Title:
Handle leveraged billiard ball rack
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A billiards ball rack design providing improved ease, accuracy, and aesthetics for setting and removing billiards balls in a triangular fifteen ball setting. The present invention creates a handle on the back of the rack upon which downward force results in a clean release from set balls. The rack contacts the balls above their midpoint and pivots off of the balls when one presses down on the handle. The creation of a handle allows for a fingertip motion to remove the rack without disturbing the balls. In addition to enhanced aesthetics, the rack offers the user an easier and more accurate way to handle and remove the rack from billiards balls without disturbing the tight racked balls.



Inventors:
Thorpe, Don W. (Costa Mesa, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/649139
Publication Date:
08/16/2007
Filing Date:
01/03/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63D15/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
ARYANPOUR, MITRA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ROY A. EKSTRAND (ANAHEIM, CA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A triangle for racking billiard balls comprising: a first leading edge; a second leading edge connect to the first leading; and a handle that connects the first leading edge and second leading edge the handle is angled upward.

2. The device of claim 1, wherein the second leading edge is connect to the first leading edge at an apex of the triangle.

3. The device of claim 1, wherein the handle that connects the first leading edge and second leading edge the handle is angled upward from a first back edge and a second back edge to allow the rack to pivot at a rack pivot point.

4. The device of claim 1, wherein a rod is formed into the shape of a contiguous triangle in a predetermined size to form an upper contact portion of the rack, billiards balls come into contact with the leading two edges of the triangularly shaped rack, the point of contact of the rod with the balls is above the midpoint of the balls.

5. The device of claim 1 wherein a contact area is formed into the shape of an inside surface of the triangle in a predetermined size to form an upper contact portion of the rack, billiards balls come into contact with the leading two edges of the triangularly shaped rack at a ball point of contact in the contact area that is above the midpoint of the balls.

6. The device of claim 1 wherein the handle is low enough to a table to keep the balls within the rack when the rack is moved forward and backward.

7. The device of claim 1 wherein a rack contact point on an inside surface of the rack touches a ball contact point above the midpoint of the ball that clears a ball set when a rotation of the rack at a pivot point occurs when a force is applied to the handle the handle is elevated above a billiard table.

8. A triangle for racking billiard balls comprising: a first leading edge; a second leading edge connected to the first leading edge at an apex of the triangle; and a handle that connects the first leading edge and second leading edge the handle is angled upward from a first back edge and a second back edge to allow the rack to pivot at a rack pivot point.

9. The device of claim 8, wherein a rod is formed into the shape of a contiguous triangle to form an upper contact portion of the rack, billiards balls come into contact with the leading two edges of the triangularly shaped rack at the upper contact point, the point of contact of the rod is above a midpoint of the balls.

10. The device of claim 8 wherein a contact area is formed into an inside surface of the triangle to form an upper contact portion of the rack, billiards balls come into contact with the leading two edges of the triangularly shaped rack at the upper contact point of the rack, the upper contact point of the rack touches each ball above a midpoint of each ball.

11. The device of claim 8 wherein the handle is low enough to a table to keep the balls within the rack when the rack is moved forward and backward.

12. The device of claim 8 wherein a rack contact point of an inside surface of the rack touches a ball contact point above a midpoint of each ball to allow rotation while minimizing movement to a racked set of balls when a force is applied to the elevated handle.

13. A method of racking billiard balls comprising: placing a rack on a billiard table; adding billiard balls to the rack; holding the balls in place by a contact area on the rack above a midpoint of each ball; applying a force to a handle on the rack; and pivoting the rack off the balls.

14. The method of claim 13 wherein the rack is triangular in shape and 15 billiard balls are used.

15. The method of claim 13 wherein the contact area above the midpoint of the balls allows the balls to remain undisturbed when the rack is pivoted.

16. The method of claim 13 wherein the force is applied downward on the handle and the pivot is in a clockwise direction.

17. The method of claim 13 wherein the contact area is on an inside surface of the rack.

18. The method of claim 13 wherein the contact area is on an inside surface of the rack and is made up of a contact rod and a foundation rod.

19. The method of claim 13 wherein setting the balls into a tight rack by moving the rack forward and backward.

20. The method of claim 13 wherein the force is applied to the handle until the handle touches a billiard table.

Description:

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/756,159, filed Jan. 4, 2006.

TECHNICAL FIELD & BACKGROUND

The present invention generally relates to the field billiards ball racks. More specifically, the present invention relates to an improved billiards rack with enhanced vertical maneuverability that results in greater accuracy in “racking or setting” of the balls for a fifteen ball setup.

The present invention is an improved billiards ball rack intended for use in the activity of billiards. The purpose of a ball rack in the present invention is to create an exact and tight triangular configuration of pool balls enabling the initial “break” to result in the maximum scattering of the balls. The problem inherent in the design of current other non-mechanized ball racks is that it is difficult to remove the rack from set balls without disturbing the tight ball formation, as well as a lack of aesthetic design alternatives to the “classic triangular” billiards racks.

Typical billiards racks require the user to make a 90 degree vertical lift when removing the rack from the balls. One must bend directly over the racked balls in order to lift the rack without disturbing the formation. This is difficult and often results in an unstable setting of the balls.

The present invention is an improved billiards rack with enhanced vertical maneuverability that results in greater accuracy in “racking or setting” of the balls for a fifteen ball setup. Vertical maneuverability is achieved via the inclusion of a raised handle on the rear of the present invention. The handle provides the ability to pivot the rack up and off the balls without bending over. This flipping motion thereby allows for a smoother, easier and more accurate removal of the rack from the balls. As well as the enhanced functionality, the present invention has distinct aesthetic differences from common non-mechanized ball racks. The rounded design of the present invention provides a seamless formation with smooth corners and a durable product in contrast to the lightweight plastic or wood racks on the market today.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention will be described by way of exemplary embodiments, but not limitations, illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which like references denote similar elements, and in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates a drawing of a perspective view of a rack with fifteen billiard balls inside, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates a drawing a drawing of a perspective view of a rack, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 3 illustrates a drawing of a side view of a rack with a racked position and a cleared position, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 4 illustrates a drawing of a perspective view of a rack with fifteen billiard balls inside, in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATIVE EMBODIMENTS

Various aspects of the illustrative embodiments will be described using terms commonly employed by those skilled in the art to convey the substance of their work to others skilled in the art. However, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the present invention may be practiced with only some of the described aspects. For purposes of explanation, specific numbers, materials and configurations are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of the illustrative embodiments. However, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that the present invention may be practiced without the specific details. In other instances, well-known features are omitted or simplified in order not to obscure the illustrative embodiments.

Various operations will be described as multiple discrete operations, in turn, in a manner that is most helpful in understanding the present invention, however, the order of description should not be construed as to imply that these operations are necessarily order dependent. In particular, these operations need not be performed in the order of presentation.

The phrase “in one embodiment” is used repeatedly. The phrase generally does not refer to the same embodiment, however, it may. The terms “comprising”, “having” and “including” are synonymous, unless the context dictates otherwise.

Referring now to FIG. 1 as in one embodiment shown is a rack 10. The rack 10 is positioned on the table 12 and fifteen billiards balls 14 are placed within the inner area of the rack 10 to form a triangle. The rounded corners 16 provide a tight fit for the ball that is placed in the front position 18 at the peak or apex of the triangle 20. The rack 10 can then be moved backward and forward in such a manner that the balls 14 within the confines of the rack form a tight triangle upon a final forward thrust. After this final forward thrust the balls 14 will be in contact with a first leading edge 22 and second leading edge 24 of the rack 10 and there will be a space between the rear or base of the rack 26.

Referring now to FIG. 2 as in one embodiment shown is the rack 10 with a handle 28. Rack 10 has a first back edge 30 and a second back edge 32 connected by the handle 28. Handle 28 is angled upward from first back edge 30 and second back edge 32 to allow the rack to pivot at a rack pivot point 34.

Referring to FIG. 3 as in one embodiment shown is a user applied downward force 36 on the handle or rear lever of the rack in the racked position 38. The rack 10 will cleanly pivot or flip off of the balls and end in a clear position 40 without disturbing the tight rack of the balls or substantially reducing any disturbance of the racked balls. Depending on whether the user utilized one or two hands to flip the rack 10 backwards the rack 10 can either simply be removed or grasped by the non-used hand to remove from the table.

Referring to FIG. 4 as in one embodiment shown is a portion 42 of the rack 10 that contacts the balls is slightly higher than the midpoint of the balls 44, the front of the rack pivots up and back when force is applied downward to the raised rear handle 28 the of the rack 10, the pivot point 34 of the rack 10 is located sufficiently to the rear of the last ball 44 coming in contact with the rack allowing for a smooth release. With hand or finger control the present invention simply navigates and the handle 28 provides a one-flip motion to remove the rack from around the balls without disturbing the set formation.

While the present invention has been related in terms of the foregoing embodiments, those skilled in the art will recognize that the invention is not limited to the embodiments described. The present invention can be practiced with modification and alteration within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. Thus, the description is to be regarded as illustrative instead of restrictive on the present invention.