Title:
Insulation assemblies for roofing and method of installation
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A ridged insulation board assembly that is comprised generally of a ridged insulation board and an additional structural element that has been pre-installed in or onto the surface of the insulation board. The assembly is installed onto a support surface such as roof deck without separate stress plates.



Inventors:
Choiniere, Stanley W. (Southwick, MA, US)
Kelly, Joshua S. (Longmeadow, MA, US)
Application Number:
11/654355
Publication Date:
10/11/2007
Filing Date:
01/17/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04C1/00
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Primary Examiner:
IHEZIE, JOSHUA K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ALIX, YALE & RISTAS, LLP (HARTFORD, CT, US)
Claims:
What is claimed:

1. An insulation board assembly for use in roof construction and repair comprised of a ridged insulation board and at least one additional pre-installed structural element having sufficient pull through resistance to permit securement by a fastener.

2. The insulation board assembly of claim 1 wherein said pre-installed structural element is a plurality of spaced stress distribution plates.

3. The insulation board assembly of claim 2 further comprising a matrix of plates.

4. The insulation board assembly of claim 1 wherein said pre-installed structural element is a reinforced facer layer.

5. The insulation board assembly of claim 4 wherein said layer has a plastic or polyurethane composition.

6. The insulation board assembly of claim 4 wherein said facer layer substantially covers the entirety of a surface of the board.

7. The insulation board assembly of claim 1 wherein said pre-installed structural element is a lattice-type reinforced facer layer.

8. The insulation board assembly of claim 1 wherein said assembly is fastened to a surface using large diameter head fasteners such as structural insulated panel (SIP) fasteners.

9. The insulation board assembly of claim 1 wherein said assembly is further secured to a metal decking layer.

10. The insulation board assembly of claim 1 wherein said pull through resistance is greater than 500 lbs.

11. A method for installing insulation board in roof construction comprising: providing an insulation board with a pre-installed arrangement of stress distribution plates; placing said insulation board on said decking; and installing fasteners through said stress distribution plates to secure the insulation board to said decking.

12. A method for installing insulation board to a structure comprising: providing an insulation board with a pre-installed reinforcement layer that defines having a grid which defines preferred fastener positions; placing said insulation board on said decking; and installing fasteners at said positions to secure said insulation board to said decking.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the priority of U.S. Provisional Application 60/760,153 filed Jan. 18, 2006.

FIELD OF THE TECHNOLOGY

The present application relates generally to construction and insulation of roofs and more particularly to flat or low-slope roofs.

BACKGROUND OF THE TECHNOLOGY

There are several types of roofing systems for low slope or flat roofs. As a general rule, however, all roofing systems including low slope and flat roofing systems, include at least three basic components: a substrate, thermal insulation and a water-proofing membrane. Four primary types of roofing systems are known: built-up roof (asphalt or cold tar pitch base), modified bitumen (asphalt based pre-manufactured sheets), single ply (EPDM, TPO and PVC and thermoplastic alloys) and spray foam polyurethane (polyurethane foam with silicone, acrylic, polyurethane and polyurea coatings).

Built-up roof and modified bitumen roofing systems are known to use two layers of ridged insulation board mechanically fastened to provide a substrate for the roof membrane. The first layer is used for insulation and to provide a flat surface. The second layer is used to provide increased insulation and to isolate the roof membrane from the wear/fatigue factor created by the fasteners and insulation board transitions.

On flat roofs, ridged insulation is typically fastened onto the roof deck using a fastener with a stress distribution plate. Panel members are secured to the secondary structure members by a workman who serially stands above one of the panel members and drives a fastener through the panel member to attach it to the underlying secondary structural members. Fastening the distribution plates is an unwieldy and time consuming process because the stress distribution plates must be correctly positioned on the insulation board and the plates must be placed right side up for proper attachment. The plates can be distributed onto the roof deck by machine; however, the plates still need to be aligned correctly on the insulation sheet.

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE

An insulation board assembly is directed to ridged insulation boards that have additional structural elements pre-installed onto the surface. These additional structural elements may be introduced during the manufacturing process or in an operation that is separate from manufacture. According to one embodiment, the insulation sheet has a matrix of stress distribution plates pre-installed on its face. In another embodiment, the insulation board has a full-coverage, reinforced facer pre-installed on its face. In a third embodiment, the reinforced facer is pre-installed onto the insulation board in a lattice configuration. An insulation board that has the necessary structural elements pre-incorporated onto its surface eliminates the need for the installer to handle and correctly place and position the individual components. This saves considerable time and reduces component placement errors.

Either during the manufacturing process or as a separate operation, a matrix of stress distribution plates may be pre-installed in or onto the face of the insulation board in various patterns and densities.

Provisions of a ridged insulation board with pre-installed and pre-positioned stress distribution plates having sufficient strength eliminates the need for separate and additional stress distribution plates and thereby improves efficiency by reducing errors and labor costs.

A method of fastening the insulation board having pre-installed structural elements is adaptable for efficient installation on flat or low slope roofs.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Referring now to the drawings wherein like elements are numbered alike in the several Figures:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a rigid insulation board assembly.

FIG. 2 is a close up view of an embodiment of the pre-installed structural element as shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of an embodiment whereby the pre-installed structural element is a full-coverage reinforced facer.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an embodiment whereby the pre-installed structural element is a reinforced facer that is configured as a lattice-type structure.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged cross sectional view of an installed insulation board assembly as shown in FIGS. 3 or 4.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A ridged insulation board assembly is designated generally by the number 10. The ridged insulation board assembly 10 is preferably employed in roofing systems, which are flat or low pitch configurations and typically have a substantial expense. The ridged insulation board assembly 10 is comprised generally of a ridged insulation board 14 and an additional structural element, such as stress distribution plates 12, incorporated on or into the surface of board 14 as shown in FIG. 1. The stress distribution plates 12 may be manufactured of metal or plastic or other suitable materials. The stress distribution plates 12 can be introduced during the manufacturing process.

Alternatively, the stress distribution plates 12 can be introduced in an operation that is separate from manufacture but prior to installation of the assembly 10 onto the structural surface or roof deck. For this application, this process of introducing additional structural elements in or onto the surface of the ridged insulation board 14 will be referred to as “pre-installation” and the elements themselves as being “pre-installed.” Stress distribution plates 12 are pre-installed on or into the surface of insulation board 14 in various patterns and densities as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The insulation board assembly 10 eliminates the need for an installer to handle and correctly place the stress distribution plates 12 on or into the insulation board 14 separately. In this way, the insulation board assembly saves considerable labor time and reduces installer error as compared to traditional methods.

It should also be understood that the insulation board assembly 10 meets all building code and approval requirements. The installer will place the assembly 10 onto the surface and drive a fastener directly through the each of the pre-installed (and therefore pre-positioned) stress distribution plates 12.

It should also to be understood that stress distribution plates 12 are not the only structural element that can be pre-installed onto insulation board 14. In another embodiment, as depicted in FIG. 3, a reinforced facer layer 16 has been pre-installed onto the surface of insulation board 14. In one embodiment, the reinforced facer layer 16 is a full-coverage layer that lies over the entire upper surface of board 14. The reinforced facer layer 16 may also define a grid to facilitate the locations of preferred fastener positions/placement. It should be understood that the insulation assembly 18 comprised of reinforced facer layer 16 and insulation board 14 is attached to a structure using special large diameter head fasteners such as structural insulated panel (SIP) fasteners 24 as shown in FIG. 5. The reinforced facer layer 16 may be comprised of pre-stress plastic or polyethylene or similar materials. The insulation assembly 18 provides sufficient strength and pull-through resistance so as to eliminate the need for stress distribution plates 12. The assembly possesses a pull-through strength resistance greater than 500 lbs. and is preferably of about 700 lbs.

It should be understood that it is not necessary for the reinforced facer layer to be a full coverage layer as shown in FIG. 3. In another embodiment, as depicted in FIG. 4, a reinforced facer layer configured in a lattice-type structure 18 is pre-installed onto the surface of the ridged insulation board 14. Assembly 20 comprised of a lattice-type reinforced facer layer 18 and insulation board 14 is installed using large diameter head fasteners such as structural insulated panel (SIP) fasteners. The SIP fasteners are installed through the lattice-type reinforced facer layer 18, preferably at the strand intersections, and, as installed, the assembly 20 eliminates the need for stress distribution plates 12.

While preferred embodiments have been set forth for purposes of illustration, the foregoing description should not be deemed a limitation of the invention herein. Accordingly, various modifications, adaptations and alternatives may occur to one skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention.