Title:
Scissors lift utility tray assembly
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An anti-sway stabilizer accessory support means and a utility tray assembly are disclosed. The utility tray assembly may be readily attached to any standard scissors lift and provide convenient storage of frequently used items by a worker.



Inventors:
Nasuti, Michelle L. (Stony Point, NY, US)
Nasuti, Eugene (Stony Point, NY, US)
Application Number:
11/703886
Publication Date:
08/16/2007
Filing Date:
02/08/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
182/141, 182/69.5
International Classes:
E04G3/26; E04G1/22
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
WALTERS, JOHN DANIEL
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Tracy Jong Law Firm (Churchville, NY, US)
Claims:
1. A utility tray assembly for holding one or more tools on a scissors lift, said utility tray assembly comprising: a tray mount, wherein said tray mount is configured to mount onto a scissors lift; and a utility tray, wherein said utility tray is engaged to said tray mount, wherein said utility tray comprises a support tray base, wherein said support tray base is configured to support at least one of the one or more tools; and one or more holder structures, wherein said one or more holder structures is configured to attach with said support tray base, wherein said one or more holder structures is configured to hold the at least one of the one or more tools.

2. The utility tray assembly as claimed in claim 1, wherein said utility tray is integrally formed as a unitary structure via a single molding process.

3. The utility tray assembly as claimed in claim 1, wherein said support tray base is perpendicular to said tray mount.

4. The utility tray assembly as claimed in claim 1, wherein said support tray base is parallel to said tray mount.

5. The utility tray assembly as claimed in claim 1, wherein said support tray base is inclined at an angle to said tray mount.

6. The utility tray assembly as claimed in claim 1, wherein said tray mount comprises at least one anti-sway stabilizer, and wherein said anti-sway stabilizer is configured to restrict the rotational motion of said utility tray assembly.

7. A utility tray assembly for holding one or more tools on a scissors lift, said utility tray assembly comprising a tray mount, wherein said tray mount is configured to mount onto a scissors lift; and a utility tray, wherein said utility tray is engaged to said tray mount, wherein said utility tray comprises a support tray base, wherein said support tray base is configured to support at least one tool, a plurality of upwardly-depending side members, wherein said plurality of upwardly-depending side members is configured to form an open-topped rectangular container structure in said utility tray, and one or more partition walls, wherein said partition walls form an array of recessed compartments, wherein at least one of said array of recessed compartments is formed with said plurality of upwardly-depending side members.

8. The utility tray assembly as claimed in claim 7, wherein said utility tray assembly further comprises a mount receiver, and wherein said mount receiver is engaged with a receptacle portion of the tray mount.

9. The utility tray assembly as claimed in claim 7, wherein said utility tray assembly further comprises one or more apertures formed in said support tray base, and wherein said apertures are configured to hold at least one of said tools.

10. The utility tray assembly as claimed in claim 7, wherein said utility tray assembly further comprises a mount receiver, and wherein said mount receiver is engaged with a receptacle portion of the tray mount, wherein said tray mount comprises at least one anti-sway stabilizer, and wherein said anti-sway stabilizer is configured to restrict the rotational motion of said utility tray assembly, wherein said utility tray assembly further comprises one or more apertures formed in said support tray base, and wherein said apertures are configured to hold at least one of said tools, and wherein the material of construction of said utility tray is selected from a group comprising metal, metal alloy, a plastic, rubber, synthetic rubber, rubber-like material, a polymer, and a composite material.

11. An apparatus comprising: a scissors lift, wherein said scissors lift comprises a horizontal deck, wherein said horizontal deck comprises a periphery, a safety support frame surrounding said horizontal deck at said periphery, wherein said safety support frame comprises a plurality of vertical members, wherein said plurality of vertical members is mounted on said horizontal deck, and one or more horizontal members, wherein said horizontal member is connected between at least two of said vertical members, a tray mount, wherein said tray mount is mounted to at least one of said horizontal members of said safety support frame, a utility tray, wherein said utility tray is engaged to said tray mount, wherein said utility tray comprises a support tray base, wherein said support tray base is configured to support one or more contents of said utility tray, and one or more holder structures, wherein said holder structure is configured to hold said contents of said utility tray in a segregated manner.

12. The apparatus as claimed in claim 11, wherein said holder structure forms one or more open-topped containers, and wherein said open-topped container is configured to hold said contents of said utility tray.

13. The apparatus as claimed in claim 12, wherein said open-topped container is affixed to said support tray base.

14. The apparatus as claimed in claim 12, wherein said one or more open-topped containers are removably attached to said support tray base to allow reconfiguration of the arrangement of said one or more open-topped containers.

15. The apparatus as claimed in claim 11, wherein said apparatus further comprises one or more support loops, wherein said support loop is attached to said support tray base, and wherein said support loop is configured to hold said contents of said utility tray.

16. The apparatus as claimed in claim 11, wherein said one or more holder structures form an array of recessed compartments.

17. The apparatus as claimed in claim 11, wherein said scissors lift further comprises a collapsible stand, and wherein said collapsible stand is configured to manage said utility tray between an upright position and a collapsible position, wherein the upright position is position of said utility tray perpendicular to said tray mount, wherein the collapsible position is position of said utility tray parallel to said tray mount.

18. The apparatus as claimed in claim 11, wherein said scissors lift further comprises a stand lock, and wherein said stand lock is configured to lock said utility tray in an upright position, wherein the upright position is position of said utility tray perpendicular to said tray mount.

19. The apparatus as claimed in claim 11, wherein said tray mount further comprises a first stabilizer member, wherein said first stabilizer member is configured to restrict the rotational motion of said utility tray; a second stabilizer member, wherein said second stabilizer member is configured to restrict the rotational motion of said utility tray; and a suspending member, wherein said suspending member joins said first stabilizer member and said second stabilizer member.

20. The apparatus as claimed in claim 19, wherein said first stabilizer member, said second stabilizer member and said suspending member are affixed together.

21. The apparatus as claimed in claim 19, wherein said apparatus further comprises one or more receptacle apertures disposed along said first stabilizer member and said second stabilizer member, and wherein said receptacle apertures are configured to attach said utility tray to said tray mount.

22. The apparatus as claimed in claim 11, wherein said apparatus further comprises one or more support arms, and wherein said support arm is configured to hold said contents of said utility tray.

23. The apparatus as claimed in claim 22, wherein said support arm is removably affixed to said support tray base.

Description:

PRIORITY

This application claims the benefit of a provisional application U.S. Ser. No. 60/772,288 filed in then names of Eugene and Michelle Nasuti on Feb. 10, 2006.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention generally relates to utility trays for lifts and more particularly, to scissors lifts.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Scissors lifts are generally known in the art and used in a variety of construction related trades. Reference is made, e.g., to U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,983,960 (Scissors Lift), 6,257,372 (Scissor Lift and Method for Using the Same), 5,722,513 (Scissor Lift), 4,113,065 (Scissors Lift), 4,175,644 (Scissors Lift), 5,490,754 (Hydraulic Upper Deck for a Trailer), 6,651,775 (Low Level Scaffold with Ballscrew Drive), 4,930,598 (Scissors Lift Apparatus), 6,761,248 (Adjustable height platform suitable for installation on a vehicle), 4,558,648 (Energy recycling scissors lift), 4,899,987 (Vehicle scissors lift), 5,394,959 (Scissor lift apparatus for work platforms and the like), 4,491,449 (Load raising vehicle and method), 3,785,462 (Scissor Lift and Drive Mechanism therefore), 6,425,459 (Aerial work platform apparatus with anti-tipping supplement), 6,050,365 (Scissors-type work platform lift machine with electromechanical based lift actuation arrangement), 5,695,173 (Scissors lift platform with electronic control), 5,145,029 (Self-storing maintenance stand for a scissors lift aerial work platform), 6,044,927 (Work platform lift machine with scissor lift mechanism employing telescopable electro-mechanical based lift actuation arrangement), 4,867,277 (Portable lifting device and cart), 4,114,854 (Scissors lift work platform) and 3,831,713 (Platforms System for Servicing Aircraft Landing Gear). The disclosure of each of these patents is incorporated by reference into this specification.

These and similar apparatus are also commonly known as snorkel lifts, knuckle lifts, man lifts, scaffolds, aerial work platforms, low-level scaffolds, platform lift machines, hydraulic decks, mobile work platforms, adjustable height work platforms and other names and nicknames known to those of ordinary skill in the art. These devices are commonly used by tradesman such as masons, carpenters, painters, carpet layers, roofers, electricians, plumbers, HVAC technicians, utility workers, and the like. These devices are also commonly used in the storage and transport of materials in commercial and industrial settings.

Generally, scissors lifts comprise a working platform, e.g. a deck, surrounded at its periphery by vertical and horizontal members, e.g. guard rails or safety railings that operate as a safety feature to enclose workers and protect against falls from the elevated surface of the deck. While presumably adequate for their intended purpose, they have drawbacks in their limited functionality. It is frequently necessary for workers in the scissors lifts to access tools and small parts to complete their work, e.g., wire cutters, hammers, pipe wrenches, screwdrivers, screws, bolts, tape, clamps, nails, drills and the like. In some applications, workers also require access to materials such as wire, pipe, lumber, roofing tiles, conduit and the like.

The work platform, or deck, has limited storage space due to its compact size. As a result, workers often repeatedly enter and exit (dismount and re-mount) the deck to access these small tools and other items, creating additional safety concerns with unnecessary movement about the elevated work surface. This frequent activity also creates wear and tear upon the scissors lift as well as inefficient and costly labor delays in completing assigned work tasks. Additionally, using the deck for transport and storage of tools and materials can create a safety hazard and an obstruction to the worker.

While the practical utility of utility trays is generally known, none of the existing devices may be suitably adapted to the unique configuration of the scissors lift. Reference is made to U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,489,837 (Mechanic's creeper support and utility tray), 4,515,242 (moveable hand railing and tray for ladders), 4,874,147 (tray and tool holder adaptable to stepladders), 5,312,002 (utility tray), 6,237,799 (utility tray), 5,836,557 (detachable utility tray for step ladder), 6,098,748 (adjustable height tool bin system), 5,915,646 (cart for carrying spools of wire and utility trays), 5,967,259 (utility tray for stepladders), and 6,902,034 (apparatus with utility tray mounted to scaffold). The disclosure of each of these patents is incorporated by reference into this specification.

Rigidly attached utility trays would not take into account various angles of position of scissors lift members or would not always be in the optimum orientation for maintaining tools and supplies for ease of use.

Existing moveable mounts for utility trays do not adequately protect against rotational movement, e.g. swaying, during the taxiing of the scissors lift, and the emptying of the contents of the utility tray.

There is needed a device or system that can obviate or mitigate the aforementioned safety concerns while simultaneously enhancing the convenience and efficiency of the deck workspace for the tradesman working in a scissors lift.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with this invention, and in one embodiment thereof, there is provided a utility tray assembly for a scissors lift that can be easily and quickly attached or detached from the horizontal deck members of almost any conventional prefabricated or constructed scissors lift.

It is therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a utility tray assembly for a scissors lift that is sufficiently light and portable to be easily transported to the job and mounted in operative position by a single workman.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a user a more convenient means of storing and accessing tools, parts, material and supplies while working in the scissors lift in the way of a utility tray assembly.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a utility tray assembly for a scissors lift that may be mounted to scissors lift members of varying thicknesses and configurations.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a user a utility tray assembly for a scissors lift for storing and accessing tools, parts, materials and supplies while working in the scissors lift that eliminates or reduces the necessity of dismounting and re-mounting the deck while completing the assigned work tasks.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a user a utility tray assembly for a scissors lift that saves the user time and energy in completing his work tasks.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a utility tray assembly for a scissors lift that is durable and reliable.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a utility tray assembly for a scissors lift that is portable and may be moved from one job site to another.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide a utility tray assembly for a scissors lift that comprises a tray mount that comprises an anti-swaying stabilizer to protect against rotation movement and emptying of the contents of the utility tray.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide a utility tray assembly for a scissors lift that is economical from the viewpoint of the manufacturer and consumer, is susceptible of low manufacturing costs with regard to labor and materials, and which accordingly is then susceptible of low prices for the consuming public, thereby making it economically available to the buying public.

Whereas there may be many embodiments of the present invention, each embodiment may meet one or more of the foregoing recited objects in any combination. It is not intended that each embodiment will necessarily meet each objective.

Thus, having broadly outlined the more important features of the present invention in order that the detailed description thereof may be better understood, and that the present contribution to the art may be better appreciated, there are, of course, additional features of the present invention that will be described herein and will form a part of the subject matter of the claims appended to this specification.

In this respect, before explaining at least one embodiment of the invention in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and the arrangements of the components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the drawings. The present invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced and carried out in various ways. Also it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology employed herein are for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting.

As such, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception, upon which this disclosure is based, may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures, methods and systems for carrying out the several purposes of the present invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including such equivalent construction insofar as they do not depart from the spirit and scope of the conception regarded as the present invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention will be described by reference to the specification and the drawings, in which like numerals refer to like elements, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a utility tray assembly mounted for use upon a scissors lift;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of another embodiment of a utility tray assembly mounted for use upon a scissors lift;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a utility tray assembly depicted in FIG. 2;

FIG. 3A is a top view of one embodiment of a utility tray assembly depicted in FIG. 3;

FIG. 4 is a front view of a preferred embodiment of a utility tray assembly depicted in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an embodiment of a utility tray depicted in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the embodiment of a utility tray depicted in FIG. 5 showing how the parts are assembled;

FIG. 7 is a side view of the embodiment of a utility tray depicted in FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is a top view of a utility tray depicted in FIG. 4 in accordance with the preferred embodiment;

FIG. 9A depicts a side view of a tray mount along 1-1 of FIG. 8 in accordance with the preferred embodiment;

FIG. 9B depicts a side view of an alternate embodiment of a tray mount along 1-1 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 9C depicts one embodiment and way to attach tray mount to a utility tray as a magnified view of BB of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9D depicts an alternative embodiment and way to attach tray mount to a utility tray as a magnified view of BB of FIG. 7; and

FIGS. 9E, 9F, 9G and 9H depict a magnified view of portion AA from FIG. 3 with alternate configurations of receptacle apertures.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

In accordance with this invention, there is provided an anti-sway stabilizer accessory support means and a utility tray assembly 100 which may be readily attached to a scissors lift 150 to provide convenient storage of frequently used items by a worker. FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the utility tray assembly 100 comprising a tray mount 102 and a utility tray 104 as it is mounted for use upon the scissors lift 150. The utility tray 104 is adjustably mounted to the tray mount 102. The tray mount 102 in turn is adjustably mounted to the scissors lift 150.

Referring to FIG. 1, the scissors lift 150 includes a horizontal deck 106 (working platform) partially enclosed by an upwardly depending safety support frame 108. Said safety support frame 108 includes a plurality of vertical members 110 and one or more horizontal members 112. The horizontal members 112 are connected between at least two of the vertical members 110. Said safety support frame 108 further includes a means of ingress and egress 114 to the horizontal deck 106.

As used in this specification, vertical members 110 shall mean a structural or supporting member that vertically extends from horizontal deck 106 or platform of scissors lift 150 or comparable apparatus, and shall include posts, rods, guardrails, safety railings, stanchions, beams and the like.

As used in this specification, one or more horizontal members, such as horizontal member 112, 112A, shall mean a structural or supporting member that extends between any two vertical members of horizontal deck 106 or platform of scissors lift 150 or comparable apparatus, and shall include posts, rods, guardrails, stanchions, safety railings, beams and the like.

Oftentimes, workers utilize a portion of the horizontal deck 106 as an impromptu staging area. As used in this specification, staging area shall mean any portion of a deck or platform, or attachment thereto, that is used to temporarily collect and organize, marshal or stage construction-related tools and materials. As will be apparent, the use of any portion of the deck for storage creates an obstruction and safety hazard for employees while working at fairly substantial heights.

Referring again to FIG. 1, the tray mount 102 is adjustably mounted to the horizontal member 112 of the scissors lift 150 and engages the utility tray 104. In one embodiment, utility tray 104 may be outwardly depending and the support tray base is positioned perpendicular to the tray mount 102 as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3.

In an alternate embodiment, utility tray 104 may be downwardly depending and the support tray base is positioned parallel to the tray mount as shown in FIGS. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8.

In accordance with another embodiment of the invention, the utility tray 104, 104A may be positioned on the interior or exterior (protruding inwardly toward the horizontal deck 106 or protruding outwardly therefrom) from the safety support frame 108.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of another embodiment of a utility tray assembly 200 mounted for use upon the scissors lift 150. The tray mount 102 is identical to that depicted in FIG. 1 but the utility tray 104A differs in its shape. In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 2, the utility tray 104A is outwardly protruding and mounted such that the plane of support tray base 202 is perpendicular to the tray mount 102. In an embodiment of the present invention, the plane of support tray base 202 is inclined at an angle to the tray mount 102.

Tray Mount 102

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the utility tray assembly 200 depicted in FIG. 2. In an embodiment as depicted in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, the tray mount 102 includes two anti-sway stabilizers (904 of FIG. 9A), however, it is to be understood that some embodiments of the present invention include only one anti-sway stabilizer (not shown) and yet other embodiments (not shown) include 3 or more anti-sway stabilizers. For simplicity in discussion, the features of one anti-sway stabilizer 904 will be described in detail, but it is to be understood that such description applies to a plurality of anti-sway stabilizers comprising the tray mount 102.

As depicted in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, while in use, the tray mount 102 is moveably mounted over (e.g. straddling) at least one horizontal member 112 of safety support frame 108. In some preferred embodiments (e.g. depicted in FIGS. 3 and 9A), the tray mount 102 is disposed over at least one horizontal member 112, 112A of the safety support frame 108.

FIG. 9A depicts a side view of a tray mount along 1-1 of FIG. 8. FIG. 9B depicts a side view of an alternative embodiment of a tray mount along 1-1 of FIG. 8. FIG. 9C depicts one embodiment and way to attach tray mount to a utility tray as a magnified view of BB of FIG. 7. FIG. 9D depicts an alternative embodiment and way to attach a tray mount to a utility tray as a magnified view of BB of FIG. 7. FIGS. 9E, 9F, 9G and 9H depict a magnified view of portion AA from FIG. 3 with alternate configurations of receptacle apertures.

Referring to FIG. 9A, the tray mount 102 essentially comprises an anti-sway stabilizer 904 and accessory support (not visible from this view but see 902 in FIG. 9E) for a utility tray 104, 104A integrally formed together. The anti-sway stabilizer 904 functions as a guiding means to restrict the rotational motion of the utility tray assembly 100, that is, to restrict a circular path about the horizontal member 112. In one embodiment, the range of rotation is limited to from about 1 to about 30 degrees about the horizontal member 112.

The accessory support comprises a plurality of receptacle apertures 902 integrally formed into the structure of anti-sway stabilizer 904 (reference is made to AA of FIG. 3) functioning to receive a fastener 603 from mount receiver 916. (Reference is made to FIGS. 9E-9H and the accompanying disclosure.)

Referring again to FIG. 9A, utility mount 102 includes a suspending member 504, a first stabilizer member 506, a second stabilizer member 508, an inverted U-shaped cavity 908, a plurality of receptacle apertures (not visible from this view but see FIGS. 9E-9H), an engagement surface 910, a first contact surface 912, and a second contact surface 914.

Referring again to FIG. 9A, first stabilizer member 506 and second stabilizer member 508 function to manage deflection and hold the utility tray assembly 100 in a substantially fixed position about horizontal members 112, 112A. First stabilizer member 506 and second stabilizer member 508 function to inhibit or arrest rotational movement and prevent the scissors lift utility tray assembly 100 from swinging and releasing the contents of the utility tray 104A. The contents of the utility tray 104A may include one or more tools such as wire cutters, hammers, pipe wrenches, screwdrivers, screws, bolts, tape, clamps, nails, drills, aerosol cans, and the like.

Referring again to FIG. 9A and the embodiment depicted, in straddling the horizontal member 112, first stabilizer member 506 communicates with said horizontal member 112 at first contact point 914 and engagement surface 910. Referring again to FIG. 9A and the embodiment depicted, in straddling the horizontal member 112A, second stabilizer member 508 communicates with said horizontal member 112A at second contact point 912. Inverted U-shaped cavity 908 surrounds the horizontal members 112, 112A.

In other embodiments with a more precise fit, additional surfaces may contact horizontal members 112, 112A.

Referring again to FIG. 9A, when in use, the weight of utility tray 104A acts to cause first contact point at 914, engagement surface 910 and second contact point at 912, thereby preventing rotational motion about horizontal member 112.

In another embodiment depicted in FIG. 9B, inverted U-shaped cavity 908 surrounds horizontal member 112 but not horizontal member 112A. In such embodiment, first stabilizer member 506 has a length 928 less than the length (see 926 of FIG. 9A) of second stabilizer member 508. In such embodiment, first stabilizer member 506 of length 928 is sufficient to provide second contact point at 914 and adequately prevent the disengagement of engagement surface 910 from horizontal member 112. By way of example, but not limitation, length of the first stabilizer member 506 ranges from about 3 to about 8 inches.

The embodiment as depicted in FIG. 9B is most suitable for applications where the scissors lift is relatively stationary or there is nominal taxiing along flat surfaces. Since the embodiment in FIG. 9A incorporates first stabilizer member 506 surrounding horizontal member 112A, it would be more advantageous in applications where there is frequent taxiing or movement across uneven (bumpy) surfaces.

FIG. 9C depicts tray mount 102 and how it is fastened to utility tray base 502. In one embodiment, receptacle aperture 902 comprises a cylindrical channel having internal threads mating with the threads of a screw 603. The cylindrical channel creates a frictional engagement for the screw 603. In such embodiment, counterpart mount receiver 916 similarly comprises a cylindrical channel, however, optionally and preferably without threads. To mount the utility tray 104 to the tray mount 102, the mount receiver 916 of utility tray base 502 is aligned with aperture 902 such that screw 603 may be axially inserted through the mount receiver 916 and then threaded through receptacle aperture 902 to create a frictional engagement of the screw 603, thus adjustably securing the utility tray base 502 to the utility mount 102.

FIG. 9D depicts an alternate embodiment of aperture 902 of tray mount 102 and how it is fastened to utility tray base 502. In this embodiment, receptacle aperture 902 includes a first segment 920 and a second segment 954. First segment 920 includes a cylindrical channel that engages the screw 603. Second segment 954 includes a recess of sufficient volume to permit a bolt 956 to be countersunk below the surface as it frictionally engages the screw 603 and secures it about the receptacle aperture 902. In such embodiment, counterpart mount receiver 916 similarly includes a cylindrical channel that engages the screw 603. To mount the utility tray 104 to the tray mount 102, a mount receiver 916 of utility tray base 502 is aligned with receptacle aperture 902 such that the screw 603 may be axially inserted through mount receiver 916. The screw 603 is then inserted through receptacle aperture 902, and a bolt 956 is screwed on its end. The bolt 956 creates a frictional engagement of the screw 603, thus adjustably securing the utility tray base 502 to the tray mount 102. In another embodiment (not depicted), the mount receiver 916 and receptacle aperture 902 channels may contain internally threads mating with the threading of the screw 603.

The tray mount 102 is desirably formed of a metal, metal alloy, a plastic, rubber, synthetic rubber, rubber-like material, a polymer, or a composite material. It is preferred, but not required, that the material comprise any combination of wear-resistant, weather-resistant, anti-corrosive and water-repellant properties. By way of example, but not limitation, said tray mount 102 may be formed of a moldable high strength, impact resistant plastic material such as glass filled nylon or synthetic rubber. By way of another example, but not limitation, said tray mount 102 may be formed of aluminum or treated aluminum.

In one embodiment, the tray mount 102 is integrally formed as a unitary structure via a single molding process. In another embodiment, the utility tray mount 102 comprises two or more sections cooperatively assembled to the desired configuration. These sections may be, but it is not required that they be, permanently adhered to one another by means known to one skilled in the art.

In one embodiment, utility tray mount 102 comprises three sections, suspending member 504, a first stabilizer member 506, a second stabilizer member 508, each section 504, 506, 508 comprising squared light gauge steel of from about 1/16 to one inch, preferably about ½ inch squared light gauge steel, welded at the joints. First stabilizer member 506 joins suspending member 504. Suspending member 504 joins first stabilizer member 506 and second stabilizer member 508 and is disposed therebetween.

Referring again to FIG. 9A, it is preferred that the width of the opening 922 of inverted U-shaped cavity 908 be a distance sufficient to permit the utility mount 102 to straddle a horizontal member 112, preferably of from about 1 to about 3 inches.

Referring again to FIG. 9A, in yet another embodiment, these 3 sections 504, 506, 508 may be removably and adjustably joined together by means known to one skilled in the art. For example, a screw mechanism may be used to adjustably move first stabilizer member 506 and second stabilizer member 508 with respect to suspending member 504 to obtain the tray mount 102 with an opening of the desired width 922 to securely fasten the utility tray assembly 100, 200 to scissors lift 150. In embodiments where the first stabilizer member 506 is adjustable, the width of the opening 922 will correspond to the adjustable width of the tray mount 102. Other adjustable mechanisms known in the art may be suitably adapted to this application.

Referring again to FIG. 9A, in one embodiment, suspending member 504 comprises a length 924 of from about one to about 10 inches, preferably three inches, and thus, first stabilizer member 506 and second stabilizer member 508 are disposed a distance 922 of from about one to about 10 inches, preferably about 2.5 inches, apart (thus width 922 would be about 2.5 inches).

Referring again to FIG. 9A first stabilizer member 506 and second stabilizer member 508 have a length 926 of from about 12 to about 48 inches, preferably 24 inches, and are disposed substantially parallel to one another.

In one embodiment (not depicted), a non-skid surface is integrated into or affixed to the area about engagement surface 910, first contact surface 912, and/or second contact surface 914. Said non-skid surface may comprise rubber material, groves, serrations, ridges, spikes, bumps, depressions, fabric or the like. One may use any suitable surface or material that creates friction and assists in preventing the utility mount 102 from moving while in use.

Referring again to FIG. 9A and the embodiment depicted, the junctions of suspending member 504 with first stabilizer member 506 and second stabilizer member 508 are angular with substantially a perpendicular angle being formed. In another embodiment (not shown), the junctions of suspending member 504 with first stabilizer member 506 and second stabilizer member 508 are curved, forming a radius of from about one inch to about five inches, preferably a radius of from about one inch to about two inches.

In a preferred embodiment, a plurality of receptacle apertures 902 are disposed along first stabilizer member 506 and second stabilizer member 508 to facilitate the securing of the utility tray 104/104A to the tray mount 102. As will be apparent, the plurality of receptacle apertures 902 may be disposed about the stabilizer members 506, 508 in a variety of ways to accomplish their intended function. In some embodiments, a plurality of receptacle apertures 902 are only disposed along first stabilizer member 506 or a portion thereof. In yet another embodiment, a plurality of receptacle apertures 902 are only disposed along second stabilizer member 508 or a portion thereof.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 9E, a section AA of FIG. 3 is depicted in magnified view in FIG. 9E. As depicted in FIG. 9E, a plurality of receptacle apertures 902 are longitudinally aligned, axially spaced along the stabilizer members 506, 508 such that the centerpoint 930 of each said receptacle aperture 902 is vertically aligned with the centerpoint 930 of the adjacent aperture and equidistantly spaced from first side 992 and second side 994. In one embodiment, the centerpoint 930 of one receptacle aperture 902 is spaced at a distance of from about one-half inch to about 6 inches from the adjacent receptacle aperture 902.

In one embodiment, at least one receptacle aperture 902 is located such that the centerpoint 930 thereof is disposed such that it facilitates a flush alignment of the top of the utility tray 104A and the top of suspending member 504 as depicted in FIGS. 3 and 9A. By way of example, in an embodiment with a utility tray 104A with a depth of 1.5 inches, at least one receptacle aperture 902 should be disposed at a point of no more than one and one-quarter inches from the first end 931 of second stabilizer member 508.

Other arrangements of receptacle apertures 902 are depicted in FIGS. 9F, 9G and 9H. As depicted in FIG. 9F, the centerpoint of aperture 960 and the centerpoint of aperture 962 are horizontally aligned with one another and equidistantly spaced from first side 992, second side 994 and one another 960, 962. Similarly, the centerpoint of aperture 964 and the centerpoint of aperture 966 are horizontally aligned with one another and equidistantly spaced from first side 992, second side 994 and one another 964, 966. The distance 996 between sides 992 and 994 is from about one inch to about twelve inches, preferably from about 1.5 inches to about 4 inches. These pairs (960 and 962 being a first pair and 964 and 966 being a second pair) are longitudinally aligned, axially spaced along the stabilizer members 506, 508. In one embodiment, these pairs (960 and 962 being a first pair and 964 and 966 being a second pair) are disposed at a distance of from about two to about twelve inches.

As depicted in FIG. 9G, the centerpoint of aperture 968 and the centerpoint of aperture 970 are vertically aligned with one another and equidistantly spaced from first side 992, second side 994. The centerpoint of aperture 968 and the centerpoint of aperture 970 are disposed at a distance of from about one-half to about two inches. Similarly, the centerpoint of aperture 972 and the centerpoint of aperture 974 are disposed at a distance of from about one-half to about two inches. These pairs (the centerpoints of apertures 968 and 970 being a first pair and the centerpoints of apertures 972 and 974 being a second pair) are longitudinally aligned, axially spaced along the stabilizer members 506, 508. In one embodiment, these pairs (the centerpoints of apertures 968 and 970 being a first pair and the centerpoints of apertures 972 and 974 being a second pair) are disposed at a distance of from about two to about twelve inches.

As depicted in FIG. 9H, the centerpoints of apertures 976, 980, 984 and 988 are vertically aligned. Similarly, the centerpoints of apertures 978, 982, 986 and 990 are vertically aligned. The centerpoint of aperture 976 and the centerpoint of aperture 980 are disposed at a distance of from about one-half to about two inches. Similarly, the centerpoint of aperture 978 and the centerpoint of aperture 982 are disposed at a distance of from about one-half to about two inches. Similarly, the centerpoint of aperture 984 and the centerpoint of aperture 988 are disposed at a distance of from about one-half to about two inches. Similarly, the centerpoint of aperture 986 and the centerpoint of aperture 990 are disposed at a distance of from about one-half to about two inches.

Referring again to FIG. 9H, the centerpoint of aperture 976 and the centerpoint of aperture 978 are horizontally aligned with one another and equidistantly spaced from first side 992, second side 994 and one another 976, 978. Similarly, the centerpoint of aperture 980 and the centerpoint of aperture 982 are horizontally aligned with one another and equidistantly spaced from first side 992, second side 994 and one another 980, 982. Similarly, the centerpoint of aperture 984 and the centerpoint of aperture 986 are horizontally aligned with one another and equidistantly spaced from first side 992, second side 994 and one another 984, 986. Similarly, the centerpoint of aperture 988 and the centerpoint of aperture 990 are horizontally aligned with one another and equidistantly spaced from first side 992, second side 994 and one another 988, 990.

The centerpoints of apertures 976, 978, 980 and 982 form a quadruplet of apertures. Similarly, the centerpoints of apertures 984, 986, 988 and 990 form a quadruplet of apertures. These quadruplets are longitudinally aligned, axially spaced along the stabilizer members 506, 508. In one embodiment, these quadruplets are disposed at a distance of from about two to about twelve inches.

These various configurations facilitate the customizable adjustable location of a utility tray 104, 104A to a desired position for the user, as well as the interchangeability of a variety of utility tray configurations on the same tray mount 102.

It is not required, but preferred, that said receptacle apertures 902 are configured such that tray mount 102 is flush and in intimate contact with horizontal members 112, 112A. Similarly, said receptacle apertures 902 are preferably configured such that the utility tray 104/104A is mounted to the tray mount 102 in a manner that the surfaces will be flush and communicating with one another for a secure fastening. As will be well known to those killed in the art, and among other ways that are known in the art, this may be accomplished by countersinking screws, bolts or other fasteners and precise location of the apertures about the respective parts.

Utility Tray 104/104A

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a utility tray assembly 200 depicted in FIG. 2. Referring to FIG. 3 and the embodiment depicted, a utility tray 104A includes a support tray base 202. Said support tray base 202 generally includes an elongated flat rectangular surface for supporting the contents of the utility tray 104A. One or more holder structures provided on the support tray base hold the one or more contents of the utility tray 104A in a segregated manner. The one or more contents may include, but are not limited to, one or more tools such as wire cutters, hammers, pipe wrenches, screwdrivers, screws, bolts, tape, clamps, nails, drills, aerosol cans, and the like. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 3, the holder structures are in the form of array of recessed compartments. Extending vertically upward from the periphery of said support tray base 202 surface are four upwardly-depending side members 304, 306, 308, 310 (referred to herein as “side walls”, “longitudinal end walls”, “proximal wall” and “distal wall”) forming an open-topped rectangular container structure. The utility tray 104A also may include a plurality of partition walls 312, 314, 316, 318, 320, 322 attached between the side walls 304, 306, 308, 310 to form an array of recessed smaller compartments 324, 326, 328, 330, 332, 334 to accommodate and maintain, in a segregated manner, small tools, parts and supplies. In another embodiment, partitions may be created with dividers 312, 314, 316, 318, 320, 322, adjustable dividers or the like. In this aspect of the invention, dividers 312, 314, 316, 318, 320, 322 may be adjusted so that different arrangements of compartments 324, 326, 328, 330, 332, 334 would be possible. Adjustable dividers may be provided such that the user may customize his utility tray to meet the needs of the specific work or task being performed.

In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 3, proximal wall 304 and distal wall 308 comprise members having a length 360 of from about 6 inches to about 120 inches, preferably from about 12 to about 36 inches. In one preferred embodiment, proximal wall 304 and distal wall 308 comprise members having a length 360 of about 24 inches.

Referring again to FIG. 3, first longitudinal end wall 306 and second longitudinal end wall 310 comprise members having a length 360 of from about 4 inches to about 36 inches, preferably from about 5 to about 24 inches, and more preferably from about 5 to about 12 inches.

Referring again to FIG. 3, compartments 324, 326, 328, 330, 332, 334 have a depth 362 of from about 1 to about 12 inches, preferably from about 1.5 to about 4 inches.

As shown in FIG. 3, the utility tray 104A is preferably partitioned into smaller compartments 324, 326, 328, 330, 332, 334 that are sized to conveniently and efficiently store frequently used items such as tools and small parts to complete their work, e.g., wire cutters, hammers, pipe wrenches, screwdrivers, screws, bolts, tape, clamps, nails, drills, aerosol cans, and the like. Since these items are usually stored on the ground or in a staging area, they may be some distance from the worker, thus complicating the worker's work procedures and consuming valuable time when such items are needed. Said utility tray assembly 200 provides a convenient and efficient way to accomplish tasks in a scissor lift 150.

FIG. 3A is a top view of one embodiment of a utility tray assembly depicted in FIG. 3. Referring to FIGS. 3 and 3A, in one embodiment, compartment 324 includes a length 378 of about 4 inches and a width 380 of about five inches; compartment 326 includes a length 376 of about 6 inches and a width of 380 about five inches; compartment 328 includes a length 374 of about 6 inches and a width 388 of about 3 inches; compartment 334 includes a length 374 of about 6 inches and a width 386 of about 2 inches; compartment 330 includes a length 372 of about 8 inches and a width 384 of about 2 inches; and compartment 332 comprises a length 372 of about 8 inches and a width 382 of about 2 inches. It is to be understood that any arrangement and size of compartments is possible as desired by the user.

In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 3, distal wall 308 is mounted to tray mount 102 such that utility tray 104A is outwardly extending from the horizontal members 112, 112A.

Said utility tray 104A further comprises a mount receiver 916 for engaging with a receptacle portion 902 of said tray mount 102. Reference is made to FIGS. 9A and 9B and the accompanying detailed description. While in use, tray mount 102 is disposed over (e.g. straddling) at least one horizontal member 112 of safety support frame 108. In some embodiments (e.g. depicted in FIG. 3), tray mount 102 is disposed over two or more horizontal members 112, 112A of safety support frame 108.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 9A, utility tray 104A may be positioned on the interior or exterior of the safety support frame 108. In straddling the horizontal members 112, 112A, engagement surface 510 of suspending member 504 of utility mount 102 will communicate with said horizontal member 112. In some embodiments, second contact surface 914 of first stabilizer member 506 also communicates with horizontal member 112.

The utility tray 104, 104A can be made in any desired size and shape. Generally, a square or rectangular base member 202 is preferred, however, other geometric shaped may be suitably used in this aspect of the invention.

The utility tray 104, 104A is desirably formed of a metal, metal alloy, a plastic, rubber, synthetic rubber, rubber-like material, a polymer, or a composite material. It is preferred, but not required, that the material comprise any combination of wear-resistant, weather-resistant, anti-corrosive and water-repellant properties.

In one embodiment, the utility tray 104A is integrally formed as a unitary structure via a single molding process. In another embodiment, the utility tray 104A comprises two or more sections cooperatively assembled to the desired configuration. These sections may be, but it is not required that they be, permanently adhered to one another by means known to one skilled in the art. In yet another embodiment, these sections may be removably and adjustably joined together by means known to one skilled in the art.

By way of example, but not limitation, the utility tray 104A may be formed of a moldable high strength, impact resistant plastic material such as glass filled nylon or synthetic rubber. By way of another example, but not limitation, said utility tray 104A may be formed of aluminum or treated aluminum.

FIG. 4 is a front view of an alternate embodiment of a utility tray assembly 100 depicted in FIG. 1. FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the embodiment of the utility tray depicted in FIG. 4. FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the embodiment of a utility tray depicted in FIG. 5 showing how the parts are assembled. FIG. 7 is a side view of the embodiment of a utility tray depicted in FIG. 4. FIG. 8 is a top view of the embodiment of a utility tray depicted in FIG. 4.

Referring to FIGS. 1, 4 and 5, utility tray 104 is outwardly and downwardly depending from the tray mount 102. Support tray base 502 generally comprises an elongated flat rectangular surface. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the holder structures are in the form of a plurality of open-topped container structures 402, 404, 406, 408 in the utility tray 104. While in use, said support tray base 502 generally hangs in a substantially vertical position along the side of the safety support frame 108 and is mounted to tray mount 102.

As depicted in FIG. 5, the inverted U-shaped tray mount 102 straddles a horizontal member 112 of the safety support frame 108. In some embodiments (e.g. depicted in FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 5), the tray mount 102 is disposed over two or more horizontal members 112, 112A of safety support frame 108. The support tray base 502 may be positioned on the interior or exterior of the safety support frame 108.

Referring again to FIGS. 4 and 5, extending outwardly from the support tray base 502 surface, are one or more open-topped container structures 402, 404, 406, 408. In one embodiment, said container structures 402, 404, 406, 408 are substantially rounded, producing a curvilinear profile (reference is made to containers 406 and 408 of FIG. 5). In yet other embodiments, said container structures 402, 404, 406, 408 are substantially square or rectangular shaped (reference is made to containers 402 and 404 of FIG. 5). The one or more container structures 402, 404, 406, 408 may comprise any combination of shapes and sizes that are desired to accommodate and maintain, in a segregated manner, small tools, parts and supplies.

Referring to FIG. 4 and the embodiment depicted, containers 402 and 404 have a length 450, 458 of about 5 inches, a width 454, 456 of about 4 inches and a depth (802 of FIG. 8) of about 1.5 inches. Container 406 has a length 446 of about 6 inches, a width 448 of about 6 inches and a depth (804 of FIG. 8) of about 4 inches. Container 408 has a length 442 of about 16 inches, a width 444 of about 6 inches and a depth (806 of FIG. 8) of about 4 inches.

Referring to FIG. 4 and the embodiment depicted, support tray base 502 has a length 430 of about 24 inches and a width 432 of about 20 inches. Containers 402 and 404 are disposed at a distance 476 of about 1 inch from the periphery of first side 434 of support tray base 502 and from about 1 to about 6 inches from one another in a vertical alignment. In other embodiments, containers 402 and 404 are disposed in an offset fashion. For example, container 404 is disposed about 5 inches from the periphery of first edge 434 and container 402 is disposed about 1 inch from the periphery of first edge 434.

Referring to FIG. 4 and the embodiment depicted, container 408 is disposed at a distance 478 of about 1 inch from the periphery of third side 438 of support tray base 502. Container 406 is disposed at a distance 464 of from about one to about 6 inches, preferably about 2 inches from container 408 and at a distance 468 of from about one to about 6 inches, preferably about 2 inches from support loop 412.

Referring to FIG. 6 and the embodiment depicted, containers 402, 404, 406, 408 are affixed to support tray base 502 with two screw bolt assemblies 612, 614, 616, 618. In one embodiment, containers 402, 404, 406, 408 are permanently affixed to support tray base 502. In another embodiment, containers 402, 404, 406, 408 are removably attached to support tray base 502 to allow a user to reconfigure the arrangement of the containers as desired. As will be apparent, other fasteners may be suitably substituted, as well as welding or other permanent adhesion, by methods and devices well known in the art.

Referring to FIG. 6 and the embodiment depicted, support tray base 502 is affixed to tray mount 102 with six screw bolt assemblies 601, 602, 603, 604. In one embodiment, support tray base 502 is permanently affixed to tray mount 102. In another embodiment, support tray base 502 is removably attached to tray mount 102 to allow a user to adjust the height of the utility tray 104 as desired. As will be apparent, other fasteners may be suitably substituted, as well as welding or other permanent adhesion, by methods and devices well known in the art.

As will also be apparent, many arrangements of the fastener assemblies are possible for securely fastening the support tray base 502 to tray mount 102. In one embodiment, it is preferred that the fastener assemblies be dispersably disposed along the length of the tray mount. Reference is made to FIGS. 9A-9H and the accompanying disclosure.

In yet another embodiment, utility tray assembly 100 (comprising support tray base 502 and utility tray 104) is integrally formed as a unitary structure via a single molding process. In another embodiment, the utility tray assembly 100 comprises two or more sections cooperatively assembled to the desired configuration. These sections may be, but it is not required that they be, permanently adhered to one another by means known to one skilled in the art. In yet another embodiment, these sections may be removably and adjustably joined together by means known to one skilled in the art.

By way of example, but not limitation, said utility tray assembly 100 may be formed of a moldable high strength, impact resistant plastic material such as glass filled nylon or synthetic rubber. By way of another example, but not limitation, said utility tray assembly 100 may be formed of aluminum or treated aluminum.

In another embodiment, support tray base 502 may also include an array of recessed smaller compartments (not depicted) to accommodate and maintain, in a segregated manner, small tools, parts and supplies.

In another embodiment, compartments or partitions may be created in the container structures 402, 404, 406, 408 with dividers, adjustable dividers or the like. In this aspect of the invention, dividers may be adjusted so that different arrangements of compartments would be possible. Adjustable dividers may be provided such that the user may customize the utility tray to meet the needs of the specific work or task being performed.

In one embodiment depicted in FIGS. 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8, one or more support arms 410 extend downwardly from the outer side 510 of the support tray base 502 in the form of a hook for storing pipes, conduit, wire, lumber, hoses, and the like. In the embodiment depicted, the centerpoint of support arms 410 are disposed at a distance 474, 472 of from about one to about twelve inches, preferably from about three to about six inches, from the periphery third side 438 and first side 434 of tray support base 502 respectively. In the embodiment depicted, the centerpoint of support arms 410 are disposed at a distance 470 of from about one to about twelve inches, preferably from about three to about six inches, from one another. In the embodiment depicted, the centerpoint of support arms 410 are disposed from about one to about twelve inches, preferably from about three to about six inches, from the periphery fourth side 440. In other embodiments, a single support arm 412 is disposed along tray support base 502. In yet other embodiments, three or more support arms 412 are disposed along tray support base 502.

In one preferred embodiment, said hook is a J-type hook. Support arm 410 may, but is not required to be, formed of the same material as support tray base 502. In one embodiment, support arm 410 is formed of a heavy gauge metal or metal alloy and is removably affixed to support tray base 502 by a screw and bolt fastener assembly (reference is made to FIG. 6). In other embodiments, support arm 410 is permanently affixed to support tray base 502 by welding or a permanent adhesive known to those skilled in the art. In yet another embodiment, support arm 410 is integrally molded into support tray base 502.

In one embodiment depicted in FIGS. 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8, one or more support loop, such as a support loop 412, extends outwardly from the outer side 510 of the support tray base 502. In an embodiment, the support loop 412 is in the form of a 3 sided loop for storing one or more tools such as hammers. In one embodiment, the diameter of support loop 412 is from about 1/16 to about ¾ inches, preferably from about ⅜ to about ⅝ inches. In one preferred embodiment, support loop 412 has a length 464 of about 2 inches and a width 808 of about 1.5 inches. Support loop 412 may, but is not required to be, formed of the same material as support tray base 502. In one embodiment, support loop 412 is formed of a heavy gauge metal or metal alloy and is removably affixed to support tray base 502 by a screw and bolt fastener assembly (reference is made to FIG. 6). In other embodiments, support loop 412 is permanently affixed to support tray base 502 by welding or a permanent adhesive known to those skilled in the art. In yet another embodiment, support loop 412 is integrally molded into support tray base 502. In one embodiment depicted, support loop 412 is disposed from about one-half to about six inches, preferably about one inch, from the periphery of second side 436 of support tray base 502 and at a distance 466, 468 of from about one to about six inches, preferably about two inches, from containers 402 and 406.

In one embodiment (not shown), there is a removable utility tray that is pivotally mounted upon the tray mount 102 to prevent emptying of any contents therein. The utility tray generally has an elongated flat rectangular bottom surface for supporting the contents of the utility tray. Extending vertically upward from the bottom surface are a pair of laterally spaced support walls and a pair of outer walls transversely disposed between said support walls to form one enclosed rectangular box-like compartment. The utility tray also may include partition walls attached between the partition and support walls to form any number of desired smaller compartments in the tray. In such embodiment, the utility tray is released from the tray mount 102 so that the utility tray may be carried to locations remote from the tray mount bracket 102. This allows for filling of the compartments without disengaging the tray mount 102, cleaning of the utility tray and convenient use by the user at various locations.

In one embodiment (not shown), a utility tray assembly 200 similar to that depicted in FIGS. 2 and 3 is collapsible for easy transport and storage while mounted on the scissors lift 150. The utility tray may be positioned in an upright position, that is, the plane of the bottom surface is parallel to the ground. In one embodiment, the utility tray may be positioned in a collapsible position, that is, the plane of the bottom surface is parallel to the tray mount 102. In this embodiment, the utility tray assembly further comprises a collapsible stand and a stand lock. Said collapsible stand manages the utility tray between the upright position and the collapsible position. In one embodiment, the collapsible stand manages the height of the scissors lift 150. Further, the stand lock is used to lock the utility tray in an upright position. Such collapsible stands and stand locks are well known in the art. By way of example, but not limitation, one may use a collapsible stand and stand lock according to the teachings of U.S. Pat. No. 6,902,034 (Apparatus with Utility Tray Mounted to Scaffold). The disclosure of said patent is hereby incorporated by reference into this specification. In this embodiment (not depicted), tray mount is mounted to a scissors lift for pivotable movement of the utility tray between the upright position and the collapsed position. The stand lock is arranged to block movement of the utility tray so as to position it in the upright position.

Pivotable assemblies are well known in the art. Reference is made to U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,250,465 (sharps container), 4,976,450 (mobile tool chest with horizontal pivotal trays), 5,279,429 (pivoting tray with pivot bearing for corner cupboards, 5,813,354 (vehicle seatback tray assembly), 6,595,609 (jewelry chest and box with slideable features), 5,299,824 (wheel chair with rotatable tray, 5,588,663 (wheelchair tray accessory), 4,239,308 (display tray assembly) 4,200,195 (stock rack with pivoted trays), 6,736,360 (rotary jointed arm for a surgical tray), 6,017,085 (folding chair tray) and 5,248,049 (nut and bolt rotating caddy). The entire disclosure of each of the patents is hereby incorporated by reference into this specification for the teachings therein.

In another embodiment (not depicted), the utility tray assembly 200 further comprises one or more depending trays. These depending trays depend from the base of the utility tray 202 and may comprise utility trays 104A of the kind previously described.

In another embodiment (not depicted), the scissor lift utility tray assembly 200 further comprises a pivotable or slideable lid for the utility tray. Hinge mechanisms are well known in the art. Reference is made to, e.g. U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,119,195 (protective case), 3,637,278 (eye makeup compact with slide trays), 4,450,976 (wheeled molded container with hinged lid), 5,762,216 (cap with a hinged top lid), 6,454,097 (prioritized first aid kit), 6,896,132 (storage media case), and 6,170,723 (double opening lid for a storage box for a pick-up truck). The entire disclosure of each of the patents is hereby incorporated by reference into this specification for the teachings therein. Slide assemblies are also well known in the art. Reference is made to, e.g. U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,707,274 (slide box), 6,499,785 (storage device), 5,782,185 (play and storage table), 4,360,148 (sliding lid for tapered tray), 6,762,361 (sliding lid with anchoring structure for electronic devices), and 4,190,191 (sliding lid for flanged tray). The entire disclosure of each of the patents is hereby incorporated by reference into this specification for the teachings therein.

In another embodiment (not depicted), the scissor lift utility tray assembly 200 further comprises pockets or brackets outwardly and downwardly depending from the side walls 304, 306, 308, 310 of FIG. 3 (referred to herein as “side walls”, “longitudinal end walls”, “proximal wall” and “distal wall”) of the utility tray 104A. These pockets provide additional storage for tools and supplies and may comprise structures similar to those described herein with respect to support loop 412, support arms 410, container structures 402, 404, 406, 408 and the like (reference is made to FIG. 4).

In another embodiment (not depicted), the utility tray assembly 200 further includes one or more apertures (holes) formed in the support tray base 202 for retaining and holding one or more contents of the utility tray. The contents may include, but are not limited to, tools such as hammers and screwdrivers capable of extending only partially through said apertures. In one embodiment, said apertures include holes with a diameter of from about one-quarter inch to about 2 inches.

In another embodiment (not depicted), utility tray assembly 200 includes a tray support base 202 shaped to optimally be disposed in a corner of a safety support frame 108. In such configuration, said tray support base 202 has a triangular configuration.