Title:
Coupling for direct venting system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A pipe coupling for components of a venting system comprising a male pipe member on an end of a first component and a female pipe member on a corresponding end of a second component. The male pipe member comprises an inner flue pipe having a compressible gasket surrounding the inner flue pipe proximate an external end of the inner flue pipe, an external venting pipe surrounding the inner flue pipe and brackets linking the inner flue pipe to the external venting pipe. The female pipe member receives the male pipe member and comprises an inner flue sleeve being sized larger than the outer diameter of the flue pipe at an outer end of the sleeve. The inner flue sleeve remains in circumferential contact with the compressible gasket when the male pipe member is inserted into the female pipe member.



Inventors:
Bibaud, Andre (St-Hippolyte, CA)
Gilbert, Luc (St-Jerome, CA)
Application Number:
11/715492
Publication Date:
09/27/2007
Filing Date:
03/08/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F24C1/14
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BERNSTEIN, DANIEL A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
JACOBSON HOLMAN PLLC (Washington, DC, US)
Claims:
1. A pipe coupling for components of a venting system comprising: a male pipe member on an end of a first one of said components, said male pipe member comprising: an inner flue pipe having a compressible gasket surrounding the inner flue pipe proximate an external end of the inner flue pipe; a first external venting pipe surrounding the inner flue pipe; and brackets linking the inner flue pipe to the first external venting pipe; and a female pipe member on a corresponding end of a second one of said components, said female pipe member receiving the male pipe member and comprising: an inner flue sleeve being sized larger than the outer diameter of the inner flue pipe at an outer end of the sleeve; and a second external venting pipe surrounding the inner flue sleeve; wherein the inner flue sleeve remains in circumferential contact with the compressible gasket, and the first and second external venting pipes remain in contact with each other, when the male pipe member is inserted into the female pipe member.

2. The pipe coupling according to claim 1, further comprising a plurality of fasteners fastening the male pipe member to the female pipe member.

3. The pipe coupling according to claim 1, wherein the compressible gasket is made of woven fibreglass.

4. The pipe coupling according to claim 1, wherein first and second external venting pipes are respectively female and male external venting pipes and are tapered such that the female external venting pipe is sized to receive the male external venting pipe when the male pipe member is inserted into the female pipe member.

5. The pipe coupling according to claim 2, wherein the fasteners are screws.

6. The pipe coupling according to claim 2, wherein the compressible gasket is made of woven fibreglass.

7. The pipe coupling according to claim 6, wherein first and second external venting pipes are respectively female and male external venting pipes and are tapered such that the female external venting pipe is sized to receive the male external venting pipe when the male pipe member is inserted into the female pipe member.

8. The pipe coupling according to claim 7, wherein the fasteners are screws.

9. A venting system comprising components that are coupled with the pipe coupling defined in claim 1.

10. The venting system according to claim 9, further comprising a square wall thimble insulated against cold air infiltrations.

11. The venting system according to claim 9, wherein one of said components is selected from the group consisting of a standard length, an adjustable length, a flexible length, an adapter, and an elbow.

12. The venting system according to claim 9, wherein one of said components is a termination cap comprising a deflector plate centered on the flue pipe and deflecting gases from the flue pipe, and a generally trapezoidally-shaped cover plate covering the termination cap.

13. A component of a venting system, said venting system having a flue sleeve of a defined diameter, said component comprising: a male pipe member on a first end of the component, said male pipe member comprising: an inner flue pipe having a compressible gasket surrounding the inner flue pipe proximate an external end of the inner flue pipe; a first external venting pipe surrounding the inner flue pipe; and brackets linking the inner flue pipe to the first external venting pipe.

14. The component according to claim 13, further comprising: a female pipe member on a second end of the component, said female pipe member comprising: an inner flue sleeve being sized larger than the outer diameter of the inner flue pipe at an outer end of the sleeve; and a second external venting pipe surrounding the inner flue sleeve, wherein the inner flue sleeve remains in circumferential contact with a further compressible gasket of a further component, and the second external venting pipe remains in circumferential contact with a further first external venting pipe of the further component, when a female pipe member of the further component receives the male pipe member.

15. The component according to claim 13, further comprising: a female pipe member on a second end of the component, said female pipe member comprising: an inner flue sleeve being sized larger than the outer diameter of the inner flue pipe at an outer end of the sleeve; and a second external venting pipe surrounding the inner flue sleeve, wherein the compressible gasket remains in circumferential contact with a further inner flue sleeve of a further component, and the first external venting pipe remains in circumferential contact with a further second external venting pipe of the further component, when the male pipe member is inserted into a female pipe member of the further component.

16. The component according to claim 13, wherein the compressible gasket is made of woven fibreglass.

17. The component according to claim 13, wherein the male pipe member comprises a plurality of holes in the first external venting pipe, each of said plurality of holes being sized to receive a fastener therethrough.

18. The component according to claim 13, wherein the component is selected from the group consisting of a standard length, an adjustable length, a flexible length, an adapter, an elbow and a termination cap.

19. The component according to claim 16, wherein the male pipe member comprises a plurality of holes in the first external venting pipe, each of said plurality of holes being sized to receive a fastener therethrough.

20. The component according to claim 19, wherein the component is selected from the group consisting of a standard length, an adjustable length, a flexible length, an adapter, an elbow and a termination cap.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to a venting system. More particularly, the present invention is directed to a coupling for a direct venting system for fireplaces and stoves. The present patent application claims priority of U.S. 60/780,062 filed Mar. 8, 2006, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Direct-vent gas fireplaces or stoves solve many of the problems associated with wood-burning forebears. Unlike traditional masonry fireplaces with foundations and chimneys, direct-vent units take advantage of technologies that allow small clearances. These systems are typically prefabricated from metal and designed to be installed in wood-frame constructions without a foundation or a chimney. As the direct-vent systems burn efficiently, combustion gases can be vented directly out a wall. These systems are much easier and less expensive to install than masonry units and allow much greater flexibility in their placement.

Direct-vent fireplaces use natural gas or propane, not wood, as a combustible material. Air required to feed the flame enters from outside and the relatively cool combustion gases are exhausted through the wall-mounted vent or the roof.

These venting systems consist of a number of parts assembled together in a manner to vent flue gases to the outside of the building and to supply outside air to the appliance.

A number of venting systems have been proposed, but none has been entirely satisfactory due to different problems described below.

Because many installations are side vented, many of the field problems associated with direct venting are wind-related. This is especially true on coastal installations where high winds are common. Wind direction is also responsible for the poor performance of appliances.

Another common problem in the field for horizontal installation systems is cold air infiltration (especially in northern areas). The cold air infiltration decreases the overall efficiency of the system

Prior art venting systems also have another problem related to pipe assembly. Several pipe assemblies require sealant application in the field to make the assemblies leak proof which complicates their installation and causes difficulties when cleaning up after installation. Very often, the installer has to return to an installation site to verify that the sealant is still successfully applied.

Yet another problem with prior art systems is related to maintenance of pipe assemblies. Not only parts of the prior art systems are difficult to assemble, but also they are equally difficult to disassemble when routine maintenance is required.

Thus there is presently a need for a direct venting system that addresses several of the above-mentioned problems.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An object of the present invention is to provide a coupling for a direct venting system that addresses the above-mentioned needs.

More particularly, the invention provides a pipe coupling for components of a venting system comprising:

    • a male pipe member on an end of a first one of the components, the male pipe member comprising:
      • an inner flue pipe having a compressible gasket surrounding the inner flue pipe proximate an external end of the inner flue pipe;
      • a first external venting pipe surrounding the inner flue pipe; and
      • brackets linking the inner flue pipe to the first external venting pipe; and
    • a female pipe member on a corresponding end of a second one of the components, the female pipe member receiving the male pipe member and comprising:
      • an inner flue sleeve being sized larger than the outer diameter of the inner flue pipe at an outer end of the sleeve; and
      • a second external venting pipe surrounding the inner flue sleeve;
        wherein the inner flue sleeve remains in circumferential contact with the compressible gasket, and the first and second external venting pipes remain in contact with each other, when the male pipe member is inserted into the female pipe member.

According to the present invention, there is also provided a direct vent system with the following parts that comprise either the above-described male or female pipe members at one end of the part, or both male and female pipe members, and which can be grouped in the following categories:

    • Lengths
    • Elbows
    • Termination Caps
    • Adapters

Parts associated to this system also include wall, floor and ceiling supports as well as shields.

The key features of the system are:

    • A double wall pipe construction with the space between the two walls acting as a conduit for supplying outside air to the appliance.
    • A gasketed seal inner flue joint preventing contamination of outside air with flue gases.
    • A tapered metal to metal seal outer casing joint preventing negative building pressure from affecting the operation of the appliance.
    • A gradual compression of the inner flue gasket and precise fabrication tolerances minimizing the force required for the assembly of parts.
    • A stable joint assembly using sheet metal screws allowing for safer long horizontal installation.
    • An esthetically pleasant looking pipe.
    • A horizontal termination design that maintains a small pressure difference between the inner flue gases conduit and the outside air conduit under varying wind direction and velocity.
    • A joint allowing varying offset angles.
    • A flexible double wall pipe section allowing more freedom in small offset installations.

The horizontal termination ensures better efficiency of the gas appliance under different wind conditions and directions. There is no poor flame and/or combustion effects under low and high wind conditions from any direction.

The invention also provides an insulated wall thimble with a rigid insulation pad inside the sleeves which eliminates cold air infiltration. This design also brings at the same time the following improvements: a decrease in the size of the hole to be cut in the wall and a reduction to zero of the clearance to the combustible framing. Also by designing a telescopic section part of the horizontal caps, the system can be adapted to different wall thicknesses.

The male-female joint attachment makes an installation very easy and versatile. The alignment can be done on 360 degrees. When the alignment of lengths, elbows or adapters satisfies the client, the sections are simply pushed together with a minimum force, sealing inner liner and outer casing at the same time. Each joint is also secured with 3 screws which provide a solid joint.

The joint design eliminates the need to apply sealant at the inner flue and/or outer casing joint in order to seal the joint. This reduces installation labor and increases the durability of the seal. It also allows dismantling of the joints for maintenance.

The present system offers several advantages including a leak proof coupling and pipe construction, a strong and durable design, an esthetically pleasant looking pipe, a faster and easier installation, an increased efficiency of the system and safer installation.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention and its advantages will be more easily understood after reading the following non-restrictive description of preferred embodiments thereof, made with reference to the following drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a side cross-sectional view of a pipe coupling according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 2A and 2B illustrate the joining of two components comprising the coupling according a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 3A and 3B illustrate two different types of configurations of direct venting systems for a gas stove ending in a horizontal termination cap using the couplings of the present invention;

FIGS. 4A and 4B illustrate two different types of configurations of direct venting systems for a gas stove or a gas chimney ending in a vertical termination cap using the couplings of the present invention;

FIG. 5 illustrates another configuration of a direct venting system using the couplings of the present invention with an offset near the roof.

FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate another configuration of a direct venting system using the couplings of the present invention and flexible lengths.

FIGS. 7A to 7C are top, perspective and side cross-section views of a length to be used in a venting system according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 8A to 8C are top, perspective and side cross-section views of a flexible length to be used in a venting system according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 9A to 9D are three perspective and one cross-sectional view respectively of a 45° elbow with the coupling elements of the present invention;

FIGS. 10A to 10D are perspective, side, and two detailed views respectively of the internal flue pipe of the elbow shown in FIGS. 9A to 9D;

FIGS. 11A to 11C are side and two detailed views respectively of the external venting pipe of the elbow shown in FIGS. 9A to 9D;

FIGS. 12A to 12D are perspective, top, front and cross-sectional views respectively of a 90° elbow with the coupling elements of the present invention;

FIGS. 13A to 13E are perspective, top, side, and two detailed views respectively of the internal flue pipe of the elbow shown in FIGS. 12A to 12D.

FIGS. 14A to 14E are perspective, top, side, and two detailed views respectively of the external venting pipe of the elbow shown in FIGS. 12A to 12D.

FIGS. 15A to 15D are perspective, exploded, top and side cross-section views of a co-axial to co-linear appliance adapter to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 16A to 16D are perspective, exploded, top and side cross-section views of a co-axial to co-linear termination adapter to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 17 is a perspective exploded view of a masonry chimney adapter to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 18A to 18D are a perspective, exploded, top and side cross-sectional views respectively of a top part of the masonry chimney adapter shown in FIG. 17;

FIGS. 19A to 19D are a perspective, exploded, top and side cross-sectional views respectively of a bottom part of the masonry chimney adapter shown in FIG. 17;

FIGS. 20A to 20C are top and two exploded views respectively of the ceiling support/fire stop assembly shown in FIGS. 4A and 4B.

FIG. 21 is a perspective exploded view of a round support radiation shield assembly to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 22 is a perspective exploded view of a square support radiation shield to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 23A to 23G are perspective, exploded and four detailed views of the square support structure shown in FIG. 22.

FIG. 24 is a perspective exploded view of a wall support assembly to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 25 is a perspective exploded view of a roof support assembly to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 26 is a perspective exploded view of an offset support assembly to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 27A to 27C are exploded perspective, front and side cross-sectional views respectively of an adjustable wall thimble assembly to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 28A to 28C are perspective, exploded and side views of an attic insulation shield/firestop to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 29A to 29D are perspective, side, exploded and detailed views of the bottom part of the attic insulation shield/firestop shown in FIGS. 28A to 28C;

FIGS. 30A to 30E are perspective, side, exploded and two detailed views respectively of a masonry chimney flashing to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 31A to 31D are perspective, top, side, and exploded views respectively of a vinyl siding standoff to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 32A and 32B are perspective and exploded views of a horizontal termination final assembly with air openings to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 33A to 33C are perspective, front and exploded views respectively of a cap of the horizontal termination final assembly with air openings shown in FIGS. 32A and 32B;

FIGS. 34A to 34D are perspective, top, side and exploded views respectively of a deflector and intermediate portion of the horizontal termination final assembly with air openings shown in FIGS. 32A and 32B;

FIGS. 35A and 35B are perspective and exploded views of another horizontal termination final assembly with air openings to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 36A to 36C are perspective, front and exploded views respectively of a base and external section of the horizontal termination final assembly with air openings shown in FIGS. 35A and 35B;

FIGS. 37A to 37D are perspective, top, side and exploded views respectively of a deflector and intermediate portion of the horizontal termination final assembly with air openings shown in FIGS. 35A and 35B;

FIGS. 38A to 38C are perspective, top, and side views respectively of an adjustable portion of the horizontal termination final assembly with air openings shown in FIGS. 35A and 35B;

FIGS. 39A to 39D are perspective, top, side cross-sectional and exploded views respectively of a Pacific Energy™-type adaptor used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 40A and 40B are perspective and top views respectively of a restriction disk used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 41 is a perspective view of a collar-sleeve used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 42A and 42B are side and top assembly views of a snorkel termination assembly to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 43A and 43B are side views illustrating an installation of the adjustable wall thimble assembly shown in FIGS. 27A to 27C;

FIG. 44 a side view illustrating an installation of a termination assembly on vinyl siding using the vinyl siding standoff structure shown in FIGS. 31A to 31D;

FIG. 45 a side view illustrating an installation of a snorkel termination assembly shown in FIGS. 42A and 42B on a foundation wall;

FIG. 46 a side view illustrating an installation of a snorkel termination assembly shown in FIGS. 42A and 42B on a foundation wall with respect to external terrain;

FIG. 47 is a side view of a vertical termination assembly to be used in a venting system according to another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 48 is a side view of elbows and lengths that can be used to create an offset and rise of piping in a venting system;

FIG. 49 a side view illustrating an installation of a venting system through a ceiling with a ceiling support/firestop shown in FIGS. 20A to 20C;

FIG. 50 is a side view illustrating an installation of a venting system through a joist with a round support/radiation shield shown in FIG. 21;

FIG. 51 is a side view illustrating an installation of a venting system through a joist and roof with a square support/radiation shield shown in FIG. 22;

FIGS. 52A and 52B illustrate the relative positioning of the round and square support/radiation shields with respect to the joists for an installations shown in FIGS. 50 and 51;

FIG. 53A is a side view illustrating an installation of a venting system with offset piping as shown in FIG. 48 with an offset support assembly of FIG. 53B also shown in FIG. 26;

FIGS. 54A and 54B is a side view illustrating an installation of a venting system through a roof with a roof support structure shown in FIGS. 54C and 54D which is also shown in FIG. 25;

FIG. 55 is a side view illustrating an installation of a venting system through a ceiling joist from a room to an attic with an attic radiation shield shown in FIGS. 28A to 28C;

FIG. 56 is a side view illustrating another installation of a venting system through a ceiling joist from a room to an attic with a round support/radiation shield shown in FIG. 21;

FIG. 57 is a side view illustrating another installation of a venting system through a ceiling joist from a room to an attic with an attic radiation shield shown in FIGS. 28A to 28C;

FIG. 58A is a perspective view illustrating the installation of a flex liner through a masonry chimney with a flex liner shown in FIG. 58B in accordance with another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 59A to 59C are perspective views illustrating the installation of a vertical termination assembly with a collinear to coaxial terminal adapter on a masonry chimney in accordance with another preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 60A and 60B are perspective views illustrating the installation of flex liners on a gas fireplace insert or a gas stove in accordance with another preferred embodiment of the present invention; and

FIGS. 61A and 61B are side partially cross-sectional views of the functioning of a telescopic length comprising the coupling according a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In accordance with the present invention and as illustrated in FIG. 1, there is provided a pipe coupling 10 for components of a venting system comprising a male pipe member 11 on an end of a first component and a female pipe member 12 on a corresponding end of a second component. The male pipe member 10 comprises an inner flue pipe 14 having a compressible gasket 16 surrounding the inner flue pipe 14 proximate an external end of the inner flue pipe 14, an external venting pipe 18 surrounding the inner flue pipe 14 and brackets 20 linking the inner flue pipe 14 to the external venting pipe 18. The female pipe member 12 receives the male pipe member 11 and comprises an inner flue sleeve 22 being sized larger than the outer diameter of the inner flue pipe at an outer end of the sleeve 22 and a second external venting pipe 24 surrounding the inner flue sleeve 22. The inner flue sleeve 22 remains in circumferential contact with the compressible gasket 16, and the first 18 and second 24 external venting pipes remain in contact with each other, when the male pipe member 11 is inserted into the female pipe member 12.

As shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B, two components comprising couplings according to the present invention can be assembled together by inserting the male pipe member 11 of one component 26 into the female pipe member of a second component 28.

Preferably, the pipe coupling 10 further comprises a plurality of fasteners 30 fastening the male pipe member 11 to the female pipe member 12.

Preferably, the fasteners are screws and three of them of used around the coupling.

Preferably, the compressible gasket 16 is made of woven fibreglass.

Preferably, as illustrated in FIGS. 2A and 2B, the first 18 and second 24 external venting pipes are respectively female and male external venting pipes and are tapered such that the female external venting pipe 18 is sized to receive the male external venting pipe 24 when the male pipe member 11 is inserted into the female pipe member 12.

According to the present invention, there is also provided a direct vent system with components that utilize the above-described coupling for a variety of components including lengths, elbows, termination caps and adapters. Parts associated to this direct vent system also include wall, floor and ceiling supports as well as shields.

In FIGS. 3A and 3B, two different types of configurations of direct venting systems for a gas stove 32 ending in a horizontal termination cap using the couplings of the present invention are shown. The direct venting system in FIG. 3A comprises a pipe length 34 (of fixed or telescopic length), a 90° elbow 36, a trim ring 38, a wall thimble 40 and a horizontal termination cap 42. The direct venting system in FIG. 3B comprises similar elements except for the elbow 36.

In FIGS. 4A and 4B, two different types of configurations of direct venting systems for a gas stove 32 or a gas chimney 44 ending in a vertical termination cap using the couplings of the present invention are shown. The direct venting system in FIG. 4A comprises a pipe length 34 (of fixed or telescopic length), a ceiling support/firestop 46, a flashing 48, a storm collar, 50 and a vertical termination cap 52. The direct venting system in FIG. 4B comprises similar elements except for the addition of a trim ring 36.

FIG. 5 illustrates another configuration of a direct venting system traversing an enclosure 57 using the couplings of the present invention with an offset component near the roof 59. The system comprises a length 34, trim ring 38, a ceiling support/firestop 54, and an offset support structure 56.

FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate another configuration of a direct venting system using the couplings of the present invention and flexible lengths. The system comprises a length 34 linked to a gas chimney 44, a flexible length 58, linking the pipe through a ceiling support/firestop structure 62, through another flexible length to the roof 59 with the aid of a roof support component 64.

As shown in FIGS. 7A to 7C, the invention preferably provides lengths 60 that are preferably available in 48″, 24″, 12″ & 6″ lengths.

As shown in FIGS. 8A to 8C, the invention also preferably provides an adjustable length 62 with the coupling elements of the present invention.

As shown in FIGS. 9A to 9D, the invention also preferably provides 45° elbows 68 with the coupling elements of the present invention. FIGS. 10A to 10D show the internal flue pipe 70 of the elbow shown in FIGS. 9A to 9D. FIGS. 11A to 11C show the external venting pipe 72 of the elbow shown in FIGS. 9A to 9D.

As shown in FIGS. 12A to 12D, the invention also preferably provides 90° elbows 74 with the coupling elements of the present invention. FIGS. 13A to 13E show the internal flue pipe 76 of the elbow shown in FIGS. 12A to 12D. FIGS. 14A to 14E show the external venting pipe 78 of the elbow shown in FIGS. 12A to 12D.

As shown in FIGS. 15A to 15D, the invention also preferably provides a co-axial to co-linear appliance adapter 80 with the coupling elements of the present invention.

As shown in FIGS. 16A to 16D, the invention also preferably provides a co-axial to co-linear termination adapter 82 with the coupling elements of the present invention.

As shown in FIG. 17, the invention also preferably provides a masonry chimney adapter 84 with the coupling elements of the present invention. FIGS. 18A to 18D show the top part 86 of the masonry chimney adapter 84 shown in FIG. 17. FIGS. 19A to 19D show the bottom part 88 of the masonry chimney adapter 84 shown in FIG. 17.

As shown in FIGS. 20A to 20C, the invention also preferably provides a ceiling support/fire stop assembly 46 as used in the system shown in FIGS. 4A and 4B.

As shown in FIG. 21, the invention also preferably provides a round support radiation shield assembly 90 to be used in a venting system.

As shown in FIG. 22 and FIGS. 23A to 23G, the invention also preferably provides a square support radiation shield assembly 92 to be used in a venting system with a square support structure 93.

As shown in FIG. 24, the invention also preferably provides a wall support radiation assembly 94 to be used in a venting system.

As shown in FIG. 25, the invention also preferably provides a roof support assembly 96 to be used in a venting system.

As shown in FIG. 26, the invention also preferably provides an offset support assembly 96 to be used in a venting system.

As shown in FIGS. 27A to 27C, the invention also preferably provides an adjustable wall thimble assembly 100 to be used in a venting system.

As shown in FIGS. 28A to 28C and 29A to 29D, the invention also preferably provides an attic insulation shield/firestop 102, including a bottom part 104, to be used in a venting system.

As shown in FIGS. 30A to 30E, the invention also preferably provides a masonry chimney flashing 106 to be used in a venting system.

As shown in FIGS. 31A to 31D, the invention also preferably provides a vinyl siding standoff 108 to be used in a venting system.

As shown in FIGS. 32A and 32B, 33A to 33C and 34A to 34D, the invention also preferably provides a horizontal termination final assembly with air openings 110 to be used in a venting system. The assembly comprises a cap 112, a deflector 114 and an intermediate section 116.

As shown in FIGS. 35A and 35B, 36A to 36C, 37A to 37D and 38A to 38C, the invention also preferably provides another horizontal termination final assembly with air openings 110′ to be used in a venting system. The assembly comprises a cap 112′, a deflector 114′, an intermediate section 116′ and an adjustable section 118′.

As shown in FIGS. 39A to 39D, the invention also preferably provides a Pacific Energy™-type adaptor 120 to be used in a venting system.

As shown in FIGS. 40A and 40B, the invention also preferably provides a restriction disk 122 to be used in a venting system.

As shown in FIG. 41, the invention also preferably provides a collar-sleeve for flexible pipes 124 to be used in a venting system.

As shown in FIGS. 42A and 42B, the invention also preferably provides a snorkel termination assembly 126 to be used in a venting system.

FIGS. 43A and 43B illustrate an installation of the adjustable wall thimble assembly 100 shown in FIGS. 27A to 27C, the wall 130 separating the inside 131 from the outside 133. As shown, the thimble assembly preferably comprises insulation 134, while a high temperature sealant 132 is used to seal the thimble assembly 100 to the wall 130.

FIG. 44 illustrates an installation of a termination assembly 138 on a vinyl siding wall 136 separating the inside 131 from the outside 133. As shown, a vinyl siding standoff structure 108 shown in FIGS. 31A to 31D is used to accomplish this.

FIGS. 45 and 46 illustrates an installation of snorkel termination assembly 126 shown in FIGS. 42A and 42B on a foundation wall 140 separating the inside 131 from the outside 133. As shown, a trim ring 142 is used to accomplish this. As shown in FIG. 46, when terrain 150 is close to the termination assembly, certain clearances must be respected, as the termination cap 145 must be a certain vertical distance d (preferably a minimum of 12″) above the terrain 150, which can also comprise a drain 146 and gravel 148 proximate the foundation wall 140. A pipe length 34 may be attached to the snorkel termination assembly 126. Tar 144 may also be applied to the structure of the termination assembly 126.

As shown in FIG. 47, the invention also preferably provides a vertical termination assembly 152 with a coupling component of the present invention.

As shown in FIG. 48, elbows 154 and lengths 34 can be used to create an offset O and rise R of piping in a venting system.

FIG. 49 illustrates an installation of a venting system through a ceiling 156 with a ceiling support/firestop 46 shown in FIGS. 20A to 20C.

FIG. 50 illustrates an installation of a venting system through a joist 158 with a round support/radiation shield 90 shown in FIG. 21. (Alternately, a square support may be used). Screws 160 are used to affix the support/shield 90 to the joist 158 and a finish collar 162 are also used. A pipe length 34 is connected to this assembly.

FIG. 51 illustrates an installation of a venting system through a joist 158 and roof 161 with a square support/radiation shield 92 shown in FIG. 22. (Alternately, a round support may be used). Screws 160 are used to affix the support/shield 92 to the joist 158 and a finish collar 162 are also used. On top of the roof, a flashing 166, storm collar 164 and a vertical termination assembly 152 are installed. A pipe length 34 is connected to this assembly.

FIGS. 52A and 52B illustrate the relative positioning of the round 90 and square 92 support/radiation shields with respect to the joists 158 for an installations shown in FIGS. 50 and 51.

FIG. 53A is a side view illustrating an installation of a venting system with offset piping as shown in FIG. 48 with an offset support assembly 98 of FIG. 53B which is also shown in FIG. 26.

FIGS. 54A and 54B illustrate an installation of a venting system through a roof with a roof support structure 96 shown in FIGS. 54C and 54D which is also shown in FIG. 25.

FIG. 55 illustrates an installation of a venting system through a ceiling joist 158 from a room 172 to an attic 174 with an attic radiation shield 102 shown in FIGS. 28A to 28C. A pipe length 34, an optional trim ring 38, a ceiling support/fire stop 46 and storm collar 164 are used as shown in the figure. The radiation shield 102 is surrounded by loose fill insulation 170.

FIG. 56 illustrates another installation of a venting system through a ceiling joist 158 from a room 172 to an attic 174 with a round support (or alternately square support)/radiation shield 90 shown in FIG. 21. A pipe length 34, an optional trim ring 38, and storm collar 164 are used as shown in the figure. The round support/radiation shield 90 is fastened to the joist 158 with screws 160. The radiation shield 90 is surrounded by loose fill insulation 170.

FIG. 57 illustrates another installation of a venting system through a ceiling joist 158 from a room 172 to an attic 174 with an attic radiation shield 102 shown in FIGS. 28A to 28C. A pipe length 34, an optional trim ring 38, and storm collar 164 are used as shown in the figure. The attic radiation shield 102 is fastened to the joist 158 with screws 160. The radiation shield 102 is surrounded by loose fill insulation 170.

FIG. 58A illustrates the installation of a flex liner 176 through a masonry chimney 178 with a flex liner 176 shown in FIG. 58B in accordance with another preferred embodiment of the present invention. A flex puller 180 is used to accomplish this.

FIGS. 59A to 59C illustrate the installation of a vertical termination assembly 152 with a collinear to coaxial terminal adapter 82 on a masonry chimney 178. A masonry chimney flashing 106 is used between the adapter 82 and the chimney 178. A bead of silicone sealant 182 is to be placed between the flashing 106 and the chimney 178. Hose clamps 184 are used to attach the flex liners 176 to the adapter 82 (a Mill-Pac™ sealant can be used). The adapter 82 is affixed to the vertical termination assembly 152.

FIGS. 60A and 60B illustrate the installation of flex liners on a gas fireplace insert 190 or a gas stove 192. A coaxial to collinear appliance adapter 82 is used to link the flex liners 176 to the gas fireplace insert 190 while a collinear flex appliance adapter 194 is used to link the flex liners 176 to the gas stove 192. Hose clamps 184 are used to attach the flex liners 176 to the adapters 82, 194.

FIGS. 61A and 61B illustrate the functioning of a telescopic length 200 comprising the coupling according a preferred embodiment of the present invention. As shown more specifically in FIG. 61B, a rubber band 202 may be used to affix the length and seal the external venting pipe of the telescopic length 200.

The venting system according to the present invention offers several other advantages over prior art systems.

Certain prior art systems include external lock tabs for coupling purposes. This type of system allows leaks through the tabs. The couplings in the present invention preferably comprise as mentioned above three metal screws that offer a greater stiffness of the joint. Moreover, the male and female parts of the coupling are tapered and constructed precisely, to offer a metal on metal junction which only presents a little amount of leakage, while avoiding the use of a sealant.

Prior art systems often also offer a 360 degree rotation capability through the coupling elements once assembled. This rotational capability decreases the gas-tightness of the coupling. The coupling according to the present invention also allows 360 degree rotation for installation purposes, but the use of the three metal screws to affix the coupling in its final configuration ensures that the mating elements do not move with respect to each other and consequently improve the tightness of the seal.

Furthermore, prior art systems also have components with the inner flue pipe centered within the component with triangular supports, both on male and female sides of the component. In the components of the present invention, the inner flue pipe is centered within the outer pipe through four brackets on the male side of the component only (except for the 48 inch section). The inner pipe is ¼ inch longer than the outer pipe which ensures easier assembly and coupling of the sections even if the sections were made oval before final assembly. The position and size of the sealing gasket, and the dimensions of the female parts of inner pipes in the components ensure that the sealing gasket is never dislodged from its position during installation and also ensures a gradual compression of the gasket. This feature eliminates the need of silicone sealants which may dry before completion of an installation.

Prior art gaskets or seals are often made of silicone woven fiberglass and measure around ⅜″ large. The gasket or seal according to the present invention is ½″ large, twice as thick and made of woven fiberglass without the need of adding a silicone coating.

Prior art external conduits are also often made of galvanized steel and then painted. The external conduits of the present invention are preferably made of galvalume (for regular conduits) or brushed steel (for painted conduits).

Moreover, prior art wall thimbles are typically round and not isolated. The wall thimbles in the present invention are square and insulated against cold air infiltrations.

Prior art systems do not offer flexible lengths. In the present invention, the availability of a flexible length allows the design of deviated trajectories in the conduits over short distances for vertical installations while allowing also easier alignments between the output of the heating element and the opening in the wall for horizontal installations.

Furthermore, prior art termination components are typically generally square or rectangular in shape. The termination components of the present invention have a generally trapezoidal shape with uniquely shaped openings which ensure a good balance between inlet and outlet pressures. The shape of the termination yields exceptional performance for the venting system for a large variety of external wind speeds and directions.

Although the present invention has been explained hereinabove by way of preferred embodiments thereof, it should be pointed out that any modifications to these preferred embodiments within the scope of the appended claims is not deemed to alter or change the nature and scope of the present invention.