Title:
Tug-O-War Exercise Machine
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention is an exercise machine that is based on the principles of the game of Tug-of-war. It has a base with a sitting means with a plurality of ropes attached to a resistance means. The resistance means is adjustable to increase or decrease the amount of resistance on the rope. The base will have foot rests allowing the user of the device good footing while pulling on the rope.



Inventors:
Mcdonnell, Neil (Dublin, IE)
Application Number:
11/308870
Publication Date:
11/22/2007
Filing Date:
05/17/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B69/06
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
HWANG, VICTOR KENNY
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
FURR LAW FIRM (UTICA, OH, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An exercise machine comprising: a base 10 having a pulling means attached to a resistance means and a seat.

2. An exercise machine as in claim 1 further comprising said base having a resistance platform, a seat bar and a seat bar support.

3. An exercise machine as in claim 1 further comprising said exercise machine being used to train for tug-of-war.

4. An exercise machine as in claim 1 further comprising having said seat be adjustable.

5. An exercise machine as in claim 1 further comprising having said pulling means be a rope.

6. An exercise machine as in claim 1 further comprising said base having said resistance means being adjustable.

7. An exercise machine as in claim 1 further comprising having foot paddles connect to said base.

8. An exercise machine as in claim 1 further comprising having a plurality of legs.

9. An exercise machine as in claim 1 further comprising said resistance means being a flywheel attached to an axle.

10. An exercise machine as in claim 9 further comprising said resistance means includes rods on each side of said flywheel applying a resistance to said flywheel.

11. An exercise machine as in claim 10 further comprising said rods are attached to a resistance adjustment control means.

12. An exercise machine as in claim 11 further comprising said resistance adjustment control means is a turn knob.

13. An exercise machine as in claim 12 further comprising said turn knob is turned one way to increase the resistance and the other way to decrease resistance.

15. An exercise machine as in claim 1 further comprising having said pulling means be a rope and said base having a plurality of rope guides attached to said base.

16. An exercise machine as in claim 1 further comprising said base having a seat bar which is connected to a seat bar support beam by seat bar connectors.

17. An exercise machine comprising: a base 10 having a rope attached to a resistance means and a seat, where said base has a resistance platform, a seat bar and a seat bar support, where said seat is adjustable, where said resistance means is adjustable, where foot paddles are connected to said base where said resistance means is a flywheel attached to an axle.

18. An exercise machine as in claim 9 further comprising said resistance means includes rods on each side of said flywheel applying a resistance to said flywheel.

19. An exercise machine as in claim 10 further comprising said rods are attached to a resistance adjustment control means.

20. An exercise machine as in claim 1 further comprising having said pulling means be a rope and said base having a plurality of rope guides attached to said base.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

This invention relates to an exercise machine and more particularly an exercise machine that uses the principals of the Tug-of-war game.

1. Background

Tug-of-war is a game that can exercise all of the major muscles and muscle groups as well as provide a good cardiovascular workout.

The conventional tug-of-war game requires only a length of rope, a relatively even number of players and a large playing area. The rope is laid out such that its midpoint is centered over an identifiable finish line or object, leaving equal lengths or portions of rope on either side of the finish line. Contestants line up along the rope on each side of the finish line grasping the rope with its midpoint still centered. When the signal to begin the game is sounded, each side attempts to pull the other side over the finish side; when that is accomplished, the game is won, and over.

The problem with using Tug-of-war as an exercise is that you need a number of people to be an each team as well as a large playing field. A tug-of-war game can last from as short as 10 seconds to hours depending on the teams competing. This makes it hard to judge the length of exercise.

2. Prior Art

U.S. Pat. No. 6,830,542 by Ball, et al. and issued on Dec. 14, 2004, is for a rowing weight training machine. U.S. Pat. No. 6,817,968 by Galbraith, et al. and issued on Nov. 16, 2004, is for an exercise machine for performing rowing-type and other exercises. U.S. Pat. No. 6,244,988 by Delman and issued on Jun. 12, 2001, is for an interactive exercise system and attachment module for same. It discloses an improved interactive exercise system. U.S. Pat. No. 5,842,961 by Davis and issued on Dec. 1, 1998, is for an exercise machine. It discloses an adjustable resistance exercise machine including a pulley system and a cable connecting a handle to a weight. U.S. Pat. No. 5,779,600 by Pape and issued on Jul. 14, 1998, is for a rowing simulator. U.S. Pat. No. 5,674,159 by Davidson and issued on Oct. 7, 1997, is for an exercise machine for one or two persons incorporating a spinning body. U.S. Pat. No. 5,620,402 by Simonson and issued on Apr. 15, 1997, is for a rear deltoid and rowing exercise machine and method of exercising.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,542,893 by Petersen, et al. and issued on Aug. 6, 1996, is for an exercise machine which converts reciprocating motion to unidirectional rotational motion. U.S. Pat. No. 5,512,028 by Sparks, III and issued on Apr. 30, 1996, discloses a flywheel exerciser. U.S. Pat. No. 5,465,428 by Earl and issued on Nov. 14, 1995, is for an exercise device of adjustable resistance for flexing of muscles of the legs and torso. U.S. Pat. No. 5,304,107 by Jones and issued on Apr. 19, 1994, is for a rowing exercise machine. U.S. Pat. No. 5,076,574 by Johnson, Jr. and issued on Dec. 31, 1991, is for a rope climbing exercise apparatus. U.S. Pat. No. 5,072,929 by Peterson, et al. and issued on Dec. 17, 1991, is for a dual resistance exercise rowing machine. U.S. Pat. No. 4,635,933 by Schnell and issued on Jan. 13, 1987, discloses a muscle toning, strengthening or exercising machine. U.S. patent application 20050164849 by Saikawa and published on Jul. 28, 2005, discloses an exercise machine. U.S. patent application 20040192509 by Tang and published on Sep. 30, 2004, is for a laptop rope pulling exerciser. It discloses a laptop rope pulling exerciser that is composed of a base, an operating device, and a resistance device.

None of these exercise machines are based on Tug-of-war.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,620,043 by Haseltine, et al. and issued on Sep. 16, 2003, is for a virtual tug of war. It discloses a novel form of entertainment in which participants compete in a “tug of war” against opponents who are remotely located, stored in electronic form in memory, or are virtual opponents graphically generated in real-time by a computer.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,769,426 by Gill and issued on Jun. 23, 1998, is for a two person tug of war. It discloses a two person tug of war apparatus that comprises a frame having a first hand grip and a second hand grip.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,572,511 by Barringer and issued on Feb. 25, 1986, is for a tug-of-war game. It discloses an invention that comprises a tug-of-war game having a drum rotatably mounted on a stationary frame, with an elongated rope wrapped about the drum with free ends extended to opposite sides of the drum, with pull on one free end rotating the drum in one direction and pull on the other free end rotating the drum in another direction, and with a scoreboard visibly responsive to which direction the drum is being rotated.

There exists a need for a tug-of-war exercise machine.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

The current invention is an exercise machine that is based on the principles of the game of Tug-of-war. It has a base with a sitting means with a rope attached to a resistance means. The resistance means is adjustable to increase or decrease the amount of resistance on the rope. The base will have foot rests allowing the user of the device good footing while pulling on the rope.

The object of the invention is an exercise machine based on the principles of Tug-of-war which exercises and builds up the major muscle groups while providing a good cardiovascular workout.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

Without restricting the full scope of this invention, the preferred form of this invention is illustrated in the following drawings:

FIG. 1 shows a front perspective view of the exercise machine;

FIG. 2 shows the top view of the exercise machine;

FIG. 3 shows the bottom view of the exercise machine;

FIG. 4 shows the front of the exercise machine;

FIG. 5 shows the back of the exercise machine;

FIG. 6 shows the right side of the exercise machine; and

FIG. 7 shows the front left side of the exercise machine.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The following description of an exercise machine is demonstrative in nature and is not intended to limit the scope of the invention or its application of uses.

There are a number of significant design features and improvements incorporated within the invention.

The current invention is an exercise machine that is based on the principles of the game of Tug-of-war. It has a base with a sitting means with a fibre rope spliced into a single continuous length or loop attached to a resistance means. The resistance means is adjustable to increase or decrease the amount of resistance on the rope. The base will have foot rests allowing the user of the device good footing while pulling on the rope.

As shown in FIGS. 1 through 7, the exercise machine 1 has a base 10, a pulling means, a plurality of resistance means 20 and a seat 30. FIG. 1 shows a front perspective view of the exercise machine. FIG. 2 shows the top view of the exercise machine. FIG. 3 shows the bottom of the exercise machine. FIG. 4 shows the front of the exercise machine. FIG. 5 shows the back of the exercise machine. FIG. 6 shows the right side of the exercise machine. FIG. 7 shows the front left side of the exercise machine.

The base 10 consists of the resistance platform 15, the seat bar 25 and the seat bar support beam 17.

The seat bar 25 connects the seat bar support beam 17 with the resistance platform 15. The seat bar 25 is perpendicular to the seat bar support beam 17 and is connected to it by seat bar connectors 18. These seat bar connectors 18 give the seat bar 25 height so that it is an optimal height for a work out and so that the seat bar 25 is level with the resistance platform 15.

The seat bar 25 is connected to the top of the resistance platform 15 and runs through the center of the resistance platform 15.

The resistance platform 15 is rectangular in shape in the preferred embodiment. The resistance frame 35 is attached to the top of and is perpendicular to the resistance platform 15. The resistance platform 15 holds the resistance means and the pulling means and consists of box frames.

The exercise machine 1 has a plurality of adjustable legs 40. These legs are attached to the bottom of the resistance platform 15 and the seat bar support beam 17. The adjustable legs 40 are screw type legs such as bolts which screw into the body 10 with each leg 40 being screwed in so it is the appropriate height so that the exercise machine 1 is level with the ground. This allows the leveling of the exercise machine 1 on an uneven surface. The legs 40 can have a soft felt or plastic cap on the bottom so not to damage the floor that the exercise machine 1 rests on.

The seat 30 rests on the top of the seat bar 25. The seat's 30 top is in a shape that a user of the exercise machine 1 can sit confirmable in and at the proper angle for pulling on the pulling means. On the bottom of the seat 30 there are two parallel extensions 31 which are at a distance apart that is slightly wider than the width of the seat bar 25 and connected at the bottom surrounding the seat bar 25 securing the seat 30 to the seat bar 25.

On one of the parallel extensions is the seat attachment means 32 which in the preferred embodiment is a handle with a cylinder bolt. The seat bar 25 has a plurality of seat position holes 26 which run through the seat bar 25. The seat attachment means run through one extension 31 through one of the seat position holes 26 and through the other extension 31. The user can adjust the seat 30 by moving it up and down the seat bar 25 so it is the proper distance from the pulling means to maximize their work out. While pulling on the rope 100, the user may fix the seat to the seat bar using this mechanism, or alternatively can allow the seat 30 to move forward and rearward along the seat bar 25 in the horizontal plane.

In the front of the resistance platform are two foot paddles 50. The foot paddles 50 are angled slightly away from the user with adjustable foot straps to hold the user's feet on the foot paddles during the pulling motion.

The pulling means in the preferred embodiment is a rope 100 of at least two inches diameter spliced into a single continuous length or loop. The rope 100 is of sufficient length to allow that part of the rope 100 returning to the resistance axle 70 to hang free of tension. The user pulls on the rope while sitting in the seat 30 with their feet firmly planted in the foot paddles using a pulling motion like that in tug-of-war. The user will pull on the rope 100 against the resistance means. As he does so, the free end of the rope loop then falls to the floor, and is coiled back onto the resistance axle 70 by the turning motion imparted to it by the user. The user can therefore pull on a rope that is, in effect, indefinitely long.

The rope ends are guided by two circular rope guides 65 through which the rope ends pass through. The rope guides 65 are made of a flexible material such as rubber or cloth. The rope guides 65 hold and guide the rope 100 as it is being pulled by the user. The rope guides 65 are held in place by the rope guide pole 66 which is connected to and runs perpendicular to the resistance platform.

The rope is wrapped around the resistance axle 70. The resistance axle 70 provides the resistance 70 to the rope 100. The resistance axle 70 is held up and runs through the platform frame 35 through an axis within each frame of the resistance platform frame 35. The axis is a standard axis which holds the resistance axle 70 to the frame while allowing it to turn with reduced friction.

In the preferred embodiment, there is a back rope guide 90 connected to the back rope guide pole 95. The back rope guide 90 guides the rope end that comes from the back of the resistance axle 70 to the front of the resistance platform 15. The rope end goes through the back rope guide 90 and up to the rope guide 65. The back rope guide pole 95 is connected to and runs perpendicular to the resistance platform 15.

On one side of the resistance axle 70 is the resistance flywheel 80. The resistance flywheel 80 provides the resistance through the resistance axle 70 to the rope 100 being pulled by the user.

A resistance applying means is used to apply resistance to the flywheel 80. In the preferred embodiment, the resistance applying means is a set of rods 85, one on each side of the top of flywheel 80. These rods 85 have fraction pads 86 that touch and apply friction to the flywheel 80 which produces the resistance. The rods 85 are attached to a tension adjustment means. The tension adjustment means can be a turn knob 105 which when turned tighter would wind two wires 97 that are each attached to one of the rods 85 bringing them closer together thereby increasing the friction on the flywheel 80 which will increase the resistance. When the knob is turned looser the rods 80 would spread apart reducing the friction and reducing the resistance. The turn knob 105 would run through the top of the frame.

In the preferred embodiment, the resistance platform 15, frame 35 and the seat bar 25 would be made of a strong durable material such as aluminum or steel.

To use the exercise machine, the user would adjust the resistance to what they wanted for a good workout. The user would adjust the seat for their body (or allow the seat to move along the seat bar, if preferred), sit in the seat 30, and put their feet in the feet paddles. They would then grip the rope 100 and pull on it using a tug-of-war pulling motion while planting their feet firmly in the foot paddles 50. They would do this until they get the proper muscle and cardiovascular workout that they were looking to get.

The exercise machine 1 could also be used as a training device for a tug-of-war sportsman.

In the preferred embodiment, a single rope 100 is used but a plurality of ropes could be used in an alternative embodiment.

Although the present invention has been described in considerable detail with reference to certain preferred versions thereof, other versions are possible. Therefore, the point and scope of the appended claims should not be limited to the description of the preferred versions contained herein.

As to a further discussion of the manner of usage and operation of the present invention, the same should be apparent from the above description. Accordingly, no further discussion relating to the manner of usage and operation will be provided. With respect to the above description, it is to be realized that the optimum dimensional relationships for the parts of the invention, to include variations in size, materials, shape, form, function and manner of operation, assembly and use, are deemed readily apparent and obvious to one skilled in the art, and all equivalent relationships to those illustrated in the drawings and described in the specification are intended to be encompassed by the present invention.

Therefore, the foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.