Title:
ROCK AND ROLL EXERCISE FITNESS DEVICE AND METHOD
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An exercise device providing a base, ball or support which can be rocked and rolled via the movement of an attached pole. The support may be weighted and additional movable handles and weights may be added to and guided by, along, or on the pole. The moving and or rock and rolling of the device is used for exercise of the human body.



Inventors:
Krietzman, Mark (Palos Verdes Estates, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/670950
Publication Date:
08/09/2007
Filing Date:
02/02/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/92, 482/110
International Classes:
A63B21/00; A63B21/06
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20070249472Exercise Pole for AthletesOctober, 2007Frei
20100035734Foot and Ankle Exercise DeviceFebruary, 2010Digiovanni
20060264307Ideal Static Contraction DeviceNovember, 2006Reno
20090239722Exercise Apparatus for the Upper BodySeptember, 2009Bisson
20040005960Treading exercise machine with elliptical traceJanuary, 2004Chang
20020193212Simple exerciserDecember, 2002Wu
20060089239Stretching barApril, 2006Davies III
20060009330Mold changeable elliptical exercisersJanuary, 2006Lo
20050009674Bicept isolatorJanuary, 2005Bogulski
20030181300Twisting exerciserSeptember, 2003Chin
20080051262Variable weight deviceFebruary, 2008Striar et al.



Primary Examiner:
BIDDER, ALLANA LEWIN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Mark H. Krietzman (Irvine, CA, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A method of constructing an exercise device comprising: connecting a stick guided element to a stick member, the stick member being affixed at a bottom end to a weighted support with a curved bottom; the stick guided element capable of movement which is at least one of up, down, off-center, and around the stick member; a resistance between the stick guided element and the stick member increases the force necessary to displace the stick guide element relative to the stick member; and, the curved bottom of the support being movable across a surface in response to the movement of the stick guided element on the stick member.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the stick guided element is weighted

3. The method of claim 2, the method further comprising or subtracting weight from the stick guided element.

4. The method of claim 1, the method further comprises adding or subtracting weight from the support.

5. The method of claim 1, the method further comprising altering the surface which the support rolls or rocks on by interposing a mat between the curved bottom of the support and the surface.

6. The method of claim 5 wherein the mat is a shaped ground covering.

7. An stick exercise device comprising: a movable base with at least a partially curved bottom; a stick-like member attached to the base; a hand held movable element with a stick guide movably supported on the stick-like member, wherein the stick guide is of a shape and size which is sufficient to allow some movement of the hand held movable element at least one of up, down and around the stick-like member; a resistance means between the stick-lie member and the hand held movable element to increase the resistance to movement of the hand held movable element along or about the stick-like member; and, the movable base is responsive to the movement of the hand held movable element on the stick-like member.

8. The stick exercise device of claim 7 wherein at least one of the base, stick-like member and stick guided hand held movable element is weighted.

9. The stick exercise device of claim 8 wherein the amount of weight is adjustable.

10. The stick exercise device of claim 7, further comprising a mat interposed between the curved bottom and a surface.

11. The stick exercise device of claim 10 wherein the mat is a shaped ground covering.

12. An exercise device comprising: a weighted rockable base with at least a partially curved bottom; a stick attached to the rockable base, wherein the stick is roughly upright when the device is at rest; and, a movable element with a stick guide connect to the stick via a stick guide.

13. The exercise device of claim 12 wherein the movable element is weighted.

14. The exercise device of claim 12 further comprising a texture on at least a portion of the partially curved bottom.

15. The exercise device of claim 12 wherein at least one of the rockable base, the stick and the movable element is at least partially hollow.

16. The exercise device of claim 15 wherein a non-fixed material is added to at least one of the hollow rockable base, the stick and the movable element.

17. The exercise device of claim 16 wherein the non-fixed material is selected from one or more of the group consisting of a liquid, beads, gravel, sand, pellets.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. Section 119(e) of provisional Application Ser. No. 60/777,236, entitled “Guided Weighted Stick Exercise Device And Method” filed Feb. 27, 2006 and provisional Application Ser. No. 60/765,780 entitled “Guided Moving Weight Exercise Device And Method” filed Feb. 7, 2006, both of which applications are incorporated by reference herein.

BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE

1. Field of the Disclosure

This present disclosure relates to an exercise device and method of use. More specifically, to a support with a curved bottom supporting an elongated stick-like element which rocks and rolls the support and a movable volumetric element moving on the stick member.

2. Background Art

Tai Chi is a system of controlled movements which when properly executed is believed by practitioners to develop the internal life energy or “Chi” of the practitioners. Tai Chi is suitable for all age groups, is non-jarring and can build stamina and strength. Tai Chi movements derive from a concept of “yin” and “yang” which roughly means opposing forces, smooth fluid controlled movements are a hallmark of Tai Chi. Learning the controlled Tai Chi movements is accomplished through repetitive practice.

Benefits of Tai Chi are said to include greater balance and life energy or chi. Tai Chi also provides aerobic exercise, strengthening and muscle development.

A medicine ball is an exercise tool and workout which can provide weight-resistance through a full range of motion A torso twist is often preformed while carrying the medicine ball. The risk of uncontrolled movement or injury may result from the free space medicine ball.

Sticks or poles are used in many forms of exercise often behind the shoulders or held horizontally in front of the body.

It would be a desideratum to have smooth Tai Chi like movements applied to the use of movable, rockable and/or guided weight element.

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE

In some exemplary implementations the present disclosure provides a base or support with at least a partially curved surface attached to a pole, elongated part or stick-like member, useful for moving the base along the ground surface. The base or support may be weighted. The pole member may also be weighted. The support inhibits free movement of both ends of the pole or stick-like member.

In some exemplary implementations a stick guided element is supported at least partially on a stick-like member connected to a support. The support has at least a partially curved bottom portion.

In some exemplary implementations the pole member affixed to the weighted base with at least partially curved bottom also is a guide for handles, grips, bars, or other weighted or non-weighted stick guided elements which may include, but shall not be limited to, balls, disks, cones, spheres, geometric or non-geometric or other volumetric shapes.

In some exemplary implementations a stick guided element is supported at least partially on a stick-like member connected to a support. The support has at least a partially curved bottom portion and the partially curved portion being at least partially textured to impact the frictional interface between the curved bottom and whatever surface it is moving on.

In some exemplary implementations a stick guided element movable along and about the stick-like member whereby when the stick guided element is pushed and/or pulled through a range of motion. Changes in the positions of a user (which may include, but is not limited to the arms, legs, and torso) relative to a stick member, can be used to target different muscle groups.

In some exemplary implementations a weighted stick guided element movable along ad about the stick-like member whereby when the stick guided element is pushed and/or pulled through a range of motion. Changes in the positions of a user (which may include, but is not limited to the arms, legs, and torso) relative to a stick member, can be used to target different muscle groups.

Some exemplary implementations provide a selectable stop limit on the stick-like member for movement of the stick guided element.

In some exemplary implementations the weighted support at least partially counter balances against a stick guided element.

In some exemplary implementations the support is weighted to act as a counter balance against the stick guided element and because of the weight of the support, limits sliding of the support (and affixed stick-like member) when the stick guided element is off-set more than a preselected amount of degrees from center.

In some exemplary implementations a base ball or support has a substantially hard outer shell and is at least partially hollow.

In some exemplary implementations a base ball or support has a substantially hard outer shell, is at least partially hollow and contains a weighted material that is substantially not fluid, such as sand, pellets, beads and the like.

In some exemplary implementations a base ball or support has a substantially flexible outer shell, is at least partially hollow and contains a weighted material that is substantially not fluid, such as sand, pellets, beads and the like.

In some exemplary implementations a base ball or support is at least partially hollow and filled with a weighted material that is substantially movable, such as plastic, beads, resins, fluids, cement, metal and the like.

In some exemplary implementations a base ball or support is at least partially hollow and filled with a weighted material that is substantially fixed, such as plastic, resins, cement, metal and the like.

In some exemplary implementations the weight of the support is selectable.

In some exemplary implementations the support is textured to dampen movement on a surface.

In some exemplary implementations the weight of the support provides resistance to rocking movement.

In some exemplary implementations the weight of the support drives rocking movement.

In some exemplary implementations the support has a fixed or removable extended edge portion to limit the amount of rocking movement.

In some exemplary implementations the support has a fixed or removable extension cap to alter the radius of the bottom portion of the base ball.

In some exemplary implementations changing the radius, of the curved portion of the support which can contact the ground during use, alters how the device will rock, roll or both rock and roll during use.

In some exemplary implementations the radius portion of the base ball which can contact the ground or floor surface during use is textured.

In some exemplary implementations a covering that rests on the ground surface and beneath the curved portion of the support may be selected of a material that limits the sliding movement of the support.

In some exemplary implementations a covering that rests on the ground surface and beneath the curved portion of the support may be selected of a material that dampens the movement of the support.

In some exemplary implementations resistance to the movement of the stick guided element is through frictional members which may be fixed or variable.

In some exemplary implementations resistance to the movement of the stick guided element is through magnetic resistance which may be fixed or variable.

Other features and advantages of the present disclosure will be set forth, in part, in the descriptions which follow and the accompanying drawings, wherein preferred embodiments and some exemplary implementations of the present disclosure are described and shown, and in part, will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon examination of the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings or may be learned by practice of the present disclosure. The advantages of the present disclosure may be realized and attained by means of the instrumentalities and combinations of elements and instrumentalities particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a front view of an implementation of a rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 2 is a front view of an implementation of a rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 3 is another front view showing movement of the exercise device of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a force diagram of an implementation of a rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 5 is a force diagram of another implementation of a rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 6 is a force diagram of an implementation of a rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 7 is a comparison diagram of two supports of varying circumferences.

FIG. 8 is a cut-away view of an implementation of a support with an extended ring.

FIG. 9 is a cut-away view of an implementation of a support with an end cap.

FIG. 10 is a cut-away view of an implementation of a support with baffles.

FIG. 11 is a cut-away implementation of a hollow support, offset from at rest.

FIG. 12 is an implementation of a support with a centering bottom.

FIG. 13 is an example of a weighted stick member with a small pivot.

FIGS. 14-16 shows an example of a use of a moving stick member exercise device.

FIG. 17 is a front view of another implementation of a rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 18 is a front view of another implementation of a rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 19 is a front view of another implementation of a rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 20 is a perspective view of another implementation of a rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 21 is a cut-away view of another implementation of a rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 22 is a diagram view of the rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 23 is a diagram of a cone of movement.

FIG. 24 is a diagram of a complex cone of movement.

FIG. 25 is another implementation of a rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 26 is a bottom view of an aspect of a support for a rock and roll exercise device.

FIG. 27 shows a front view of an implementation of a guided weight exercise device with magnetic resistance.

FIG. 28 shows a cut-away view of the implementation of the guided weight exercise device of FIG. 27 along line “A-A”.

FIG. 29 shows a partial blow up of the top of the ovoid shown in of FIG. 28.

FIG. 30 shows a front view of an implementation of a guided weight exercise device with frictional resistance.

FIG. 31 shows a cut-away view of the implementation of the guided weight exercise device of FIG. 30 along line “A-A”.

It should be appreciated that for simplicity and clarity of illustration, elements shown in the Figures have not necessarily been drawn to scale. For example, the dimensions of some of the elements are exaggerated relative to each other for clarity. Further, where considered appropriate, reference numerals have been repeated among the Figures to indicate corresponding elements.

DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENTS OF THE DISCLOSURE

Detailed embodiments are disclosed herein; however, it is to be understood that the disclosed embodiments are merely exemplary implementations of the disclosure, which may be embodied in various forms. Therefore, specific structural and functional details disclosed herein are not to be interpreted as limiting, but merely as a basis for claims and as a representative basis for teaching one skilled in the art to variously employ the present disclosure in virtually any appropriately detailed structure.

Shown in FIGS. 1-3 is a guided moving exercise device 100. A stick guided element, such as a sphere 110, may be slide and or rotatably attached to a stick member 120. The stick member 120 attached to a weighted support 150 in some implementations is an exercise device. The stick member can also be a type of arm. The cross section of the stick member may be round, flat, square, tapered, oval, planar, geometric. The stick member 120 may be a group of elongated members held or bound together (not shown). The stick member has a top 125 and a bottom portion 130. The bottom portion 130 of the stick 120 is connected to, and extends from, a support 150. The critical aspect of the support, whether it is spherical or bowl like or some other shape, is that the bottom portion of the support 150 which may contact the ground 500 during exercise, be at least partially curved to allow a rock and/or a roll movement. The stick member 120 affixed to the weighted support 150 may be used with or without the stick guided element 110 for exercise. The stick element 120 may be multi-part and connected in two or more stick sections 120′, 120″ and 120′″ for ease of shipment storage or to adjust stick length. A stick guided element 110 can be slid over the top 125 of the stick member 120 via a stick guide 112.

The stick guided element, in this implementation, is preferably a weighted volumetric shape such as a sphere 110, it may be hard, soft or flexible. It may also be hollow or solid. It may be weighted with viscous fluid, sand, gravel, pellets, ball bearings, bbs, metal or other material. The amount of weight may be fixed or varied. The support 150 need not be a sphere and merely requires a surface that is conducive to a rolling movement. One or more elements (such as the weighed sphere 110) may be added to a stick member 120. The stick member has a top end 125 and a bottom portion 130. The bottom portion of the stick member 130 is affixed to a support 150. The affixation of the stick member to the support 150 may be permanent or temporary. The volumetric shape or element shown as a sphere 110 may be moved by a user about the stick member and/or up and down along the line of arrow 1. The surface of the stick guided element may be textured for grip.

The curved portion 152 of the support 150 or base may be circular, oval or a non-homogeneous ellipse or series of curves. The footprint of the support need not provide for uninterrupted contact with the ground surface. The curved portion 152 of the support 150 interfacing with the ground, preferably has a diameter, at its widest point, at least about 1.5 times the diameter of the stick member 120. The curved portion 152, interfacing with the ground, of the support 150 or base, more preferably has a diameter, at its widest point, larger than about 1.5 times the diameter of the stick member 120 and less than about 4 time the diameter of the stick member. The curved portion 152, interfacing with the ground, of the support 150 or base, most preferably has a diameter, at its widest point, above 4 times the diameter of the stick member 120.

The support 150 may be weighted. The support 150 preferably has sufficient mass to resist substantial slippage across the ground 500 during use which offsets the stick member 120 up to at least 5 degrees from center. The support 150 more preferably has sufficient mass to resist substantial slippage across the ground 500 during use which offsets the stick member 120 up to at least 15 degrees from center. The support 150 most preferably has sufficient mass to resist substantial slippage across the ground 500 during use which offsets the stick member 120 up to at least 30 degrees from center.

In addition to providing a guide, via the stick member 120, for moving the stick guided element, in some implementations a sphere 110, up and down. The sphere 110 may also be moved side to side, in a circular path (see FIG. 3) or in any number of complex movements. Hand holds 200 may be added to the sphere 110.

Shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 are implementations of an exercise device whereby hand holds 200 extend from the stick guided element 110. The hand holds may be removable, hollow or weighted. Not shown, but within the scope of this disclosure, is an implementation wherein hand holds are integrated into a stick guided element at or within the perimeter or circumference of the weighted element. Movement of the hand holds both up and down relative to the ground 500 and left to right twisting relative to the stick member 120 is depicted along the line of arrow 2 and can be used to strengthen, tone and exercise different muscles in the body.

A sphere stop 300 may be placed on the stick member 120 to limit the portion of the stick member 120 the sphere 110 can travel along. The sphere stop may be movable and removable. The sphere stop may be attached via pressure around the stick, or have a latching member that mates with guide holes in the stick member 120. Such guide holes and latches are well known in the art and therefore not more fully described.

The weighted sphere 110, or other stick guided element, may also be guided on the stick member 120 in a circular path long the line of arrow 25 as well as any number of varied pathways such as a figure “8”, arc, line or other movement within the area the stick member can be moved within. The stick member 120 at its maximum can move in substantially a half dome above the ground 500.

In some implementations the support 150 may include a surface covering 160 added to the outer surface or a portion thereof. The outer surface of the support 150 may be covered in whole or part by such a surface covering 160. The surface covering 160 can have a different coefficient of friction or surface texture than the surface of the support 150. The support may also have a texture added to the support surface (not shown) and that texture may be used dampen rolling, limit slipping along the ground, or alter the velocity of rock or roll movement. The material may add textured or otherwise be dis-similar to the uncovered surface of the support 150. The surface covering 160 can be selected to impact the ease or amount of slippage across the ground 500, the device may encounter during use. The surface covering 160 may be selected of a soft or hard and in addition or in the alternative to being selected to limit slippage, may be selected to limit or add dampening to the rolling movement. The surface covering 160 on the support 150 is preferably selected to generally reduce slippage, as compared to an uncovered support, along the ground 500 during use when the stick member 120 is offset up to about 15 degrees from center. The surface covering 160 on the support 150 is more preferably selected to generally reduce slippage, as compared to an uncovered support, along the ground 500 during use when the stick member 120 is offset up to about 30 degrees from center. The surface covering 160 on the support 150 is preferably selected to generally reduce slippage, as compared to an uncovered support, along the ground 500 during use when the stick member 120 is offset up to about 45 degrees from center.

The circumference and radius of the support 150 can also be selected to effect the movement and use of the device. For example when a support 150/155 is substantially a sphere like base ball, a circumference increase provides an increase in curvature “C1/C2” and alters the surface area that will contact the ground during a given rocking or rolling movement. Similarly a circumference decrease will alter the surface area in contact with the ground 500 during the same movement. Similar adjustments of the surface area contacting the ground per movement can be selected for a non-spherical support with a generally inverted dome portion in contact with the ground.

When the support 150 is weighted in addition to acting as an anchor for the device, it also provides a counter balance to the stick member 120 and or to a weighted sphere 110, or other weighted element, thereon. A larger support 150 made of the same material as a smaller support will have a greater distance to travel due to the difference in curvature “C1/C2” when moving the stick member 120.

FIGS. 4-6 are force diagrams comparing and contrasting implementation of a device with an aspect altered. The devices are shown on a mat 550 surface as opposed to the ground. A mat 550 may be used to change the texture or friction of the surface beneath the support 150, the mat 550 is not a limitation. A device with a base ball support 150 with a mass “m” is compared with a device having a base ball 150 with a mass “m2”. Assuming acceleration and distance are constants unless m=m2, the force “F” to displace the stick member 120 (and any guided element such as the weighted sphere 110 which may optionally be added) connect the support with mass “m” a distance “d” will be different than the Force “F2” required to displace the same stick member 120 (and any guided element such as the weighted sphere 110 which may optionally be added) with a mass “m2”. In mathematical terms since F=ma, if acceleration “a” and distance “d” are constant and if m≠m2 then F≠F2. Further, the force “F3” to return the stick member 120 (and any guided element such as the weighted sphere 110 which may optionally be added) on the base ball with mass “m” to upright will also be different than the force “F4” return the stick member 120 (and any guided element such as the weighted sphere 110 which may optionally be added) on the base ball with mass “m2” to upright.

The support 155 shown in FIG. 6 has a mass “m2” which is equal to the mass “m2” of the support 150 shown in FIG. 5. However, the diameter “D2” and the circumference of the support 155 shown in FIG. 6 is greater than the diameter “D1” and the circumference of the support shown in FIG. 5. The supports 150 &155 shown in FIGS. 5 & 6 are spherical and the circumference defines a curvature for that portion of the support to be in contact with the ground. The difference in the circumferences is compared in FIG. 7. The smaller support 150 has a smaller curvature “C1” than the curvature “C2” of the larger support 155. The curvature difference affects the distance a support will roll when the top 125 of the stick member 120 is the displaced off-upright a distance. For the same displacement of the stick member, a larger curvature support will travel (roll) a greater distance along the ground then a smaller curvature support. Additionally because a smaller curvature support travels a shorter distance than the larger curvature support the stick member will travel the distance faster when connect to the smaller curvature support.

In FIG. 8 a support 150 with an extended lip 300 is shown. The lip 300 provides a stop to limit the movement of the stick member 120 relative to the ground 500. The lip 300 may be removable or height adjustable.

FIG. 9 shows a partial cut-away view of a support 150 with an extended end cap 320. That end cap 320 fits over the bottom of the support and provides different curvature.

Shown in FIG. 10 is a cut away view of a baffled weighted support 400. The support is at least partially hollow with inside space 410. Baffles 420 interfere with the free movement, around the inside space 410 of the support, of non-fixed materials such as fluids or particles that may be used as weighting material within the support 400.

FIG. 11 is a partial cut-away view of another hollow support 150 with stick member offset from upright. Affixed substantially immovably within the hollow support 150 is a weighted material 440. A first portion of the material 442 is on one side of center and above the “at rest” line. The second portion of the weighted material 444 is below the “at rest” line and to other side of center. The support 150 is shown in a not at rest state. The weighted material 440 will tend to move to “at rest” along the line of arrow 3 wherein both the first and second portions of material are at the “at rest” line.

FIG. 12 shows a partial view of an exercise device. One aspect of the support 150 is a cut-out or flat 450 area at the center of the bottom of the support 150. When the stick member 120 is upright the opening 450 provides a guide urging the support 150 to stay at rest on the ground 500 with the stick member in the upright.

FIG. 13 shows a stick “A” with a small curved bottom pivot “B” and a weight “W”. When a force “F6” is applied above the pivot “B” to move the stick “A” off center a few degrees the pivot “B” will tend to slip or slide along the line of arrow 4 or rotate along the line of arrow 5 off the ground. A stick “A” moving along the path of arrow 4 or 5 provides little functional counterbalance for exercise.

FIGS. 14-16 show an example of some movements to use the exercise device. The movements shown in FIGS. 14-16 are in no way intended to be inclusive of all possible movements and exercise methodologies. Those skilled in the art will recognizer the wide variety of exercises this device can support. A user 1000 grasps the weighted element 110 with the user's arms 1010 while standing on the user's legs 1020. The user's trunk 1030 being between the user's arms and legs. By moving the arms 1010, legs 1020 and or twisting the trunk 1030 exercise of many groups of muscles is possible. The stick guided weighted element 110 can be guided during the user's exercise via the stick guide 112 which is affixed to or formed as part of the stick guided weighted element 110. Guided movements may include up and down and rotationally around the stick member. The movements cause the support 150 to rock or roll along the ground.

FIG. 17 shows a weighted stick member 600, attached to a support 150 on the ground 500, with adjustable weight. The weighted stick member 600 is partially hollow and houses weight guides 625 running longitudinally to accept weight inserts 650 thereby adjusting the weight. Those skilled in the art will recognize that the weight inserts could also be attached to the external wall of the stick member.

Shown in FIGS. 18 and 19 are implementations of a weighted stick member 700, attached to a support 150 on the ground 500, with adjustable weight. The weighted stick member 700 is hollow with a weight guides 725 running longitudinally to accept weight inserts 750 and or spacer inserts 775 thereby adjusting the weight and the position of the weight. The center of the weight in the weighted stick member shown in FIGS. 18 and 19 is different. For a fixed distance, the position (relative to the perimeter of the support 150) of the offset center of weight “CW2” in the implementation in FIG. 18 is different the position of the offset center of weight “CW2” shown in FIG. 19. In FIG. 18 the offset center of weight “CW2” is within the perimeter “P” of the support 150. In FIG. 19 the offset center of weight “CW2” is moved outside the perimeter “P” of the support 150. Accordingly, when utilizing the exercise device to move the upright center of weight “CW” to offset “CW2” the user needs to move the center of weight different distances. The offset center of weight “CW2” of the variation in FIG. 19 must travel further to reach center than the variation shown in FIG. 18.

Shown in FIG. 20 is an implementation of a guided exercise device whereby extended hand holds 800 on a collar unit 850 are affixed to the stick member 120 and weighted support 150. Movement of the hand holds 800 both up and down relative to the ground surface 500 along the line of arrow 6 and left to right twisting relative to the stick member 100 is depicted along the line of arrow 7. The hand holds 800 may be affixed via a pivot 802 thereby allowing up or down movement of the hand holds 800, along the line of arrow 8, separate from collar unit 850 movement. The basic collar 852 portion of the collar unit 850 may be fix weight, un-weighted, or variably weighted. Weight modules 854, 856 may be selectively added or subtracted from he collar unit 850.

The movement, by a user, of the hand holds (as shown in various implementations) may alter the location of, offset, or otherwise move the stick member and support. The hand holds can direct the stick member off center and roll or rock the support. The moving support—stick combination provide a variable position anchor which can support a weight element and also be a force or weight to exercise with.

A hollow stick member and support 900 is shown in FIG. 21. The hollow stick member 910 may communicate with the support 920 base via an internal channel 925. Water, other fluid or particlulate material can be added to the support and or stick member by pouring into the internal channel. A cap 30 fits over the top 935 of the stick member to seal the hollow cavity. One benefit of constructing the support 920 and or the stick member 910 in a hollow fashion is that the device may be shipped empty thereby making it lighter.

Shown in FIG. 21 is a shaped ground cover 502. The illustration of the shaped ground cover 502 only in FIG. 21 is not a limitation. The shaped ground cover 502 may be selected to work in combination with the shape of the support (or any covering applied thereto) or to be independent of the shape of the support. One aspect shown in this implementation is a raised perimeter 504. The shaped ground cover both allows the rock and rolling movement of the support 920 and may be used to urge the device back to the center 506 of the shaped ground support 502.

Shown in FIG. 22 is an a diagram of a movement of the device other than back and forth along a plane. Because the support 150 is not pivoting it can be rolled or rocked in a variety of complex sequences, shown by the line of arrow 9, to follow the stick member 120 movements. A support “B” that is fixed in a pivot (see FIG. 23) no matter the movement of the stick “A” will remain fixed. The inverted cone of movement “ICOM” will have the same end point “EP” from which it radiates regardless of the stick movement. The end point “EP” of the “ICOM” of the rock and roll stick device (FIG. 24) is relocated to new end points “EPn” as the stick and support moves. This change in position of the end point “EP” and ICOM makes the cone of movement variable and/or complex as compared to a pivoting stick.

A generally flexible support 950 is shown in FIG. 25. The stick member 120 is shown affixed to the support 950 at bottom 952 of the support 950 and also at the top 954. The wall 956 of the support 950 is flexible and will spread along the ground during rolling. Within the support 950 is water, other fluid or particulate material such a sand, beads or gravel. The spread of the support 950 across the ground moves the center of weight and provides a mass to exercise against.

A support 150 bottom is shown in FIG. 26. Lobes 960 and cavities 970 radially placed around the stick member 120 provide a rolling support that has some wall regions in contact with the ground and other regions not in contact thereby making it lighter.

Shown in FIG. 27-29 is a guided exercise device 1000 with an ovoid 1010 guided on a moving stick member 1020 attached to a weighted support 150. The ovoid 1010 may be hard, soft or flexible and it may or may not contain additional weights. It may be hollow or solid. Inside the ovoid are magnetic elements 1030 mounted to a spindle screw 1040 which is held in a specific orientation within the ovoid via spindle guides 1050. A knob 1060 is attached to each spindle screw 1040 whereby the magnetic element or elements 1030 may be adjusted relative to the stick member 1010 to increase or decrease magnetic resistance to movement, by varying the magnetic field applied. Those of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that the knob, spindle guide arrangement is but one of many different well known method for moving an internal element within an enclosure and is not a limitation on the disclosure.

The stick member 1020 is shown as a multi-layered member. A spacer 1070 which, may be optional, can be constructed of a plastic and functions to space the magnetically attractive layer 1075 from the ovoid 1000. The region of magnetically attractive material 1075 and the optional spacer are supported on a stick member 1080. In addition to, or in lieu of, the spacer 1070, button spacers 1012 may also be formed on, or attached to, the guide channel 1014 of the ovoid 1010 through which the stick member 1020 extends. The placement of the magnet(s) relative to the magnetically attractive material 1075 will impact the magnetic field applied to the magnetically attractive material 1075 and thereby impact the resistance of the ovoid housing the magnets to movement along the stick member. Those of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that the number, shape, orientation, composition of, or size of the magnets are variable depending on the intended usage of the device and the examples shown are not a limitation.

Shown in FIGS. 30-31 is a guided exercise device 1100 with an ovoid 1110 guided on a moving stick member 1120. The stick member is affixed to a weighted support 150. The ovoid 1110 may be hard, soft or flexible and it may or may not contain additional weights. It may be hollow or solid. Inside the ovoid are pressure wheels 1130 mounted to a spindle screw 1140 which is held in a specific orientation within the ovoid via spindle guides 1150. A knob 1160 is attached to each spindle screw 1140 whereby the pressure wheel (frictional elements) 1130 may be adjusted relative to the stick member 1120 to increase or decrease resistance to movement of the ovoid along the stick member. Those of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that the knob, spindle guide arrangement is but one of many different well known method for moving an internal element within an enclosure and is not a limitation on the disclosure.

The resistance providing elements described above increase the force necessary to move or displace the stick guided element along, about or around the stick member.

Those of ordinary skill in the art will also recognize that the number, shape, orientation or size of the wheels or other friction providing members (including but not limited to springs, brakes, pressure plates, and bearing) are variable depending on the intended usage of the device and the examples shown are not a limitation.

Since certain changes may be made in the above apparatus without departing from the scope of the disclosure herein involved, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description, as shown in the accompanying drawing, shall be interpreted in an illustrative, and not a limiting sense.