Title:
Precipitated Silica
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A precipitated silica with the following physiochemical properties: BET surface area35 m2/g to 350 m2/gBET/CTAB surface area ratio0.8 to 1.1Pore volume, PV1.6 ml/g to 3.4 ml/gSilanol group density (V2 = NaOH3 ml/(1.5 g) to 9.5 ml/(1.5 g)consumption)Average aggregate size250 nm to 1500 nmCTAB surface area30 m2/g to 350 m2/gDBP value150 ml/100 g to 300 ml/100 gV2/V1 by Hg porosimetry0.19 to 0.46DBP/CTAB1.2 to 3.5
is produced by reacting alkali silicate with mineral acids at temperatures of 60° C. to 95° C. while maintaining a pH of 7.5 to 10.5 and continuously stirring, continuing the reaction to a solids concentration in the precipitation suspension of 90 g/l to 120 g/l, adjusting the pH value to a value of less than or equal to 5, filtering out, washing, drying and optionally grinding or granulating the precipitated silica. The precipitated silica is used as a filler in vulcanizable rubber compounds and vulcanizates.



Inventors:
Esch, Heinz (Bonn, DE)
Gorl, Udo (Bornheim-Roisdorf, DE)
Kuhlmann, Robert (Erfstadt, DE)
Rausch, Ralf (Kreuzau, DE)
Application Number:
11/536505
Publication Date:
09/06/2007
Filing Date:
09/28/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
428/402
International Classes:
C01B33/14; C01B33/193; C08K3/36; C08L21/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
HENDRICKSON, STUART L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman, LLP (McLean, VA, US)
Claims:
1. 1-6. (canceled)

7. A rubber composition comprising a rubber compound and a precipitated silica having the following physico-chemical properties:
BET surface area:35 m2/g to 350 m2/g;
BET/CTAB surface area ratio:0.8 to 1.1;
pore volume, PV:1.6 ml/g to 3.4 ml/g;
silanol group density, ml of NaOH3 ml/(1.5 g) to 9.5 ml/(1.5 g);
consumed in raising pH to 9:
average aggregate size:250 nm to 1500 nm;
CTAB surface area:30 m2/g to 350 m2/g;
DBP volume:150 ml/100 g to 300 ml/100 g;
V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry:0.19 to 0.46; and
DBP/CTAB:1.2 to 3.5.


8. The rubber composition of claim 7, wherein the DBP/CTAB ratio ranges from 1.2 to 2.4.

9. The rubber composition of claim 7, wherein said DBP/CTAB ratio is 1.545 to 3.5.

10. The rubber composition of claim 7, wherein said V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry ranges from 0.19 to 0.43.

11. The rubber composition of claim 10, wherein said V2/V1 by Hg porosimetiy ranges from 0.19 to 0.32.

12. The rubber composition of claim 11, wherein said V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry ranges from 0.1 9 to 0.28.

13. The rubber composition of claim 12, wherein said V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry ranges from 0.19 to 0.20.

14. The rubber composition of claim 7, wherein the precipitated silica is modified with at least one organosilane.

15. The rubber composition of claim 7, further comprising at least one filler selected from the group consisting of carbon black, clay, siliceous chalk, commercial silica, and combinations thereof.

16. The rubber composition of claim 7, wherein the rubber compound is selected from the group consisting of a natural rubber, butadiene rubber, isoprene rubber, butadiene/styrene rubber, butadiene/acrylonitrile rubber, butyl rubber, terpolymer, and combinations thereof.

17. The rubber composition of claim 7, wherein the rubber composition is used in a tire, conveyor belt, seal, V-belt, tube, or shoe sole.

18. A tire comprising a rubber compound and a precipitated silica having the following physico-chemical properties:
BET surface area:35 m2/g to 350 m2/g;
BET/CTAB surface area ratio:0.8 to 1.1;
pore volume, PV:1.6 ml/g to 3.4 ml/g;
silanol group density, ml of NaOH3 ml/(1.5 g) to 9.5 ml/(1.5 g);
consumed in raising pH to 9:
average aggregate size:250 nm to 1500 nm;
CTAB surface area:30 m2/g to 350 m2/g;
DBP volume:150 ml/100 g to 300 ml/100 g;
V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry:0.19 to 0.46; and
DBP/CTAB:1.2 to 3.5.


19. The tire of claim 14, wherein the DBP/CTAB ratio ranges from 1.2 to 2.4.

20. The tire of claim 14, wherein said DBP/CTAB ratio is 1.545 to 3.5.

21. The tire of claim 18, wherein said V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry ranges from 0.19 to 0.43.

22. The tire of claim 21, wherein said V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry ranges from 0.19 to 0.32.

23. The tire of claim 22, wherein said V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry ranges from 0.19 to 0.28.

24. The tire of claim 23, wherein said V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry ranges from 0.1 9 to 0.20.

25. The tire of claim 18, wherein the precipitated silica is modified with at least one organosilane.

26. The tire of claim 18, wherein the tire further comprises at least one filler selected from the group consisting of carbon black, clay, siliceous chalk, commercial silica, and combinations thereof.

27. The tire of claim 18, wherein the lubber compound is selected from the group consisting of a natural rubber, butadiene rubber, isoprene rubber, butadiene/styrene rubber, butadiene/acrylonitrile rubber, butyl rubber, terpolyier, and combinations thereof.

28. A precipitated silica having the following physico-chemical properties:
BET surface area:35 m2/g to 350 m2/g;
BET/CTAB surface area ratio:0.8 to 1.1;
pore volume, PV:1.6 ml/g to 3.4 ml/g;
silanol group density, ml of NaOH3 ml/(1.5 g) to 9.5 ml/(1.5 g);
consumed in raising pH to 9:
average aggregate size:250 nm to 1500 nm;
CTAB surface area:30 m2/g to 350 m2/g;
DBP volume:150 ml/100 g to 300 ml/100 g;
V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry:0.19 to 0.43; and
DBP/CTAB:1.2 to 3.5.


29. The precipitated silica of claim 28, wherein the DBP/CTAB ratio ranges from 1.2 to 2.4.

30. The precipitated silica of claim 28, wherein said DBP/CTAB ratio ranges from 1.545 to 3.5.

31. The precipitated silica of claim 28, wherein said V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry ranges from 0.19 to 0.32.

32. The precipitated silica of claim 31, wherein said V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry ranges from 0.19 to 0.28.

33. The precipitated silica of claim 32, wherein said V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry ranges from 0.19 to 020.

34. The precipitated silica of claim 28, wherein said BET surface area ranges from 35 m2/g to 150 m2/g.

35. The precipitated silica of claim 34, wherein said BET surface area ranges from 100 m2/g to 150 m2/g.

36. The precipitated silica of claim 28, wherein said BET surface area ranges from 150 m2/g to 350 m2/g.

37. The precipitated silica of claim 36, wherein said BET surface area ranges from 150 M2/g to 200 in2/g.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/870,591, filed Jun. 6, 1997, which is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/594,327, filed Jan. 30, 1996 (now abandoned), which is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/319,490, filed Oct. 7, 1994 (now abandoned), which in turn claims priority to German Patent Application No. P 44 27 137.9, filed Jul. 30, 1994 and German Patent Application No. P 43 34 201.9, filed Oct. 7, 1993. All applications are incorporated herewith in their entirety by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to precipitated silicas, to the process for the production thereof and to the use thereof in rubber compounds.

2. Background of the Invention

Precipitated silicas may be incorporated into rubber compounds (Wolff, Kautschuk und Gummikunstst. 41(7), 674- 698, 1988). Known silicas may be only very poorly dispersed in rubber compounds, particularly at high filling rates. This poor dispersibility is one of the reasons why elevated silica filling rates are used only rarely in tire compounds. One reason for poor dispersibility may lie in the process by which the precipitated silicas are produced. Drying, poor grinding or also excessively hard granulation may lead to silica particles which cannot readily be dispersed (filler flecks). These flecks may be seen with the naked eye.

Furthermore, silicas are highly polar and therefore have only poor phase compatibility with the non-polar polymers in the rubber compound. This form of dispersion occurs on the basis of the silica aggregates. It may only be evaluated using a light microscope and is known as microdispersion.

Precipitated silicas which may be used as a filler in rubber compounds for tires are known from EP-A 0 520 862.

A precipitated silica is known from published European Patent Application EP-A 0 157 703 which, according to EP-A 0 501 227, may be used as a filler in rubber compounds for tires.

Known precipitated silicas have the disadvantage that they exhibit poor microdispersion.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The object of the invention is to provide a precipitated silica with optimum phase compatibility with rubber, polymer, and good microdispersion.

The present invention provides a precipitated silica characterized by the following physicochemical properties:

BET surface area35 m2/g to 350 m2/g
BET/CTAB surface area ratio0.8 to 1.1
Pore volume, PV1.6 ml/g to 3.4 ml/g
Silanol group density (V2 = NaOH3 ml/(1.5 g) to 9.5 ml/(1.5 g)
consumption)
Average aggregate size250 nm to 1500 nm
CTAB surface area30 m2/g to 350 m2/g
DBP value150 ml/100 g to 300 ml/100 g
V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry0.19 to 0.46
preferably0.20 to 0.23
DBP/CTAB1.2 to 3.5

The physicochemical properties are determined using the following measurement methods:

BET surface areaAreameter, Ströhlein, to ISO 5V94/Annex D
Pore volumeMercury porosimetry to DIN 66 133 (7
bar to 2000 bar)
Silanol groupin Sears values, according to Sears,
densityAnal. Chem. 28(12), 1981-1983, 1956.
Average aggregatePhoton correlation spectroscopy, determined
sizeby Zeta Sizer 3 (manufacturer: Malvern
Instruments)
CTAB surface areaat pH 9, according to Janzen et al., Rubber
Chem. Technol. 44, 1287-1296, 1971.
DBP valueASTM D 2414-88
Hg porosimetryDIN 66 133

The precipitated silica according to the invention may in particular have the following physicochemical parameters:

BET surfaceAverage
areaHg porosimetrySears value V2aggregate
[m2/g][ml/g]NaOH [ml/(1.5 g)]size [nm]
35 to 1002.5 to 3.43 to 5.8900 to 1500
100 to 1502.4 to 3.24 to 7.2400 to 850
150 to 2001.6 to 2.45.3 to 9.1300 to 550
200 to 3501.6 to 2.35.8 to 9.5250 to 520

In a preferred embodiment, the precipitated silica according to the invention has good grindability. This characteristic is represented by the average particle size determined using Malverm laser diffraction (D(4.3)) of ≦11 μm, in particular of ≦10 μm, measured after grinding on an Alpine Kolloplex pin impact mill (Z 160) at a throughput of 6 kg/h.

The present invention also provides a process for the production of the precipitated silica with the following physicochemical parameters

BET surface area35 m2/g to 350 m2/g
BET/CTAB surface area ratio0.8 to 1.1
Pore volume, PV1.6 ml/g to 3.4 ml/g
Silanol group density (V2 = NaOH3 ml/(1.5 g) to 9.5 ml/(1.5 g)
consumption)
Average aggregate size250 nm to 1500 nm
CTAB surface area30 m2/g to 350 m2/g
DBP value150 ml/100 g to 300 ml/100 g
V2/V1 by Hg porosimetry0.19 to 0.46
preferably0.20 to 0.23
DBP/CTAB1.2 to 3.5

which is characterized in that alkali silicate is reacted with mineral acids at temperatures of 60° C. to 95° C. while maintaining a pH of 7.5 to 10.5 and continuously stirring, the reaction is continued to a solids concentration in the precipitation suspension of 90 g/l to 120 g/l, the pH value is adjusted to a value of less than or equal to 5, the precipitated silica filtered out washed, dried and optionally round or granulated.

In a preferred embodiment, customary commercial sodium water glass may be diluted with water to a pH of 8 to 9 and concentrated sulfuric acid and the same water glass solution may simultaneously be added to this diluted water glass solution which has an SiO2 content of 4.9 g/l, while maintaining the pH value of 8 to 9.

Other preferred ranges of the pore volume ratio (V2/V1) are 0.19 to 0.43, 0.19 to 0.32, and 0.19 to 0.28.

Simultaneous addition of water glass solution and sulfuric acid may be performed over a period (duration of precipitation) of up to 160 minutes, preferably of greater than 90 minutes, in particular within 30 minutes to 90 minutes.

Depending upon the duration of precipitation, differing BET surface areas of the precipitated silica may be achieved. Thus, at a duration of precipitation of more than 90 minutes, surface areas of 35 m2/g to 150 m2/g are achieved and, at a duration of 30 minutes to 90 minutes, surface areas of 150 m2/g to 350 m2/g.

The precipitated silica according to the invention may be modified with organosilanes of the formulas I to III
[R1n—(RO)3-nSi-(Alk)m-(Ar)p]q[B] (I)
R1n—(RO)3-nSi-(Alkyl) (II)

or
R1n—(RO)3-nSi-(Alkenyl) (III)
in which:

  • B: means —SCN, —SH, —C, —NH2 (if q=1) or —Sx—](if q=2)
  • R and R1: mean an alkyl group with 1 to 4 carbon atoms, the phenyl residue, wherein and all residues R and R1 may each have the same or different meaning
  • R: means a C1-C4 alkyl, C1-C4 alkoxy group
  • n: means 0, 1 or 2
  • Alk: means a divalent unbranched or branched hydrocarbon residue with 1 to 6 carbon atoms
  • m: means 0 or 1
  • Ar: means an arylene residue with 6 to 12 carbon atoms, preferably 6 carbon atoms
  • p: means 0 or 1, providing that p and n do not simultaneously mean 0
  • x: means a number from 2 to 8
  • Alkyl: means a monovalent unbranched or branched unsaturated hydrocarbon residue with 1 to 20 carbon atoms, preferably 2 to 8 carbon atoms
  • Alkenyl: means a monovalent unbranched or branched unsaturated hydrocarbon residue with 2 to 20 carbon atoms, preferably 2 to 8 carbon atoms

Modification with organosilanes may be performed in mixtures of 0.5 parts to 50 parts of organosilanes, related to 100 parts of precipitated silica, in particular of 2 parts to 15 parts, related to 100 parts of precipitated silica, wherein the reaction between the precipitated silica and silane may be performed during compounding (in situ) or outside the compounding process (premodified).

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, bisftriethoxy-silylpropyl) tetrasulphane may be used as the silane.

The precipitated silica according to the invention may be incorporated into vulcanizable rubber compounds as a reinforcing filler in quantities of 5 parts to 200 parts, related to 100 parts of rubber, as a powder, microbeads or granules both with and without silane modification.

One or more of the above-stated silanes may be added, together with the silica according to the invention, to the rubber compound, wherein the reaction between the filler and silane proceeds during the compounding process at elevated temperatures (in situ modification), or in already premodified form (see, for example, DE 40 04 781), i.e., the two reactants are reacted outside the actual compounding process.

In addition to compounds exclusively containing the silicas according to the invention with and without organosilanes according to formulae I to III, the rubber compounds may additionally be reinforced with one or more fillers having a greater or lesser reinforcing action. It would primarily be customary in this connection to use a blend of carbon blacks (for example furnace, gas, flame, acetylene blacks) and the silicas according to the invention, with or without silane, but also of natural fillers, such as for example clays, siliceous chalks, other commercial silicas and the silicas according to the invention.

The blending ratio, as with the quantity of organosilane added, depends in this connection on the range of properties to be achieved in the finished rubber compound. A ratio of 5% to 95% between the silicas according to the invention and the other above-stated fillers, i.e., the silica according to the invention is 5% to 95% by weight of the mixture of fillers, is conceivable and is also achieved in this context

Apart from the silicas according to the invention, the organosilanes and other fillers, the elastomers comprise a further important constituent of the rubber blend. The silicas according to the invention may be used in any types of rubber which may be vulcanized with accelerators/sulphur or also peroxide curable rubbers. Rubbers which may be cited in this connection are natural or synthetic elastomers, oil-extended or not, as a single polymer or blend with other rubbers such as for example natural rubbers, butadiene rubbers, isoprene rubbers, butadiene/styrene rubbers, in particular SBR produced using the solution polymerization process, butadiene/acrylonitrile rubbers, butyl rubbers, terpolymers of ethylene, propylene and unconjugated dienes.

The following additional rubbers may moreover also be considered for use in rubber compounds with the stated rubbers: carboxyl rubbers, epoxy rubbers, transpolypentenamers, halogenated butyl rubbers, 2-chlorobutadiene rubbers, ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymers, ethylene/propylene copolymers, optionally together with chemical derivatives of natural rubber and modified natural rubbers.

Customary further constituents such as plasticizers, stabilizers, activators, pigments, antioxidants and processing auxiliaries in customary quantities are also known.

The silicas according to the invention, with and without silane, may be used in any rubber applications, such as for example tires, conveyor belts, seals, V-belts, tubes, shoe soles etc.

Dispersion, i.e. the distribution of a substance (filler) in a polymer compound, is of vital significance to the subsequent properties of the article containing this substance. Tear strength values in particular (tensile strength, elongation at break, tear propagation resistance), but also hysteresis and abrasion values are highly dependent upon dispersion (Schweitzer et al., Rubber World 138(6), 869-876, 1958; Schweitzer et al., Rubber World 139(1), 74-81,1958; Hess et al., Rubber Chem. Tech. 36(5), 1175-1229, 1963).

The significance of this parameter to rubber properties is accompanied by a lack of options for exactly measuring it, or many of the most commonly used methods allow only a subjective examination and assessment of dispersion.

The most widely used methods for measuring dispersion are described in ASTM D 2663-88 and were all developed to measure the dispersion of carbon black in rubber, but may however also be used to measure the dispersion of silica-filled compounds, provided that the compound contains only this filler and not blends, for example carbon black and silica.

One of the three methods described in the above-mentioned standard involves visual examination with the naked eye or slight magnification under the microscope and photographic recording of the vulcanizate samples, wherein the result is assessed against 5 standard photographs using a numbered scale from 1 to 5.

Another method is to count filler agglomerates with a size of ≦5 μm. To this end, a microtome section of the vulcanizate is prepared and the percentage of the area occupied by these agglomerates is determined by transmission light microscopy. Here too, dispersion is divided into classes.

The third option described is scanning the surface roughness of the vulcanizate with a needle. In this manner, the number and average height of surface roughness is measured. As with method 2, the roughness factor is converted into a dispersion index from very good to very poor.

The microscopic method (for example 30 times magnification), in which dispersion in the vulcanizate is assessed against a numbered scale from 1 to 10 using 10 standard photographs is presently the most commonly used method, which, although subjective, is rapid, meaningful and most suited to laboratory operation.

Dispersion and its evaluation described above constitute a property of the silica in the polymer compound. In order to be able to predict the subsequent dispersion behavior of a silica in the polymer compound before it is compounded, for example with rubber, the person skilled in the art makes use of the grindability of the silica. In other words, the grindability of the silica and its subsequent dispersion, for example in rubber, largely correlate.

This grindability may inter alia be characterized by the energy required to achieve a particular particle fineness, or conversely by the particle fineness achieved when a grinder is operated at the same power and product throughput. The mill used is an Alpine-Kolloplex pin impact mill (Z 160) operated at a constant product throughput of 6 kg/h.

Particle fineness is characterized by the average, volume-weighted particle diameter MIG (D(4.3)) measured by laser diffraction (Malvern Instruments, model 2600c).

Values of ≦11 μm, in particular of ≦10 μm, are achieved for the silicas according to the invention, which are higher in customary silicas (≧12 μm). It has also been found that, due to the process by which the silicas are produced, the silicas according to the invention are already so fine that, in contrast with conventional products, they require no further grinding for many industrial applications and thus also offer economic advantages.

The present invention also provides vulcanizable rubber compounds which contain the precipitated silicas according to the invention in quantities of 5 parts to 200 parts, related to 100 parts of rubber. Incorporation of this silica and production of the compounds containing this silica proceed in the manner customary in the rubber industry in an internal mixer or roll mill. The silica may be presented or used as powder, microbeads or granules. In this respect too, the silicas according to the invention do not differ from known, light silicate fillers.

Due to the above-stated differences, the precipitated silicas according to the invention lead to improved dispersion properties at a constant surface area compared with standard silicas.

The silicas according to the invention also exhibit better properties in relation to some other technically important rubber parameters. The following properties may be mentioned, higher modulus, lower tan 5 as a measure of tire rolling resistance, better abrasion resistance, lower T-center values, better wet skid resistance, better rebound resilience, better heat build-up performance and better viscosity.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF ABE FIGURES

The drawings compare the essential physicochemical parameters of the precipitated silica according to the invention with those of known precipitated silica. The drawings show:

the ratio of CTB to DBP
the ratio of CTAB to DBP
the ratio of CTAB to DBP
the ratio of CTAB to DBP
the ratio of CTAB to V2/V1
the ratio of CTAB to DBP/CTAB.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The following examples illustrate the invention: The following substances are used in the examples:

First Latexnatural rubber
Crepe
Ultrasilprecipitated silica (Degussa AG) with an N2 surface area
VN 2of 125 m2/g
Ultrasilprecipitated silica (Degussa AG) with an N2 surface area
VN 3of 175 m2/g
CBSbenzothiazyl-2-cyclohexylsulphenamide
TMTMtetramethylthiuram monosulphide
Si 69bis(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)tetrasilane (Degussa AG)
DEGdiethylene glycol
VSL 1955solution polymerized styrene/butadiene rubber with a
S 25styrene content of 25% and a vinyl content of 55%
(Bayer AG)
DPGdiphenylguanidine
VulkanoxN-(1,3-dimethylbutyl)-N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine
4020(Bayer AG)
Protectorozone protective wax
G 35
ZBEDzinc dibenzylthiocarbamate
Buna CB 24butadiene rubber from Bunawerke Hüls
Naftolene ZDaromatic mineral oil plasticizer
Hisil 210silica from PPG with an N2 surface area of approx.
130 m2/g
Hisil 255silica from PPG with an N2 surface area of approx.
170 m2/g
KS 300silica from Akzo with an N2 surface area of approx.
125 m2/g
KS 404silica from Akzo with an N2 surface area of approx.
175 m2/g

TestUnitStandard
Tensile stressMPaDIN 53 504
Compression set B%ASTM D 395
Loss angle tan δDIN 53 513
DIN abrasionmm3DIN 53 516
Firestone ball rebound%AD 20 405
Mooney viscosityMEDIN 53 523/524
Goodrich flexometer° C.ASTM D 623 A

EXAMPLE 1

Production of a Silica According to the Invention with an N2 Surface Area in the Range 100 m2/g.

43.5 m3 of hot water is introduced into a vat and customary commercial sodium waterglass (weight modulus 3.42, density 1.348) is stirred in a quantity such that a pH of 8.5 is achieved. While maintaining a precipitation temperature of 88° C. and pH 8.5, 16.8 m3 of the same water glass and sulfuric acid (96%) are simultaneously added within 150 minutes from opposite positions. A solids content of 100 g/l is produced. Further sulfuric acid is then added until a pH of <5 is achieved. The solids are separated in presses, washed and the pressed paste dried by spray drying or in a rotary kiln and optionally ground.

The precipitated silica obtained has an N2 surface area of 80 m2/g, an aggregate size of 1320 nm and grindability of 10 μm. The Sears value (V2) is 4.4 ml/(1.5 g) and Hg porosimetry 2.7 ml/g. The CTAB surface area is 75 m2/g. The DBP value is 236 ml/100 g. The V2/V1 ratio is 0.32. The DBP/CTAB ratio is 3.15.

EXAMPLE 2

Production of a Silica According to the Invention with an N2 Surface Area of the 100 m2/g to 150 m2/g Range

The same procedure is used as in Example 1, with the exception that a pH value of 9.0 is maintained in the initial precipitation batch and during precipitation. After 135 minutes, a solids content of 98 g/l is achieved in the precipitation suspension.

The precipitated silica obtained has an N2 surface area of 120 m2/g, grindability of 8.8 μm, a Sears value of 4.45 ml/(1.5 g) at an aggregate size of 490 nm and an Hg pore volume of 2.85 ml/g. The DBP value is 270 ml/100 g. The CTAB surface area is 115 m2/g. The V2/N1, ratio is 0.28. The DBP/CTAB ratio is 2.34.

EXAMPLE 3

Production of a Silica According to the Invention with an N2 Surface Area in the 150 m2/g to 200 m2/g range

The same procedure is used as in Example 2, with the difference that the precipitation time is shortened to 76 minutes and the precipitation temperature reduced to 80° C. After this period, a solids content in the precipitation suspension of 100 g/l is achieved. The precipitated silica obtained has the following physicochemical parameters: BET surface area of 184 m2/g, grindability of 8.7 μm, Sears value of 7.5 ml/(1.5 g) at an aggregate size of 381 nm, Hg pore volume 2.26 ml/g. The CTAB surface area is 165 m2/g. The DBP value is 255 ml/100 g. The V2/V1 ratio is 0.2080 to 0.2299. The DBP/CTAB ratio is 1.545.

EXAMPLE 4

Determination of Pore Volume by Hg Porosimetry on Silicas According to the Invention Compared with Some Presently Known Commercial Standard Silicas

  • Process: Hg-Porosimetry according to DIN 66 133 but using an injection process of from 7 bar to 500 bar

N2 surface area (M2/g): 100 to 150

Product NameN2 surface area (m2/g)Pore Volume (ml/g)
Hisil 2101301.54
KS 3001251.98
Ultrasil VN 21251.82
Silica according to the1202.85
invention (Example 2)

N2 surface area (m2/g): 150 to 200

Product NameN2 surface area (m2/g)Pore Volume (ml/g)
Hisil 2251701.13
KS 4041751.66
Ultrasil VN 31751.46
Silica according to the1842.26
invention (Example 3)

The silicas according to the invention have a distinctly higher pore volume.

EXAMPLE 5

Comparison of Sears value (V2) as a Measure of the OH Group Density of the Silicas According to the Invention with Standard Commercial Silicas N2 Surface Area (m2/g): 100 to 150

V2 [ml] = NaOH
Product NameN2 surface area [m2/g]consumption [ml/(1.5 g)]
Hisil 2101308
KS 3001257.7
Ultrasil VN 21257.2
Silica according to the1204.4
invention (Example 2)

N2 surface area (m2/g): 150 to 200

V2 [ml] = NaOH
Product NameN2 surface area [m2/g]consumption [ml/(1.5 g)]
Hisil 2551708.1
KS 4041758.1
Ultrasil VN 31759.9
Silica according to the1847.5
invention (Example 3)

The lower V2=NaOH consumption, the lower is the —OH group density. The comparison shows that the silicas according to the invention may have a silanol group density of up to 40% lower than known precipitated silicas.

EXAMPLE 6

Determination of Average Aggregate Size by Photon Correlation Spectroscopy

Parameters:

Ultrasound time:15 minutes
Ultrasonic Device used:RK 510 H (manufacturer: Bandelin)
Suspending agent:Isopropanol/pentanol 10:1
Weight:30 mg silica per 10 ml suspending agent

N2 surface area (m2/g): 100 to 150

Average aggregate
Product NameN2 surface area (m2/g)size (nm)
Hisil 210130254
KS 300125197
Ultrasil VN 2125191
Silica according to the120490
invention (Example 2)

N2 surface area (m2/g): 150 to 200

Average aggregate
Product NameN2 surface area (m2/g)size (nm)
Hisil 255170152
KS 404175218
Ultrasil VN 3175167
Silica according to the184381
invention (Example 3)

The average aggregate size of the silicas according to the invention is distinctly greater than that of the known precipitated silicas.

EXAMPLE 7

Silica According to Example 2 of the Invention in Comparison with Ultrasil VN 2 in a Natural Rubber Formulation with Si 69

12
First Latex Crepe100100
Ultrasil VN 250
Silica according to the50
invention (Example 2)
ZnO RS44
Stearic acid22
DEG11
Si 693.23.2
CBS1.61.6
TMTM0.30.3
Sulfur0.80.8
Mooney viscosity (MU)7769

Vulcanizate data: 150° C./t95%

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300% modulus (MPa)8.19
Ball rebound (%)56.858.6
DIN abrasion (mm3)125114
Goodrich flexometer (0.175″, 108 N, RT, 18 h)
T-center (° C.)81.270.8
tan δ/60° C.0.0930.085

In comparison with Ultrasil VN 2, which is comparable in surface area, the silica according to Example 2 of the invention leads to lower viscosities, higher modulus and resilience values, improved abrasion, lower heat build-up and lower loss angle tan at 60° C. and thus lower rolling resistance.

EXAMPLE 8

Silica According to the Invention (Example 3) in Comparison with Ultrasil VN 3 in a Solution-SBR/BR Tire Tread Formulation with Si 69

12
VSL 1955 S 259696
Buna CB 243030
Ultrasil VN 380
Silica according to the80
invention (Example 3)
ZnO RS33
Stearic acid22
Naftolen ZD1010
Vulkanox 40201.51.5
Protektor G 3511
Si 696.46.4
CBS1.51.5
DPG22
ZBED0.20.2
Sulfur1.51.5
Mooney viscosity (MU)7268

Vulcanizate data: 150° C./t95%

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300% modulus (MPa)8.99.3
Ball rebound (%)52.654.7
Loss tan δ according to DIN 53 513, device used: MTS
tan δ/0° C.0.4800.501
tan δ/60° C.0.1520.144

In comparison with VN 3, the silica according to the invention has lower viscosity, higher modulus, higher elasticity and, particularly importantly, higher wet skid resistance with low rolling resistance.

EXAMPLE 9

Comparison of Dispersion of Silica According to the Invention (Example 2) Compared with VN 2 (Identical N, Surface Area of Approx. 120 m2/g) (using the Philipps Methods, Described in Technical Information Brochure 102 A).

A piece of rubber approximately 20 to 30 μm in thickness (area approx. 5×5 mm2) is cut using a Vibracut apparatus from FTB-Feinwerktechnik from a 6 mm sheet of vulcanizate of the formulation according to Example 8 filled with 80 parts of Ultrasil VN 2 or of the silica according to the invention from Example 2, related to 100 parts of rubber. This sample of rubber is transferred onto a glass slide and covered with a second glass slide. The sample prepared in this manner is examined under a light microscope with a reflected light attachment and reproduced as a negative image with 55-times magnification. A positive image with the desired final magnification is prepared from this negative.

Dispersion is assessed according to the Philipps method using 10 standard photographs as stated below:

NumberDispersion
1 to 2very poor
3 to 4poor
5 to 6adequate
7 to 8good
9 to 10very good

The dispersion of Ultrasil VN 2 is rated at 5 and is thus adequate, the dispersion of the silica according to the invention from Example 2 is rated at 9 and is thus very good.

EXAMPLE 10

Comparison of Dispersion of Silica According to the Invention from Example 3 with Ultrasil VN 3 (Identical N2 Surface Area of Approx. 175 m/2/g). Formulation, Procedure and Assessment are Performed in a Similar Manner to Example 9.

The dispersion of Ultrasil VN 3 is rated at 2 and is thus very poor, the dispersion of the silica according to Example 3 of the invention is rated at 8 and is thus good.

EXAMPLE 11

Determination of Dispersion by Roughness Measurement using a Federal Dispersion Analysis EM D-4000-W7 unit. Comparison of Ultrasil VN 2 with the Silica According to the Invention from Example 2.

A piece of rubber (20 mm×2 nm) is cut using a cutting device also supplied by the above-stated equipment manufacturer from a 2 mm sheet of vulcanizate of the formulation according to Example 8 filled with 80 parts of Ultrasil VN 2 or with the silica according to the invention from Example 2, related to 100 parts of rubber, and is fixed into a holder provided by the equipment manufacturer. The surface of the vulcanizate is scanned using a diamond needle and the surface roughness caused by dispersion so determined. This process allows dispersion to be quantified as the device determines a value F2H. F means the number of peaks and H their average height. Thus, the lower the value of this parameter, the better is the dispersion of the filler in the vulcanizate sample.

For the above-stated fillers, the parameter F2H gave the following values:

Silica according to the
Ultrasil VN 2invention (Example 2)
F2H8236632556

The silica according to the invention thus has distinctly better dispersion. This method thus confirms the results from Example 9.

EXAMPLE 12

Comparison of Dispersion of Ultrasil VN 3 with the Silica According to the Invention from Example 3 using the Roughness Measurement from Example 11.

The filling rate and procedure are here similar to those in Example 11.

Silica according to the
Ultrasil VN 3invention (Example 3)
F2H5560122602

The silica according to the invention has distinctly better dispersion characteristics than VN 3. This method confirms the results found in Example 10.