Title:
POWER DRIVEN HAMMER
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A power hammer apparatus including a cart and a power hammer arrangement mounted at a front region of the cart. The power hammer arrangement including a reciprocating bit that contacts a working surface to break up the working surface as the power hammer is advanced by the power-driven cart.



Inventors:
Due, Joseph E. (Mauston, WI, US)
Application Number:
11/278311
Publication Date:
10/04/2007
Filing Date:
03/31/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E21C25/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KRECK, JANINE MUIR
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MERCHANT & GOULD P.C. (MINNEAPOLIS, MN, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A power hammer apparatus, comprising: a) a power-driven cart having a front region and a rear region, the cart including controls located at the rear region of the cart for driving the cart along a working surface; and b) a power hammer mounted at the front region of the power-driven cart, the power hammer including a reciprocating bit that contacts the working surface during operation of the power hammer apparatus.

2. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the power hammer is a hand-held power hammer mounted at the front region of the power-driven cart.

3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein the hand-held power hammer includes a housing having a handle portion and an operating switch for use of the power hammer independent of the cart.

4. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein the hand-held power hammer is an electrical power hammer, the operating switch being electrically connected to a power cord.

5. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the power hammer is pivotally mounted at the front region of the power-driven cart.

6. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein the bit of the power hammer is selectively oriented at an angle of between about 30 degrees and 60 degrees relative to the working surface.

7. The apparatus of claim 5, further including a detachable mounting bracket arrangement configured to pivotally mount the power hammer at the front region of the power-driven cart.

8. The apparatus of claim 7, wherein the detachable mounting bracket arrangement includes first and second primary arms that couple to the power hammer at a pivot location.

9. The apparatus of claim 8, wherein the detachable mounting bracket arrangement further includes a collet that couples around a nose portion of the power hammer.

10. The apparatus of claim 9, wherein the detachable mounting bracket arrangement includes secondary arms, the collet being pivotally connected to the secondary arms of the detachable mounting bracket arrangement.

11. The apparatus of claim 1, further including wheels attached to the power-driven cart, the wheels being located rearward of a center fulcrum of the power-driven cart so that a portion of the cart's weight provides a downward force on the bit of the power hammer.

12. A method of breaking up a working surface, the method comprising the steps of: a) coupling a hand-held power hammer to a power-driven cart; b) angling the hand-held power hammer in a selected angular orientation relative to a working surface; c) securing the hand-held power hammer in the selected angular orientation; and d) advancing the power hammer along the working surface with the power-driven cart while operating the secured power hammer, wherein a reciprocating bit of the power hammer contacts the working surface to break up the working surface as the hand-held power hammer is advanced by the power-driven cart.

13. The method of claim 12, wherein the step of operating the power hammer includes switching on a switch of the power hammer, the switch being electrically connected to a power cord.

14. The method of claim 12, wherein the step of angling the hand-held power hammer includes angling the power hammer at an angle of between about 30 degrees and 60 degrees relative to the working surface.

15. The method of claim 12, wherein the step of coupling the hand-held power hammer includes pivotally mounting the hand-held power hammer to a mounting bracket arrangement, and further detachably mounting the mounting bracket arrangement to the power-driven cart.

16. The method of claim 15, wherein the step of securing the hand-held power hammer in the selected angular orientation includes securing the power hammer at one of a plurality of pivot location defined by the mounting bracket arrangement.

17. The method of claim 15, wherein the step of pivotally mounting the hand-held power hammer to the mounting bracket includes positioning a pivoting collet about a nose portion of the power hammer.

18. A method of breaking up a working surface, the method comprising the steps of: a) providing a power-driven cart having a front region and a rear region, the power-driven cart further including mechanically-driven wheels and operating controls that control the drive of the mechanically-driven wheels, the operating controls being located at the rear region of the cart; b) providing a power hammer mounted at the front region of the cart; c) securing the power hammer in a selected angular orientation relative to a working surface; and d) advancing the power hammer along the working surface with the power-driven cart while operating the secured power hammer, wherein a reciprocating bit of the power hammer contacts the working surface to break up the working surface as the power hammer is advanced by the power-driven cart.

19. The method of claim 18, further including operating the power hammer independent of the cart.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The principles disclosed relate to the operation and use a tool for loosening and breaking apart flooring material. More particularly, this disclosure relates to the operation and use of a power hammer apparatus.

BACKGROUND

Working surfaces and flooring are made of a variety of materials, including concrete, wood, and tiling, for example. As the working surface ages, wear and cracks can arise requiring repair and/or replacement of the surface. In repairing or replacing the working surface, large portions, and sometimes the entire working surface, must be removed. Removal of some working surfaces requires the use of a hammer, such as a jackhammer or power driven hammer.

Jackhamnmers and power driven hammers have an aggressive reciprocating bit that is used to loosen or break apart a working surface. As can be understood, operation of such hammers can be physically challenging and labor intensive. In general, improvement has been sought with respect to such machines or tools to better accommodate ease of use.

SUMMARY

One aspect of the present disclosure relates to an arrangement including a power-driven cart and a power hammer arranged to remove or break apart flooring material. Another aspect of the present invention relates to a method of removing or breaking apart flooring material that preferably utilizes a power hammer arrangement advanced by a power-driven cart.

A variety of examples of desirable product features or methods are set forth in part in the description that follows, and in part will be apparent from the description, or may be learned by practicing various aspects of the disclosure. The aspects of the disclosure may relate to individual features as well as combinations of features. It is to be understood that both the foregoing general description and the following detailed description are explanatory only, and are not restrictive of the claimed invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of one embodiment of a power hammer apparatus according to the principles of the present disclosure;

FIG. 2 is front perspective view of a mounting bracket arrangement of the power hammer apparatus shown in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a partial front elevation view a cart of the power hammer apparatus shown in FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

With reference now to the various figures in which identical elements are numbered identically throughout, a description of various exemplary aspects of the present invention will now be provided.

FIG. 1 illustrates one embodiment of a power hammer apparatus 10 having features that are examples of how inventive aspects in accordance with the principles of the present disclosure may be practiced. Preferred features are adapted for easing the physically challenging and labor intensive operation of power hammers.

In general, the power hammer apparatus 10 includes a carrier or cart 12 having wheels 14 (only one wheel shown). The cart 12 is preferably a power-driven cart 12. That is, the cart 12 includes a propulsion system, such as a motor and a drive mechanism, that is controlled by an operator during use of the apparatus 10. One suitable power-driven cart is manufactured by NuStar of Shakopee, Minn.

The cart 12 has a front region 16 and a rear region 18. For purposes of clarification, the front region 16 of the power hammer apparatus 10 refers to the portion of the apparatus farthest from the operator during use, and the rear region 18 of the power hammer apparatus 10 refers to the portion of the apparatus closest to the operator during use. A power hammer arrangement 20 is mounted at the front region 16 of the cart 12. During operation of the apparatus 10, the operator drives or advances the power hammer arrangement 20 along a working surface 50 via the power-driven cart 12. One such working surface 50 can include a concrete working surface, for example. The power hammer arrangement 20 is arranged to break up the concrete working surface as the arrangement 20 is advanced by the power-driven cart 12.

Although reference is made throughout the present disclosure to the use of the present apparatus 10 on a concrete working surface, it can be appreciated that the disclosed power hammer apparatus 10 can be used on other types of working surfaces. For example, the power hammer arrangement can be used to break up ceramic tiling or asphalt, or remove linoleum and wood flooring as well.

The cart 12 shown in FIG. 1 generally includes a main body 22 and a handle portion 26. In the illustrated embodiment, the motor and the drive mechanism of the power-driven cart 12 are enclosed within the main body 22. In other arrangements, the motor and drive mechanism may simply be mounted to a main body frame without being enclosed. The handle portion 26 of the cart 12 extends outward from the main body 22 of the cart. A drive lever 28 extending from the handle portion 26 is used to engage and disengage the drive mechanism to control the drive of the mechanically-driven wheels 14. In the illustrated embodiment, the wheels 14 include large rubber wheels that grip the working surface 50 to power or drive the cart 12 along the working surface 50 during operation of the apparatus 10. The wheels 14 may include other types of wheels adapted to provide non-slip driving power during operation. Other operating controls 30 are also located on the handle portion 26 at the rear region 18 of the cart 12.

Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, the power hammer arrangement 20 includes a power hammer 40 detachably mounted at the front region 16 of the cart 12 by a mounting bracket arrangement 42. What is meant by “power” hammer is that impact from the hammer is not manually generated, but rather is generated either electrically or hydraulically. The power hammer 40 may include hand-held power hammers commonly used in the industry. What is meant by “hand-held” is that the power hammer 40 is capable of operating apart and separate from the cart 12, i.e., independently of the cart 12.

In the illustrated embodiment, the power hammer 40 is an electric, hand-held power hammer having a 35-lb impact rating. Suitable electric, hand-held power hammers are sold by Metabo Inc., of Germany. Such hand-held power hammers generally include a housing 44 having a handle 46, an electric motor contained within the housing 44, and an interchangeable, reciprocating bit 48 powered by the electric motor. The illustrated electric hand-held power hammer 40 also includes an operating switch 52 electrically connected to a power cord 54. In one embodiment, the power cord 54 can be run from the power hammer 40 to a toggle switch 32 located at the rear region 18 of the cart 12. The power cord 54 is electrically connected to the toggle switch 32 so that the operator can operate the power hammer 40 from the rear region 18 of the cart 12. Other hand-held power hammer configurations may be used in accordance with the principles disclosed.

In operation, the operator switches on the power hammer 40 to activate the reciprocating bit 48. The operator then drives the power-driven cart 12 such that the power hammer 40 is advanced along the working surface 50 by the power-driven cart while breaking up the working surface in front of the cart. As can be understood, the large rubber wheels 14 of the cart 12 assist in traversing the loosened or broken up material of the working surface.

The present apparatus 10, including the hand-held power hammer 40 carried and transported during operation by the power-driven cart 12, reduces operator fatigue; yet the operator can still remove the power hammer 40 from the cart 12 to manually operate the hammer in hard to access areas. The removability of the power hammer 40 also permits an operator to easily replace or repair the power hammer. While it is preferred to detachably mount the power hammer 40 to the cart 12, permanent mounting configurations can also be used.

Referring again to FIG. 1, the reciprocating bit 48 of the power hammer 40 includes a blade 56. The blade 56 is designed to break up concrete or otherwise loosen flooring material. The blade 56 can be made of stainless steel, or any other hardened and tempered steel having a structural strength sufficient to break up the particular working surface. In another embodiment, the blade 56 can be structurally strengthened by a hardened material or compound adhered or bonded to the blade 56.

As shown in FIG. 1, the blade 56 and the bit 48 are oriented at a non-perpendicular angle A relative to the working surface 50. In most applications, the angle A of the blade 56 and bit 48 relative to the working surface 50 ranges from about 10 degrees to 75 degrees. Typically, the angle A is between about 30 degrees to 60 degrees.

Referring to FIG. 2, the power hammer 40 is mounted to the power-driven cart 12 by a bracket frame 68 of the mounting bracket arrangement 42. In the illustrated embodiment, the bracket frame 68 of the mounting bracket arrangement 42 detachably mounts to a mounting plate 84 (FIG. 1) located at the front region 16 of the cart 12. As shown in FIG. 3, the mounting plate 84 includes a sleeve 88 affixed to the mounting plate 84 by an angle bracket 78. When the bracket frame 68 is coupled to the mounting plate 84 of the cart 12, the sleeve 88 fits between vertical supports 108, 110 (FIG. 2) of the bracket frame 68.

Still referring to FIG. 2, the bracket frame 68 of the mounting arrangement 42 includes a mounting flange 80. The mounting flange 80 hooks onto a top edge 82 (FIG. 1) of the mounting plate 84 to detachably secure the power hammer arrangement 20 to the cart 12. That is, the mounting flange 80 attaches to the mounting plate 84 such that a flange lip 104 (FIG. 2) inserts within a gap G (FIGS. 1 and 3) between the cart 12 and the mounting plate 84.

When the flange 80 is attached to the mounting plate 84, the sleeve 88 (FIG. 3) of the mounting plate 84 aligns with holes 92 (FIG. 2) formed in the vertical supports 108, 110 of the bracket frame 68. A pin or rod 94 (FIGS. 1 and 3) is inserted through the holes 92 of the bracket frame 68 and the sleeve 88 to secure the power hammer arrangement 20 to the cart 12. To detach or remove the power hammer arrangement 20 from the cart 12, the rod 94 is removed from the sleeve 88 and the power hammer arrangement 20 is lifted from the mounting plate 84.

In the preferred embodiment, the power hammer 40 is pivotally mounted to the power-driven cart 12 by the detachable mounting bracket arrangement 42. That is, preferably, the blade 56 and bit 48 can be selectively oriented at the angle A relative to the working surface 50.

In particular, the mounting bracket arrangement 42 includes first and second pivoting attachments 60, 62 (FIG. 1). The first pivoting attachment 60 is defined by first and second primary alms 64, 66 (FIG. 2) extending outward from the bracket frame 68. The second pivoting attachment 62 is defined by first and second secondary arms 74, 76 extending outward from the bracket frame 68.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the first pivoting attachment 60 defined by the primary arms 64, 66 couples to the housing 44 of the power hammer 40. In particular, fasteners, such as bolts 96 (only one shown in FIG. 1), extend through holes 98 (FIG. 2) formed in the primary arms 64, 66, and thread into threaded holes (not shown) formed in the power hammer housing 44. The threaded holes formed in the power hammer housing 44 are typically pre-tapped for the attachment of handles (not shown) for manual use. If existing threaded holes are not provided in the housing 44, such holes can be made for attachment to the mounting bracket arrangement 42. In the illustrated embodiment, three holes 98 are provided in each of the first and second primary arms 64, 66 of the mounting bracket arrangement 42. As will be described in greater detail hereinafter, the multiple holes 98 accommodate the angular adjustability feature of the present hammer arrangement 20.

Still referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the second pivoting attachment 62 is defined by the secondary arms 74, 76. The secondary arms 74, 76 are coupled to a pivoting lever arm 100. The pivoting lever arm 100 includes a collet 102 that couples around a front nose portion 106 of the housing 44 of the power hammer 40.

The multiple holes 98 of the primary arms 64, 66 and the pivoting lever arn 100 coupled to the secondary arms 74, 76 define the pivoting attachments 60, 62 that permit a user to selectively pivot the hammer 40. That is, the hammer 40 can be selectively mounted at one of the three holes 98 to adjust the angle A of the bit 48 in relation to the working surface 50.

For example, to operate the apparatus 10 with a less aggressive shearing force, the power hammer 40 is mounted at an uppermost hole of the multiple holes 98 formed in the first and second primary arms 64, 66. This lifts a head portion 108 of the power hammer 40 upward while tilting the nose portion 106 of the power hammer downward to create a large angle A between the reciprocating bit 48 and the working surface. The pivoting lever arm 100 is designed to follow the tilt of the housing 44 corresponding to the selected positioning of the head portion 108 of the power hammer 40. In contrast, to operate the apparatus 10 with a more aggressive shearing force, the power hammer 40 can be mounted at a lowermost hole of the multiple holes 98 formed in the first and second primary arms 64, 66. This lowers the head portion 108 of the power hammer 40 while tilting the nose portion 106 of the power hammer upward to create a smaller angle A between the reciprocating bit 48 and the working surface.

As can be understood, utilizing bits 48 having different shaft lengths also changes the angle A of the blade 56 and the bit 48 relative to the working surface 50. That is, an operator can adjust the angle A of the blade 56 and bit 48 relative to the working surface by using bits with shorter or longer shafts. In the alternative, the operator can adjust the length of the shaft 110 (FIG. 1) of the reciprocating bit 48 by insert the bit farther into the collet of the power hammer 40. This increases the angle A of the bit and reduces the shearing force produced. Likewise, the operator can locate the blade 56 of the bit 48 farther from the collet of the hammer 40 to lessen the angle A and increase the shearing force produced.

While the illustrated embodiment discloses the use of a bit having a single blade 56, other types of tools or bits used in a reciprocating manner can be used. In one alternative embodiment, the bit can include a plow piece located at the end of a shaft. The plow piece can be used to clean joints or cracks formed in a working surface, for example.

Referring back to FIG. 1, the wheels 14 of the power hammer apparatus 10 are located a distance rearward of a center fulcrum F of the cart 12. The center fulcrum of the cart 12 is the fulcrum at which the cart's weight is evenly distributed forward and rearward of the fulcrum. Because the wheels 14 are rearwardly offset from the center fulcrum F, the cart 12 has a tendency to tip or tilt forward. Accordingly, the bit 48 of the power hammer arrangement 20 acts to stabilize and balance the power hammer apparatus 10 during operation. The blade 56 of the power hammer arrangement 20 thereby carries a portion of the weight of the cart 12. The portion of the cart's weight carned by the blade 56 provides a downward force that, coupled with a driving force of the cart 12, effectively controls the reciprocating impacts produced by the power hammer 40.

Because the cart is automated, that is, power driven, operation of the power hammer is made significantly less laborious than conventional manual operation. The operator can simply walk behind the cart 12 of the power hammer apparatus 10 while controlling the forward drive and direction the power hammer arrangement 20.

As previously described, the devices and methods of the present disclosure can be used in breaking up concrete surfaces. It is contemplated that the principles relating to the disclosed devices and methods can also be used in other applications, such as the removal of carpet, tile, linoleum, wooden flooring, and ice from outdoor surfaces.

The above specification, examples and data provide a complete description of the invention. Since many embodiments of the invention can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, the invention resides in the claims hereinafter appended.