

14. The method of claim 11 further comprising the step of forming a recess in the barrel for receiving the post.

15. The method of claim 11 wherein the attaching step comprises integrally forming the post during manufacture of the barrel.

16. The method of claim 11 further comprising the step of adjusting a tension of the bolt.

17. The method of claim 11 further comprising the step of attaching a sting or sling swivel post to the bolt.

18. The method of claim 11 wherein the inserting step comprises inserting the bolt through an escutcheon inserted in the stock.

19. The method of claim 18 further comprising the step of shaping the escutcheon during shaping of the stock.

20. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of permitting the barrel to vibrate substantially freely from the location of the post to a muzzle of the barrel.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of the filing of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/808,319, entitled “Firearm Barrel Vibrational Stabilizing Device”, filed on May 24, 2006, and the specification thereof is incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention (Technical Field)

The present invention is a device and system to dampen or control barrel vibrations which occur when a firearm, particularly a rifle, is fired.

2. Background Art

Note that the following discussion refers to a number of publications and references. Discussion of such publications herein is given for more complete background of the scientific principles and is not to be construed as an admission that such publications are prior art for patentability determination purposes.

When firing a projectile through a firearm, vibrations in the firearm barrel are caused, which results in lower targeting accuracy and less uniformity from shot to shot. FIG. 1 schematically depicts vibrations 12 of a segment of barrel 20. The vibrations typically comprise standing waves, with certain locations on the barrel corresponding to maximum amplitudes of the standing waves, and other locations, or nodes, corresponding to minimum standing wave amplitudes. The standing wave frequency and maximum amplitude are typically highly dependent on the specific design, dimensions, and materials of the firearm. A description of barrel vibrations may be found in U.S. Pat. No. 2,372,568, incorporated herein by reference.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION (DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION)

The present invention is an apparatus for controlling vibrations of a firearm barrel, the apparatus comprising a post comprising an at least partially threaded interior cavity, the post attached to the barrel at a location for controlling vibrations of the barrel, and a threaded bolt screwed into the cavity, the bolt at least partially securing the firearm stock to the barrel. The location is preferably approximately a point of maximum vibration of the barrel. The barrel preferably comprises a recess for receiving the post. The post is preferably hard soldered or welded to the barrel, or is optionally integrally formed with the barrel. The tension of the bolt is preferably adjustable. The barrel is preferably substantially free to vibrate from approximately the location of the bolt to a muzzle of the barrel. The bolt preferably comprises a hole for receiving a sling or a sling swivel post. The apparatus preferably further comprises an escutcheon for receiving the bolt and securing the stock to the barrel. The escutcheon preferably comprises a metal or a hard wood.

The present invention is also a method for controlling vibrations of a firearm barrel, the method comprising the steps of attaching a post comprising an at least partially threaded interior cavity to a firearm barrel at a location suitable for controlling vibrations of the barrel, inserting a bolt through an opening of a firearm stock, and screwing the bolt into the cavity, thereby at least partially securing the stock to the barrel. The attaching step preferably comprises welding or hard soldering the post to the barrel. The location is preferably approximately a point of maximum vibration of the barrel. The method preferably further comprises the step of forming a recess in the barrel for receiving the post. The attaching step optionally comprises integrally forming the post during manufacture of the barrel. The method preferably further comprises the step of adjusting a tension of the bolt. The method preferably further comprises the step of attaching a sling or sling swivel post to the bolt. The inserting step preferably comprises inserting the bolt through an escutcheon inserted in the stock. The method preferably further comprises the step of shaping the escutcheon during shaping of the stock. The method preferably further comprises the step of permitting the barrel to vibrate substantially freely from the location of the post to a muzzle of the barrel.

An object of the present invention is to dampen vibrations of a firearms barrel during firing.

An advantage of the present invention is improved firearm accuracy and uniformity from shot to shot.

Another advantage of the present invention is that for a rifle the device is preferably mounted to the barrel through the rifle's wooden forearm or stock, where the strongest vibrations typically occur.

Other objects, advantages and novel features, and further scope of applicability of the present invention will be set forth in part in the detailed description to follow, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, and in part will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon examination of the following, or may be learned by practice of the invention. The objects and advantages of the invention may be realized and attained by means of the instrumentalities and combinations particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings, which are incorporated into and form a part of the specification, illustrate several embodiments of the present invention and, together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention. The drawings are only for the purpose of illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention and are not to be construed as limiting the invention. In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a schematic showing standing wave vibrations of a section of a firearm barrel;

FIGS. 2a-2c show an exploded cross sectional view of a segment of an embodiment of the present invention; and

FIGS. 3a-3e depict multiple methods of fastening the stabilizing post to a section of the firearm barrel.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Best Modes for Carrying Out the Invention

The present invention is a device for dampening, stabilizing, or controlling barrel vibrations caused by firing a firearm, particularly but not limited to a rifle. The present invention preferably forces the barrel to vibrate approximately the same from shot to shot. It also preferably controls vibrational nodes of the barrel so that different weight projectiles having various velocities may be used with more accuracy to a given point of aim.

Stabilizer post 10 of the present invention is preferably located at a position of maximum vibration of firearm barrel 20 as shown in FIG. 1. The location providing optimal vibration control may be different for any particular combination of firearm and ammunition and may be determined theoretically, by simulations, or empirically. One or more devices may alternatively be located at nodes or other positions along the barrel in order to provide desired results.

As used throughout the specification and claims, “firearm” means any weapon through which a projectile such as ammunition is fired, such as a pistol, handgun, rifle, carbine, automatic weapon, shotgun, cannon, lank, and the like.

A schematic of an embodiment of the device is shown in FIG. 2a. The device preferably comprises post 10, which is preferably cylindrical. Barrel 20 may optionally comprise recess 30 for receiving post 10. Recess 30 does not protrude into the interior of barrel 20 and may be milled, drilled, or otherwise machined. At least a portion of the interior of post 10 is preferably threaded, preferably with 10-32″ threads, for receiving locking bolt 50.

Female escutcheon 40 is preferably disposed in the stock so that its bottom surface is flush with the bottom of the stock. Female escutcheon 40 may comprise 4140 Chrome-moly or stainless steel to S.A.A.M.I. specifications, in which case it is preferably inletted or inlayed and spotted into the stock. Female escutcheon 40 may alternately be comprised of a hard wood, such as ebony, which is preferably permanently embedded, for example by gluing, in the forearm. Female escutcheon 40 could then be drilled, countersunk, and shaped when the stock is being shaped prior to finishing. A top view of one embodiment of female escutcheon 40 is shown in FIG. 2b. The bottom surface of female escutcheon 40 may be flat, or, as shown in FIG. 2c, may optionally be milled or otherwise shaped to form convex radius 65, or any other shape to complement the stock shape as desired.

Locking bolt 50 preferably passes through female escutcheon 40 and screws into the interior threads of post 10, thus securing female escutcheon 40 and the stock (not shown) to post 10 and barrel 20. The accuracy of the firearm is adjustable by adjusting the tension of locking bolt 50, which is preferably tightened to approximately 35 ft-lbs. of torque. Locking bolt 50 is preferably the means of attaching the stock to barrel 20 which is located closest to the muzzle. The stock typically prevents barrel 20 from vibrating freely where the two members are contiguous, i.e. along the barrel channel of the stock. Thus in the present invention barrel 20 is preferably free to vibrate approximately from the location of locking boll 50 forward to the firearm muzzle, which permits dampening of the standing waves without interference from the barrel channel inside the stock's forearm.

The depth of countersinking of the opening of female escutcheon 40 is preferably chosen so that the head of locking bolt 50 when tightened is flush with the bottom of the forearm; however, the head may optionally protrude or be inset according to the desires of the user. The head of locking bolt 50, which preferably comprises a 10-32″ threaded bolt but may optionally comprise any type or size of bolt or screw, may be flat and/or comprise a socket for a hex wrench, screwdriver, or the like. The head of locking bolt 50 preferably comprises a protrusion comprising hole 60 for receiving the swivel post of a sling, thus performing a second use as an attachment for a sling swivel. Post 10 and locking bolt 50 are preferably comprised of 4140 Chrome-moly or stainless steel to S.A.A.M.I. specifications. Unlike other designs, preferably no spring is used in the present invention.

Post 10 may be affixed to firearm barrel 20 using various configurations. As shown in FIGS. 3a and 3b, post 10 may comprise square head 70 that fits square slot 75, or dovetail head 80 that fits dovetail slot 85. In either case, the post can be press fit in place and left as such, or subsequently hard soldered, preferably using 3% nickel soldering rod, or welded in place. As shown in FIG. 3c post 10 can be hard soldered into recess 30, or may be soldered or welded directly to the exterior of barrel 20 as shown in FIG. 3d. As shown in FIG. 3e, post 10 may alternately be machined from the barrel blank, which typically starts off with a diameter of 2¼-2½″, when the blank is being milled and/or lathed to produce rifle barrel 20. For this embodiment post 10 would be integrally formed with barrel 20.

In an alternative embodiment, the use of post 10 is optional, or post 10 comprises a cylindrical tube (fully threaded, partially threaded or unthreaded), and recess 30 is threaded. In this embodiment at least a portion of locking bolt 50 screws directly into recess 30, and optionally additionally screws into post 10 if used.

In other alternative embodiments, female escutcheon 40 is not used and locking bolt 50 directly holds the stock to barrel 20, or one or more locking bolts 50 are placed in locations that are not coincident with the stock in order to fine tune the control of the barrel vibrations.

EXAMPLE 1

A .256 Newton custom 98 Mauser rifle equipped with the vibrational stability device of the present invention was test fired by a shooting and ballistics expert using a variety of ammunition at various loads. Referring to FIG. 2a, recess 30 was located 8.50″ from the muzzle. Post 10 was 0.375″ in diameter and 500″ long, and comprised a 0.185″ diameter hole with 10-32 TPI threads. Female escutcheon 40 was 9/16″ high, comprised a 1¼×¾″ diamond-shaped top as shown in FIG. 2b, and comprised edge 45 which comprised a 6° bevel and was 0.25″ high. Swivel hole 60 was 0.145″ in diameter. Testing showed that there were effectively no signs of high pressure due to the installation of the device, with a maximum case head expansion of 0.002 and only one instance of slightly sticky bolt lift. Bullets of various weights and loads shot monotonously to the same place. Ten shots were fired into two inches using 85, 100, 129, and 140 grain weight bullets in five loads; all but two of the shots fell inside an inch and a half at 100 yards. Thus all but two of the projectiles, which comprised four different weights, landed within 1.5 minutes of angle. This is remarkable accuracy for a series of bullets having multiple weights and loads.

Although the invention has been described in detail with particular reference to these preferred embodiments, other embodiments can achieve the same results. The dimensions and details disclosed in the example are specific to that example only, and any variations thereof for other embodiments or examples are intended to be covered. Variations and modifications of the present invention will be obvious to those skilled in the art and it is intended to cover all such modifications and equivalents. The entire disclosures of all patents and publications cited above are hereby incorporated by reference.