Title:
Cord organizer for telescoping outriggers
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
In one embodiment, the present invention comprises a rope, line or cord-organizer for a telescoping outrigger pole used on fishing vessels. The organizer comprises two, oppositely spaced spring-clip members adapted to releasably and selectively couple to varying diameter telescoping outrigger poles. A pair of oppositely spaced hook elements adapts to receive segments of the cord. The two hook elements and two spring-clip members are disposed on a central, supporting bar-piece member. The entire assembly is coated with a moisture-resistant coating, encapsulating the components to prevent corrosion from marine environmental conditions typical to the application of the invention.



Inventors:
Mantey, Scott R. (Little Torch Key, FL, US)
Application Number:
11/347869
Publication Date:
08/09/2007
Filing Date:
02/06/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47F7/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20090301981MOBILE RACKDecember, 2009Kuang
20030178382Sporting equipment support systemSeptember, 2003Tucker
20020038788Clothes hanger organization method and systemApril, 2002Halleman et al.
20090261214Securing And Managing Electronic Cables In A Modular, Rack-Mounted Computer SystemOctober, 2009Beauchamp et al.
20090066201Apparatus for Storing and Dispensing Rolled Cleaning WipesMarch, 2009Colon et al.
20050150847Adjustable divider base for a display rackJuly, 2005Hawkinson
20090315436Movable multipurpose toilet cabinetDecember, 2009Robinson et al.
20030213763Garage door track clotheslineNovember, 2003Morin et al.
20050173362Self-contained merchandise display and service systemAugust, 2005Squitieri et al.
20060037920Holder for elongated articlesFebruary, 2006Baranya
20100089848SPICE RACK FOR MINI SPICE CONTAINERSApril, 2010Thompson



Primary Examiner:
SMITH, NKEISHA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Mohr IP Law (Portland, OR, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. An organizer comprising: a support means having at first end and an oppositely spaced second end; the first end having a first cord-suspending means and a first coupling means; and the second end having a second cord-suspending means and a second coupling means.

2. The organizer of claim 1 wherein the support means comprises an elongated bar-piece member.

3. The organizer of claim 1 wherein the first support means comprises a first hook element fixably coupled to the support member.

4. The organizer of claim 1 wherein the second support means comprises a second hook element fixably coupled to the support member.

5. The organizer of claim 1 wherein the first coupling means comprises a first spring-clip member.

6. The organizer of claim 1 wherein the second coupling means comprises a second spring-clip member.

7. The organizer of claim 1 further comprising a coating means for creating a barrier to protect the organizer from a marine environment.

8. The organizer of claim 1 wherein the first coupling means comprises a first spring-clip adapted to engage an outrigger pole and the second coupling means comprises a second spring-clip adapted to releasably and selectively engage the outrigger pole.

9. The organizer of claim 1 wherein the first support means comprises a marine-grade hook element adapted to receive a cord and wherein the second support means comprises a marine-grade hook element adapted to receive the cord.

10. An organizer for a cord for a telescoping outrigger pole, the organizer comprising: an elongated bar-piece member having a first end and an oppositely spaced second end wherein the first end further comprises a first hook element adapted to receive the cord and a first spring-clip member adapted to releasably and selectively couple to the telescoping outrigger pole; and the second end further comprises a second hook element and a second spring-clip member.

11. The organizer of claim 10 further comprising a moisture-resistant barrier coating means for encapsulating the elongated bar-piece member, the first hook element, the first spring-clip member, the second hook element, and the second spring-clip member.

12. A cord organizer for coupling to a support structure, the organizer comprising: a central bar-piece member having a first end and a second end; at least one support means for supporting a segment of cord; and a first coupling means disposed on the first end and a second coupling means disposed on the second end wherein each respective coupling means adapts to couple the organizer to the support structure.

13. The organizer of claim 12 further comprising a second support means adapted to cooperate with the first support means to retain a plurality of segments of the cord.

14. The organizer of claim 12 further comprising an external coating means for encapsulating the bar-piece member, the at least one support means, the first coupling means, and the second coupling means whereby the coating means provides corrosion resistance to the organizer due to marine environmental conditions.

15. The organizer of claim 12 wherein the at least one support means comprises a hook element and the first coupling means comprises a spring-clip member.

16. The organizer of claim 12 wherein the first and second support means comprise a first and second spring-clip member, respectively, adapted to releasably couple to the support structure.

Description:

PRIORITY CLAIM

This application claims benefit of an provisional patent application titled “Cord Organizer For Telescoping Outriggers” filed by the inventor on 08 Feb. 2005 via express mail # EV 627723627 US and having a Ser. No. ______.

This invention relates generally to marine hardware and, more specifically, to a rope (or line, or cord) organizer device adapted to engage a structure provided by a marine vessel.

BACKGROUND

A popular fishing method uses outrigger poles attached to a boat deck or other support structure to extend fishing lines, ropes or cords outward from the sidewalls of a boat. Outriggers enable placement of bait in the wake of a trolling boat. Outriggers increase the number of lines trolled, since multiple cords can be used on each outrigger.

The typical outrigger pole selectively telescopes from a first, shortened length to a second, extended length. Accordingly, multiple nesting segments are slideably coupled to fit within one another. The tubular segments extend so that the end of a first segment interlocks with a corresponding, adjacent end of a second segment. Commonly, the outer diameter of the tubular segments ranges from about one-inch to about one and three-quarters of an inch. Individual eyelets attach to the sidewall of each tubular, nesting outrigger segment and adapt to receive a rope-cord or multiple rope-cords.

Commonly, outrigger poles can extend outwards of about 12 to about 30-feet or longer and the plurality of cords or lines extend this length. A problem arises when the outrigger pole is collapsed: the approximately 30-feet length of cords, no longer supported by the outrigger, piles up on the deck of the boat in a rat's nest of disorder. This often results in tangled lines, creates a safety hazard to the fisherman, damages the cords, and otherwise creates an unsightly mess of lines.

One attempt to solve this problem, U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2004/0181992, provides a dual spring system for automatically recoiling this excess line when the outrigger pole retracts. The spring loaded line recoil device of this reference, however, has some shortcomings. First, a complicated system of dual, balanced spring assemblies that automatically recoil requires that the line be attached to the device in some manner. Second, this cumbersome mechanism requires several components to attach to the boat. This device, further, requires several components that are costly to produce.

Therefore, there remains a need for a simple, cost-effective, and elegant device that alleviates excess cord when a telescoping outrigger is retracted. Such a device should be simple to use and economical to produce.

Further such a device should readily adapt to varying diameters of telescoping outrigger poles.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention includes a marine-grade quality hardware device for organizing ropes, lines, or cords and it is adapted to couple to a structure provided by a vessel or a pier. In one embodiment, the present invention includes an organizer comprising: a support means having at first end and an oppositely spaced second end; the first end having a first cord-suspending means and a first coupling means; and the second end having a second cord-suspending means and a second coupling means.

In addition, the organizer includes support means comprising an elongated bar-piece member; and the first support means comprises a first hook element fixably coupled to the support member. Further, the organizer includes a second support means that comprises a second hook element fixably coupled to the support member.

The organizer includes a first coupling means that comprises a first spring-clip member. And, a second coupling means that comprises a second spring-clip member.

Additionally, the organizer further comprises a coating means for creating a barrier to protect the organizer from a marine environment.

The organizer includes a first coupling means that comprises a first spring-clip adapted to engage an outrigger pole and the second coupling means that comprises a second spring-clip adapted to releasably and selectively engage the outrigger pole.

The organizer includes a first support means that comprises a marine-grade hook element adapted to receive a cord and a second support means that comprises a marine-grade hook element adapted to receive the cord.

In a second embodiment, an organizer for a cord for a telescoping comprises: an elongated bar-piece member having a first end and an oppositely spaced second end. The first end further comprises a first hook element adapted to receive the cord and a first spring-clip member adapted to releasably and selectively couple to the telescoping outrigger pole; and the second end further comprises a second hook element and a second spring-clip member.

The organizer further comprises a moisture-resistant barrier coating means for encapsulating the elongated bar-piece member, the first hook element, the first spring-clip member, the second hook element, and the second spring-clip member.

A third embodiment of the present invention includes a cord organizer for coupling to a support structure, the organizer comprising a central bar-piece member having a first end and a second end; at least one support means for supporting a segment of cord; and a first coupling means disposed on the first end and a second coupling means disposed on the second end wherein each respective coupling means adapts to couple the organizer to the support structure.

The organizer further comprises a second support means adapted to cooperate with the first support means to retain a plurality of segments of the cord.

The organizer further comprises an external coating means for encapsulating the bar-piece member, the at least one support means, the first coupling means, and the second coupling means whereby the coating means provides corrosion resistance to the organizer due to marine environmental conditions.

The organizer includes at least one support means that comprises a hook element and the first coupling means comprises a spring-clip member.

The organizer includes a first and second support means that comprise a first and second spring-clip member, respectively, adapted to releasably couple to the support structure.

DRAWING

FIG. 1 is a side view of one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a front view of the embodiment of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a top view of the embodiment of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 shows one possible use of the present invention on a telescoping outrigger and includes a perspective view of one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a top view of one embodiment of the present invention showing use of the invention on a telescoping outrigger segment.

FIG. 6 is a side view of one embodiment of the present invention and shows one possible use to wind cords while mounted on a telescoping outrigger segment.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention, described herein and illustrated in the accompanying figures of the drawing, is portrayed through the use of exemplary embodiments that represent its spirit and scope. Further, in the various Figures certain components may be omitted to more clearly illustrate a particular aspect of the invention. And, those skilled in the art will appreciate that various combinations of elements, substitutions of elements, omissions and deletions of elements will not deviate from the spirit and intent of the present invention. The scope of the invention shall be limited only by the appropriate construction of the claims that follow.

The terms cord, line, and rope are used interchangeably in this description and a person of ordinary skill in the art will readily recognize that such indiscriminate use of the terms does not detract from the scope and spirit of the invention. Similarly, this disclosure refers to a telescoping outrigger pole, however, the invention readily adapts to couple to a rigid pole or any suitable support structure provided by a vessel or even a stationary support as would be provided by a pier, for example.

When a standard telescoping outrigger is collapsed, roughly 24 to 36-feet of excess cord hangs down. This cord can become easily tangled and can be a nightmare when it needs to be untangled. The present invention, a cord organizer for telescoping outriggers, snaps or otherwise easily attaches to the outrigger and allows the user to organize the cords, which prevents knots and tangles. The present invention also looks better than having a cord wrapped around the outrigger pole or hard-top frame.

The present invention allows a user to organize outrigger cords and thereby spend less time untangling cords and more time enjoying sport fishing.

The present invention adapts to attach to telescoping outrigger poles by simply snapping on (or otherwise releasably coupling) with flexible spring clips. Alternatively, the present invention adapts to attach to telescoping outrigger poles by or customized plastic clips, which are specifically tailored to a specific diameter outrigger pole. The coupling means including the spring or plastic clips attach to any common outrigger pole diameter from about 1-inch to about 1 and ¾ inches in diameter. The versatility of these clips allows them to fit all standard outriggers. In another embodiment, slightly smaller dimensioned clips are used to facilitate releasable coupling to smaller outrigger poles having typical diameters of ⅝-inch to about 1 and ¼-inch diameter.

In one embodiment, the present invention comprises a bar piece having an overall length of about 14-inches to about 16-inches and fabricated from aluminum or stainless-steel or other marine-environment grade material. For example a nominal ¾-inch by ⅛th inch stock of aluminum trimmed to length of about 16 inches. Two marine-grade hooks secure, at opposite ends, to the bar pieces. The entire assembly is preferably coated with plastic material to resist corrosion from the marine environment and reduce marring of the outrigger poles. Additionally, marine-grade hardware secures the hooks to the bar. One coating means includes, for example, a moisture resistant barrier such as a plastic coating encapsulating the entire assembly common to household tools such as plastic-coat available under the brand name Plastisol, a dip-coating from www.piper-plastics.com, Piper Plastics Corp. of Copiagua N.Y. 11726, USA.

The present invention can easily and selectively attach and release from standard outrigger poles, even when cord is wrapped around the hooks. Unintended extension of the outrigger is prevented when outrigger cords are wrapped around the organizer and the organizer is attached to the outrigger.

FIG. 1 illustrates, in profile, one embodiment of the present invention. A rope, line or cord-organizer 10 for a telescoping outrigger pole consists of a central spine, or an elongated bar-piece member 12, having a first end and second, oppositely spaced second end. At each end, a hook element 14 fixably couples to the central spine. And, at each respective end a first and second spring-clip 16 fixably couples to the common member 12.

More clearly illustrated in FIGS. 2, 3, and 5, the spring-clip member 16 adapts to selectively couple to a telescoping outrigger pole 3. The spring-clip member 16 is one means for attaching or coupling the organizer 10 to a pole 3 or other support structure provided by a typical vessel. Other coupling means can be utilized by the organizer 10. For example, suitable coupling means include spring-clips, fasteners, tie-downs, rope-ties, or wire. In some applications, a more permanent coupling means is desired. In such situations suitable coupling means can include welding, riveting, or using adhesive to permanently or semi-permanently bonding, attaching, or coupling the organizer 10 to a support structure on a vessel, for example.

The organizer 10 includes two, oppositely spaced support means, such as hook elements 14. However, other support means are contemplated. For example, one hook element is sufficient to hang rope, line, or cords. Also, the support means can consist of a peg, a pin, a protruding member, a fastener, a loop or rope, a segment of cloth, or other structure adapted to receive a segment (or several segments) of rope, line, or cords as would be typically found on a vessel having a telescoping or rigid outrigger pole.

FIG. 4 illustrates the present invention disposed on an outrigger pole typical to a recreational fishing vessel 1. For example, the organizer 10 couples to a pole 3 and a line, rope, or cord 5 selectively winds around opposing support means such as hook elements.

FIG. 6 shows a segment of line or cord 5 wound around oppositely spaced support means, such as hook-elements 14. Each respective hook element is fixably coupled to a central bar-piece member 12, which is fixably coupled to a pair of opposing coupling means, such as spring clips 16. The coupling means adapt to couple to a pole 3.

In many of the figures the same reference numeral is used to demonstrate the same or a similar component in different embodiments of the invention. Some figures omit features to more clearly demonstrate certain aspects of the present invention. The foregoing embodiments of the present invention are intended as representational examples and should not be construed as limiting.