Title:
Toy automobile and method of using the same
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A toy car and method provided with a base car portion and an exterior portion, where the design of the exterior portion may be changed by removing and reassembling multiple parts to create different automobile designs. A toy car that may be included in kits. The toy car may have a base automobile frame having connection fittings thereon. At least one non-interchangeable component releasably connected to the base automobile frame. The non-interchangeable component includes a frame cover having connection fittings thereon. A plurality of interchangeable components are releasably connected to the connection fittings of the frame cover or base automobile frame. Each interchangeable component includes a fitting structure connectable with one of the connection fittings of the base automobile frame or frame cover. Each interchangeable component includes an automobile design feature and/or functionality that may be replaceable by another interchangeable component having an equivalent automobile design feature and/or functionality.



Inventors:
Yuen, Shiu Hang (Kowloon, HK)
Application Number:
11/512983
Publication Date:
08/30/2007
Filing Date:
08/30/2006
Assignee:
Golden Bright Manufacturer Limited (Kowloon, HK)
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
446/95
International Classes:
A63H17/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
RICCI, JOHN A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HAMRE, SCHUMANN, MUELLER & LARSON, P.C. (Minneapolis, MN, US)
Claims:
1. A toy comprising: a base toy frame having connection fittings thereon; at least one non-interchangeable component connected to the frame, the non-interchangeable component includes a frame cover, the frame cover having connection fittings thereon; and a plurality of interchangeable components releasably connected to the base toy frame and the non-interchangeable component, each interchangeable components includes a fitting structure connectable with one of the connection fittings of the base automobile frame or the frame cover, wherein each interchangeable component includes design aspects and functionality aspects, such that it may be replaced by another interchangeable component having an equivalent design feature or functionality aspects.

2. The toy of claim 1, wherein the connection fittings comprises a tongue and groove connector.

3. The toy of claim 1, wherein the connection fittings comprises a magnet.

4. The toy of claim 1, wherein the connection fittings comprises a snap-fit connector.

5. The toy of claim 1, wherein the connection fittings comprises an interference fit connector.

6. A toy automobile comprising: a base automobile frame having connection fittings thereon; at least one non-interchangeable component connected to the frame, the non-interchangeable component includes a frame cover, the frame cover having connection fittings thereon; and a plurality of interchangeable components releasably connected to the base automobile frame and the non-interchangeable component, each interchangeable components includes a fitting structure connectable with one of the connection fittings of the base automobile frame or the frame cover, wherein each interchangeable component includes automobile design aspects and automobile functionality aspects, such that it may be replaced by another interchangeable component having an equivalent automobile design feature or functionality aspects.

7. The toy automobile of claim 6, wherein the connection fittings comprises a tongue and groove connector.

8. The toy automobile of claim 6, wherein the connection fittings comprises a magnet.

9. The toy automobile of claim 6, wherein the connection fittings comprises a snap-fit connector.

10. The toy automobile of claim 6, wherein the connection fittings comprises an interference fit connector.

11. A method of assembling a toy automobile, comprising the steps of: providing a base automobile frame having connection fittings thereon; providing at least one interchangeable fitting structure; and connecting said interchangeable fitting structure to a connection point on said base automobile frame.

12. The method of claim 11, further comprising: disconnecting an interchangeable fitting structure that is connected to a connection point on a base automobile frame; and connecting another interchangeable fitting structure, having an equivalent automobile design feature or functionality aspects of said disconnected structure, to a connection point on said base automobile frame.

13. A kit for a toy car comprising: instructions for assembling a toy car; and a toy automobile including: a base automobile frame having connection fittings thereon; and at least one non-interchangeable component connected to the frame, the non-interchangeable component includes a frame cover, the frame cover having connection fittings thereon.

14. A kit for a toy car comprising: instructions for assembling a toy car; and a plurality of interchangeable components, wherein each interchangeable component includes automobile design aspects and automobile functionality aspects, such that it may be replaced by another interchangeable component having an equivalent automobile design feature or functionality aspects.

15. A kit for a toy car comprising: a toy automobile including: a base automobile frame having connection fittings thereon; at least one non-interchangeable component connected to the frame, the non-interchangeable component includes a frame cover, the frame cover having connection fittings thereon; and a plurality of interchangeable components, each interchangeable components includes a fitting structure connectable with one of the connection fittings of the base automobile frame or the frame cover, wherein each interchangeable component includes automobile design aspects and automobile functionality aspects, such that it may be replaced by another interchangeable component having an equivalent automobile design feature or functionality aspects; and instructions for assembling the toy car.

16. A kit for a toy car comprising: a toy automobile including: a base automobile frame having connection fittings thereon; at least one non-interchangeable component connected to the frame, the non-interchangeable component includes a frame cover, the frame cover having connection fittings thereon; and a plurality of interchangeable components releasably connected to the base automobile frame and the non-interchangeable component, each interchangeable components includes a fitting structure connectable with one of the connection fittings of the base automobile frame or the frame cover, wherein each interchangeable component includes automobile design aspects and automobile functionality aspects, such that it may be replaced by another interchangeable component having an equivalent automobile design feature or functionality aspects; label identifiers for each of the automobile base frame, the frame cover, and the interchangeable components; and instructions for assembling the toy car.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a Non-provisional of application Ser. No. 60/712,351, filed Aug. 30, 2005, which application is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to a toy car and method of assembling the same. More particularly, a toy car is disclosed in which a base car frame includes interchangeable parts resembling automobile design features. The interchangeable parts are interchangeable with other design parts, so that the outer car design may be changed.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Toy and model cars are well known and widely used, particularly by children for their enjoyment and play. Additionally, toy and model cars have been made to be self-assembly by a user or “do-it-yourself” type toys. These cars have been in demand and are popular worldwide. However, different manufacturers have produced limited lines of toy cars as a way to increase the sales volume. In the current toy car market, there is no such completely “do-it-yourself” toy car that may be assembled and used without brand limitations and car make and model limitations.

For example, toy car producers of a sports car, such as Ferrari, provide design assembly parts that can only be changeable with specific makes and models. For instance, a Ferrari's front bumper, but may not be changeable with a Nissan's front bumper. Even within the same car brand, like Ferrari for instance, a toy car may still be limited to the specific car model only, which means the hood of a Ferrari's sport car is only suitable for a particular Ferrari model, and is not suitable for other Ferrari models.

Although toy cars in the current market provide parts that can be removed and reassembled by the user, there are still limitations. To reassemble a toy car in the current market, a user must use toy car accessories from the same brand and same model and that are not interchangeable. Oftentimes, the reason for such limitations is due to differences in the car designs themselves (e.g. different angle, curve, volume, inch, etc). Furthermore, the accessories and assembly parts of different toy cars have their own cutting methods and unique connection structures/fittings making them specific to a particular make and model. With these differences, the accessories and assembly parts of different toy cars do not have interchangeability. Such toy cars are limited in their variability of design combinations, or may not be varied at all.

While these previous toy car types may have enjoyed some success and may be suitable for their purposes, improvements may yet be made for toy cars. There is a need for a toy car that can completely be self-designed and/or unique without being limited from typical car makes and models. Improvements may still be made to a toy car that provides design flexibility, facilitates creativity.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is the purpose in the descriptions hereafter to overcome these shortcomings, thereby providing an improved toy car. A toy car is provided with a base car portion and an exterior portion, where the design of the exterior portion may be changed by removing and reassembling multiple parts to create different automobile designs.

In one exemplary embodiment, a toy car includes a base automobile frame having connection fittings thereon. At least one non-interchangeable component releasably connected to the base automobile frame. The non-interchangeable component includes a frame cover having connection fittings thereon. A plurality of interchangeable components are releasably connected to the connection fittings of the frame cover or base automobile frame. Each interchangeable component includes a fitting structure connectable with one of the connection fittings of the base automobile frame or frame cover. Each interchangeable component includes an automobile design feature and/or functionality that may be replaceable by another interchangeable component having an equivalent automobile design feature and/or functionality.

As one advantage for a toy car described hereinafter, a toy car is provided that can be completely self-designed and assembled, and that may be unique without being limited from typical car makes and models. Such a toy car provides design flexibility and facilitates creativity.

These and other various advantages and features of novelty, which characterize the toy car, are pointed out in the following detailed description. For better understanding of the toy car, its advantages and the objects obtained by its use, reference should also be made to the drawings which form a further part hereof, and to the accompanying descriptive matter, in which there are illustrated and described specific examples of the toy car.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Like reference numbers generally indicate corresponding elements in the Figures. The embodiments illustrated are exemplary only and are in accordance with the principles of the present invention.

FIG. 1A represents an elevational perspective view of one embodiment of a base automobile frame and a frame cover connected thereon. The base automobile frame illustrates one embodiment of wheels and tires connected thereto.

FIG. 1B-1 is a top elevational view of the frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 1B-2 is a side elevational view of the frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 1B-3 represents a top perspective elevational view of the frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 1B-4 represents a bottom perspective elevational view of the frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 1C-1 represents a top elevational view of the base automobile frame of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 1C-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the base automobile frame of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 1C-3 represents a top elevational view of the base automobile frame of FIG. 1A and showing an embodiment of toy car operating parts disposed thereon.

FIG. 1C-4 represents an exploded elevational view of the base automobile frame and toy car operating parts of FIG. 1H.

FIG. 2A represents a perspective elevational view of the wheels and tires shown in FIG. 1A.

FIG. 2B represents an exploded perspective elevational view of one wheel and tire of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 3A-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of a toy car model A.

FIG. 3A-2 represents a rear perspective view of the toy car model A of FIG. 3A-1.

FIG. 3B represents a rear perspective view of one embodiment of a rear bumper for toy car model A showing only the rear bumper connected to the base automobile frame and frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 3B-1 represents a rear elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model A.

FIG. 3B-2 represents a top elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model A.

FIG. 3B-3 represents a front elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3B-4 represents a bottom elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model A.

FIG. 3C represents a rear perspective view of one embodiment of a trunk for toy car model A showing only the trunk connected to the base automobile frame and frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 3C-1 represents a rear elevational view of the trunk for toy car model A.

FIG. 3C-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the trunk for toy car model A.

FIG. 3C-3 represents a front elevational view of the trunk for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3C-4 represents a side sectional view of the trunk for toy car model A taken from FIG. 3C-3.

FIG. 3C-5 represents a top elevational view of the trunk for toy car model A.

FIG. 3D represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of a rear windshield for toy car model A showing only the rear windshield connected to the base automobile frame and frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 3D-1 represents a bottom elevational view of the rear windshield for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3D-2 represents a rear elevational view of the rear windshield for toy car model A.

FIG. 3D-3 represents a top elevational view of the rear windshield for toy car model A.

FIG. 3D-4 represents a side sectional view of the rear windshield for toy car model A taken from FIG. 3D-3.

FIG. 3D-5 represents a front elevational view of the rear windshield for toy car model A.

FIG. 3E represents a rear perspective view of one embodiment of a roof and front windshield for toy car model A showing only the roof and front windshield connected to the base automobile frame and frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 3E-1 represents a bottom elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3E-2 represents a rear elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model A.

FIG. 3E-3 represents a side elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model A.

FIG. 3E-4 represents a top elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model A.

FIG. 3E-5 represents a side sectional view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model A taken from FIG. 3D-4.

FIG. 3E-6 represents a front elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model A.

FIG. 3F represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of a hood for the toy car model A showing only the hood connected to the base automobile frame and frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 3F-1 represents a top elevational view of the hood for toy car model A.

FIG. 3F-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the hood for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3F-3 represents a front partial sectional view of the hood for toy car model A taken from FIG. 3F-2.

FIG. 3F-4 represents a side sectional view of the hood for toy car model A taken from FIG. 3F-2.

FIG. 3G represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of headlights for the toy car model A showing only the headlights connected to the base automobile frame and frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 3G-1 represents a front elevational view of the headlights for toy car model A.

FIG. 3G-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the headlights for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3G-3 represents a rear elevational view of the headlights for toy car model A.

FIG. 3G-4 represents a side sectional view of the headlights for toy car model A taken from FIG. 3G-3.

FIG. 3H represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of a front bumper for the toy car model A showing only the front bumper connected to the base automobile frame and frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 3H-1 represents a front elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model A.

FIG. 3H-2 represents a top elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3H-3 represents a rear elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model A.

FIG. 3H-4 represents a bottom elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model A.

FIG. 3I represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of left and right front panels for the toy car model A showing only the front panels connected to the base automobile frame and frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 3I-1 represents a front elevational view of the left front panel for toy car model A.

FIG. 3I-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the left front panel for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3I-3 represents an end view of the left front panel for toy car model A.

FIG. 3I-4 represents a rear elevational view of the left front panel for toy car model A.

FIG. 3I-5 represents a sectional view of the left front panel for toy car model A taken from FIG. 3I-4.

FIG. 3I-6 represents a front elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model A.

FIG. 3I-7 represents a bottom elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3I-8 represents an end view of the right front panel for toy car model A.

FIG. 3I-9 represents a rear elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model A.

FIG. 3I-10 represents a sectional view of the right front panel for toy car model A taken from FIG. 3I-9.

FIG. 3J represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of left and right doors for the toy car model A showing only the doors connected to the base automobile frame and frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 3J-1 represents a front elevational view of the left door for toy car model A.

FIG. 3J-2 represents a top elevational view of the left door panel for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3J-3 represents an end view of the left door for toy car model A.

FIG. 3J-4 represents a bottom elevational view of the left door for toy car model A.

FIG. 3J-5 represents a rear elevational view of the right door for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3J-6 represents a top elevational view of the right door for toy car model A.

FIG. 3J-7 represents an end view of the right door for toy car model A.

FIG. 3J-8 represents a bottom elevational view of the right door for toy car model A.

FIG. 3K represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of left and right rear panels for the toy car model A showing only the rear panels connected to the base automobile frame and frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 3K-1 represents a front elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model A.

FIG. 3K-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3K-3 represents a rear elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model A.

FIG. 3K-4 represents a sectional view of the left rear panel for toy car model A taken from FIG. 3K-3.

FIG. 3K-5 represents an end view of the left rear panel for toy car model A.

FIG. 3K-6 represents a front elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model A.

FIG. 3K-7 represents a bottom elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3K-8 represents a rear elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model A.

FIG. 3K-9 represents a sectional view of the right rear panel for toy car model A taken from FIG. 3K-8.

FIG. 3K-10 represents an end view of the right rear panel for toy car model A.

FIG. 3L represents a rear perspective view of one embodiment of a left side skirt for the toy car model A showing only the side skirt connected to the base automobile frame and frame cover of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 3L-1 represents a bottom elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model A.

FIG. 3L-2 represents a side elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3L-3 represents a top elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model A.

FIG. 3L-4 represents a sectional end view of the left side skirt for toy car model A taken from FIG. 3L-3.

FIG. 3L-5 represents a bottom elevational view of one embodiment for a right side skirt for toy car model A.

FIG. 3L-6 represents a side elevational view of the right side skirt for toy car model A and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 3L-7 represents a top elevational view of the right side skirt for toy car model A.

FIG. 3L-8 represents a sectional view of the right side skirt for toy car model A taken from FIG. 3L-7.

FIG. 4A-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of a toy car model B.

FIG. 4A-2 represents a rear perspective view of the toy car model B of FIG. 4A-1.

FIG. 4B-1 represents a rear elevational view of one embodiment of a rear bumper for toy car model B.

FIG. 4B-2 represents a top elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model B.

FIG. 4B-3 represents a front elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4B-4 represents a bottom elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model B.

FIG. 4C-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a trunk for toy car model B.

FIG. 4C-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the trunk for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4C-3 represents a sectional view of the trunk for toy car model B taken from FIG. 4C-2.

FIG. 4C-4 represents a front elevational view of the trunk for toy car model B.

FIG. 4D-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a rear windshield for toy car model B.

FIG. 4D-2 represents a front elevational view of the rear windshield for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4D-3 represents a bottom elevational view of the rear windshield for toy car model B.

FIG. 4D-4 represents a side sectional view of the rear windshield for toy car model B taken from FIG. 4D-3.

FIG. 4E-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a roof and front windshield for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4E-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4E-3 represents a side sectional view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model B taken from FIG. 4E-2.

FIG. 4E-4 represents a front elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model B.

FIG. 4F-1 represents a bottom elevational view of one embodiment of a hood for toy car model B.

FIG. 4F-2 represents a sectional view of the hood for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof taken from FIG. 4F-1.

FIG. 4F-3 represents a rear elevational view of the hood for toy car model B.

FIG. 4G-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of headlights for toy car model B.

FIG. 4G-2 represents a rear elevational view of the headlights for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4G-3 represents a bottom elevational view of the headlights for toy car model B.

FIG. 4H-1 represents a bottom elevational view of one embodiment of a front bumper for toy car model B.

FIG. 4H-2 represents a rear elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4H-3 represents a top elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model B.

FIG. 4I-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a left front panel for toy car model B.

FIG. 4I-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the left front panel. for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4I-3 represents a rear view of the left front panel for toy car model B.

FIG. 4I-4 represents an end view of the left front panel for toy car model B.

FIG. 4I-5 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a right front panel for toy car model B.

FIG. 4I-6 represents a bottom elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model B.

FIG. 4I-7 represents a rear elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4I-8 represents an end view of the right front panel for toy car model B.

FIG. 4J-1 represents a rear elevational view of one embodiment of left door for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4J-2 represents a top elevational view of the left door for toy car model B.

FIG. 4J-3 represents a front view of the left door for toy car model B.

FIG. 4J-4 represents a sectional view of the left door for toy car model B taken from FIG. 4J-3.

FIG. 4J-5 represents a rear elevational view of one embodiment of a right door for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4J-6 represents a top elevational view of the right door for toy car model B.

FIG. 4J-7 represents a front view of the right door for toy car model B.

FIG. 4J-8 represents a sectional view of the right door for toy car model B taken from FIG. 4J-7.

FIG. 4K-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a left rear panel for toy car model B.

FIG. 4K-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4K-3 represents a rear elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model B.

FIG. 4K-4 represents a sectional view of the left rear panel for toy car model B taken from FIG. 4K-3.

FIG. 4K-5 represents another sectional view of the left rear panel for toy car model B taken from FIG. 4K-3.

FIG. 4K-6 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a right rear panel for toy car model B.

FIG. 4K-7 represents a bottom elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4K-8 represents a rear elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model B.

FIG. 4K-9 represents a sectional view of the right rear panel for toy car model B taken from FIG. 4K-8.

FIG. 4K-10 represents a sectional view of the right rear panel for toy car model B taken from FIG. 4K-8.

FIG. 4L-1 represents a bottom elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model B.

FIG. 4L-2 represents a side elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4L-3 represents a bottom elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model B.

FIG. 4L-4 represents a sectional end view of the left side skirt for toy car model B taken from FIG. 4L-3.

FIG. 4L-5 represents a bottom elevational view of one embodiment of a right side skirt for toy car model B.

FIG. 4L-6 represents a side elevational view of the right side skirt for toy car model B.

FIG. 4L-7 represents a top elevational view of the right side skirt for toy car model B and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 4L-8 represents a sectional view of the right side skirt for toy car model B taken from FIG. 4L-7.

FIG. 4M-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a spoiler for toy car model B.

FIG. 4M-2 represents a sectional view of the spoiler for toy car model B taken from FIG. 4M-1.

FIG. 4M-3 represents a bottom elevational view of the spoiler for toy car model B.

FIG. 5A-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of a toy car model C.

FIG. 5A-2 represents a rear perspective view of the toy car model C of FIG. 5A-1.

FIG. 5B-1 represents a front perspective elevational view of one embodiment of a rear bumper for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5B-2 represents a rear elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model C.

FIG. 5B-3 represents a bottom elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model C.

FIG. 5B-4 represents a rear elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model C.

FIG. 5B-5 represents a sectional view of the rear bumper for toy car model C taken from FIG. 5B-4.

FIG. 5B-6 represents a top elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model C.

FIG. 5C-1 represents a bottom elevational view of one embodiment of a trunk for toy car model C.

FIG. 5C-2 represents a rear elevational view of the trunk for toy car model C.

FIG. 5C-3 represents a top elevational view of the trunk for toy car model C.

FIG. 5C-4 represents a sectional view of the trunk for toy car model C taken from FIG. 5C-3.

FIG. 5C-5 represents a rear perspective elevational view of the trunk for toy car model C.

FIG. 5D-1 represents a bottom elevational view of one embodiment of a rear windshield for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5D-2 represents a rear elevational view of the rear windshield for toy car model C.

FIG. 5D-3 represents a top elevational view of the rear windshield for toy car model C.

FIG. 5D-4 represents a bottom perspective view of the rear windshield for toy car model C.

FIG. 5E-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a roof and front windshield for toy car model C.

FIG. 5E-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5E-3 represents a side sectional view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model C taken from FIG. 4E-2.

FIG. 5E-4 represents a rear elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model C.

FIG. 5E-5 represents a bottom perspective view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-1 represents a bottom perspective elevational view of one embodiment of a hood for toy car model C and showing one embodiment of an exposed engine.

FIG. 5F-2 represents a top perspective elevational view of one embodiment of a first engine part for the exposed engine of toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-3 represents a bottom elevational view of the first engine part for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5F-4 represents a top elevational view of the first engine part for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-5 represents a sectional view of the first engine part for toy car model C taken from FIG. 5F-5.

FIG. 5F-6 represents an end view of the first engine part for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-7 represents a bottom perspective view of one embodiment of a second engine part for the exposed engine of toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-8 represents an end view of the second engine part for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-9 represents a bottom view of the second engine part for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5F-10 represents a sectional view of the second engine part for toy car model C taken from FIG. 5F-9.

FIG. 5F-11 represents top elevational view of the second engine part for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-12 represents a top perspective elevational view of one embodiment of a third engine part for the exposed engine of toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-13 represents a bottom elevational view of the third engine part for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-14 represents a rear elevational view of the third engine part for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5F-15 represents a front elevational view of the third engine part for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-16 represents a bottom perspective view of one embodiment of a fourth engine part for the exposed engine of toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-17 represents a bottom elevational view of the fourth engine part for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5F-18 represents a rear elevational view of the fourth engine part for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-19 represents a front elevational view of the fourth engine part for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-20 represents a perspective elevational view of one embodiment of a fifth engine part for the exposed engine for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-21 represents a top elevational view of the fifth engine part for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-22 represents a perspective elevational view of the hood for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5F-23 represents a top elevational view of the hood for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-24 represents a bottom elevational view of the hood for toy car model C.

FIG. 5F-25 represents an end view of the hood and exposed engine for toy car model C in an assembled state.

FIG. 5G-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of headlights for toy car model C.

FIG. 5G-2 represents a top elevational view of the headlights for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5G-3 represents a rear elevational view of the headlights for toy car model C.

FIG. 5H-1 represents a rear perspective view of one embodiment of a front bumper for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5H-2 represents a front elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model C.

FIG. 5H-3 represents a bottom elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model C.

FIG. 5H-4 represents a rear elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model C.

FIG. 5H-5 represents a top elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model C.

FIG. 5I-1 represents a rear perspective view of one embodiment of a left front panel for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5I-2 represents a top elevational view of the left front panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5I-3 represents a rear elevational view of the left front panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5I-4 represents a bottom elevational view of the left front panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5I-5 represents a rear perspective view of one embodiment of a right front panel for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5I-6 represents a top elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5I-7 represents a rear elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5I-8 represents a bottom elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5J-1 represents a rear perspective view of one embodiment of a left door for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5J-2 represents a front elevational view of the left door for toy car model C.

FIG. 5J-3 represents a bottom elevational view of the left door for toy car model C.

FIG. 5J-4 represents a rear elevational view of the left door for toy car model C.

FIG. 5J-5 represents a top elevational view of the left door for toy car model C.

FIG. 5J-6 represents a rear perspective view of one embodiment of a right door for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5J-7 represents a front elevational view of the right door for toy car model C.

FIG. 5J-8 represents a bottom elevational view of the right door for toy car model C.

FIG. 5J-9 represents a rear elevational view of the right door for toy car model C.

FIG. 5J-10 represents a top elevational view of the right door for toy car model C.

FIG. 5J-11 represents a perspective elevational view of one embodiment of a side view mirror for the left door of toy car model C.

FIG. 5J-12 represents an elevational view of the side view mirror of FIG. 5J-11.

FIG. 5J-13 represents an elevational view of the side view mirror of FIG. 5J-11.

FIG. 5J-14 represents a top elevational view of the side view mirror of FIG. 5J-11.

FIG. 5K-1 represents a rear elevational view of one embodiment of a left rear panel for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5K-2 represents a front elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5K-3 represents a bottom elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5K-4 represents a rear elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5K-5 represents a top elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5K-6 represents a rear elevational view of one embodiment of a right rear panel for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5K-7 represents a front elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5K-8 represents a bottom elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5K-9 represents a rear elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5K-10 represents a top elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model C.

FIG. 5L-1 represents a top perspective view of one embodiment of a left side skirt for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5L-2 represents a top elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model C.

FIG. 5L-3 represents a side elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model C.

FIG. 5L-4 represents a bottom elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model C.

FIG. 5L-5 represents a top perspective view of one embodiment of a right side skirt for toy car model C and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 5L-6 represents a top elevational view of the right side skirt for toy car model C.

FIG. 5L-7 represents a side elevational view of the right side skirt for toy car model C.

FIG. 5L-8 represents a bottom elevational view of the right side skirt for toy car model C.

FIG. 6A-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of a toy car model D.

FIG. 6A-2 represents a rear perspective view of the toy car model D of FIG. 6A-1.

FIG. 6B-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a rear bumper for toy car model D.

FIG. 6B-2 represents a top elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model D.

FIG. 6B-3 represents a rear elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6B-4 represents a bottom elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model D.

FIG. 6C-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a trunk/rear windshield combination for toy car model D.

FIG. 6C-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the trunk/rear windshield combination for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6C-3 represents a sectional view of the trunk/rear windshield combination for toy car model D taken from FIG. 6C-2.

FIG. 6C-4 represents a front elevational view of the trunk/rear windshield combination for toy car model D.

FIG. 6C-5 represents a rear elevational view of the trunk/rear windshield combination for toy car model D.

FIG. 6D-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a roof and front windshield for toy car model D.

FIG. 6D-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6D-3 represents a sectional view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model D taken from FIG. 6D-2.

FIG. 6D-4 represents a rear elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model D.

FIG. 6E-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a hood for toy car model D.

FIG. 6E-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the hood for toy car model D.

FIG. 6E-3 represents a sectional view of the hood for toy car model D taken from FIG. 6E-2.

FIG. 6F-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of headlights for toy car model D.

FIG. 6F-2 represents a top elevational view of the headlights for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6F-3 represents a rear elevational view of the headlights for toy car model D.

FIG. 6G-1 represents a front view of one embodiment of a front bumper for toy car model D.

FIG. 6G-2 represents a top elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model D.

FIG. 6G-3 represents a rear elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6G-4 represents a bottom elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model D.

FIG. 6H-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a right front panel for toy car model D.

FIG. 6H-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model D.

FIG. 6H-3 represents a rear elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6H-4 represents an end elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model D.

FIG. 6H-5 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a left front panel for toy car model D.

FIG. 6H-6 represents a bottom elevational view of the left front panel for toy car model D.

FIG. 6H-7 represents a rear elevational view of the left front panel for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6H-8 represents an end elevational view of the left front panel for toy car model D.

FIG. 6I-1 represents a rear elevational view of one embodiment of a left door for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6I-2 represents a sectional view of the left door for toy car model D taken from FIG. 6I-1.

FIG. 6I-3 represents a rear elevational view of one embodiment of a right door for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6I-4 represents a sectional view of the right door for toy car model D.

FIG. 6J-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a left rear panel for toy car model D.

FIG. 6J-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model D.

FIG. 6J-3 represents a rear elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6J-4 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a right rear panel for toy car model D.

FIG. 6J-5 represents a bottom elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model D.

FIG. 6J-6 represents a rear elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6K-1 represents a side elevational view of one embodiment of a left side skirt for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6K-2 represents a top elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model D.

FIG. 6K-3 represents a side elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model D.

FIG. 6K-4 represents a side elevational view of one embodiment of a right side skirt for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6K-5 represents a top perspective view of the right side skirt for toy car model D.

FIG. 6K-6 represents a side elevational view of the right side skirt for toy car model D.

FIG. 6L-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a spoiler for toy car model D.

FIG. 6L-2 represents a front elevational view of the spoiler for toy car model D and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 6L-3 represents a rear elevational view of the spoiler for toy car model D.

FIG. 7A-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of a toy car model E.

FIG. 7A-2 represents a rear perspective view of the toy car model E of FIG. 7A-1.

FIG. 7B-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a rear bumper for toy car model E.

FIG. 7B-2 represents a top elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model E.

FIG. 7B-3 represents a bottom elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model E.

FIG. 7B-4 represents a rear elevational view of the rear bumper for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7C-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a trunk/rear windshield combination for toy car model E.

FIG. 7C-2 represents a sectional view of the trunk/rear windshield combination for toy car model E taken from FIG. 7C-1

FIG. 7C-3 represents a bottom elevational view of the trunk/rear windshield combination for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7C-4 represents a front elevational view of the trunk/rear windshield combination for toy car model E.

FIG. 7C-5 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a left rear shade for the trunk/rear windshield combination.

FIG. 7C-6 represents a side perspective view of the left rear shade.

FIG. 7C-7 represents a bottom elevational view of the left rear shade.

FIG. 7C-8 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a right rear shade for the trunk/rear windshield combination.

FIG. 7C-9 represents a side perspective view of the right rear shade.

FIG. 7C-10 represents a bottom elevational view of the right rear shade.

FIG. 7D-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a roof and front windshield for toy car model E.

FIG. 7D-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7D-3 represents a side elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model E.

FIG. 7D-4 represents a rear elevational view of the roof and front windshield for toy car model E.

FIG. 7D-5 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a left front shade for the trunk/rear windshield combination.

FIG. 7D-6 represents a side perspective view of the left front shade.

FIG. 7D-7 represents a bottom elevational view of the left front shade.

FIG. 7D-8 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a right front shade for the trunk/front windshield combination.

FIG. 7D-9 represents a side perspective view of the right front shade.

FIG. 7D-10 represents a bottom elevational view of the right front shade.

FIG. 7E-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a hood for toy car model E.

FIG. 7E-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the hood for toy car model E.

FIG. 7E-3 represents a sectional view of the hood for toy car model E taken from FIG. 7E-2.

FIG. 7F-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of headlights for toy car model E.

FIG. 7F-2 represents a top elevational view of the headlights for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7F-3 represents a rear elevational view of the headlights for toy car model E.

FIG. 7G-1 represents a front view of one embodiment of a front bumper for toy car model E.

FIG. 7G-2 represents a top elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model E.

FIG. 7G-3 represents a rear elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7G-4 represents a bottom elevational view of the front bumper for toy car model E.

FIG. 7H-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a left front panel for toy car model E.

FIG. 7H-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the left front panel for toy car model E.

FIG. 7H-3 represents a rear elevational view of the left front panel for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7H-4 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a right front panel for toy car model E.

FIG. 7H-5 represents a bottom elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model E.

FIG. 7H-6 represents a rear elevational view of the right front panel for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7I-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a left door for toy car model E.

FIG. 7I-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the left door for toy car model E.

FIG. 7I-3 represents a rear elevational view of the left door for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7I-4 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a right door for toy car model E.

FIG. 7I-5 represents a bottom elevational view of the right door for toy car model E.

FIG. 7I-6 represents a rear elevational view of the right door for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7J-1 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a left rear panel for toy car model E.

FIG. 7J-2 represents a bottom elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model E.

FIG. 7J-3 represents a rear elevational view of the left rear panel for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7J-4 represents a front elevational view of one embodiment of a right rear panel for toy car model E.

FIG. 7J-5 represents a bottom elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model E.

FIG. 7J-6 represents a rear elevational view of the right rear panel for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7K-1 represents a side elevational view of one embodiment of a left side skirt for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7K-2 represents a top elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model E.

FIG. 7K-3 represents a side elevational view of the left side skirt for toy car model E.

FIG. 7K-4 represents a side elevational view of one embodiment of a right side skirt for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7K-5 represents a top perspective view of the right side skirt for toy car model E.

FIG. 7K-6 represents a side elevational view of the right side skirt for toy car model E.

FIG. 7L-1 represents a top elevational view of one embodiment of a spoiler for toy car model E.

FIG. 7L-2 represents a front elevational view of the spoiler for toy car model E and showing a fitting structure thereof.

FIG. 7L-3 represents a rear elevational view of the spoiler for toy car model E.

FIG. 8A-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of a toy car model F.

FIG. 8A-2 represents a rear perspective view of the toy car model F of FIG. 6A-1.

FIG. 9A represents a schematic view of one embodiment for a method of assembling a toy car model A and showing an identification system.

FIG. 9B represents a schematic view of one embodiment for a method of assembling a toy car model B and showing an identification system.

FIG. 10A-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment of a first combination toy car and showing an identification scheme.

FIG. 10A-2 represents a rear perspective view for the first combination toy car.

FIG. 10B-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment for a second combination toy car and showing an identification scheme.

FIG. 10B-2 represents a rear perspective view for the second combination toy car.

FIG. 10C-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment for a third combination toy car and showing an identification scheme.

FIG. 10C-2 represents a rear perspective view for the third combination toy car.

FIG. 10D-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment for a fourth combination toy car and showing an identification scheme.

FIG. 10D-2 represents a rear perspective view for the fourth combination toy car.

FIG. 10E-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment for a fifth combination toy car and showing an identification scheme.

FIG. 10E-2 represents a rear perspective view for the fifth combination toy car.

FIG. 10F-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment for a sixth combination toy car and showing an identification scheme.

FIG. 10F-2 represents a rear perspective view for the sixth combination toy car.

FIG. 10G-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment for a seventh combination toy car and showing an identification scheme.

FIG. 10G-2 represents a rear perspective view for the seventh combination toy car.

FIG. 10H-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment for an eighth combination toy car and showing an identification scheme.

FIG. 10H-2 represents a rear perspective view for the eighth combination toy car.

FIG. 10I-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment for a ninth combination toy car and showing an identification scheme.

FIG. 10I-2 represents a rear perspective view for the ninth combination toy car.

FIG. 10J-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment for a tenth combination toy car and showing an identification scheme.

FIG. 10J-2 represents a rear perspective view for the tenth combination toy car.

FIG. 10K-1 represents a front perspective view of one embodiment for an eleventh combination toy car and showing an identification scheme.

FIG. 10K-2 represents a rear perspective view for the eleventh combination toy car.

FIG. 11 represents a schematic view of one embodiment for a method of assembling a fitting structure of an interchangeable component to a connection point on the chassis.

FIG. 11-A represents a schematic view of one embodiment for a method of assembling a fitting structure of an interchangeable component to a connection point on the chassis.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

One exemplary embodiment of a toy car concept is provided in FIGS. 1A-10K.

FIG. 1A to 2B illustrate one embodiment of a main base car 20 for a toy car that includes a base automobile frame 24 and frame cover 22. The base automobile frame 24 and frame cover 22 may generally resemble a chassis and chassis cover, respectively. In one preferred embodiment, the base automobile frame 24 and frame cover 22 may be non-interchangeable components and are used for any toy car design. FIGS. 1A to 1B-3 show the frame cover 22 with multiple areas with connection fittings 1-13 and 17. The base automobile frame 24 preferably includes connection fittings 14, 15 thereon. The connection fittings are disposed about an outer surface of the frame cover 22 and in specific areas thereof. The connection fitting are provided with a structure for releasable connection with interchangeable components, preferably car exterior design components, which are described in more detail below. In one preferred embodiment, the connection fittings are configured and arranged about the outer surface of the frame cover 22 so as to only be compatible with a particular type of interchangeable component.

In the exemplary embodiment, the connection fittings illustrated each resemble a hole structure receivable for prongs (described below) of interchangeable components. It will be appreciated, however, that the hole structure for the connection fittings is exemplary as other connection configurations may be employed that are equally suitable. For example, the connection fittings may be structured as prongs connecting with holes on the interchangeable components. Furthermore, a tongue and groove connection, magnetic connection, snap-fit or interference fit connection, or any combination of fittings may be employed. That is, the term connection fitting is not to be narrowly construed, and is meant to releasably connect interchangeable components for a desired toy car design.

Preferably, the connection fittings 1-13 on the frame cover 22 may be arranged as follows. Connection fittings 1 and 2 preferably are arranged at the rear of the frame cover 22 (and rear of the toy car). As shown, the connection fittings 1, 2 each may include two holes, where one hole is disposed proximate left side and the other hole is proximate the right side. The connection fitting 1 preferably is a rear bumper connection fitting specifically connecting an interchangeable component that includes a rear bumper part. The connection fitting 2 preferably is a rear bumper connection fitting specifically connecting an interchangeable component that includes a trunk part.

Preferably, connection fittings 3 and 4 may be arranged as follows. Connection fitting 3 preferably is arranged proximate the rear of the frame cover 22 and on a top surface thereof. As shown, the connection fitting 3 includes a three hole structure. Connection fitting 4 preferably is arranged generally in a middle area of the frame cover 22 on a top surface thereof. The connection fitting 3 preferably is a rear windshield connection fitting specifically connecting an interchangeable component that includes a rear windshield. The connection fitting 4 preferably is a roof and front windshield connection fitting specifically connecting an interchangeable component that includes a roof and front windshield.

Preferably, connection fitting 5 may be arranged as follows. Connection fitting 5 preferably is arranged proximate the front of the frame cover 22 and on a top surface thereof. As shown, the connection fitting 5 includes a four hole structure. The connection fitting 5 preferably is a hood connection fitting specifically connecting an interchangeable component that includes a hood.

Preferably, connection fittings 6 and 7 may be arranged as follows. Connection fittings 6 and 7 preferably are arranged proximate the front of the frame cover 22. As shown, the connection fittings 6, 7 each may include two holes, where one hole is disposed proximate the left side and the other hole is proximate the right side of the frame cover (and toy car). The connection fitting 6 preferably is a headlights connection fitting specifically connecting an interchangeable component that includes a headlights part. The connection fitting 7 preferably is a front bumper connection fitting specifically connecting an interchangeable component that includes a front bumper.

Preferably, connection fittings 8 and 13 may be arranged as follows. Connection fittings 8, 13 preferably are generally arranged in a middle area on right and left sides of the frame cover 22, and on respective outer side surfaces thereof. As shown, the connection fittings 8 and 13 include a three hole structure. (See for example FIGS. 1A and 1B-3.) The connection fittings 8, 13 preferably are left and right front panel connection fittings, respectively. That is, the connection fittings 8 specifically connect an interchangeable component that includes a left front panel, and the connection fittings 13 specifically connect an interchangeable component that includes a right front panel.

Preferably, connection fittings 9 and 12 may be arranged as follows. Connection fittings 9, 12 preferably are generally arranged in a middle area on right and left sides of the frame cover 22, and on respective outer side surfaces thereof. As shown, the connection fittings 9 and 12 include a four hole structure. (See for example FIGS. 1A and 1B-3.) The connection fittings 9, 12 preferably are left and right door connection fittings, respectively. That is, the connection fittings 9 specifically connect an interchangeable component that includes a left door, and the connection fittings 12 specifically connect an interchangeable component that includes a right door.

Preferably, connection fittings 10 and 11 may be arranged as follows. Connection fittings 10, 11 preferably are generally arranged in a middle area on right and left sides of the frame cover 22, and on respective outer side surfaces thereof. As shown, the connection fittings 10 and 11 include a three hole structure. (See for example FIGS. 1A and 1B-3.) The connection fittings 10, 11 preferably are left and right rear panel connection fittings, respectively. That is, the connection fittings 10 specifically connect an interchangeable component that includes a left rear panel, and the connection fittings 11 specifically connect an interchangeable component that includes a right rear panel.

Preferably, connection fittings 17 may be arranged as follows. Connection fittings 17 preferably are generally arranged between the hood connection points 5. As shown, the connection fittings 17 include a two hole structure. (See for example FIG. 1A.) The connection fittings 17 preferably are for exposed engine parts, such as in a muscle car. That is, the connection fittings 17 specifically connect an interchangeable component that includes exposed engine parts.

The frame cover 22 includes underside connection points for connecting the frame cover to the base automobile frame 24. (See for example FIG. 1B-3.) The base automobile frame 24 preferably includes connection fittings 14 and 15. Connection fittings 14, 15 preferably are arranged in a middle area of the frame 24 on left and right sides, respectively. As shown, each connection fitting 14, 15 preferably includes a two hole arrangement extending through a planar surface of the frame 24. The connection fittings 14, 15 preferably are for specifically connecting interchangeable components that respectively include left and right side skirts.

The frame 24 includes areas for disposing motors and a power source. As one preferred example, the frame 24 may provide a rear area 27 for a rear motor and back gear assembly 27a. Further, the frame 24 may include a front area 23 for a front motor and front gear assembly 23a. Lastly, a power source 25a may be operatively connected with the front and back motors and disposed at a middle area 25. Multiple covers, such as battery cover 24a, may be included as necessary or desired for covering motor, gear, and other mechanical parts used. It will be appreciated that the motor and gear assemblies illustrated are for a preferred toy car that is radio controlled. However, it will be further appreciated that such mechanical features may be modified as known in the art for a radio controlled toy car. Furthermore, it may be desired that a toy car be designed without radio control or electric capability. For example, a toy car may be designed that is hand or manually powered by a user (by user pushing/pulling), or may be fuel operated, such as by a small gas engine.

Wheel assemblies 30 are provided for the toy car and may be one of multiple interchangeable components possible. As shown best in FIG. 2B, a wheel assembly 30 may include a tire 32 fitted about a rim 38. The rim 38 may include a rim cover 34 and brake disc connected therein. An end of a bushing 31 may be inserted in a hole of the rim 38 so as to connect the brake disc 36 and rim cover 34 with the rim 38. The other end of the bushing 31 may also be used to connect the wheel assembly to the frame 24 at connecting points on the frame 24.

FIGS. 3A-1 to 3L-8 illustrate one exemplary embodiment of a toy car model A with multiple interchangeable components. FIG. 3B to 3B-4 show one embodiment of a rear bumper A1 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the rear bumper A1 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 1. The rear bumper preferably includes a fitting structure 1a arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 1 in a male/female connection. As with the use of holes for the connection points illustrated above, the use of prongs for a fitting structure of the interchangeable parts described herein is exemplary only. Other mating/fitting connection structures for connecting the interchangeable parts, such as the rear bumper, may be employed that are equally suitable.

FIG. 3C to 3C-5 show one embodiment of a trunk A2 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the trunk A2 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 2. The trunk A2 preferably includes a fitting structure 2a arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 2 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 3D to 3D-5 show one embodiment of a rear windshield A3 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the rear windshield A3 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 3. The rear windshield A3 preferably includes a fitting structure 3a arranged as three prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 3 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 3E to 3E-6 show one embodiment of a roof and front windshield A4 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the roof and front windshield A4 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 4. The roof and front windshield preferably includes a fitting structure 4a arranged as four prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 4 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 3F to 3F-4 show one embodiment of a hood A5 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the hood A5 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 5. The hood A5 preferably includes a fitting structure 5a arranged as four prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 5 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 3G to 3G-4 show one embodiment of headlights A6 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the headlights A6 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 6. The headlights preferably include a fitting structure 6a arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 6 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 3H to 3H-4 show one embodiment of a front bumper A7 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the front bumper A7 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 7. The headlights preferably include a fitting structure 7a arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 7 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 3I to 3I-10 show one embodiment of left and right front panels A8, A13 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right front panels A8, A13 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 8 and 13, respectively. The left and right front panels A8, A13 respectively include a fitting structure 8a and 13a that are both arranged as three prongs. The fitting structures 8a, 13a respectively match with the holes of the connection points 8, 13 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 3J to 3J-8 show one embodiment of left and right doors A9, A12 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right doors A9, A12 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 9 and 12, respectively. The left and right doors A9, A12 respectively include a fitting structure 9a and 12a that both have a four prong arrangement. The fitting structures 9a, 12a respectively match with the holes of the connection points 9, 12 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 3K to 3K-10 show one embodiment of left and right rear panels A10, A11 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right rear panels A10, A11 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 10 and 11, respectively. The left and right rear panels A10, A11 respectively include a fitting structure 10a and 11a that are both arranged as three prongs. The fitting structures 10a, 11a respectively match with the holes of the connection points 10, 11 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 3L to 3L-8 show one embodiment of left and right side skirts A14, A15 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right side skirts A14, A15 may only be connected to the frame 24 at the connection points 14 and 15, respectively. The left and right side skirts A14, A15 respectively include a fitting structure 14a and 15a that are both arranged as two prongs. The fitting structures 14a, 15a respectively match with the holes of the connection points 14, 15 on the frame 24 and in a male/female connection.

FIGS. 4A-1 to 4M-3 illustrate one exemplary embodiment of a toy car model B with multiple interchangeable components. Interchangeable components of model B connect to the frame cover 22 and frame 24 similarly as with toy model car A. Differences including additional interchangeable components are further described. Thus, the interchangeable components of toy car model B and following interchangeable components for models C, D, E, and F are not individually illustrated as connected to the frame cover 22 or the frame 24. However, it will be appreciated that corresponding design and functional components of the following models have the same fitting structure for connecting to the connecting points on the frame cover 22 or frame 24.

FIG. 4B-1 to 4B-4 show one embodiment of a rear bumper B1 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the rear bumper B1 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 1. The rear bumper B1 preferably includes a fitting structure 1b arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 1 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 4C-1 to 4C-4 show one embodiment of a trunk B2 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the trunk B2 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 2. The trunk B2 preferably includes a fitting structure 2b arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 2 in a male/female connection. Furthermore, the trunk B2 includes connecting points Bh structured as holes Bh for connecting a spoiler B16 (discussed below).

FIG. 4D-1 to 4D-4 show one embodiment of a rear windshield B3 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the rear windshield B3 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 3. The rear windshield B3 preferably includes a fitting structure 3b arranged as three prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 3 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 4E-1 to 4E-4 show one embodiment of a roof and front windshield B4 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the roof and front windshield B4 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 4. The roof and front windshield preferably includes a fitting structure 4b arranged as four prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 4 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 4F-1 to 4F-3 show one embodiment of a hood B5 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the hood B5 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 5. The hood B5 preferably includes a fitting structure 5b arranged as four prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 5 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 4G-1 to 4G-3 show one embodiment of headlights B6 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the headlights B6 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 6. The headlights B6 preferably include a fitting structure 6b arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 6 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 4H-1 to 4H-3 show one embodiment of a front bumper B7 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the front bumper B7 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 7. The headlights preferably include a fitting structure 7b arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 7 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 4I-1 to 4I-8 show one embodiment of left and right front panels B8, B13 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right front panels B8, B13 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 8 and 13, respectively. The left and right front panels B8, B13 respectively include a fitting structure 8b and 13b that are both arranged as three prongs. The fitting structures 8b, 13b respectively match with the holes of the connection points 8, 13 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 4J-1 to 4J-8 show one embodiment of left and right doors B9, B12 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right doors B9, B12 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 9 and 12, respectively. The left and right doors B9, B12 respectively include a fitting structure 9b and 12b that both have a four prong arrangement. The fitting structures 9b, 12b respectively match with the holes of the connection points 9, 12 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 4K-1 to 4K-10 show one embodiment of left and right rear panels B10, B11 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right rear panels B10, B11 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 10 and 11, respectively. The left and right rear panels B10, B11 respectively include a fitting structure 10b and 11b that are both arranged as three prongs. The fitting structures 10b, 11b respectively match with the holes of the connection points 10, 11 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 4L-1 to 4L-8 show one embodiment of left and right side skirts B14, B15 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right side skirts B14, B15 may only be connected to the frame 24 at the connection points 14 and 15, respectively. The left and right side skirts B14, B15 respectively include a fitting structure 14b and 15b that are both arranged as two prongs. The fitting structures 14b, 15b respectively match with the holes of the connection points 14, 15 on the frame 24 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 4M-1 to 4M-3 show one embodiment of a spoiler B16 as an interchangeable component connectable to the trunk B2 interchangeable component. That is, toy car model B provides a design configuration in which an interchangeable component may have its own interchangeable parts, and thus allowing for further design possibilities. It will be appreciated that any of the interchangeable components previously described may include their own interchangeable parts. Preferably, the spoiler may be connected to the trunk B2 at the connection points Bh or any trunk having the connection point Bh for connecting a spoiler. The spoiler includes a fitting structure Bp having a two prong arrangement. The fitting structure Bp preferably matches with the holes of the connection points Bh on the trunk B2 in a male/female connection.

One embodiment of a toy car model C is illustrated in FIGS. 5A-1 to 5L-8 with multiple interchangeable components. Interchangeable components of model C connect to the frame cover 22 and frame 24 similarly as with toy model cars A and B. Differences including additional interchangeable components are further described.

FIG. 5B-1 to 5B-6 show one embodiment of a rear bumper C1 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the rear bumper C1 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 1. The rear bumper C1 preferably includes a fitting structure 1c arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 1 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 5C-1 to 5C-5 show one embodiment of a trunk C2 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the trunk C2 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 2. The trunk C2 preferably includes a fitting structure 2c arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 2 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 5D-1 to 5D-4 show one embodiment of a rear windshield C3 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the rear windshield C3 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 3. The rear windshield C3 preferably includes a fitting structure 3c arranged as three prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 3 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 5E-1 to 5E-5 show one embodiment of a roof and front windshield C4 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the roof and front windshield C4 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 4. The roof and front windshield preferably includes a fitting structure 4c arranged as four prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 4 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 5F-1 to 5F-25 show one embodiment of a hood C5 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the hood C5 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 5. The hood C5 preferably includes a fitting structure 5c arranged as six prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 5 and 17 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection. Furthermore, the hood C5 may include an opening 5(1) therein such that an exposed engine C16 may be assembled to a toy car, such as toy car model C. The exposed engine C16 includes a fitting structure 16c in a two prong arrangement such that the exposed engine only connects to the connection points 16 of the frame cover 22. The exposed engine C16 includes first through fifth engine parts. These engine parts include respective connection points and fitting structures, in which the first through fifth engine parts may be assembled to design a unique exposed engine, such as in a muscle car. (See for example reference numerals 16(1) to 16(10)). It will be appreciated that the engine parts may be interchangeable with other engine parts of similar function and/or design.

FIG. 5G-1 to 5G-3 show one embodiment of headlights C6 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the headlights C6 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 6. The headlights C6 preferably include a fitting structure 6c arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 6 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 5H-1 to 5H-5 show one embodiment of a front bumper C7 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the front bumper C7 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 7. The headlights preferably include a fitting structure 7c arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 7 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 5I-1 to 5I-8 show one embodiment of left and right front panels C8, C13 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right front panels C8, C13 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 8 and 13, respectively. The left and right front panels C8, C13 respectively include a fitting structure 8c and 13c that are both arranged as three prongs. The fitting structures 8c, 13c respectively match with the holes of the connection points 8, 13 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 5J-1 to 5J-14 show one embodiment of left and right doors C9, C12 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right doors C9, C12 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 9 and 12, respectively. The left and right doors C9, C12 respectively include a fitting structure 9c and 12c that both have a four prong arrangement. The fitting structures 9c, 12c respectively match with the holes of the connection points 9, 12 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection. Further, an embodiment for a left side view mirror C1 7 is shown. The side view mirror C17 includes a fitting structure 17c that may only connect with a connection point on a side portion of a door, such as connection point 18 on left door C9. It will be appreciated that a right side mirror may be constructed as a mirror version as the left side view mirror so as to be connectable to a connection point on the right side door C12.

FIG. 5K-1 to 5K-10 show one embodiment of left and right rear panels C10, C11 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right rear panels C10, C11 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 10 and 11, respectively. The left and right rear panels C10, C11 respectively include a fitting structure 10c and 11c that are both arranged as three prongs. The fitting structures 10c, 11c respectively match with the holes of the connection points 10, 11 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 5L-1 to 5L-8 show one embodiment of left and right side skirts C14, C15 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right side skirts C14, C15 may only be connected to the frame 24 at the connection points 14 and 15, respectively. The left and right side skirts C14, C15 respectively include a fitting structure 14c and 15c that are both arranged as two prongs. The fitting structures 14c, 15c respectively match with the holes of the connection points 14, 15 on the frame 24 and in a male/female connection.

One embodiment of a toy car model D is illustrated in FIGS. 6A-1 to 6M-3 with multiple interchangeable components. Interchangeable components of model D connect to the frame cover 22 and frame 24 similarly as with toy model cars A B, and C. Differences including additional interchangeable components are further described.

FIG. 6B-1 to 6B-4 show one embodiment of a rear bumper D1 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the rear bumper D1 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 1. The rear bumper D1 preferably includes a fitting structure 1d arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 1 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 6C-1 to 6C-5 show one embodiment of a trunk D2 and an embodiment of a rear windshield D3 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the trunk D2 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 2. The trunk D2 preferably includes a fitting structure 2d arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 2 in a male/female connection. The trunk D2, similarly as trunk B2, includes a connection point Bh configured as a two hole arrangement. The connection point Bh is for connecting a spoiler D16 further described below.

As the rear windshield D3 may be pre-connected with the trunk D2, no fitting structure may be employed to connect with connection points 3, such as required by toy model cars A, B, and C.

FIG. 6D-1 to 6D-4 show one embodiment of a roof and front windshield D4 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the roof and front windshield D4 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 4. The roof and front windshield preferably includes a fitting structure 4d arranged as four prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 4 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 6E-1 to 6E-3 show one embodiment of a hood D5 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the hood D5 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 5. The hood D5 preferably includes a fitting structure 5d arranged as six prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 5 and 16 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 6F-1 to 6F-3 show one embodiment of headlights D6 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the headlights D6 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 6. The headlights D6 preferably include a fitting structure 6d Sarranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 6 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 6G-1 to 6G-4 show one embodiment of a front bumper D7 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the front bumper D7 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 7. The headlights preferably include a fitting structure 7d arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 7 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 6H-1 to 6H-8 show one embodiment of right and left front panels D13, D8 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the right and left front panels D13, D8 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 13. The right and left front panels D13, D8 respectively include a fitting structure 13d, 8d that may be arranged as three prongs. The fitting structures 13d, 8d respectively match with the holes of the connection points 13 and 8 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 6I-1 to 6I-4 show one embodiment of left and right doors D9, D12 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right doors D9, D12 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 9 and 12, respectively. The left and right doors D9, D12 respectively include a fitting structure 9d and 12d that both have a four prong arrangement. The fitting structures 9d, 12d respectively match with the holes of the connection points 9, 12 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 6J-1 to 6J-6 show one embodiment of left and right rear panels D10, D11 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right rear panels D10, D11 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 10 and 11, respectively. The left and right rear panels D10, D11 respectively include a fitting structure 10d and 11d that are both arranged as three prongs. The fitting structures 10d, 11d respectively match with the holes of the connection points 10, 11 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 6K-1 to 6K-6 show one embodiment of left and right side skirts D14, D15 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right side skirts D14, D15 may only be connected to the frame 24 at the connection points 14 and 15, respectively. The left and right side skirts D14, D15 respectively include a fitting structure 14d and 15d that are both arranged as two prongs. The fitting structures 14d, 15d respectively match with the holes of the connection points 14, 15 on the frame 24 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 6L-1 to 6L-3 show one embodiment of a spoiler D16 as an interchangeable component connectable to the trunk D2 interchangeable component.

That is, toy car model D provides a design configuration in which an interchangeable component may have its own interchangeable parts, and thus allowing for further design possibilities. It will be appreciated that any of the interchangeable components previously described may include their own interchangeable parts. Preferably, the spoiler D16 may be connected to the trunk D2 at the connection points Bh. The spoiler D16 may also be connected to the trunk B2 or any trunk having the connection point Bh. The spoiler includes a fitting structure Bp having a two prong arrangement. The fitting structure Bp preferably matches with the holes of the connection points Bh on the trunk B2 in a male/female connection.

One embodiment of a toy car model E is illustrated in FIGS. 7A-1 to 7L-3 with multiple interchangeable components. Interchangeable components of model E connect to the frame cover 22 and frame 24 similarly as with toy model cars A B, C, and D. Differences including additional interchangeable components are further described.

FIG. 7B-1 to 7B-4 show one embodiment of a rear bumper E1 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the rear bumper E1 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 1. The rear bumper E1 preferably includes a fitting structure 1 e arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 1 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 7C-1 to 7C-10 show one embodiment of a trunk E2 and an embodiment of a rear windshield E3 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the trunk E2 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 2. The trunk E2 preferably includes a fitting structure 2e arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 2 in a male/female connection. The trunk E2, similarly as trunk B2, includes a connection point Bh configured as a two hole arrangement. The connection point Bh is for connecting a spoiler E16 further described below.

As the rear windshield E3 may be pre-connected with the trunk E2, no fitting structure may be employed to connect with connection points 3, such as required by toy model cars A, B, and C.

Also illustrated are exemplary embodiments for rear shades E2(1), E2(2). As shown the left side and right side rear shades include fitting structures p1 having a three-prong arrangement and that are connectable with connection points h on the trunk/rear windshield combination.

FIG. 7D-1 to 7D-10 show one embodiment of a roof and front windshield E4 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the roof and front windshield E4 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 4. The roof and front windshield E4 preferably includes a fitting structure 4e arranged as four prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 4e of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

Also illustrated are exemplary embodiments for front shades E4(1), E4(2). As shown the left side and right side front shades include fitting structures p2 having a three prong arrangement and that are connectable with connection points h2 on the roof/front windshield combination.

FIG. 7E-1 to 7E-3 show one embodiment of a hood E5 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the hood E5 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 5. The hood E5 preferably includes a fitting structure 5e arranged as six prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 5 and 16 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 7F-1 to 7F-3 show one embodiment of headlights E6 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the headlights E6 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 6. The headlights E6 preferably include a fitting structure 6e arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 6 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 7G-1 to 7G-4 show one embodiment of a front bumper E7 as an interchangeable component. Preferably, the front bumper E7 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 7. The front bumper preferably includes a fitting structure 7e arranged as two prongs that match with the holes of the connection points 7 of the frame cover 22 in a male/female connection.

FIG. 7H-1 to 7H-6 show one embodiment of left and right front panels E8, E13 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right front panels E8, E13 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at connection points 8 and 13, respectively. The left and right front panels E8, E13 respectively include a fitting structure 8e, 13e that are both arranged as three prongs. The fitting structures 8e, 13e respectively match with the holes of the connection points 8 and 13 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 7I-1 to 7I-4 show one embodiment of left and right doors E9, E12 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right doors E9, E12 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 9 and 12, respectively. The left and right doors D9, D12 respectively include a fitting structure 9e and 12e that both have a four prong arrangement. The fitting structures 9e, 12e respectively match with the holes of the connection points 9, 12 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 7J-1 to 7J-6 show one embodiment of left and right rear panels E10, E11 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right rear panels E10, E11 may only be connected to the frame cover 22 at the connection points 10 and 11, respectively. The left and right rear panels E10, E11 respectively include a fitting structure 10e and 11e that are both arranged as three prongs. The fitting structures 10e, 11e respectively match with the holes of the connection points 10, 11 on the frame cover 22 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 7K-1 to 7K-6 show one embodiment of left and right side skirts E14, E15 as interchangeable components. Preferably, the left and right side skirts E14, E15 may only be connected to the frame 24 at the connection points 14 and 15, respectively. The left and right side skirts E14, E15 respectively include a fitting structure 14e and 15e that are both arranged as two prongs. The fitting structures 14e, 15e respectively match with the holes of the connection points 14, 15 on the frame 24 and in a male/female connection.

FIG. 7L-1 to 7L-3 show one embodiment of a spoiler E16 as an interchangeable component connectable to the trunk E2 interchangeable component. That is, toy car model E provides a design configuration in which an interchangeable component may have its own interchangeable parts, and thus allowing for further design possibilities. It will be appreciated that any of the interchangeable components previously described may include their own interchangeable parts. Preferably, the spoiler E16 may be connected to the trunk E2 at the connection points Bh. The spoiler E16 may also be connected to the trunks D2 or B2 or any trunk having the connection point Bh. The spoiler E16 includes a fitting structure Bp having a two prong arrangement. The fitting structure Bp preferably matches with the holes of the connection points Bh on the trunk E2 in a male/female connection.

One embodiment of a toy car model F is illustrated in FIGS. 8A-1 to 8A-2 and showing multiple interchangeable components. Interchangeable components of model F may connect to the frame cover 22 and frame 24 similarly as with toy model cars A B, C, D, E. Differences including additional interchangeable components are further shown in the combination toy model car illustrations.

Turning the FIGS. 9A to 9B, one embodiment of a method of assembling a toy car model A and an embodiment of an identification system are shown. The identification labeling scheme, such as shown in 11 and 12, may include a model type letter and part number provide a method for assembling a model toy car. As shown, toy car models A and B are illustrated with the interchangeable components in exploded view. The identification labeling scheme can provide instruction for assembling the model A and B type toy cars. It will be appreciated that the alpha-numeric identification scheme is exemplary only as other identification schemes may be employed, such as but not limited to color coding. Additionally, the fitting structure of the interchangeable parts have unique connection to the connection points on the frame cover 22 and frame 24, thus aiding in the assembling process.

FIGS. 10A-1 to 10K-2 show exemplary embodiments of a method assembling a toy model car with the identification scheme as discussed with toy model cars A and B. As examples only, eleven combinations M1-M11 are shown incorporating different interchangeable components from the described toy car models A, B, C, D, E, and F and making a complete toy car with a unique design. As shown in FIGS. 9A, 9B, and 10A-1 to 10K-2, an assembly sequence for assembling a toy model car may be illustrated. It will be appreciated that a toy model car may be assembled using any one of the original models such as A, B, C, D, E, and F, or may combine interchangeable components from the any of the different models. It will be further appreciated that the toy car concept is not limited to only models A-F, as additional future models may be created such as a model G, H, and etc. The toy car concept may only limited to the extent that current and future models are provided with interchangeable components having the correct fitting structure to fit in the connection points of the base car (frame 24 and frame cover 22).

FIG. 11 illustrates an exemplary embodiment for a method of assembling a fitting structure of an interchangeable component to a connection point A302 on the chassis A301. As shown, an interchangeable component may have a plastic tube A101 to which a plastic rubber A201 may be glued to at one end. For each interchangeable component, each plastic tube A101 having a glued plastic rubber A201 may be fit into the frame cover and frame at a respective connection point A302, such as the set hold shown in FIG. 11-A.

The toy car concept, as described, may be provided in multiple kit forms. That is, a toy car may be provided as a kit including the base car and one model type, such as model type A or B as shown in FIG. 9. Kits may be provided that include at least one set of interchangeable components for any given model type, such as model types A, B, C, D, E, and/or F. A kit may include the base car 20 and a plurality of interchangeable component sets, such as model types A, B, C, D, E, and/or F. It will be appreciated that any kit may include assembly instructions such as shown in FIGS. 9.

It will be appreciated that a kit, particularly a kit for a radio-controlled toy car, would have a transmitter included in the frame and hand radio controller operable by a user for controlling the toy car. Such transmitters are well known in the art and not further described.

A benefit of the toy car as described is that a user can design and produce his/her own style car. As shown in the model combination figures, the interchangeable components can be interchanged and assembled so as to change the toy car design and look. Each toy car may have its own individual characteristics, reflecting a user's preferences and creativity. The toy car disclosed thus provides a personalized toy car, such as a radio control car. A user can be involved with all stages of play including designing the toy car (picking out the interchangeable components), manufacturing the toy car (assembling the interchangeable components), and mobilizing the toy car (for example by radio-control).

The toy car described is a complete do it yourself process, where design decisions may be made by the user. For example, a toy car user who prefers a sports car features, may also choose some features of a luxury sedan or economy sized car. Another user may prefer the steadiness of sedan, but he/she can also choose functional features of a wagon. That is, a toy car user may choose advantages/disadvantages of a particular type of car or car model to satisfy his/her likings and/or dislikings.

With one base automobile frame and frame cover, a user can redesign and reassemble a toy car from multiple designs. For example, a user may create a car with the hood of sedan and trunk of wagon. As another example, a toy car combination may be made of two or more different styles, and may be designed from two or more different time periods, such as current models and classic models. The toy car as described can fulfill every user's multiple wishes in producing an ideal toy car design without the limitations of single model or single design toy cars.

The interchangeability of the components can inspire a user's creativity, providing a new playing method for the player. The playing method for the toy car described may be compared to changing clothes. As one can choose to mix and match with dresses or trousers, a toy car user can alter the outer design of the toy car by changing the interchangeable components. Even for one choosing a dress to wear, there are many kinds of dresses for one to choose, such as a-line, accordion pleats, longnette and miniskirts, etc. Similarly for a toy car user, one may choose and modify a design for a particular type of car, such as a sportscar, rather than being limited to a single sportscar design. Just like dressing, one can match with different car model styles. Such a playing method allows a user to “change the clothes” (the interchangeable components) of the toy car. Player can get involved from the beginning of the process in designing the car, which increases player's involvement and facilitating creativity. Moreover, the twenty-three or so separate and removable components may be unique themselves. This kind of division is unique and new to the current toy car's market.

As one preferred example, a toy car may include at least twenty-three individual interchangeable components, including a hood, head lights, a front bumper, a right front panel, left a front panel, a right door, a left door, a roof and front windshield, a trunk, a rear windshield, a right rear panel, a left rear panel, a rear bumper, a right side skirt, a left side skirt, right and left front/rear wheels and rims. These twenty-three parts are separate components from the frame cover, which can be removed and assembled. It will also be appreciated that some of the interchangeable components, such as a hood, rear window and trunk may include their own interchangeable components. Such additional interchangeable components include, but are not limited to, exposed engine parts, a spoiler, or window shades. By removing and reassembling these individual components, a user can design and create his/her own unique toy car by him/herself.

The interchangeability of the components provides a host of possibilities and almost unlimited combinations and variability. For example, the twenty-three interchangeable components can be removed and reassembled individually, which means they are all individual parts. Using mathematical calculation, it can be shown that the possibility of different design changes of a toy car design is enormous. The mathematical formula is based on the quantity of toy car as the root and the quantity of the accessories as the power. As one example, if a user takes a kit or package having two original model cars (i.e. model A and model B) having the twenty-three parts of accessories, a toy car may be assembled into more than 8 million new design combinations (223=8,388,608). The possibilities are even higher where a user starts with three original model cars, where there may be over 94 billion combinations (323=94,143,178,827). If there are four original model cars to start with, there may be more than 70 trillion of combinations (423=70,368,744,177,644).

From the above data, this shows that as additional designs for original model cars are added, the number of design combinations drastically increases. Further, as one preferred example only, twenty-three parts may be the smallest quantity of interchangeable parts. The quantity of interchangeable parts can be increased, even providing additional interchangeable components for the interchangeable components themselves. Thus, the design combinations that a toy car as disclosed can have may be even higher. For instance, if the quantity of the interchangeable components increases to 24 parts, a toy car having 2 original model car designs can have more than 16 million possibilities (224=16,777,216). Three original model car designs may have more than 200 billion combinations (324=282,429,536,481). Four original model car designs may have more than 200 trillions of different outlooks (424=281,474,976,710,656). That is, the possible number of combinations can increase by more than double when another interchangeable component is added.

The toy automobile as described may be a toy radio control car which one can design and produce to his/her own style car. Every exterior component of the car, like the body or the hood, can be removed and/or exchanged for another part and reassembled. Hence the user can design the style of his/her car according to his/her favorite or unique style. For instance, if one likes a trendy style, he/she can design and produce his/her own car as sports car. If one likes some special and peculiar style, one can design and produce his/her own car such as a muscle car. The toy automobile as described provides a user to make his/her dream car, in which a toy car can be designed and assembled according to one's own dream and creativity.

The above specification provides a complete description of the composition, manufacture and use of an improved toy car with interchangeable parts in accordance with the principles of the present invention. Since many embodiments of the toy car can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, the invention resides in the claims hereinafter appended.