Title:
Back spin wedge
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A back spin wedge to make a golf ball rolls backward after the golf ball hit the ground is provided. The back spin wedge of the current application is equipped with at least one additional blade of thickness 1/16 inch. Additional blades are attached on the front face of a base wedge. Various loft angle, such as, 48 degree, 52 degree, 64 degree are also used for the current application. The additional blade of the current application is made of, including but not limited to, poly urethane, ethylene-propylene co-polymer, silicon rubber, natural rubber, stainless steel, titanium oxide, aluminum, and carbon steel.



Inventors:
Choi III, Young (Burbank, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/412889
Publication Date:
11/01/2007
Filing Date:
04/28/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/236
International Classes:
A63B69/36; A63B53/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
HUNTER, ALVIN A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Eugene Oak,Ph.D., J.D.,M.Div. (Los Angeles, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A back spin wedge to make a golf ball rolls backward after it touches a green is comprised of a numbers of additional blades attached on the front face of the base wedge.

2. A back spin wedge of claim 1, where the number of additional blades is one.

3. A back spin wedge of claim 1, where the number of additional blades is two.

4. A back spin wedge of claim 1, where the number of additional blades is three.

5. A back spin wedge of claim 1, where the number of additional blades is four.

6. A back spin wedge with a numbers of additional blades that are attached on the front face of the base wedge having a loft angle between 45 degree to 60 degree.

7. A back spin wedge of claim 6, wherein the loft angle is 48 degree.

8. A back spin wedge of claim 6, wherein the loft angle is 52 degree.

9. A back spin wedge of claim 6, wherein the loft angle is 56 degree.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

Current application is related with a wedge golf club, especially a wedge golf club with additional blades on the front surface thereof for engaging a back spin force to a golf ball.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

In a short golf game, which is played within a range shorter than 50 yards, it is very hard to escape the situation without losing score. Various kinds of clubs such as chipping wedge, jigger, dual wedge, pitching wedge, and sand wedges are used for the short game to escape from the situation. When a player use a pitching wedge of FIG. 1, whose loft is 54 degree, to approach a golf ball to a hole cup on a green, the golf ball flies ⅔ of the whole distance and then rolls the left ⅓ of the distance. However, in many cases such as 1) when a hole cup locates at front edge of a green, 2) when a hole cup is located at back of a bunker or a water hazard, 3) when a hole cup is located just in front of a bunker or a water hazard as shown in FIGS. 2, and 4) when a hole cup is on a plateau green, where the green is top of dunce, it is almost impossible to use a pitching wedge because of the rolling distance. Especially when there is no space to run for the golf ball on a green, all of the wedges are useless before the golf ball rolls backward after touch the green. It is very hard for an average golf player to engage enough back spin to the golf ball with a conventional wedge. It the purpose of the current application to provide a wedge club that enables an amateur player engages a back spins to a golf ball.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART

U.S. Patent Application 20050101410 to Bonneau, Michael D. illustrates a wedge type golf club head including a blade having a majority of its mass in an upper portion of the blade. The upper portion of the blade is weighted with a bulbous mass disposed at the rear of the blade, the bulbous mass decreasing in thickness towards a lower portion of the club from a region of greatest thickness and the bulbous mass being formed, in one embodiment, along a top surface of the club. U.S. Pat. No. 6,641,491 to Schillaci illustrates a golf sand wedge head which has a front planar face and a rear surface which is formed to include a plurality of precisely defined relief areas.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,971,866 to Adams, et al. illustrates an iron type golf club head including a bottom sole having a first level support surface at a first angle relative to the ball striking face, a second level support surface at a second angle relative to the ball striking face, and a third level support surface offset laterally from the first and second levels at a third angle relative to the ball striking face.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,547,196 to Izett, et al. illustrates a wedge-shaped club head having a top and a ball striking face is provided. A first hosel has a first end coupled to the top of the club head and a second end for rigidly holding a connecting end of a first shaft in a fixed position relative to the club head. A second hosel has a first end coupled to the top of the club head and a second end for rigidly holding a connect-ing end of a second shaft in a fixed position relative to the club head.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,458,335 to Hattori illustrates a golf club including a shaft connected to a club head having first leg with a putting face thereon and a second leg with a chipping or pitching surface thereon is disclosed.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,090,703 to Koumarianos illustrates a golf club for use as a sand wedge and as a putter, in which the ball-engaging face of the club head has a rectangular central opening through which sand can pass during a stroke while the club is used as a sand wedge.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,000,455 to Beilfuss, Sr. illustrates a sand wedge is provided with an improved club head which is designed to substantially cut through sand or water thus minimizing drag and allowing a golfer to strike a golf ball with less interference from the sand or water.

U.S. Pat. No. D341,865 to Humphreys, U.S. Pat. No. D346,840 to Fenton, U.S. Pat. No. D357,294 to Solheim, U.S. Pat. No. D360,668 to Hattori, U.S. Pat. No. D360,919 to O'Hara, U.S. Pat. No. D363,962 to Smith, U.S. Pat. No. D368,127 to Solheim, U.S. Pat. No. D388,487 to Sheets, U.S. Pat. No. D398,356 to Delaney, U.S. Pat. No. D426,276 to Besnard, et al., U.S. Pat. No. D426,603 to Besnard, et al., U.S. Pat. No. D457,211 to Bakke, U.S. Pat. No. D474,254 to Schillaci, U.S. Pat. No. D476,048 to Cleveland, et al., U.S. Pat. Nos. D476,050 and D476,707 to Walker, U.S. Pat. No. D478,949 to DeLaCruz, U.S. Pat. No. D507,320 to Roberts, et al., U.S. Pat. No. D511,194 to Roberts, et al. illustrate wedge golf clubs having different rear faces.

None of the prior art illustrates a wedge golf club that has additional blades on the front face to render a function of engaging back spin force to a golf ball.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A back spin wedge to make a golf ball rolls backward after the golf ball hit the ground is provided. The back spin wedge of the current application is equipped with at least one additional blade of thickness 1/16 inch. Additional blades are attached on the front face of a base wedge. Various loft angle, such as, 48 degree, 52 degree, 64 degree are also used for the current application. The additional blade of the current application is made of, including but not limited to, poly urethane, ethylene-propylene co-polymer, silicon rubber, natural rubber, stainless steel, titanium oxide, aluminum, and carbon steel. When a golf ball is hit by a back spin wedge of the current application that is equipped with two additional blades, the tip of the wedge and the front end of the first additional blade touch the golf ball at the same time. Then an initial back spin momentum is developed. At the same time, the golf ball is lifted upward. As the wedge precedes forward, the golf ball, which is already lifted upward, is hit by the second additional blade at the bottom. Then the momentum of back spin increases by this second hit. This back spin momentum is much greater than the first back spin momentum. Then the golf ball will spins backward even after it touches the green and will not roll further to the flying direction. By adding more additional blades, the back spin force is increased.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a wedge of prior art.

FIG. 2 is a schematic drawing that simulate the movement of a golf ball, hit by a conventional wedge, on a green where the hole cup locatets just in front of a bunker or a water hazard.

FIG. 3 is a schematic drawing that simulate the movement of a golf ball, hit by a back spin wedge of the current application, on a green where the hole cup locatets just in front of a bunker or a water hazard.

FIG. 4 side view of a back spin wedge of the current application equipped with one additional blade.

FIG. 5 is a side view of a back spin wedge of the current application equipped with two additional blades.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a back spin wedge of the current application equipped with two additional blades.

FIG. 7 is a schematic drawing explaining how the additional blades spin a golf ball.

FIG. 8 is a side view of a back spin wedge equipped with three additional blades.

FIG. 9 is a side view of a back spin wedge equipped with four additional blades.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a wedge (1) golf club of prior art. The direction (2) of the movement of a wedge is downward with a slope. When the front surface (3) of the wedge hits a golf ball (4), the ball spins a little bit back ward (5) due to the friction between the golf ball and horizontal grooves (6) developed on the front surface (3). The golf ball flies to a direction perpendicular to the front surface (3).

However, in many cases the back ward (5) spinning force is not strong enough to make the golf ball (4) rolls backward after it touches the ground. Then the golf ball rolls (4) forward as shown in FIG. 2 and fall into a water hazard (7) after the golf ball (4) touches down the green (8) infront thereof.

FIG. 3 is a schematic drawing that simulate the movement of a golf ball (4), hit by a back spin wedge of the current application, on a green (8) where the hole cup (9) locatets just in front of a bunker or a water hazard (5). Pluralities of additional blades are attached on the front face of a wedge golf club to reinforce the back spinning force. If enough back spin momentum is applied to the golf ball (4), it rolls backward after touch the green (8). Then a player successfully approaches to the hole cup (9) without losing score of the game.

FIG. 4 is a side view of a back spin wedge (10) of the current application equipped with one additional blade (11). The additional blade (11) is attached on the front face (11-1) of the base wedge (11-2). Basic loft angle (12) of the wedge club with shaft is 58 degree. Various loft angle, such as, 48 degree, 52 degree, 64 degree are also used for the current application. Thickness (13) of the additional blade (11) is 1/16 inch and the angle (14) of the blade (11) is 90 degree. Width (15) of the blade at the most front side of the wedge (shown in FIG. 6) is 1 inch. The additional blade (11) of the current application is made of, including but not limited to, poly urethane, ethylene-propylene co-polymer, silicon rubber, natural rubber, stainless steel, titanium oxide, aluminum, and carbon steel.

FIG. 5 is a side view of a back spin wedge (16) of the current application equipped with two additional blades. And FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a back spin wedge (16) of the current application equipped with two additional blades. The first additional blade (17) is the same as the blade (11) of FIG. 4. The second additional blade (18) is in a half conical shape. Height (19) of the second additional blade is ¼ inch. Length (20) of the second additional blade (18) along the long axis of the wedge (16) is ¼ inch. The angle (21) between the wedge surface and the second additional blade (18) front face is 90 degrees. Therefore, the angle (22) of the slope formed, on the rear side of the wedge; by the second additional blade (15) is 45 degrees.

FIG. 7 is a schematic drawing explaining how the additional blades spin a golf ball. When a golf ball (4) is hit by a back spin wedge (16) of the current application that is equipped with two additional blades, the tip of the wedge (23) and the front end (24) of the first additional blade (17) touch the golf ball (4) at the same time. Then a first back spin momentum (25) is developed. At the same time, the golf ball (4) is lifted upward. As the wedge (16) proceedes forward, the golf ball, which is already lifted upward, is hit by the second additional blade (18) at the bottom. Then the momentum of back spin (26) increases by this second hit. This back spin momentum (26) is much greater than the first back spin momentum (25). Then the golf ball (4) will spin backward even after it touches the green and will not roll further to the flying direction. By adding more additional blades, the back spin force is increased. FIG. 8 illustrates back spin wedges of current application with three additional blades and FIG. 9 illustrates back spin wedges of current application with three and four additional blades.

The more additional blades are attached the stronger back spin force is developed. Material of the additional blades may be the same or different each other.