Title:
VAPOR FUEL COMBUSTION SYSTEM
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A burner, for burning a liquid fuel/compressed air fuel mixture, comprising a discharge nozzle having a mixing chamber for mixing a liquid fuel with compressed air and discharging the fuel mixture via a discharge orifice. The burner is coupled to a liquid fuel storage source for storing and supplying the liquid fuel, at a sight positive pressure, to the mixing chamber and the burner also coupled to a source of compressed air which is supplied to the mixing chamber. An igniter is provided for igniting the fuel mixture, discharged from the discharge orifice in a substantially atomized form, for rapid and through combustion of the fuel mixture. Additional ambient air is also supplied, via a variable speed fan, to assist with complete combustion of the fuel mixture.



Inventors:
Frenette, Henry E. (Pittsfield, NH, US)
Frenette, Eugene R. (Salisbury, NH, US)
Application Number:
11/768630
Publication Date:
11/15/2007
Filing Date:
06/26/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
431/8
International Classes:
F23D11/10
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
SAVANI, AVINASH A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Finch & Maloney PLLC (Manchester, NH, US)
Claims:
Wherefore, we claim:

1. A burner for burning a fuel mixture, the burner comprising: a discharge nozzle having a mixing chamber; a liquid fuel reservoir for supplying liquid fuel to the mixing chamber, with the liquid fuel being feed, at a slight positive pressure, from the reservoir to mixing chamber; a source for supplying compressed air to the mixing chamber which, during operation of the burner, mixes with the liquid fuel to form a fuel mixture therefrom for discharge by the discharge nozzle; and an igniter for igniting the fuel mixture discharged by the discharge nozzle.

2. The burner according to claim 1, wherein a fan supplies ambient air to the discharge nozzle to facilitate substantially complete combustion of the fuel mixture discharge from the discharge nozzle.

3. The burner according to claim 1, wherein the reservoir contains a desired quantity of the liquid fuel and supplies the liquid fuel to the mixing chamber, via a liquid fuel supply conduit, at a positive pressure of less than 35 inches of water and, following discharge of the liquid fuel from the discharge nozzle, the liquid fuel has a particle size of between 5 and 15 microns.

4. The burner according to claim 3, wherein a valve is provided, along the liquid fuel supply conduit, for interrupting a flow of the liquid fuel from the reservoir to the mixing chamber.

5. The burner according to claim 3, wherein a liquid fuel supply storage tank is connected with the reservoir, via the liquid fuel supply conduit, and a liquid fuel pump is provided for pumping the liquid fuel from the liquid fuel supply storage tank to the reservoir.

6. The burner according to claim 5, wherein one of the liquid fuel conduit and the reservoir is provided with a hydronic air vent to facilitate addition of air to the reservoir as liquid fuel is removed therefrom during operation of the burner.

7. The burner according to claim 5, wherein the reservoir includes a float valve and the float valve controls operation of the liquid fuel pump which pumps of the liquid fuel from the liquid fuel storage tank to the reservoir.

8. The burner according to claim 3, wherein the source for supplying compressed air is an air compressor which is coupled to the mixing chamber for supplying compressed air thereto, and the air compressor supplies compressed air at a pressurize of between 10 and 30 psi.

9. The burner according to claim 8, wherein the air supply conduit includes a pressure gauge for detecting and displaying a pressure of the compressed air being supplied by the air compressor to the discharge nozzle.

10. The burner according to claim 2, wherein the discharge nozzle is located within a housing and the fan is located adjacent an inlet end of the housing, upstream of the discharge nozzle, for supplying additional combustion air to the fuel mixture discharged from the discharge nozzle.

11. The burner according to claim 10, wherein the fan supplies between 10 and 120 cubic feet per minute of additional combustion air to the discharged fuel mixture.

12. The burner according to claim 3, wherein the discharge nozzle comprises concentric first and second nozzles and the liquid fuel is supplied to and discharged by the first nozzle into the mixing chamber and the compressed air mixes with the liquid fuel, within the mixing chamber, and the fuel mixture of the liquid fuel and the compressed air mixture is discharged by the second nozzle.

13. The burner according to claim 12, wherein the first nozzle has a first needle valve which facilitates adjustment of a flow of the liquid fuel through the first nozzle, and a second valve includes a second needle valve which facilitates adjustment of a flow of the compressed air which is allowed to flow through the second valve into the mixing chamber and mix with the liquid fuel and form the fuel mixture to be discharged from the discharge nozzle.

14. The burner according to claim 12, wherein the discharge orifice of the discharge nozzle has an opening which is between 0.01 and 0.8 millimeters in diameter.

15. The burner according to claim 13, wherein the igniter comprises a pair of electrode, located adjacent and downstream of the discharge orifice of the discharge nozzle, for igniting the fuel mixture discharged from the discharge nozzle.

16. The burner according to claim 3, wherein a flame detector is located to detect a presence of a flame generated by combustion of the fuel mixture discharged by the discharge nozzle.

17. The burner according to claim 13, wherein as the compressed air flows through the discharge valve, past the first nozzle, the compressed air evacuates the liquid fuel through the first nozzle for mixing within the mixing chamber.

18. A burner for burning a fuel mixture, the burner comprising: a discharge nozzle having an mixing chamber; a liquid fuel reservoir for supplying liquid fuel to the mixing chamber, with the liquid fuel being feed from the reservoir to mixing chamber at a positive pressure of less than 35 inches of water; a source for supplying compressed air to the mixing chamber at a pressurize of between 10 and 30 psi which, during operation of the burner, mixes with the liquid fuel to form a fuel mixture therefrom for discharge by the discharge nozzle; the discharge nozzle comprising spaced apart first and second nozzles and the liquid fuel is supplied to and discharged by the first nozzle into the mixing chamber and the compressed air mixes with the liquid fuel, within the mixing chamber, and the fuel mixture being discharged by the second nozzle such that the liquid fuel mixture is atomized substantially immediately upon being discharged therefrom; and an igniter for igniting the fuel mixture discharged by the discharge nozzle and generating heat within a furnace.

19. The burner according to claim 18, wherein a fan supplies ambient air to the discharge nozzle to facilitate substantially complete combustion of the fuel mixture discharge from the discharge nozzle.

20. A method of providing heat, the method comprising the steps of: providing a discharge nozzle with a mixing chamber; supplying a liquid fuel, from a liquid fuel reservoir, to the mixing chamber, with the liquid fuel being supplied at a positive pressure of less than 35 inches of water; supplying pressurized air, at a pressurize of between 10 and 30 psi, to the mixing chamber for mixing with the liquid fuel and forming a fuel mixture therefrom for discharge by the discharge nozzle; forming the discharge nozzle as first and second nozzles with the liquid fuel being supplied to and discharged by the first nozzle into the mixing chamber and the compressed air mixing with the liquid fuel, within the mixing chamber, and the fuel mixture being discharged by the second nozzle; and the fuel mixture being discharged by the second nozzle such that the liquid fuel mixture is substantially atomized immediately upon being discharged therefrom; and igniting the fuel mixture, discharged by the discharge nozzle, and generating heat within a furnace.

Description:

This application claims priority from U.S. application Ser. No. 11/657,816 filed Jan. 25, 2007 which claims the benefit of U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/762,551 filed Jan. 26, 2006.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to an improved fuel source which is directed at achieving substantially “perfect combustion” of the fuel source so that substantially all of the fuel source is converted into CO2 and H2O without any significant amount of unburned hydrocarbons.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

As is well known in the art, the combustion of most fuels typically results from the combustion of fuel and air whereby the byproducts are typically unburned hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide, nitric oxides, carbon monoxide, and water. One of the drawbacks associated with such combustion is that the unburned hydrocarbons are normally vented to and pollute the atmosphere. In addition, the combustion byproducts tend to leave the combustion chamber in a heated state, thus carrying heat away from the combustion region, thereby reducing the energy efficiency of the combustion system.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Wherefore, it is an object of the present invention to overcome the drawbacks associated with the prior art combustion of fuel so as to approach a substantially “perfect combustion” in which such fuel (i.e., fuels containing hydrocarbons) and the air are substantially completely reacted with one another to result in substantially only carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) and unaffected nitrogen (NO2).

A object of the present invention is to provide a burner which is relatively inexpensive to manufacture but which has an improved efficiency while still minimizing the generation of CO2 during operation thereof.

A further object of the present invention is to atomize or vaporize substantially all of the fuel components and mix the vaporized fuel components with an adequate supply of air (e.g., oxygen) to thereby result in complete and thorough combustion of all of the fuel components (i.e., hydrocarbons) so as to minimize the discharge of any pollutants (e.g., unburned hydrocarbons) which are exhausted to the atmosphere. Such complete combustion thereby increases the overall energy efficiency of the combustion system.

Yet another object of the present invention is to minimize the consumption of the fuel product, during combustion, and maximize utilization of the air to thereby result in a clean and more thorough combustion of the fuel components.

A still further object of the present invention is to combine two different fuels with one another, e.g., a gaseous fuel component such as compressed air, propane, natural gas, etc., and a liquid fuel component such as gasoline, kerosene, #2 home heating oil, diesel fuels such, as standard diesel fuel and bio-diesel, or some other petroleum product and form a mixed atomized and/or vaporized fuel component thereof which, when burned, results in the complete and thorough combustion of the mixed vaporized fuel component.

The present invention also relates to a burner for burning a fuel mixture, the burner comprising: a discharge nozzle having a mixing chamber; a liquid fuel reservoir for supplying liquid fuel to the mixing chamber, with the liquid fuel being feed from the reservoir to mixing chamber at a slight positive pressure; a source for supplying compressed air to the mixing chamber which, during operation of the burner, mixes with the liquid fuel to form a fuel mixture therefrom for discharge by the discharge nozzle; and an igniter for igniting the fuel mixture discharged by the discharge nozzle.

The present invention also relates to a burner for burning a fuel mixture, the burner comprising: a discharge nozzle having an mixing chamber; a liquid fuel reservoir for supplying liquid fuel to the mixing chamber, with the liquid fuel being feed from the reservoir to mixing chamber at a positive pressure of less than 35 inches of water; a source for supplying compressed air to the mixing chamber at a pressurize of between 10 and 30 psi which, during operation of the burner, mixes with the liquid fuel to form a fuel mixture therefrom for discharge by the discharge nozzle; the discharge nozzle comprising concentric first and second nozzles and the liquid fuel is supplied to and discharged by the first nozzle into the mixing chamber and the compressed air mixes with the liquid fuel, within the mixing chamber and the fuel mixture being discharged by the second nozzle such that the liquid fuel mixture is atomized substantially immediately upon being discharged therefrom, and the fuel mixture being discharged by the second nozzle; and an igniter for igniting the fuel mixture discharged by the discharge nozzle and generating heat within a furnace.

The present invention finally relates to a method of providing heat, the method comprising the steps of: providing a discharge nozzle with a mixing chamber; supplying a liquid fuel, from a liquid fuel reservoir, to the mixing chamber, with the liquid fuel being supplied at a positive pressure of less than 35 inches of water; supplying pressurized air, at a pressurize of between 10 and 30 psi, to the mixing chamber for mixing with the liquid fuel and forming a fuel mixture therefrom for discharge by the discharge nozzle; forming the discharge nozzle as concentric first and second nozzles with the liquid fuel being supplied to and discharged by the first nozzle into the mixing chamber and the compressed air mixing with the liquid fuel, within the mixing chamber, and the fuel mixture being discharged by the second nozzle; and the fuel mixture being discharged by the second nozzle such that the liquid fuel mixture is atomized substantially immediately upon being discharged therefrom; and igniting the fuel mixture, discharged by the discharge nozzle, and generating heat within a furnace.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic drawing showing the basic components for the improved fuel combustion system according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic drawing showing a mixing chamber of the fuel combustion system in greater detail;

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic drawing of a second embodiment of the improved fuel combustion system according to the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic drawing of the second embodiment of the improved fuel combustion system incorporated into a heating system; and

FIG. 5 is a diagrammatic drawing of a spray nozzle of the second embodiment of the improved fuel combustion system.

FIG. 6 is a block diagrammatic of a third embodiment of the improved fuel combustion system for use with a heating system;

FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic view of the third embodiment of the improved fuel combustion system showing further details thereof;

FIG. 8 is a diagrammatic wiring diagram of the third embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 9 is a diagrammatic drawing showing mixing of the liquid and gas fuel sources with an ample supply of oxygen to facilitate complete combustion thereof;

FIG. 10 is a diagrammatic drawing showing the discharge nozzle for adequately mixing the liquid fuel source with the compressed air to provide an atomized mixture thereof which can be substantially instantaneously burned; and

FIG. 11 is a table showing the test results for a 30 year furnace, which was modified according to the present invention, to have an improved efficiency which still minimizing the generation of CO2.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Turning now to FIGS. 1 and 2, a detailed description concerning the vapor fuel combustion system 2, according to the present invention, will now be described in detail. As can be seen in these Figures, the vapor fuel combustion system 2 generally comprises a sealed mixing chamber 4. An outlet 6 of the mixing chamber 4 is coupled, via a first leg 8 of a vapor fuel supply conduit 10, to an inlet 12 of a vacuum pump 14. An outlet 16 of the vacuum pump 14 is coupled, via a second leg 18 of the vapor fuel supply conduit 10, to an inlet 20 of a conventional burner 22 which facilitates combustion, in a conventional manner, of the vaporized fuel supplied thereto. The burner 22 is typically located to heat a conventional furnace 24, in a normal fashion or manner, and the generated heat from the furnace 24 is disbursed throughout a building by a conventional heating system of the building 68 (not described in further detail). As both the furnace 24 and the heating system 68 are conventional and well know and as neither, per se, forms any part of the present invention, a further detailed description concerning the furnace or the heat system of the building will not be provided.

A liquid fuel component storage source 26 is provided for accommodating a desired quantity of a liquid petroleum fuel 28, e.g., 10-100 gallons, etc., of a petroleum product such as gasoline, kerosene, #2 home heating oil, diesel fuels such, as standard diesel fuel and bio-diesel, or some other petroleum product. A first end 30 of a liquid fuel supply conduit 32 communicates with and is located adjacent the bottom of the liquid fuel component storage source 26, while a second end 34 of the liquid fuel supply conduit 32 communicates with and is located adjacent the bottom or a lower region of the mixing chamber 4 to supply the desired quantity of the liquid fuel component 28 to the bottom of the mixing chamber 4 during operation of the vapor fuel combustion system 2. Typically, a quantity of the liquid fuel component 28 is allowed to accumulate in the bottom of the mixing chamber 4 and the level of liquid fuel component 28 which is allowed to accumulate may vary, depending upon the particular application and the characteristics of the mixing chamber 4. The inventors have found that a level of between about 3 inches or so is generally adequate, but other fuel levels could also be utilized and would be readily apparent, depending upon the specific application and heating requirements, to those skilled in the art.

The combustion system 2 also includes a gaseous fuel component storage source 36 which accommodates a desired quantity of the gaseous fuel component 38, e.g., propane, natural gas, etc. A first end 40 of a gaseous fuel supply conduit 42 is connected to the gaseous fuel component storage source 36 while a second end 44 of the gaseous fuel supply conduit 42 communicates with the mixing chamber 4. An outlet of the second end 44 of the gaseous fuel supply conduit 42 is located within the mixing chamber 4 so as to be submerged within the liquid fuel component 28 accommodated therein, e.g., be submerged by at least 1 inch or so. The gaseous fuel conduit 42 has a regulator valve 45 for completely interrupting and/or regulating the flow of gaseous fuel component 38 supplied from the gaseous fuel component storage source 36 to the liquid fuel component 28 contained within the mixing chamber 4. Typically the flow pressure of the gaseous fuel component 38 is about ⅛ pound of pressure or so. Such pressure is typically adequate to allow a sufficient flow of the gaseous fuel component 38 to the mixing chamber 4 for bubbling and permeating through the liquid fuel component 28 located within the mixing chamber 4 and thereby inducing some of the liquid fuel component 28 to become vaporized and mixed with the gaseous fuel component 38 and result in the formation of a substantially uniform mixture thereof. It will be appreciated, by those skilled in the art, that other supply pressures may be utilized depending upon the specific application and the heating requirements. Preferably the outlet of the second end 44 of the gaseous fuel supply conduit 42 has an enlarged outlet (not shown in detail) to facilitate supply of the gaseous fuel component throughout the liquid fuel component 28 accommodated within the mixing chamber 4.

In addition, the mixing chamber 4 is provided with one or more air intake inlet(s) 46 for allowing an adequate quantity of room air (e.g., oxygen) to flow or enter the mixing chamber 4 and mix with the vaporized liquid and the gaseous fuel components and thereby form a substantially uniform vaporized mixture thereof, e.g., form a vaporized fuel mixture 48. The air intake inlet 46 normally has a check valve 50 associated therewith to ensure that the room air is only allowed to enter the mixing chamber 4 when the vapor fuel combustion system 2 is operating, e.g., the vacuum pump 14 is operating and drawing from the mixing chamber 4 and supplying the vaporized fuel mixture to the burner 22 but not allow any of the vaporized fuel components to flow out through the air intake check valve(s) 50.

To assist with creation of a substantially uniform vaporized fuel mixture 48 of the vaporized liquid fuel component 28, the gaseous fuel component 38, and the air, a sparger/diffuser member 52 is located so as to separate the intake 6 of the first leg 8 of the vapor fuel supply conduit 10 from a remainder of the interior space of the mixing chamber 4. That is, the vaporized liquid and gaseous fuel components 28, 38 as well as the air must generally pass through one or more small opening or passages 54, formed in the sparger/diffuser member 52, prior to those components being sucked into the intake 6 of the first leg 8 of the vapor fuel supply conduit 10 and conveyed to the burner 22 for combustion.

The vacuum pump 14 is typically a piston pump which is capable of achieving about 30 pounds of suction at the intake 6 of the first leg 8 of the vapor fuel supply conduit 10 during operation. Preferably the first leg 8 of the vapor fuel supply conduit 10 has a larger diameter than the second leg 18 of the vapor fuel supply conduit 10 which supplies the vaporized fuel from the vacuum pump 14 to the burner 22. According to one embodiment, the first leg 8 of the vapor fuel supply conduit 10 has a diameter of about ⅜ of an inch or so while the second leg 18 of the vapor fuel supply conduit 10 has a diameter of about ¼ of an inch or so. It is to be appreciated that other sizes would be readily apparent to those skilled in the art without departing form the spirit and scope of the present invention.

Typically a water trap 56 is provided along either the first leg 8 and/or the second leg 18 of the vapor fuel supply conduits 10, or both legs, to facilitate removal of any liquid fuel 28 which may possibly condense while flowing along the vapor fuel supply conduit 10 from the mixing chamber 4 to the burner 22.

Preferably the intake 6 of the first leg 8 of the vapor fuel supply conduit 10 is located approximately 18 inches or so above the level of the liquid fuel component 28 contained within the mixing chamber 4. In addition, preferably a pair of air inlets 46 are provided in the mixing chamber 4 (e.g., one adjacent each side of the mixing chamber 4) to ensure that an adequate supply of air is allowed to enter into the mixing chamber 4 to mix with the gaseous and liquid vaporized fuel components 28, 38 and facilitate formation of vaporized fuel mixture which promotes substantially perfect combustion of the vaporized fuel mixture upon combustion.

Preferably the lower section of the mixing chamber 4 is provided with a high level and low level liquid fuel component sensors 58, 60 which are each connected to a flow valve 62 located along the liquid fuel supply conduit 32, to facilitate maintaining a desired level of the liquid fuel component 28 within the mixing chamber 4 during operation. When the low level sensor 60, for the liquid fuel component 28, determines that the level of the liquid fuel component 28 is below the low level sensor 60, a signal is sent to the flow valve 62 to open the valve 62 and allow the liquid fuel component 28 to flow from the liquid fuel component storage source 26 into the mixing chamber 4 and raise the level of the liquid fuel component 28 into the mixing chamber 4 until the high level sensor 58 detects the liquid fuel component 28. Thereafter, the high level sensor 58 sends a signal to the flow valve 62 to close the valve 62 and interrupt or discontinue the flow of additional liquid fuel component 28 into the mixing chamber 4. It is to be appreciated that other fluid level indicators and flow valve controllers would be readily apparent to those skilled in the art without departing form the spirit and scope of the present invention.

A heating system control unit 64 communicates with each of the gaseous fuel regulating valve 45, the vacuum pump 14, the burner 22 and a thermostat 66 via conventional electrical lines and/or connections 68. The thermostat 66 sends signals to the control unit 64 to either commence or terminate operation of the combustion system 2, depending on the current temperature detected by the thermostat 66 associated with the control unit 64. When the thermostat 66 indicates a low temperature within the building, the control unit 64 activates the combustion system 2 and also activates burner 22. The vacuum pump 14 will initiate operation and supply the burner 22 with the necessary quantity of vaporized fuel mixture 48. The control unit 64 will also open the gaseous fuel regulating valve 45 to commence the supply of the gaseous fuel 38 to the mixing chamber 4.

Operation of the vapor fuel combustion system 2 will now be described. When the heating system 68 requires additional heat, as determined by the thermostat 66 or some other conventional devices, the control unit 64 opens the flow valve 45 for the gaseous fuel component 38 to allow the gaseous fuel component 38 to flow from the gaseous fuel component storage source 36 through the regulator valve 45 and into the mixing chamber 4. The gaseous fuel component 38 then permeates and bubbles through the liquid fuel component 28, contained in the bottom of the mixing chamber 4, to induce vaporization thereof. At the same time, the vacuum pump 14 commences operation to syphon and/or withdraw the vaporized fuel components, once adequately mixed with room air, from the mixing chamber 4 and supply the vaporized fuel mixture to the burner 22 for combustion via the vapor fuel supply conduit 10 and the vacuum pump 14. The evacuation of the vaporized fuel mixture 48 from the mixing chamber 4 causes a negative pressure within the mixing chamber 4. This negative pressure opens the check valve 50, associated with the air intake inlet 46, to allow additional atmospheric air to enter the mixing chamber 4.

After receiving a signal from the control unit 64, the burner 22 ignites the supply of vaporized fuel mixture, in a conventional fashion, and the combustion gases generate heat which is used to heat a conventional hot water heating system 68, for example, or a conventional forced hot air heating system, etc.

During operation, once a sufficient quantity of the liquid fuel 28 component becomes vaporized such that the low level sensor 60 detects an insufficient quantity of the liquid fuel component 28, additional liquid fuel component 28 is allowed to flow from the liquid fuel component storage source 26 into the mixing chamber 4.

Once the burner 22 generates sufficient heat to the furnace 24 and the associated heating system 68 and this heat is disbursed throughout the building, the thermostat 66 eventually detects an adequate increase in temperature within the building and indicates the same to the control unit 64. The control unit 64 then automatically shuts down the vapor fuel combustion system 2, e.g., turns or shuts off the burner 22 and the vacuum pump 14 and closes the regulator valve 45 supplying the gaseous fuel component 38 to the mixing chamber 4. This, in turn, allows the check valve 50 for the air intake(s) 46 to close automatically and seal and thereby prevent additional air from entering into the mixing chamber 4 and/or allow any of the vaporized fuel components, contained within the mixing chamber 4, to escape therefrom into the room or atmosphere.

Preferably the mixing chamber 4 is a completely sealed unit which has a storage capacity of between 5 and 300 cubic feet or so and more preferably has a storage capacity of between about 10 and 50 cubic feet.

The inventors of the present invention believe that by permeating the gaseous fuel component 38 through the liquid fuel component 28, such as by bubbling and permeation, induces vaporization of the liquid fuel component 28 and thereby results in the formation of a composite vaporized fuel mixture 48 which minimizes the amount of any unburned hydrocarbons in the combustion byproducts and thus facilitates extracting virtually all of the BTU energy from the composite vaporized fuel mixture during conventional combustion thereof. That is, the present invention is believed to approach substantially “perfect combustion” of the composite vaporized fuel mixture such that all of the fuel (e.g., hydrocarbons) is combined with a sufficient supply of air (e.g., oxygen and nitrogen) and, upon combustion thereof, generally only results in carbon dioxide and water, plus unaffected nitrogen, as the sole combustion byproducts.

It is to be appreciated that the present invention may be also useful in a commercial production facility for manufacture of a composite vaporized fuel mixture. That is, the commercial production facility will include a commercial gaseous fuel component source, a commercial liquid fuel component source, a commercial mixing chamber and one or more commercial vacuum pump(s). The vacuum pump(s) would supply the vaporized fuel mixture to an associated compressor for compressing the vaporized fuel mixture, at high pressure, and storing the same in suitable conventional pressurized containers, e.g., 20 lbs., 50 lbs., 100 lbs., 200 lbs., etc., pressurized containers. Each such pressurized container would thus already have the desire amount of vaporized fuel, from both fuel sources, as well as a desired amount of oxygen to facilitate direct supply of this fuel source to a burner without requiring the addition of any additional oxygen thereto prior to combustion.

Turning now to FIGS. 3 and 5, a detailed description concerning a second embodiment of the vapor fuel combustion system 2′, according to the present invention, will now be described in detail. As can be seen in these Figures, the second embodiment of the vapor fuel combustion system 2′ generally comprises a liquid fuel supply storage tank 72, e.g., approximately 10-300 gallons or so, of a petroleum product accommodating a desired quantity of a liquid fuel component 74 such as gasoline, #2 home heating oil, kerosene, standard diesel fuel, or bio-diesel fuel, for example. An adjustable flow valve 76, typically located adjacent the bottom of the fuel supply storage tank 72 or in a liquid fuel supply conduit 78 coupled thereto, regulates the flow rate of the liquid fuel which is allowed to flow from the fuel supply storage tank 72 to the combustion system 2′. The flow valve 76 can be either a manually adjustable or controllable flow valve or, more preferably, an automatically adjustable or controllable flow valve which is coupled to a control system C (see FIG. 5) for controlling the flow of liquid fuel from the liquid fuel supply storage tank 72. As the adjustable or controllable flow valve 76 is conventional and well known, a further detailed description concerning such valve will not be provided. The liquid fuel supply conduit 78 is coupled to either the adjustable or controllable flow valve 76 or the liquid fuel supply storage tank 72 for supplying the fuel from the fuel supply storage tank 72 to an liquid fuel (first) inlet 80 of a pressured spray nozzle 82.

A compressor or a pressurized gas source 84, e.g., air, oxygen, etc., is coupled to a pressurized gas (second) inlet 86 of the pressure spray nozzle 82 via a pressurized gas supply conduit 88. A gas pressure valve 90 is provided either at the compressor or the pressurized gas source 84 or along the pressurized gas supply conduit 88 for adjusting the pressure and the flow rate of the gas as the gas flows along the conduit 88. The gas pressure valve 90 typically adjusts the gas pressure such that the mixing chamber is maintained at a pressure of, for example, between about 3 and 8 psi. The pressurized gas is introduced into the spray nozzle 82, via the pressurized gas (second) inlet 86 located adjacent a rear of the spray nozzle 82, while the liquid fuel is introduced into the spray nozzle 82, via the liquid fuel (first) inlet 80 also located adjacent the rear of the spray nozzle 82. It is to be appreciated that the location of the first and the second inlets 80, 86 could vary. The fuel supplied via the pressurized gas (second) inlet 86 and the liquid fuel inlet 80 both communicate with one another in an internal mixing chamber 94 within the spray nozzle 82. The liquid fuel and the pressurized gas mix with one another, at an elevated pressure, within the mixing chamber 94 to form a composite fuel mixture, and this fuel mixture is then accelerated as the fuel mixture is discharged out via the relatively small discharge opening 96 of the spray nozzle 82, e.g., an opening of between about 0.01 and 0.05 inches or so. Due to the relatively high pressure of the mixing chamber 94 and the relatively small size of the discharge opening 96 of the spray nozzle 82, the mixture is essentially atomized substantially immediately upon being discharged from the spray nozzle 82. That is, the discharge opening 96 of the spray nozzle 82 and the pressure difference between the pressure of the internal mixing chamber 94 and the atmospheric pressure located downstream of the spray nozzle 82 are such that sufficiently all of the liquid fuel becomes instantaneously atomized so as to be immediate suitable for combustion.

A conventional igniter 98 is located downstream but sufficiently close to the discharge opening 96 of the spray nozzle 82 to facilitate ignition of the fuel mixture being discharged and atomized by the spray nozzle 82. To facilitate substantially complete combustion of the fuel mixture, the ambient air is forced into a first end 102 of a burner housing 100, and this ambient air is initially heated as this air passes through a burn zone—the burn zone 104 is an area within the flame shroud 110 where the atomized liquid fuel is ignited by the igniter 98 of the ignition system. The ignition system includes the ignitor 98 arranged along the axis of the vapor fuel combustion system 2′, downstream from the spray nozzle 82, so that as the atomized liquid fuel mixture is sprayed into the flowing stream of ambient air, the ignitor 98 is energized and thus ignites the atomized liquid fuel mixture. The ignitor 98 may include a pilot flame, an electrical spark, a glowing resistor, etc., and communicates with an ignition control system 107 which energizes or interrupts the flow of electrical power, for example, to the ignitor 98. As the igniter 98 and a remainder of the ignition control system 107 is conventional and well known, a further detailed description concerning the same is not provided

The flame shroud 110 is accommodated within the burner housing 100 and is generally in the form of a cylindrical tube which has a diameter of between 2 and 12 inches. The flame shroud 110 surrounds and encases the spray nozzle 82. The spray nozzle 82 is arranged within the elongate burner housing 100 so as to discharge the fuel along a central axis of the vapor fuel combustion system 2′. It is to be appreciated that the overall size, shape and configuration of the burner housing 100 and the flame shroud 110 may vary, depending upon the particular application, but is generally designed so as to induce sufficient air flow from the open first end 102, of the flame shroud 110, to an opposed second open end 106 thereof. The first end 102 of the housing is generally open so as to allow an inward flow of ambient air, into the flame shroud 110, and thereby ensure substantially complete combustion of all of the supplied fuel. To assist with air flowing through the flame shroud 110, a fan or blower 108, for example, may be provided to drawing or forcing ambient air into the first open end 102 of the flame shroud 110 and channeling or directing such air therethrough toward the second open end 106 thereof. Preferably a speed of the fan or the blower 108 is adjustable in order to regulate the velocity of the ambient air being forced or directed through the burner housing 100, e.g., at a flow rate of between 5 feet per second to about 100 feet per second or so, for example. The flame shroud 110 restricts the combustion of the fuel mixture along the axis of the vapor fuel combustion system 2′ so as prevent the burner housing 100 from becoming excessively hot during the combustion process.

The vapor fuel combustion system 2′, of the second embodiment, allows adjustment of the fuel flow rate to the spray nozzle 82, adjustment of the pressurized gas flow rate to the spray nozzle 82 and the amount and the velocity of the ambient air allowed to mix with the sprayed fuel mixture, within the burner housing 100, to ensure a substantially complete combustion of all of the sprayed fuel mixture. As the flow rate of the liquid fuel decreases, the amount of ambient air forced through the combustion system 2′ is generally correspondingly decreased. As the flow rate of the liquid fuel increases, the amount of ambient air forced through the combustion system 2′ will also generally correspondingly increase. As the flow of pressurized gas increases or decreases, the difference in pressure between the mixing chamber 94 and the atmosphere outside of the spray nozzle 82 changes thus altering the burning efficiency of the liquid fuel.

The vapor fuel combustion system 2′, according to the present invention, may be incorporated into an individual space heater or used as a burner or a heat source for a conventional furnace of a heating system, as diagrammatically shown in FIG. 4. The heating system used with the vapor fuel combustion system would be similar to any known heating system having a heating chamber with a water heating coil, a water inlet and a water outlet.

Turning now to FIGS. 6-10, a detailed description concerning a third embodiment of the fuel combustion system 2″, according to the present invention, somewhat similar to the second embodiment will now be described in detail. As can be seen in FIGS. 6-8, the fuel combustion system 2″ generally comprises a liquid fuel supply storage tank 72, e.g., having a storage capacity of approximately 10 to a 300 gallons, for example, for storing a petroleum product such as No. 2 home heating oil, kerosene, diesel fuel, bio-diesel fuel, or the like. A liquid fuel pump 112 is coupled to the liquid fuel supply storage tank 72, via a first section of a liquid fuel supply conduit 114, for pumping the liquid fuel from the liquid fuel supply storage tank 72 to a burner 122 for combustion. A further section of a liquid fuel supply conduit 114 couples the liquid fuel pump 112 to a liquid fuel reservoir 116 for supplying the liquid fuel thereto. Typically either the liquid fuel conduit 114 or the liquid fuel reservoir 116 is provided with a conventional hydronic air vent 118 which allow the liquid fuel reservoir 116 to breath, e.g., facilitates replenishment or addition of air thereto, as the liquid fuel is removed therefrom during operation of the combustion system 2′. In FIGS. 7 and 8, the hydronic air vent 118 is shown coupled to the liquid fuel conduit 114 but other arrangements are also within the spirit and scope of this invention.

The liquid fuel reservoir 116 typically holds between 8 ounces and 128 ounces of liquid fuel therein and, as discussed below in further detail, is generally a gravity feed reservoir which operates at a very slight positive pressure, e.g., a positive pressure of between approximately 1-35 inches of water. Typically, the liquid fuel reservoir 116 is equipped, adjacent a vertically uppermost portion thereof, with a float valve 126 which is coupled to a float switch 128. The float switch 128 controls operation of the liquid fuel pump 112 to facilitate turning the liquid fuel pump 112 “on” and “off” so that the liquid fuel pump 112 may be automatically controlled and operated to supply, as necessary, the liquid fuel from the liquid fuel storage tank 72 to the liquid fuel reservoir 116 during operation of the combustion system 2″.

An outlet of the liquid fuel reservoir 116 is coupled, via a third section of the liquid fuel supply conduit 114, to a liquid fuel inlet 120 of a discharge nozzle 124. A solenoid valve 130, e.g., an solenoid valve manufactured by ASCO Red-Hat Valves of N. Cuthbert Inc. of Toledo, Ohio or Automatic Switch, Co., is provided along the third section of the liquid fuel supply conduit 114 and this valve, when the solenoid valve 130 is activated or open, allows the flow of the liquid fuel from the liquid fuel reservoir 116 to the discharge nozzle 124 and, when the solenoid valve 130 is deactivated or closed, interrupts the flow of the liquid fuel from the liquid fuel reservoir 116 to the discharge nozzle 124. A further detailed discussion concerning the supply, mixing, discharge and combustion of the liquid fuel will follow below.

An air compressor 132, e.g., an oil-less air compressor, is coupled, via an air supply conduit 134, to a compressed air inlet 136 of the discharge nozzle 124 for supplying compressed air thereto. The air supply conduit 134 typically includes an air gauge 138 for detecting and displaying the pressure of the compressed air being supplied by the air compressor 132 to the discharge nozzle 124. The compressed air is typically supplied to the discharge nozzle 124, via the air compressor 132, at a air pressurize of between 10 and 30 psi and more preferably supplied at an air pressure of about 20 psi or so. A further detail discussion concerning mixing of the compressed air with the liquid fuel and combustion of that formed fuel mixture 153 will follow below.

The discharge nozzle 124 is typically located within and enclosed by a cylindrical blast tube or housing 140. The blast tube or housing 140 typically has a diameter of between 4 and 6 inches and a length of between 4 and 24 inches with the discharge orifice 125 of the discharge nozzle 124 being located closely adjacent a leading outlet end of the blast tube or housing 140. A blast tube fan 142 is located behind and upstream of the discharge nozzle 124, adjacent an inlet end of the blast tube or housing 140, for supplying additional combustion air to the liquid fuel/compressed air fuel mixture 153 being atomized and exhausted from the discharge orifice 125 of the discharge nozzle 124 during operation of the combustion system 2″. This additional combustion air, along with the compressed air supplied by the air compressor 132, facilitates substantially complete combustion of all of the liquid fuel as the liquid fuel/compressed air mixture ignites, burns and is consumed within the furnace 154. The blast tube fan 142 typically supplies between 10 and 120 cubic feet per minute or so of additional combustion air and more preferably supplies about 80 cubic feet per minute or so of additional combustion air. Preferably the rotational speed of the blast tube fan 142 is variable or adjustable so as to allow adjustment of the rotational speed of the fan blades 144 and thereby the amount of additional air which is supplied to and mixes with the liquid fuel/compressed air mixture discharged by the discharge nozzle 124 into the furnace 154 to thereby result optimal and substantially complete combustion of all of the liquid fuel during operation of the combustion system 2″.

The discharge nozzle 124 generally comprises (see FIGS. 9 and 10) a pair of concentric nozzle openings, i.e., a centrally located internal nozzle 146 and a centrally located exterior nozzle or discharge orifice 125 formed in a cover 127 of the discharge nozzle 124. The liquid fuel is supplied to and discharged via the internal centrally located nozzle 146 and an internal needle valve 148 cooperates with the internal nozzle 146 to facilitate adjustment of the flow rate of the liquid fuel therethrough during operation of the combustion system 2″. Rotation of the internal needle valve 148 in a first rotational direction decreases the cross-sectional flow area, between an exterior surface of the needle valve 148 and the inwardly facing surface of the internal nozzle 146, to thereby restrict the flow rate of the liquid fuel that is permitted to pass therethrough and be exhausted by the liquid fuel nozzle 146, while rotation of the internal needle valve 148, in the opposite direction, increases the cross-sectional area, between an exterior surface of the needle valve and the inwardly facing surface of the internal nozzle 146, and thereby increases the flow rate of the liquid fuel that is permitted to pass therethrough. As it is desirable to minimize the amount of liquid fuel being consumed, preferably the nozzle is adjusted toward a minimal liquid fuel flow position so that the smallest amount of liquid fuel, e.g., between 2 and 40 ounces of liquid fuel per hour, for example, may pass through the liquid fuel inlet and be discharged by the internal nozzle 146 but the flow rate is adjusted by an operator to achieve optimum utilization of the liquid fuel.

A compressed air chamber 150, having a small size of only one to three cubic square or less, is formed within the discharge valve 124, between an inwardly facing surface of cover 127 and an exterior surface of the internal nozzle 146, and this chamber generally encloses or encases an outlet of the internal valve 146 so that the liquid fuel is initially exhausted solely and directly into the compressed air chamber 150 for mixing with the compressed air. The exterior nozzle or discharge orifice 125 is typically concentric with but spaced from the internal nozzle 146 to provide sufficient room for the liquid fuel to mix with the compressed air, within the compressed air chamber 150, prior to the combined liquid fuel and compressed air fuel mixture 153 being accelerated and discharged, via the exterior nozzle or discharge orifice 125, into the furnace 154.

A compressed air valve 151 cooperates with an associated needle valve 152 to control the flow of the compressed air which is allowed to flow into the compressed air chamber and the needle valve 152 allows fine tuning adjustment of the compressed air flow into and through the compressed air chamber 150 for mixing with the liquid fuel and forming a liquid fuel/compress air fuel mixture 153 which is then discharged, via the exterior nozzle or discharge orifice 125 of the discharge nozzle 124, into a combustion zone of the furnace 154. Rotation of the compressed air needle valve 152, in a first rotational direction, decreases the cross-sectional flow area, between an exterior surface of the compressed air needle valve 152 and the inwardly facing surface of the compressed air nozzle 151, and thereby restricts the flow rate of the compressed air that is allowed to flow into the compressed air chamber 150 and mix with the liquid fuel and be discharged by the exterior nozzle or discharge orifice 125, while rotation of the compressed air needle valve 152, in the opposite direction, increases the cross-sectional flow area, between an exterior surface of the compressed air needle valve 152 and the inwardly facing surface of the compressed air nozzle 151, and thereby increases the flow rate of the compressed air that is permitted to flow into the compressed air chamber 150 and mix with the liquid fuel and be discharged by the exterior nozzle or discharge orifice 125.

Preferably both the liquid fuel needle valve 148 and the compressed air needle valve 152 each have a very fine thread to allow minute, fine adjustment of the flow of the liquid fuel and the compressed air, respectively, so that an optimized flame, e.g., the blue flame, can be achieved within the furnace as the fuel mixture 153 is consumed during operation of the combustion system 2″.

As the compressed air flows into through the compressed air chamber 150, the compressed air flows around and/or over the internal valve 146, the compressed air tends to create a vacuum which withdraws, sucks and/or evacuates the liquid fuel through the orifice of the internal nozzle 146. The slight positive pressure of the liquid fuel assists with the discharging of the liquid fuel from the internal nozzle 146. As the compressed air is under pressure, e.g., 10-30 psi for example, the compressed air along with the liquid fuel evacuated from the internal nozzle 146 normally swirls and adequately mixes with the withdrawn liquid fuel and the resulting fuel mixture is then discharged out through the discharge orifice 125 in a substantially atomized form, e.g., following discharge the liquid fuel typically has a droplet or particle size of between 5 and 15 microns, for example. Due to such fine liquid fuel particle size and due to the fact that the liquid fuel is adequately mixed with an ample supply of oxygen contained within the compressed air, substantially all of the liquid fuel is immediately burned and consumed upon being discharged from the spray nozzle 124 and burned within the furnace 154.

To assist further with such combustion, the blast tube fan 142 supplies additional air which facilitates substantially complete combustion of the liquid fuel. The blast tube fan 142 also controls the axial and radial dimensions of the flame burning within the furnace 154 as well as the spacing of the flame from the discharge nozzle 124. The exterior nozzle or discharge orifice 125 typically has about 0.4 mm diameter opening therein while the interior nozzle 146 typically has a 0.2-4 mm diameter opening therein, e.g., both nozzles have a diameter of between 0.01 and 0.8 millimeters.

To facilitate ignition of the fuel mixture 153, the combustion system 2″ is provided with a pair of conventional electrodes 156, 158 (FIG. 7) which each have a tip located closely adjacent the discharge orifice 125 of the discharge nozzle 124, e.g., approximately ¼ of an inch to an 1 inch or so in front of the discharge orifice 125 with the electrode tips being spaced apart from one another by about ¼ of an inch to about ½ of an inch or so. In addition, a flame detector 160 is normally positioned upstream of the electrodes 156, 158 and located to view and detect the presence of a flame in the area immediately in front of the discharge orifice 125 to confirm whether or not a flame is present within the furnace 154. In the event that the flame detector 160 does not detect a flame, a lack of flame signal is then supplied, in a conventional manner, to the control unit 64 which then interrupts the flow of liquid fuel and/or compressed air to the discharge nozzle 124 and initiates a restarting of the flame, in a conventional manner. However, in the event that the flame detector 160 does, in fact, detect the presence of a flame resulting from the combustion of the fuel mixture 153, then such information is also conveyed to the control unit 64 which allows the burner to continue to operate and generate heat until a sufficient amount of heat is generated within the furnace 154 as detected by a thermostat 162, for example, located at a suitable location within the building to be heated.

The liquid fuel reservoir 116 is typically located vertically above the discharge orifice 125 of the discharge nozzle 124 so that liquid fuel, contained in the liquid fuel reservoir 116, creates a head of liquid (distance D in FIG. 8) which provides a slight positive pressure which causes the liquid fuel, within the liquid fuel reservoir 116, to flow from the liquid fuel reservoir 116 toward the liquid fuel inlet 120 of the discharge nozzle 124 when solenoid valve 130 is open. Typically the liquid fuel reservoir 116 is installed so that a distance or spacing D of the liquid fuel, i.e., a top surface of the liquid fuel contained within the liquid fuel reservoir 116, is between about 0.1 and about 35 inches above a height of the discharge orifice 125 of the discharge nozzle 124 of the spray device, more preferably the spacing D is about 2 to 10 inches, and most preferably the spacing D is about 3 inches or so. It is to be appreciated that the actual positive dispensing pressure of the liquid fuel, from the liquid fuel reservoir 116, will depend upon the relative vertical spacing or distance between the top surface or level of the liquid fuel, contained within the liquid fuel reservoir 116, and the discharge orifice 125 of the discharge nozzle 124.

As can be seen in FIG. 9, the cylindrical housing 140 is equipped with an exterior adjustable flange 166, slidable and adjustably mounted on an exterior surface thereof, to facilitate attaching the nozzle end of the burner to a burner opening of a conventional boiler or furnace 154. Preferably the flange 166 is slidably adjustable along the exterior surface of the housing 140, in an conventional manner, to facilitate adjustment of the distance or extent to which the leading or discharge end of the burner is allowed to project into a combustion chamber of the furnace 154 so that the burner flame is optimally located and positioned within the furnace 154 for generating a maximum amount of heat while, at the same time, consuming a minimal amount of liquid fuel.

As can be seen in FIG. 10, the liquid fuel is generally supplied along the central axis of the discharge nozzle and the liquid fuel needle valve can be minutely adjusted to vary the flow of liquid fuel which is allowed to be fed, via gravity, and at very slight positive pressure through the liquid fuel discharge opening. The compressed air generally enters the discharge nozzle circumferentially about the liquid fuel discharge nozzle 146 and the compressed air, along with the evacuated and/or sucked liquid fuel, are then mixed with one another and are constricted and accelerated as that fuel mixture 153 is discharged out through the discharge orifice 125 of the discharge nozzle 124. As a result of this, the liquid fuel 153 is substantially vaporized and/or atomized, upon being discharge therefrom, is thus immediately able to be rapidly consumed and burned within the furnace 154 while still minimizing consumption of fuel and maximizing the generation of heat within the furnace 154.

As is conventional in the art, it is desirable that the exhaust fumes, as such fumes are exhausted from the furnace 154 and flow up the chimney, typically have a temperature of at least 350° F. and, most preferably, have a temperature approaching 450° F., but typically no greater than 450° F. By adequately adjusting the supply pressure and/or the flow rate of the liquid fuel, the supply pressure and/or flow rate of the combustion air and/or the rotational speed of the blast tube fan 142, an operator is readily able to modify, adjust and/or alter the burner characteristics so as to achieve substantially complete combustion of the liquid fuel and thereby achieve exhaust fumes from the furnace 154 which have a temperature approaching, but typically no greater than, 450° F.

The third embodiment of the combustion system 2″ operates as follows. When a building or other structure or facilitate requires heat, the thermostat 162 is triggered or activated and the send a control signal to control unit 62 which activates the air compressor 132 to commence supplying compressed air to the discharge nozzle 124. In addition, the solenoid valve 130 is also simultaneously actuated or opened to thereby allow the flow of the liquid fuel therethrough from the liquid fuel reservoir 116 to the liquid fuel discharge nozzle 146. Further, the blast tube fan 142 is turned on so as to supply additional combustion air to the burner. The pair of conventional electrodes 156, 158 are also activated, in a conventional manner by a conventional electronic fuel igniter 157, for igniting the fuel mixture 153 as this mixture discharges from the discharge orifice 125 of the discharge nozzle 124. Assuming that a flame is detected by the flame detector 160, the air compressor 132, the solenoid valve 130 and the blast tube fan 142 will all remain in an active, operating state until the combustion system 2″ eventually determines, in a conventional manner, that sufficient heat has been generated by the combustion system 2″ for the building or other structure requiring heat. Once this occurs, the control unit 62 will shut off the air compressor 132, which interrupts the supply of compressed air to the discharge nozzle 124, and also close the solenoid valve 130, which interrupts the flow of liquid fuel to the discharge nozzle 124, and discontinue the supply of electricity to the blast tube fan 142 to thereby terminate combustion of the fuel mixture 153 within the furnace 154. It is to be appreciated that the control unit 62 may be programmed to allow the blast tube fan 142 to continue to operate for a short duration of time, e.g., 10 seconds to a few minutes or so after the flame is discontinued to facilitate purging of any remaining and/or unconsumed fuel mixture 153 still remaining within the burner or furnace 154.

As with the previous embodiments, combustion of the fuel mixture 153, within the furnace, generates sufficient heat therein and this heat is, in turn, transferred to the associated heating system of the building or other structure, in a conventional manner, which then circulates and distributes the heat in a conventional manner throughout the building or other structure to be heated. The transfer medium, e.g., water, is then returned to the furnace 154 to be reheated for further redistribution of such heat via the associated heating system. Once the building or other structure is sufficient heated, the control unit 64 automatically shuts down the fuel combustion system 2″ which, in turn, shuts or turns off the solenoid valve 130, the air compressor 132, and the blast tube fan 142.

With reference to FIG. 11, the test results for a 30 year old burner, which was modified to incorporate the teaching of the present invention, are shown. As can be seen in this Figure, the modified burner has an efficiency ranging between 86.3 and 88.4% while only generating between 9.2 and 11.0% of CO2 during operation. The inventors have found that the burner, incorporating the teachings of the present invention, results in an improved efficiency which is substantially equal to or better than most burners costing 3 to 5 times as much while, at the same time, typically generates less CO2 than such more expensive burners. In addition, the burner, according to the teachings of the present invention, also generally results in a substantial savings in fuel costs by utilizing less fuel.

The spray nozzle 124 is preferably a Binks Model 460 automatic spray nozzle (manufactured Binks Manufacturing Company, Franklin Park, Ill. and distributed by ITW Industrial Finishing of Glendale Heights, Ill.) which is conventionally used to atomize and spray paint for painting of a surface. The inventors have determined that an automatic spray nozzle, which sufficiently mixes the liquid fuel with an ample supply of oxygen from a combustion source, such as compressed air, and also atomizes the liquid fuel, upon being discharged from the nozzle, is sufficient for use with the present invention.

As can be seen in FIG. 8, the fuel combustion system 2″ further includes the power distribution unit for supplying electrical power to all of the various components contained and comprising the fuel combustion system 2″. The electrical power is supplied via input connection 170 and grounded via connection 172. An electrical box 174 is generally centrally located to facilitate electrical connection to the various components of the combustion system 2″. The various components of the combustion system 2″ are wired, as shown in FIG. 7 and briefly described below, as such wiring is standard and conventional in the art, a further detail description concerning the same is not provided.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF FIG. 8 WIRING

Line 225 From Hot Line to Float Switch

Line 226 From Drive Motor for Fuel Pump Burner to Float Switch

Line 227 From Electromechanical Thermostat to Fuel Primary

Line 228 From Electromechanical Thermostat to Fuel Primary

Line 229 From Drive Motor for Fuel Pump Burner to Ground

Line 230 From Drive Motor for Fuel Pump Burner to Neutral Line

Line 231 From Fuel Primary to Flame Detector

Line 232 From Fuel Primary to Hot Line

Line 233 From Fuel Primary to Neutral Line

Line 234 From Fuel Primary to Power Supply

Line 235 From Power Supply to Ground

Line 236 From Power Supply to Neutral Line

Line 237 From Asco Solenoid to Neutral Line

238 From Asco Solenoid to Hot Line

Line 239 From Fan to Ground

Line 240 From Fan to Neutral Line

Line 241 From Duct Fan to Hot Line

Line 242 From Electronic Fuel Ignitor to Electrodes

Line 243 From Electronic Fuel Ignitor to Hot Line

Line 244 From Electronic Fuel Ignitor to Neutral Line

Line 245 From Air Compressor to Hot Line

Line 246 From Air Compressor to Ground

Line 247 From Air Compressor to Neutral Line

Since certain changes may be made in the above described improved fuel combustion system, without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention herein involved, it is intended that all of the subject matter of the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted merely as examples illustrating the inventive concept herein and shall not be construed as limiting the invention.