Title:
Beverage dispensing system pressurized release liquid USPA2
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A liquid beverage dispensing system having a specialized sealed container and a tube which extends from a top of the container and terminates just before the floor of the container. The tube has a one way valve that allows liquid to come up and out of the container when the valve is opened. Before the valve is opened the liquid may be a carbonated liquid under pressure. Then the valve opens upon the user's action, such as, sucking or squeezing the nipple. When the valve is opened the pressure inside of the container exerted by rising or trapped air bubbles exerts a downward force on the liquid below. The downward force thereby pushes the liquid below into and up the tube and into the user's mouth. The one way valve having unique form characteristics to permit this operation and permit other operations.



Inventors:
Siri, Adam (Jamaica Est., NY, US)
Application Number:
11/699834
Publication Date:
08/02/2007
Filing Date:
01/30/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
220/705
International Classes:
A47G19/22
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
SMALLEY, JAMES N
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Adam Siri (Jamaica Est., NY, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A pressurized liquid dispensing system for regulating the release of a pressurized liquid from a container comprising: a. a specialized container including a liquid passage and a mouth, the mouth having a top opening and the container being hermetically sealed; b. a cap being provided and adapted to be fitted to the top opening of said mouth; c. a container tube running along the length of said container, the container tube being held vertically by horizontal support arms, said container tube including flaps extending outward for placement of the bottom portion of opening-tube into the container-tube when said cap is lowered; and d. a cylindrical nipple having a automatic close loaded one way valve, the one way valve retaining pressurized liquid in the container, e. said nipple further including a nipple head jutting out of the cap on the top and an opening tube at the bottom, said opening tube being inserted in said flaps of said container tube.

2. The pressurized liquid dispensing system as claimed in claim 1, wherein the container tube is a single piece tube extending through said bottom of said nipple vertically up to the bottom of said container

3. The pressurized liquid dispensing system as claimed in claim 2, further comprising a disk-operated valve to control the flow of the pressurized liquid inside said container through said nipple.

4. The container as claimed in claim 3 wherein said container is in any orientation.

5. The container as claimed in claim 3 wherein the container comprises regulating means for regulating the internal pressure or vacuum of the container.

6. The container as claimed in claim 3 wherein the container comprises regulating means for regulating the release of dangerously high internal pressure.

7. The container as claimed in claim 3 wherein the container comprises regulating means for regulating the internal pressure on a liquid portion of the contents of the container.

8. The container as claimed in claim 3 wherein the container comprises regulating means for regulating the exit flow of contents from said container.

9. The container as claimed in claim 3 wherein the container comprises regulating means for regulating the liquid-to-gas ratio of contents exiting said container.

10. The container as claimed in claim 3 wherein the container comprises harnessing means for harnessing energy from contents flowing through the tube.

11. The container as claimed in claim 3 further comprising a cap; a mouth; internal pressure regulating means; exit means; liquid-gas ratio regulating means harnessing means; and combinations thereof.

12. The container as claimed in claim 11 wherein said combination thereof are detachable and reattach able to each other.

13. A container comprising: a. pressurized contents, b. flow regulating means for regulating the flow of contents from a bottom portion of the container to a release area of the container, a. first regulating means including closing means for hermetically sealing and retaining the contents held within the container, and opening means for releasing the contents held within the container, c. where for direct human consumption.

14. The container as claimed in claim 13 wherein said container is in any orientation.

15. The container as claimed in claim 13 wherein the container comprises regulating means for regulating the internal pressure or vacuum of the container.

16. The container as claimed in claim 13 wherein the container comprises regulating means for regulating the release of dangerously high internal pressure.

17. The container as claimed in claim 13 wherein the container comprises regulating means for regulating the internal pressure on a liquid portion of the contents of the container.

18. The container as claimed in claim 13 wherein the container comprises regulating means for regulating the exit flow of contents from said container.

19. The container as claimed in claim 13 wherein the container comprises regulating means for regulating the liquid-to-gas ratio of contents exiting said container.

20. The container as claimed in claim 13 wherein the container comprises harnessing means for harnessing energy from contents flowing through the tube.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED MATERIAL

This application claims the benefit of provisional patent applications;

Serial Number60/649,347FiledFeb. 02, 2005
Serial Number60/650,484FiledFeb. 07, 2005
Serial Number60/651,924FiledFeb. 10, 2005
Serial Number60/655,631FiledFeb. 23, 2005
Serial Number60/688,015FiledJun. 07, 2005
Serial Number60/736,994FiledNov. 15, 2005
Serial Number11/320,458FiledDec. 28, 2005
Serial NumberPCT/US2006/002706FiledJan. 25, 2006
Serial Number60/763,299FiledJan. 30, 2006

By the present inventor.

BACKGROUND ART

U.S. Patent Documents
5,186,34702/1993 Freeman et al.220/254
5,482,20201/1996 Wen229/103.1
6,290,090 B109/2001 Essebaggers220/710
6,427,928 B108/2002 Hirota et al.239/33
6,360,912 B103/2002 Lee220/705
6,745,949 B206/2004 Lee239/33

1. Field of the Invention

The field of the present invention is that of beverage containers. The closest related art are of no spill beverage containers, stoppage of carbonation loss, and the like. There are no prior art process's of relative area of process of the present invention. The present invention relates to pressurized liquid dispensing system having a nipple with valve function, and more particularly to a specialized container for dispensing pressurized drinks directly into ones mouth, allowing a controlled release of the pressurized drink, capable of allowing the user to start and stop the supply of the drink at will, preventing the unintentional spouting of the pressurized drink due to an impact applied on the container, maintaining the carbonation, taste, flavor and aroma of the drink, allowing to open the container, and the option to replace the drink inside to reuse the container repeatedly.

2. Description of the Related Art

Different dispensing systems for effervescent fluids, beverages and cold drinks have been proposed in the prior art. These are generally designed for dispensing beverages, carbonized fluids or cold drinks. Simple straight rod like straws were used initially but they were very inconvenient to use. Straws with bellows replaced the simple straws. There are many problems associated with the simple straw as well as the straws with bellows. The opening provided on the container for inserting the straw in the container is greater than the straw diameter, so the fluid inside the container is prone to surrounding contamination at the same time there is a fear of unintentional spillage.

To address the above mentioned problems a drinking straw that has a valve function inside the bellows portion (U.S. Pat. No. 6,360,912) is proposed, wherein the valve is closed when the straw is bent about the billows portion of the straw. This requires coupling, holding member or straw mounting member to be manufactured and mounted separately on the container. The process of manufacturing these components is very complex. Mounting the straw is not so easy, the handling and packaging of the container is not friendly and it does not look good in its appearance. Further the main problem with this tube is that the liquid inside the container may gush out of the beverage container through the tube in the conditions of excessive external or internal pressure on the beverage container.

A straw with hollow plug (U.S. Pat. No. 6,427,928 B1) is also proposed. The top end of the straw protrudes from the mouth of a beverage container through the plug and is compressible into the plug, and the lower end of the straw is positioned in the vicinity of the bottom of the container. The disadvantages, such as taking out the straw from the beverage container or the possibility of causing surroundings contamination are well addressed. The problem of withstanding high pressure remains unresolved. It leads to dripping of the liquid inside the container when the container is inverted. The spouting of liquid is possible due to excessive outside pressure or when the user is riding or driving a vehicle.

The problem of spilling under excessively high pressure is addressed by using spout and valve of stronger resilient material. But this is not desirable and fails when the user has to apply a sucking force beyond this capacity. This would be unmanageable.

The carbonated drinks and beverages are provided in packed containers with inbuilt spouts. However the drawback of these containers is that once the seal is opened it should be consumed within a limited duration of time before the carbon dioxide is released, otherwise it goes flat and tasteless. These containers are made of aluminum and cannot be reused or refilled.

A valve with spring loaded valve wall (U.S. Pat. No. 6,290,090 B1) wherein the spring pushes a valve wall downward to close the valve. Suction is used to pull the valve wall up against the spring and open the valve. In this related art the spring pushes the pivot down directly against any internal pressure. Since, the amount of energy needed in the spring to close the valve is in direct correlation with the amount of sucking force needed to open the valve, if the pressure inside the container were raised (amount of energy released when shaking an average soda container on today's market or the amount of energy needed to push out the contents) the spring would have to have sufficient force to hold down the pivot however this also means that the amount of sucking force needed to open the valve would need to be in correlation with that of the spring. The amount of force needed in a spring to hold down the pivot against the contents would make it nearly impossible for an average person to open the valve. Also the shape of the pivot increases its pressure area in direct opposition to the internal pressure. If the valve closing means as embodied and described were strengthened it would have a direct affect on the strength needed for opening valves opening means making it more difficult to open, and the amount of strength that is needed to make the closing means stay closed under the relevant pressure, if the strength were added, would make the opening means very difficult if not impossible by an ordinary person to open.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The general idea is one of a specialized container for dispensing carbonated drinks. The material inside the container could be pressurized during manufacture or after manufacture. The specialized container is entirely sealed except for a tube, which runs the length of the container on the inside of the container.

At the top of the container is a cap with a nipple. The top portion of the nipple juts out slightly from the top of the container cap. The bottom end of the container tube terminates just before the floor of the container. The tube has an opening at its top and bottom. The bottom opening is opened to the inside of the container and the top opening will be exposed to the outside air of the container either directly or via, perimeter being attached hermetically to perimeter of, the nipple. Apart from the opening at the top of the tube the container is entirely sealed.

The tube or nipple has a valve inside of it on its top. This valve, when opened, allows liquid to come up and out of the container. The valve opens upon the consumer performing some sort of act-such as squeezing the straw or nipple with the teeth or performing some other function, which will open the valve. The consumer will be able to open and close the valve at will. Certain valves will close automatically in their normal rest state.

Before the valve is opened the carbonated liquid, which at that point is in a sealed environment, will be under pressure because the rising air bubbles inside the container have no place to escape. When the valve is opened the pressure inside of the container exerted by the rising (or trapped) air bubbles exert a downward force on the liquid below. The downward force pushes the liquid below into and up the tube whose only opening inside the container is at bottom of container. The fizz will remain at the top of the bottle and the soda will come up through the tube. Thus, once the valve in the tube is opened the downward force caused by the rising air bubbles causes the liquid to be forced up through the tube and in to the consumers mouth.

In the present invention the valve means utilizes the pressure in the container. Some examples are embodiments shown for the present invention wherein the closing means is not in direct opposition to the opening means, and or the closing means are not in direct opposition to the pressure in the container, rather distributes it, directs it to certain points of relevance, Etc. (see embodiments). Also are utilized pivot shapes, Locations that assist in the functionality of the valve as they correspond with the internal pressure. A valve in the present invention may utilize the pressure to assist in keeping the valve open once opened and closed once closed and still the amount of energy needed by a person to open the valve is small.

No prior art utilize types of valves wherein the valve stays closed under high internal pressure and at the same time is relatively easy to open. Also the pressure is utilized in the normal functioning of the valve (shape, location, size, embodiments, of pivots). Also the pressure may be utilized to assist in holding a opened pivot open and closed pivot closed and at the same time the valve shuts automatically and also is relatively easy to open. No prior arts first embodiment or any embodiments thereafter or in their claims have claimed this type of valve or use of such a valve as operational means for a container whose contents exit said container by means of said contents wherein regulating means of said exit of said contents where for immediate consumption.

No prior arts show means for a container whose contents exit said container by means of said contents wherein regulating means of said exit of said contents where for immediate consumption. The present invention is a new process. Also this process can be used in conjunction with many other aspects, for example when the bottle is sealed it can retain heat, carbonation.

The process in and of itself may be seen as a business method in that the process is relevant to the marketing of a beverage by a beverage company.

The present invention used with a pressurized beverage container. The present invention can be used with a carbonated beverage, beer, wine or the like. It can also be used with a regular beverage or carbonated beverage not under pressure, simply by opening a air inlet valve, discussed later, and the tube can be used as a regular built in straw. Even then this container can prevent spillage, loss of carbonation, loss of heat. Also when used with a hot liquid it retains heat.

The present invention also has people friendly options. No need to tilt your head to drink nor to exert energy to tilt the bottle. Could even be used in a weightless environment. Kids might like to use it as a spray bottle. There is no need to manually close the container, and it is not necessary to have a removable cap. Its also quicker to get a drink, from time you decide to drink to point were the drink enters your mouth and it took less energy. People also have the option of opening the liquid exit with their mouth, teeth, lips, hand, or simply by suck action.

The present invention can also be used as many different types of bottles. Prior arts show for example a no spill bottle but it wont stop carbonation leakage or heat escape. The present invention has many uses as, such as auto contents exit, no spill bottle, heat retention, regular container with built in straw, drinker can control the liquid to gas ratio exiting container, spray bottle, and or carbonation leakage control.

In some cases the pressure is used to assist in holding a open valve open and a shut valve shut. The present invention embodies a new process plus a combination of many other aspects, that the prior art do not have.

From the above it is clear that the straws and container for dispensing the liquid in the prior art have a limited scope. The present invention provides a comprehensive solution by addressing all of the disadvantages of previous liquid dispensing systems. The pressurized liquid dispensing system is capable of maintaining the gas pressure inside the container. The dispensing system prevents spilling of the liquid in all conditions in practice, could be cleaned and refilled, with ease of packaging and pleasing appearance. One can drink the liquid inside the container with less physical effort, an injured person can drink by holding in any orientation. It can be used for hot drinks and beverages as well. Further it could be used as a drinking utensil and a spray bottle. The product is an appeal to the thirst for novelty thereby increasing the marketability of the product.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1A shows a front view of the first embodiment with means of regulating content release shut.

FIG. 1B shows a front view of the first embodiment with means of regulating content release open.

FIG. 2A shows a front view of another tube embodiment.

FIG. 2B shows a front view of tube embodiment in FIG. 2A with cap separated from container.

FIG. 2C shows a top view of tube [23] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 2A.

FIG. 2D shows a top view of guiding flap [24] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 2A.

FIG. 2E shows a top view of support arms [25] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 2A.

FIG. 2F shows a top view of guiding flap [24] and support arms [25] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 2A.

FIG. 3A shows a front view of another tube embodiment wherein the upper tube is connected to the lower tube by screw function.

FIG. 3B shows a front view of tube embodiment in FIG. 3A with cap separated from container.

FIG. 3C shows a top view of cap tube [31] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 3A.

FIG. 3D shows a top view of container tube [35] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 3A.

FIG. 3E shows a top view of support arms [34] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 3A.

FIG. 3f shows a top view of container tube [35] and support arms [34] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 9.

FIG. 4A shows a front view of another tube embodiment wherein tube is attached to cap.

FIG. 4B shows a front view of tube embodiment in FIG. 4A with the cap separated from container.

FIG. 4C shows a top view of tube [42] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 4A.

FIG. 5A shows a front view of another tube embodiment wherein upper tube connects to lower tube by spinning the cap.

FIG. 5B shows a front view of tube embodiment in FIG. 5A with the cap separated from the container.

FIG. 5C shows a top view of cap tube [52] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 5A.

FIG. 5D shows a top view of container tube [53] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 5A.

FIG. 5E shows a top view of cap tube [52] and container tube [53] whilst they are connected of the embodiment shown in FIG. 5A.

FIG. 6A shows a front view another tube and cap embodiments wherein tube is attached to cap and cap is a screw function in relation to container.

FIG. 6B shows a front view of embodiment in FIG. 6A with the cap separated from container.

FIG. 6C shows a top view of tube [63] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 6A.

FIG. 7A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 7B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 7A in the open position.

FIG. 7C shows a top view of upper arms [74] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 7A.

FIG. 7D shows a top view of sealing element middle arms [76] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 7A.

FIG. 7E shows a top view of spring action flexible lower arms [78] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 7A.

FIG. 7F shows a top view of sealing element [77] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 7A.

FIG. 7G shows a top view of valve walls [72] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 7A.

FIG. 7H shows a top view of FIG. 7A of the embodiment shown in FIG. 7A.

FIG. 8A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 8B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 8A in the open position.

FIG. 8C shows a top view of upper arms [85] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 8A.

FIG. 8D shows a top view of middle arms [87] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 8A.

FIG. 8E shows a top view of spring action flexible arms [88] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 8A.

FIG. 8F shows a top view of sealing elements [82] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 8A.

FIG. 8G shows a top view of valve walls [83] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 8A.

FIG. 8H shows a top view of valve embodiment in FIG. 8A.

FIG. 9A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 9B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 9A in the open position.

FIG. 9C shows a top view of upper arms [94] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 9A.

FIG. 9D shows a top view of sealing element middle arms [96] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 9A.

FIG. 9E shows a top view of spring guides [99] and of springs [98] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 9A.

FIG. 9F shows a top view of sealing elements [427, 420h] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 9A.

FIG. 9G shows a top view of valve walls [92] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 9A.

FIG. 9H shows a top view of valve embodiment of the embodiment shown in FIG. 9A.

FIG. 10A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 10B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 10A in the open position.

FIG. 10C shows a top view of upper arms [104] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 10A.

FIG. 10D shows a top view of sealing element middle arm [106] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 10A.

FIG. 10E shows a top view of spring action flexible lower arms [108] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 10A.

FIG. 10F shows a top view of sealing elements [107] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 10A.

FIG. 10G shows a top view of valve wall [102] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 10A.

FIG. 10H shows a top view of valve embodiment of the embodiment shown in FIG. 10A.

FIG. 11A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 11B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 11A in the open position.

FIG. 11C shows a top view of upper arms [114] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 11A.

FIG. 11D shows a top view of sealing element middle arm [116] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 11A.

FIG. 11E shows a top view of spring guides [119] and springs [118] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 11A.

FIG. 11F shows a top view of sealing elements [117] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 11A.

FIG. 11G shows a top view of valve wall [112] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 11A.

FIG. 11H shows a top view of valve embodiment of the embodiment shown in FIG. 11A.

FIG. 12A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 12B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 12A in the open position.

FIG. 12C shows a front view of cap tube [122], right side view, of the embodiment shown in FIG. 12A.

FIG. 12D shows a front view of cap tube [122] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 12A.

FIG. 12E shows a front view of container tube [124] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 12A.

FIG. 12F shows a front view of cap tube [122] and container tube [124] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 12B.

FIG. 13A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 13B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 13A in the open position.

FIG. 13C shows a top view of support sealing element [132] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 13A.

FIG. 13D shows a top view of upper bulge [133] and upper holes [137] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 13A.

FIG. 13E shows a top view of arms [135] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 13A.

FIG. 13F shows a top view of lower bulge [136] and lower holes [134] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 13A.

FIG. 13G shows a top view of spring action flexible arms [138] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 13A.

FIG. 14A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 14B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 14A in the closed position.

FIG. 14C shows a top view of tube [141] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 14A.

FIG. 14D shows a top view of controlling disk [147] and extension [145] and hole [144] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 14A.

FIG. 14E shows a top view of flexible cover [143] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 14A.

FIG. 14F shows a top view of support arm [142] and spring action flexible arm [148] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 14A.

FIG. 15A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 15B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 15A in the open position.

FIG. 15C shows a top view of the tube [151] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 15A.

FIG. 15D shows a top view of the controlling disk [157] and extension [156] and hole [155] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 15A.

FIG. 15E shows a top view of flexible cover [154] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 15A.

FIG. 15F shows a top view of support arm [152] and spring guide [153] and spring [158] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 15A.

FIG. 16A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 16B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 16A in the open position.

FIG. 16C shows a top view of valve wall top [163] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 16A.

FIG. 16D shows a top view of spring action flexible arms [166] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 16A.

FIG. 16E shows a top view of sealing stopping element [165] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 16A.

FIG. 16F shows a top view of arms [162] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 16A.

FIG. 17A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 17B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 17A in the open position.

FIG. 17C shows a top view of valve wall top [172] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 17A.

FIG. 17D shows a top view of spring action flexible arms [176] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 17A.

FIG. 17E shows a top view of sealing stopping element [175] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 17A.

FIG. 17F shows a top view of arms [173] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 17A.

FIG. 18A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 18B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 18A in the open position.

FIG. 18C shows a front view of lever [183] and arm [185] and rope [182] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 18A.

FIG. 19A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 19B shows a right side view of the valve embodiment shown in FIG. 19A.

FIG. 19C shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 19A in the open position.

FIG. 19D shows a right side view of the valve embodiment shown in FIG. 19C.

FIG. 19E shows a top view of spring action flexible valve walls [193] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 19A.

FIG. 19F shows a top view of sealing element [194] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 19A.

FIG. 19G shows a top view of valve embodiment of the embodiment shown in FIG. 19D.

FIG. 20A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 20B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 20A in the open position.

FIG. 20C shows a top view of upper valve wall [203] and upper holes [202] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 20A.

FIG. 20D shows a top view of lower valve wall [205] and lower holes [204] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 20A.

FIG. 20E shows a top view of valve embodiment of the embodiment shown in FIG. 20A.

FIG. 20F shows a top view of valve embodiment of the embodiment shown in FIG. 20B.

FIG. 21A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 21B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 21A in the open position.

FIG. 21C shows a top view of upper spring action flexible arms [212] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 21A.

FIG. 21D shows a top view of upper valve wall [211] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 21A.

FIG. 21E shows a top view of upper sealing element [216] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 21A.

FIG. 21F shows a top view of upper arm [215] and arms pivot [219] and lower arm [219b] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 21A.

FIG. 21G shows a top view of support arm [219g] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 21A.

FIG. 21H shows a top view of lower valve wall [219f] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 21A.

FIG. 21I shows a top view of lower sealing element [219h] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 21A.

FIG. 21J shows a top view of lower spring action flexible arms [219e] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 21A.

FIG. 22A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 22B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 22A in the open position.

FIG. 22C shows a top view of valve wall top [227] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 22A.

FIG. 22D shows a top view of latch arm element [221] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 22A.

FIG. 22E shows a top view of latch groove element [222] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 22A.

FIG. 22F shows a top view of upper sealing stopping element [226] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 22A.

FIG. 22G shows a top view of lower sealing element [228] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 22A.

FIG. 23A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 23B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 23A in the open position.

FIG. 23C shows a top view of pivot arms [232] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 23A.

FIG. 23D shows a top view of arms [234] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 23A.

FIG. 23E shows a top view of valve wall bases [235] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 23A.

FIG. 23F shows a top view of flexible sealing element [236] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 23A.

FIG. 24A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 24B shows a right side view of the valve embodiment shown in FIG. 23A.

FIG. 24C shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 24A in the open position.

FIG. 24D shows a right side view of the valve embodiment shown in FIG. 24C.

FIG. 24E shows a top view of connecting element [242] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 24A.

FIG. 24F shows a top view of tube [241] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 24A.

FIG. 24G shows a top view of sealing element [243] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 24A.

FIG. 24H shows a top view of valve wall [244] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 24A.

FIG. 24I shows a top view of valve embodiment of the embodiment shown in FIG. 24C.

FIG. 25A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 25B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 25A in the open position.

FIG. 25C shows a top view of bulge element [252] and stopper elements [253] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 25A.

FIG. 25D shows a top view of pivot handles [254] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 25A.

FIG. 25E shows a top view of spring action flexible arm [256] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 25A.

FIG. 25F shows a top view of sealing element [259] and lower holes [250] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 25A.

FIG. 25G shows a top view of valve wall base [258] and upper holes [257] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 25A.

FIG. 26A shows a front view of a valve attachment valve in the closed position.

FIG. 26B shows a front view of valve attachment embodiment in FIG. 26A valve being in the open position.

FIG. 26C shows a top view of valve attachment embodiment of the embodiment shown in FIG. 26A.

FIG. 26D shows a top view of valve attachment embodiment of the embodiment shown in FIG. 26B.

FIG. 27A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 27B shows a front view of valve embodiment in FIG. 27A in the open position.

FIG. 27C shows a top view of temporary stopping element [275] and permanent stopping element [274] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 27A.

FIG. 27D shows a top view of holding element [276] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 27A.

FIG. 27E shows a top view of flow thru element [277] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 27A.

FIG. 27F shows a top view of sealing element [278] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 27A.

FIG. 28A shows a front view of air inlet valve in the closed position.

FIG. 28B shows a front view of air inlet valve embodiment in FIG. 28A in the open position.

FIG. 28C shows a top view of right view of spring action flexible spout [282] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 28A in the closed position.

FIG. 28D shows a top view of FIG. 28C in the open position.

FIG. 29A shows a front view of another air inlet valve embodiment in the closed position.

FIG. 29B shows a front view of air inlet valve embodiment in FIG. 29A in the open position.

FIG. 29C shows a front view of knob element [292] and outer hole [293] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 29A.

FIG. 29D shows a front view of bulge element [294] and inner hole [295] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 29A.

FIG. 30A shows a front view of emergency pressure release valve in the closed position.

FIG. 30B shows a front view of emergency pressure release valve embodiment in FIG. 30A in the open position.

FIG. 30C shows a top view of breakable sealing element [302] with grooves [303] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 30A.

FIG. 30D shows a top view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 30C in the open position.

FIG. 31A shows a front view of pressure assisting valve wall with contents filling a half of the container.

FIG. 31B shows a front view of pressure assisting valve wall of the embodiment shown in FIG. 31A with contents filling a quarter of the container.

FIG. 31C shows a top view of auto valve wall [313] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 31A.

FIG. 32A shows a front view of contents exiting directional control spout.

FIG. 32B shows a front view of contents exiting directional control spout of the embodiment shown in FIG. 32A with automatic alternating open closed exit points controlling valve wall.

FIG. 32C shows a top view of bulge element [321] and holes [322] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 32A.

FIG. 32D shows a top view of bulge element [321] and holes [322] and propeller element [326] and propeller arm [327] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 32A.

FIG. 32E shows a front view of propeller element [326] and propeller arm [327] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 32A.

FIG. 33A shows a front view of control mechanism for control of ratio of liquid to gas exiting container with its position in that of the ratio of liquid is much greater than gas exiting container.

FIG. 33B shows a front view of control mechanism for control of ratio of liquid to gas exiting container embodiment of the embodiment shown in FIG. 32A with its position in that of the ratio of gas is much greater than liquid exiting container.

FIG. 33C shows a front view of outer tube [333] and outer top hole [335] and outer lower hole [338] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 32A.

FIG. 33D shows a front view of flaps [331] and inner tube [332] and inner upper hole [336] and inner lower hole [337] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 33A.

FIG. 33E shows another embodiment of control mechanism for control of ratio of liquid to gas exiting container.

FIG. 34A shows a front view of another control mechanism for control of ratio of liquid to gas exiting container with its position in that of the ratio of liquid is much greater than gas exiting container.

FIG. 34B shows a front view of control mechanism for control of ratio of liquid to gas exiting container embodiment in FIG. 34A with its position in that of the ratio of gas is much greater than liquid exiting container.

FIG. 34C shows a front view of outer tube [343] and outer hole [344] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 34A.

FIG. 34D show a front view of inner tube [342] and inner hole [345] of the embodiment shown in FIG. 34A.

FIG. 34E shows a front view of another control mechanism for control of ratio of liquid to gas exiting container.

FIG. 35A shows a front view of mechanism for harness and transfer of energy from exiting contents.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

FIG. 1A shows a front view of a preferred embodiment of the present invention with a nipple cap, the cap screwed on to the container and the valve in the closed position. FIG. 1B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 1A with the nipple cap off, the cap screwed off the container and the valve in the open position.

These figures illustrate a new means of contents regulated in a beverage container and the embodiments to follow will show, replacements of means or parts depicted in this first embodiment and will show add on means or parts that may be added to this first embodiment and certain means or parts depicted in this first embodiment may be removed.

FIG. 1A shows a cover 10 which is placed on top of the top part of cap tube 14 (nipple) and is removable. The cover 10 protects the nipple from dirt. The top part of the cap tube 14 (nipple) projects thru the top horizontal wall of the cap 13 and the cap tubes 14 walls outer perimeter is attached hermetically to the perimeter of the hole in the cap 13 thru which it projects. At the top of the cap tube 14 is a bulge element 11 which has a circular base converted into a hemispherical bulge at its top and projects in an upward direction. The bulge element 11 has holes 11a which direct the flow of the contents exiting the tube. For further details on the regulating of exiting flow of contents element depicted here see FIG. 32A thru FIG. 32E. This add on assists in directing the flow of the contents out of the tube 14 in directions other than strait out the tube 14 top which may cause a choking hazard. Below the bulge element 11 in the cap tube 14 is the valve element 12, 12a, 12b which is the valve element depicted in the embodiment shown in FIG. 17A thru 17F. When no pressure is applied to the cap tube 14 the valve remains closed by to spring action flexible arms which are attached to the valve wall 12 base and hold the valve wall 12 base upward against the sealing element 12b. For further details on the valve element depicted here see FIGS. 17A thru 17F. The cap 13 is a screw on in relation to the container 19b. When the cap 13 is screwed on to the container 19b the cap tube 14, which is connected to the cap 13 and therefore moves downward as the cap is screwed on, is guided by the guiding flap 17, which is ring shaped projecting upward at an angle away from the container tube 19a, into the container tube 19a. The container tube is held stationary by the support arms 19a which are connected on their other end to the container 19b wall. Thus contents flow from the bottom of the container tube 19a to the top of the cap tube 14 when the valve is opened. The container 19b also has a one way valve 18, which is cone shaped lying horizontally with a pin hole at its point and the cone shaped portion is flexible, close to its top. For further details on the one way valve depicted here see FIG. 28A thru 28D. The one way valve stops internal pressure from escaping however if a vacuum is formed internally the one way valve 18 allows air outside the container 19b to flow into the container 19b. This allows for contents not under pressure to be used in the container 19b whilst the container still retains heat, carbonation, stops accidental spillage, and if the contents become pressurized the container still retains its unique characteristics.

FIG. 1B shows the embodiment shown in FIG. 1A with the cover 10 removed. The valve 12, 12a,12b has been opened by pressure applied to the nipple walls wherein lie the arms 12a which caused the valve wall 12 to lower in turn lowering the valve wall base from the sealing element 12b allowing contents to flow between them. For further details on the valve element depicted here see FIGS. 17A thru 17F. The cap 13 has been separated from the container 19b, and there tubes respectively have also been separated in turn.

The first embodiment gives a view of an embodiment whilst in the figures to come the, individual parts and functions will be discussed in further detail, either parts and functions shown in FIG. 1A and FIG. 1B or new parts and functions that may replace parts and functions depicted in the first embodiment Also in the figures to come are shown new parts and functions that may be added on to the first embodiment. Some of the parts and functions depicted in FIGS. 1A and 1B may be removed. A main staple of the first embodiment no matter what valve type of the many valve types depicted in further figures is used, is that under relatively high pressure the valve remains shut yet is still relatively easy to open, and the valves still function when no internal pressure is present. In many cases the internal pressure assists in the functions of the valve, for example assisting in keeping the valve open once opened and assisting in keeping the valve shut once closed.

FIG. 2A shows a front view of a tube embodiment wherein the tube is two parts and are in the connected position. FIG. 2B shows the two tube parts in the separated position. FIG. 2C thru FIG. 2F show top views of the parts of this tube embodiment.

These figures illustrate a means of container wherein the cap is separable and reattach able wherein the means of contents exit area of the cap is hermetically connected with the container tube.

The cap tube 23 is connected to the cap. The top part of the tube exit's the top wall of cap 21. The outer perimeter walls of the cap tube 23 and a hole in the top wall of the cap 21 are hermetically joined. The contents exit the top of the tube for consumption. The container tube 26 is held in place by support arms 25 which in this embodiment are shown as bar shaped. The container tube 26 is joined with the cap tube 23 at the point where lies the guiding flap 24 which in this embodiment has a ring shaped base from which it extends in an upward outward direction. The cap tube 23 is guided by the guiding flap 24 and slides in to the container tube 26. The cap tubes 23 size is relative to that of the container tube 26 in that it fits into it snug. The cap tube 23 and container tube 26 are separated when the cap is removed.

This embodiment allows for the removal of a cap without having to remove the entire tube. If necessary washers can be placed around the top of the container tube 26. Also if necessary a ring lock fitting can be used on the ends of the tube parts that meet.

FIG. 3A shows a front view of another tube embodiment. FIG. 4B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 3A with the cap tube 31 removed. FIGS. 3C thru FIG. 3F show top views of individual parts

These figures illustrate a means of container wherein the cap is separable and reattach able wherein the means of contents exit area of the cap is hermetically connected with the container tube.

In this embodiment the cap tube 31 is connected to the container tube 35 by screwing into it. The container tube is held in place by support arms 34.

The cap tube 31 separates from the container tube 35 by unscrewing it.

The top of the container tube may also have a guiding flap. The screwing causes the downward motion of the cap 32 which may be used as a means of bringing the cap 32 and container 36 together causing them to hermetically join thereby sealing all exits from the container other than that of the cap tube 31. A washer may be placed on the top of the container 36 rim to assist in the hermetic seal between itself and the bottom rim of the cap 32. The cap 32 may also be a screw on in relation to the container 36 wherein the when the cap is screwing on to the container 36 the threads of the cap tube 31 are screwing into the container tube 35 at the same time.

FIG. 4A shows a front view of another tube embodiment. FIG. 4B shows a front view of the tube embodiment shown in FIG. 4A with the cap removed. FIG. 4C shows a top view of individual part.

These Figures illustrate a means of access for cleaning the inside of the container The Tube 42 is connected to the cap 41. When the cap 41 is removed the tube 42 is also removed. The cap may be a screw on in relation to the container. In these Figures is shown a cap that is substantially large. A large cap may be used with a container to facilitate in the cleaning of the container in that the area of the container were upon lies the cap is relatively large enough to allow for access to the inside of the container for purposes of cleaning.

FIG. 5A shows front view of another tube embodiment. FIG. 5B shows a front view of FIG. 5A with the cap 51 separated from the container 54. FIG. 5C thru FIG. 5E show top views of individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of container wherein the cap is separable and reattach able wherein the means of contents exit area of the cap is hermetically connected with the container tube.

In these figures is shown a embodiment wherein cap tube 52 starts above the cap 51 and extends downward thru a hole in the top horizontal wall of the cap 51 and extends outward underneath said top wall sideways to the vertical outer wall of the cap. Then it runs along the inner side of said outer wall. The container tube 53 extends upward from the bottom of the container 54 then turns and runs along the inner wall of the container near its top. The position of the cap tube 52 portion that runs along the inner wall of the cap 51 relative to that of the container tube 53 portion that runs along the inner wall of the container 54 is that, that when the cap is placed on the container they are aligned on a horizontal plane. By turning the cap 51 cap tube 52 portion that runs along the inner wall of the cap 51 slides into the container tube 53 portion that runs along the inner wall of the container 54 and a hermetically sealed tube that runs from the bottom of the container to the top of the cap is created.

The tube parts are disconnected by turning the cap 51.

The cap may be a screw on in relation to the container wherein when screwing in the cap the tube portions connect and by screwing off the cap they disconnect. If necessary a washer may be placed around the ends of tube portions that connect.

FIG. 6A shows a front view of another tube embodiment. FIG. 6B shows a front view of the tube embodiment shown in FIG. 6A with the cap separated from the container. FIG. 6C shows a top view of an individual part.

These Figures illustrate a means of regulating the flow of contents form an area within the container to a release area of said container wherein said container being in any orientation.

In these Figures is shown the embodiment wherein a flexible tube 63 extends downward from an area near the top of the container 64. At the bottom of the tube are weights 65 that cause the bottom of the flexible tube 63 to gravitate towards the lowest portion of the container 64. Gravity is used as the source of energy causing the weights 65 to gravitate to the bottom of the container.

Also shown here is that the flexible tube 63 is attached solely to the cap 61 however the tube can be in two parts as described before. Also it is shown here that the cap 61 threads 62 screw on to the container 64 threads 62a.

A container can be in any orientation and still by use of this tube embodiment the bottom of the tube in the container will always be at the bottom of the liquid contents of the container which also flow according to gravity.

FIG. 7A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 7B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 7A in the open Position. FIG. 7C thru FIG. 7H show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

Two valve walls 72 are connected to two opposite walls 71 of the valve, one on each side, by three arms. The valve walls are shown here as a diagonal rectangular plate shape. In the closed position the valve wall 72 meets the valve wall 71 at its top and the meets the center of the valve at its bottom. The upper arms 74 are shown here as bar shaped with a flexible point 73 at the point were the upper arm 74 and the valve wall 72 meet. The sealing element middle arm 76 is shown here as a horizontal rectangular plate shaped arm that also forms a seal between the valve wall 72 and the tube wall 71. The spring action flexible lower arms 78 are shown here as bar shaped and they are strait in their rest position from tube wall 78 to valve wall 72. Also there are the sealing elements 77 which lie parallel to the valve walls 72 when the valve is in the closed position, one on each side of a valve wall 72 slightly above the valve wall 72, its length starting at the horizontal plane wherein lies the sealing element middle arms 76 at its top and ending were the two valve walls 72 meet at its bottom. The Sealing elements 77 are attached to the valve walls 71 to the sides of the valve walls 72 and protrude slightly from the valve wall 71, thereby causing a seal when the valve walls 72 are pressed against them. In the closed position the valve is sealed by the sealing element middle arms 76 (which are connected hermetically to the valve wall 71 and the valve wall 72) which connect to the valve walls 72 which seal against the sealing elements 77.

The valve is opened by pressing on the portion of the valve walls 71 wherein lie the upper arms 74 which they in turn push the upper portion of the valve wall inward. However the sealing element middle arms 76 hold the center of the valve wall 72 in the same area. This action in turn causes the bottom of the valve wall 72 to automatically move outward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, which opens the valve. The contents exit the valve between the valve wall 72 and between the sealing elements 77. The valve in turn is closed automatically by the spring action flexible lower arms 78 which are flexed when the valve is opened, but when the pressing on the upper valve walls 71 is released the spring action flexible lower arms return to their rest state automatically which in turn pushes the bottom portion of the valve walls 72 inward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, which in turn press against the sealing elements 77 causing the valve to be sealed.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Also the pressure assists in holding the valve closed once it is closed and assists in holding the valve open once it is opened. Also even if no pressure is present the valve still functions. The spring action flexible lower arms 78 function can be replaced by the valve wall 71 if the valve wall has spring action in that after releasing the pressure of pressing on the relevant portion of the valve wall 71 it automatically moves in an outward, relative to the area center of the valve, direction to its rest position which in turn pulls the top of the valve walls 72 outward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, which in turn pulls the bottom of the valve walls 72 inward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, sealing the valve, leaving no need for the spring action flexible lower arms 78. Also another replacement for the means accomplished by the spring action flexible lower arms can be a spring. The valve can be located inside the top portion of the tube or the cap or a nipple (which means that the valve wall 71 can also be referred to as the tube wall when the valve is inside a tube or a nipple wall when the valve is inside a nipple). Also when placed in a tube, cap or nipple the bottom portion of the valve (area below the sealing element middle arm 76) can be placed inside the portion of the cap (tube or nipple) which is not easily accessible, for example below the top cap horizontal wall since a person opening the valve does not need to apply pressure to this portion of the valve (person needs access only to the portion of the valve wall to be pressed upon). The valve can be placed in a round tube by sealing off the areas between the valve wall 71 and the tube wall. The flexible portions of the arms 73, 75 allow for the ends (point were the arm meets the valve wall) of the arms to bend as the orientation of the valve wall 72 changes. The flexible portion of the arms 73, 75 can also be that of a hinge, such as a living hinge or integral hinge. If necessary the portion of the valve wall not to be pushed inward may be strengthened or the portion of the valve wall to move inward may be weakened.

FIG. 8A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 8B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 8A in the open Position. FIG. 8C thru FIG. 8H show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

Two valve walls 83 are connected to two opposite walls 81 of the valve, one on each side, by three arms. The valve walls are shown here as a diagonal rectangular plate shape. In the closed position the valve wall 83 meets the valve wall 81 at its top and the meets the center of the valve at its bottom. The top of the valve walls 83 are hermetically connected to the valve wall 81. The upper arms 85 are shown here as bar shaped with a flexible point 84 at the point were the upper arm 85 and the valve wall 83 meet. The middle arms 87 are shown here as bar shaped with a flexible point 86 at the point were the middle arm 87 and the valve wall 83 meet. The spring action flexible lower arms 88 are shown here as bar shaped and they are strait in their rest position from tube wall 81 to valve wall 83. Also there are the sealing elements 82 which lie parallel to the valve walls 83 when the valve is in the closed position, one on each side of a valve wall 83 slightly above the valve wall 83, its length starting at the horizontal plane wherein lies the top of the valve wall 83 at its top and ending were the two valve walls 83 meet at its bottom. The Sealing elements 82 are attached hermetically to the valve walls 81 to the sides of the valve walls 83 and protrude slightly from the valve wall 81, thereby causing a seal when the valve walls 83 are pressed against them. In the closed position the valve is sealed by point were the valve wall 83 tops meet the valve wall, the valve walls 83, and the sealing elements 82.

The valve is opened by pressing on the portion of the valve walls 81 wherein lie the upper arms 85 which they in turn push the upper portion of the valve wall inward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve. However the middle arms 87 hold the center of the valve wall 83 in the same area. This action in turn causes the bottom of the valve walls 83 to automatically move outward, relatively relative to area center of valve, which opens the valve. The contents exit the valve between the valve walls 83 and between the sealing elements 82. The valve in turn is closed automatically by the spring action flexible lower arms 88 which are flexed when the valve is opened, but when the pressing on the upper valve walls 81 is released the spring action flexible lower arms return to their rest state automatically which in turn pushes the bottom portion of the valve walls 83 inward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, which in turn press against the sealing elements 82 causing the valve to be sealed.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Also the pressure assists in holding the valve closed once it is closed and assists in holding the valve open once it is opened. Also even if no pressure is present the valve still functions. The spring action flexible lower arms 88 function can be replaced by the valve wall 81 if the valve wall 81 has spring action in that after releasing the pressure of pressing on the relevant portion of the valve wall 81 it automatically moves in an outward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, direction to its rest position which in turn pulls the top of the valve wall 83 outward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, which in turn pulls the bottom of the valve wall 83 inward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, sealing the valve, leaving no need for the spring action flexible lower arms 88. Also another replacement for the means accomplished by the spring action flexible lower arms can be a spring. The valve can be located inside the top portion of the tube or the cap or a nipple (which means that the valve wall 81 can also be referred to as the tube wall when the valve is inside a tube or a nipple wall when the valve is inside a nipple). Also when placed in a tube, cap or nipple the bottom portion of the valve (area below the middle arm 87) can be placed inside the portion of the cap (tube or nipple) which is not easily accessible, for example below the top cap horizontal wall since a person opening the valve does not need to apply pressure to this portion of the valve (person needs access only to the portion of the valve wall to be pressed upon). The valve can be placed in a round tube by sealing off the areas between the valve wall 81 and the tube wall. The flexible portions of the arms 84, 86 allow for the ends (point were the arm meets the valve wall) of the arms to bend as the orientation of the valve wall 83 changes. The flexible portion of the arms 84, 86 can also be that of a hinge, such as a living hinge or integral hinge. If necessary the portion of the valve wall not to be pushed inward may be strengthened or the portion of the valve wall to move inward may be weakened.

FIG. 9A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 9B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 9A in the open Position. FIG. 9C thru FIG. 9H show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

These Figures show an embodiment identical to that of the Embodiment shown in FIG. 7 except that instead of the spring action flexible lower arms, springs 98 and spring guides 99 are used. Which push the valve walls 92 to the closed position.

When opening the valve the bottom portion of the valve walls 92 push the springs 98 outward, relatively relative to area center of valve, and when the pressure used to open the valve is released the springs 98 push the bottom portion of the valve walls inward, relatively relative to the area center of valve, closing the valve.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Also the pressure assists in holding the valve closed once it is closed and assists in holding the valve open once it is opened. Also even if no pressure is present the valve still functions. The springs 98 and spring guides 99 function can be replaced by the valve wall 91 if the valve wall has spring action in that after releasing the pressure of pressing on the relevant portion of the valve wall 91 it automatically moves in an outward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, direction to its rest position which in turn pulls the top of the valve wall 92 outward, relatively relative to area center of the valve, which in turn pulls the bottom of the valve wall 92 inward, relatively relative to area center of valve, sealing the valve, leaving no need for the springs 98 and spring guides 99. The valve can be located inside the top portion of the tube or the cap or a nipple (which means that the valve wall 91 can also be referred to as the tube wall when the valve is inside a tube or a nipple wall when the valve is inside a nipple). Also when placed in a tube, cap or nipple the bottom portion of the valve can be placed inside the portion of the cap (tube or nipple) which is not easily accessible, for example below the top cap horizontal wall since a person opening the valve does not need to apply pressure to this portion of the valve (person needs access only to the portion of the valve wall to be pressed upon). The valve can be placed in a round tube by sealing off the areas between the valve wall 91 and the tube wall. The flexible portions of the arms 93, 95 allow for the ends (point were the arm meets the valve wall) of the arms to bend as the orientation of the valve wall 92 changes. The flexible portion of the arms 93, 95 can also be that of a hinge, such as a living hinge or integral hinge. If necessary the portion of the valve wall not to be pushed inward may be strengthened or the portion of the valve wall to move inward may be weakened.

FIG. 10A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 10B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 10A in the open Position. FIG. 10C thru FIG. 10H show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

In this embodiment the valve wall 102 which in this embodiment is rectangular plate shaped is placed in the valve diagonally. The upper arms 103 which are shown as bar shaped, are connected on one end to the valve wall 101 and on the other to the upper portion of the valve wall 102. At the point were the valve wall 102 and upper arm meet is a flexible point 103 of the upper arm. The sealing element middle arm 106 which is shown as rectangular plate shaped, is connected on one end hermetically to the valve wall 101 and on the other hermetically to the center of the valve wall 102. The sealing element middle arm 106 functions as arm and functions as a sealing element which can be replaced by attaching the top of the valve wall 102 hermetically to the valve wall 101, or making the spring action lower arms 108 rectangular plate shaped connected hermetically to the valve wall 101 and the valve wall 102, which in turn means the sealing element middle arms 106 would be arms that may be bar shaped. The spring action flexible lower arms which are shown as bar shaped are connected on one end to the valve wall and on the other to the lower end of the valve wall 102. The sealing element 107 which are shown as protrusions of the valve wall 101 located on the valve walls 101 to the sides of the valve wall 102, running parallel to the valve wall 102, slightly above the valve wall 102, from the horizontal plane within which lies the sealing element middle arm 106 to the bottom of the valve wall, when the valve is in the closed position.

The valve is opened by applying pressure, pressing the area of the valve wall 101 within which lies the upper arm 104 which in turn push's the top part of the valve wall 102 inward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, which in turn causes the bottom portion of the valve wall 102 to move inward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, since the center of the valve wall 102 is held in place (vertical plane) by the sealing element middle arm. This in turn flexes the spring action flexible lower arms 108 and the valve is opened. By releasing the pressure, pressing on the valve wall 101 the spring action flexible lower arm 108 push's the bottom of the valve wall 102 back outward, relatively relative to the area center of valve, closing the valve.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Also the pressure assists in holding the valve closed once it is closed and assists in holding the valve open once it is opened, and still is relatively easy to open. Also even if no pressure is present the valve still functions. The spring action flexible lower arms 108 function can be replaced by the valve wall 101 if the valve wall has spring action in that after releasing the pressure of pressing on the relevant portion of the valve wall 101 it automatically moves in an outward direction to its rest position which in turn pulls the top of the valve wall 102 outward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, which in turn pulls the bottom of the valve wall 102 outward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, sealing the valve, leaving no need for the spring action flexible lower arms 108. The valve can be located inside the top portion of the tube or the cap or a nipple (which means that the valve wall 101 can also be referred to as the tube wall when the valve is inside a tube or a nipple wall when the valve is inside a nipple). Also when placed in a tube, cap or nipple the bottom portion of the valve can be placed inside the portion of the cap (tube or nipple) which is not easily accessible, for example below the top cap horizontal wall since a person opening the valve does not need to apply pressure to this portion of the valve (person needs access only to the portion of the valve wall to be pressed upon). The valve can be placed in a round tube by sealing off the areas between the valve wall 101 and the tube wall. The flexible portions of the arms 103, 105 allow for the ends (point were the arm meets the valve wall) of the arms to bend as the orientation of the valve wall 102 changes. The flexible portion of the arms 103, 105 can also be that of a hinge, such as a living hinge or integral hinge. If necessary the portion of the valve wall not to be pushed inward may be strengthened or the portion of the valve wall to move inward may be weakened.

FIG. 11A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 11B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 11A in the open Position. FIG. 11C thru FIG. 11H show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

These Figures show an embodiment identical to that of the Embodiment shown in FIG. 10 except that instead of the spring action flexible lower arms, springs 118 and spring guides 119 are used. Which push the valve walls 112 to the closed position.

When opening the valve the bottom portion of the valve walls 112 push's the springs 118 inward, and when the pressure used to open the valve is released the springs 118 push the bottom portion of the valve walls 112 outward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, closing the valve. Outward.

Possible changes, uses, embodiments and the like discussed in the embodiment shown in FIG. 10 apply here.

FIG. 12A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 12B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 12A in the open Position. FIG. 12C thru FIG. 11F show a front view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

In this embodiment a cap tube 122 is shown as beginning above the top of the cap 121 projecting in a downward direction thru the top horizontal wall of the cap 121 wherein the outer walls of the cap tube 122 are hermetically joined with the perimeter of the area of the cap 121 thru which it projects. The cap tube 122 is opened at the top, sealed at the bottom and has a hole 123 which is located on the area of the tube that is on the same horizontal plane as that of the hole at the top of the container tube 124. The cap 121 can be spun which in turn spins the cap tube 122. In the closed position the cap tubes 122 holes 123 is unaligned with the hole at the top of the container tube 124. The container tube runs from the bottom of the container 125 to its top then projects to meet the cap tube 122 wherein the top hole of the container tube 124 is pressed snugly against the cap tube 122 on the horizontal plane wherein lies the cap tube 122 hole 123. If necessary a washer can be placed around the top hole of the container tube 124.

To open the valve the cap 121 is spun until the cap tube 122 hole 123 aligns with the top hole of the container tube 124.

This type of valve does not close directly against the pressure inside the container and can be used even if no pressure is present.

FIG. 13A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 13B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 11A in the open Position. FIG. 13C thru FIG. 13G show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

The top perimeter of the support sealing element 132 is hermetically attached to the valve wall 131. The support sealing element 132 shaped here as a circular disk (whose outer perimeter is hermetically connected to the valve wall 131) with a hole at center were from the perimeter of the hole a ring extends downward to hermetically connect to the perimeter of the upper bulge 133 which is shaped here as a circular base converted in to a hemispherical bulge at its top projecting in an upward direction. The upper bulge 133 has upper holes 137 located close to its perimeter while the lower bulge 136, shaped here as a circular base converted in to a hemispherical bulge at its top projecting in an upward direction, has lower holes 134 located close to its center. The lower bulge 136 is supported by the spring action flexible arms 138, which press the lower bulge 136 snugly against the upper bulge 133 which seals the valve. Since the bulges holes are not aligned each bulge closes the holes of the other bulge. If necessary a washer may be placed around the lower holes 134 of the lower bulge 136 for further sealing between the upper holes 137 and lower holes 134.

To open the valve the valve walls 131 are pushed inward which in turn push the arms 135 which in turn cause the lower bulge 136 to go downward because of the lower bulges 136 curved features. This causes the spring action flexible arms 138 to flex.

Since the lower bulge 136 is moved away from the upper bulge 133 the contents can flow thru the lower holes 134 and then thru the upper holes 137.

The lower holes 134 in the lower bulge are not necessary for the valve to function in which case, if the lower holes 134 were removed, you may also place a washer around the bottom perimeter of the support sealing element 132 to assist in sealing the valve.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Also the pressure assists in holding the valve closed once it is closed and assists in holding the valve open once it is opened, and still is relatively easy to open. Also even if no pressure is present the valve still functions. If necessary the portion of the valve wall not to be pushed inward may be strengthened or the portion of the valve wall to move inward may be weakened. The valve wall 131 may be substituted for tube walls when the embodiment is placed in a tube or cap walls when the embodiment is placed in the cap or nipple walls when the embodiment is placed in a nipple.

FIG. 14A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 14B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 14A in the open Position. FIG. 14C thru FIG. 14F show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

A controlling disk 147 shaped here as a rectangular plate with a hole 144 and an extension 145, slides thru a hole in the tube 141. A spring action flexible arm 148 push's the controlling disk 147 outward aligning the plate of the controlling disk 147 to seal the tube 141. The spring action flexible arms 148 rest position is strait in this case. Also shown is a support arm 142 shaped here as a vertical plate with horizontal arms extending to the tube wall 141, which can assist in sealing the area between the spring action flexible arm 148 and the controlling disk 147. Also shown is flexible cover 143 which seals the area around the controlling disk 147.

To open the tube the extension 145 is pressed inward which pushes inward the controlling disk 147 aligning the hole 144 with the inside of the tube thereby opening the tube. This causes the spring action flexible arm 148 to flex. Once the extension is released the spring action flexible arm automatically pushes the controlling disk 147 outward closing the tube.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort The support arm 142 can be taken out by attaching the spring action flexible arm to the tube wall 141 and using a washer on the tube hole were the controlling exits when the valve is open. The flexible cover can be taken out by using a washer on the tube hole were the controlling disk 147 enters. The spring action flexible arm can be taken out by making the part of the tube wall were the end of the controlling disk 147 is spring action flexible in that when the extension 145 is pressed the end of the controlling disk pushes the said spring action flexible wall part out and the hole 144 aligns with the inside of the tube. The tube is sealed by releasing the extension 145 because the spring action flexible wall part push's the controlling disk 147 back, also there is no need for a washer or sealing element on this end of the controlling disk 147 because it never exit's the tube wall 141. This type of valve can be placed anywhere along the exit path of the contents of the container from the bottom of the container to the exit point. The tube wall 141 can also be referred to as the valve wall when the entire system is placed inside a tube and sealed therein.

FIG. 15A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 15B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 15A in the open Position. FIG. 15C thru FIG. 15F show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

Everything written about the closing of the embodiment in FIG. 14 applies here except that instead of a spring action flexible arm a spring 158 and spring guide 153 is used.

Everything written about the opening of the embodiment in FIG. 14 applies here except that instead of a spring action flexible arm a spring 158 and spring guide 153 is used

Everything written about the embodiment in FIG. 14 applies here except as stated in the previous paragraph.

FIG. 16A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 16B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 16A in the open Position. FIG. 16C thru FIG. 16F show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

Attached to the valve walls are arms 162, which are bar shaped, within which runs the valve wall top 163, which is shown as a circular base converted into a strait hemispherical bulge at its top projecting in an upward direction (cone), which is supported by the support arm 164, which is bar shaped, which in turn is supported by support sealing element 167, which is circular plate shaped, which in turn is supported by the spring action flexible arms 166, which are bar shaped. The support sealing element 167 is pushed against the sealing stopping element 165, which is circular plate with hole at center shaped, and its outer perimeter is hermetically connected to valve wall 161, thereby closing the valve.

The valve is opened by pressing on the valve walls 161 which in turn push the arms 162 inward which in turn cause the valve wall top 163 to go downward (because of the bulge shape of the valve wall wherein the walls are slanted) which in turn pushes the support arm 164 downward which in turn push's the support sealing element 167 downward which allows the content to pass between the support arm 164 and the sealing stopping element 165 there by opening the valve. The spring action flexible arms 166 now become flexed. When the pressure, pressing on the valve wall 161 is released the spring action flexible arms 166 return to their rest state automatically, which in this case is strait which in turn push's the support sealing element 167 upward against the sealing stopping element 165 thereby closing the valve.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Also the pressure assists in holding the valve closed once it is closed and assists in holding the valve open once it is opened. Also even if no pressure is present the valve still functions. The valve walls 161 can be replaced by tube walls, nipple walls, cap walls when the embodiment is placed in a tube, nipple, cap respectively. Also when placed in a tube, cap or nipple the bottom portion of the valve can be placed inside the portion of the cap (tube or nipple) which is not easily accessible, for example below the top cap horizontal wall since a person opening the valve does not need to apply pressure to this portion of the valve (person needs access only to the portion of the valve wall to be pressed upon). The spring action flexible arm 166 can be replaced by a spring. A washer may be placed on the support sealing element 167 or stopping sealing elements 165 underside to assist in the seal between the two parts.

FIG. 17A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 17B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 17A in the open Position. FIG. 17C thru FIG. 17F show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

Everything involved in opening this valve is the same as stated in paragraphs about FIG. 16

Everything involved in closing this valve is the same as stated in paragraphs about FIG. 16

Everything written about the embodiment in FIG. 16 applies here except as stated in the previous paragraph. The only difference in the embodiment in FIG. 17 relative to that of FIG. 16 is the shape of the valve wall which in FIG. 17 is upside down U shaped, which may assist in the closing of the valve since the pressure has more internal valve wall area to push against.

FIG. 18A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 18B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 18A in the open Position. FIG. 18C shows a front view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

Here is shown a rope 182 which is connected to a arm 185 which is connected to a lever 183.

When the lever 183 is depressed the arm 185, which is connected on one end to the lever at a flexible point 184 (living hinge of the arm), the end connected to the rope 182 is forced downward because it hit's the wall of the container and has no were else to go. This pulls the rope downward which activates a valve which in this case is the valve embodiment described in FIG. 15. The lever 183 can be pushed back to its outward position by a means such as a spring, or by the valve wall in a valve which closes automatically and is connected to the rope 182 wherein when the lever is released the valve wall pulls the rope 182 back.

This embodiment is just an example of how the regulating means of the contents in a container can be that which is controlled by a persons hand.

FIG. 19A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 19B shows a right side view of FIG. 19A. FIG. 19C shows a front view of the embodiment shown if FIG. 19A in the closed position. FIG. 19D shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 19B in the closed position. FIG. 19E thru FIG. 19G show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

In this embodiment two spring action flexible valve walls 193 run parallel to each other and are connected to the valve walls at their ends. Attached to each spring action flexible valve wall 193 is the sealing element 194, which is a plate shaped highly flexible material which is connected hermetically to the entire length of the spring action flexible valve wall 193 and the valve wall walls around the spring action flexible valve wall 193 on the side opposite to the other spring action flexible valve wall 193. The spring action flexible valve walls 193 rest state is strait creating a seal between them and the rest of the valve is sealed by the sealing elements 194 which run, one from each spring action flexible valve wall 193 to the valve walls 192.

To open the valve pressure, pressing is applied to the area of the valve walls 192 wherein lie the spring action flexible valve walls 193 causing them to flex outward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, whereupon the sealing elements 194 which are very flexible fold up between the spring action flexible valve walls 193 and the valve walls 192. Thus the valve is opened. When releasing the pressure, pressing on the valve walls 192 the spring action flexible valve walls 193 return to there rest state closing the valve.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. The spring action flexible valve walls 193 need only be flexible valve walls if the valve wall 192 has spring action wherein when the pressure squeezing the valve walls 192 is released the valve walls 192 return outwardly to their rest position which they in turn pull on the now solely flexible valve wall on its ends causing them to straiten and seal the valve. A spring with spring guide may also be used to replace the spring action function of the flexible valve wall wherein the spring runs from the valve wall to the now solely flexible valve wall, on a horizontal plane. If necessary washers may be placed on the sides of the spring action flexible valve walls that meet each other. The valve may be placed in the tube, cap, nipple and the valve walls 192 may be replaced by the tube, cap, nipple walls respectively.

FIG. 20A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 20B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 20A in the open Position. FIG. 20A thru FIG. 20F shows a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

The upper valve wall 203, which in this embodiment is rectangular plate shaped, is hermetically connected to the valve wall 201 on one end. Washers may be placed on the valve walls 201 to the sides of said connected side directly above upper valve wall 203. The upper valve wall 203 has upper holes 202 close to its center. The lower valve wall 205, which in this embodiment is rectangular plate shaped, is hermetically connected to the valve wall 201 on one end, which is the valve wall 201 opposite to the valve wall 201 that the upper valve wall 201 is connected to Washers may be placed on the valve walls 201 to the sides of said connected side directly below lower valve wall 203. The lower valve wall 205 has lower holes 204 near its center. Because the upper holes 204 are not aligned with the lower holes 204 the valve is closed.

To open the valve pressure, pressing is placed on the valve wall 201 area wherein lie the valve walls. This squeezes the valve walls 201 pushing in the valve walls causing the upper holes 202 of the upper valve wall 203 to align with the lower holes 204 of the lower valve wall 205. The valve walls are stopped when the holes align because the ends if the valve walls opposite the end connected to the valve wall hit's the valve wall on the other side. By releasing the pressure to open the valve the spring action of the valve walls 201 cause the valve walls to move outward to their rest position which in turn pulls the valve walls and causes the holes in the valve walls to become unaligned closing the valve. A washer may be placed on the end of the valve walls opposite that end which is connected to the valve wall 201 to assist in sealing.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Also the pressure assists in holding the valve closed once it is closed and assists in holding the valve open once it is opened. Also even if no pressure is present the valve still functions. The spring action function of the valve walls 201 can be replaced by spring action flexible arms or a horizontal spring attached on one end to the valve wall and on the other to the valve wall 201 or they can be attached two both valve walls wherein pushing them apart. The valve can be placed in the tube, nipple cap, wherein the valve walls 201 can be replaced by the tube walls, nipple walls, cap walls, respectively.

FIG. 21A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 21B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 21A in the open Position. FIG. 21C thru FIG. 21J shows a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container wherein the said means is opened via vacuum action.

The upper spring action flexible arms 212, which here are bar shaped, are connected on one end to the valve wall 210a and on the other to the upper valve wall 211, which here is circular plate shaped, holding it down against the upper sealing element 216, which is circular with hole at center plate shaped sealing the valve. The upper valve wall 211 is connected at a flexible point 213 (hinge) to the valve wall 210a and is connected on its underside to the upper arm 215, which is bar shaped and has a flexible point on its top 214 and on its bottom 217 (hinge), which in turn is connected to the arms pivot 219, which is bar shaped, which is in turn connected to the lower arm 219b, which is bar shaped and has a flexible point on its top 219a and its bottom 219c (hinge), which in turn is connected to the lower sealing element 219f, which is circular plate shaped, which is pushed up by lower spring action flexible arms 219e, which are bar shaped, and forms a second seal against the lower sealing element 219h, which is circular plate with hole at center shaped. The lower valve wall 219f is connected to the valve wall at a flexible point 219d (hinge). The support arm 219g holds the arms pivot 219 in place but allows it to seesaw on its flexible point 218 (hinge). The upper and lower sealing elements are hermetically connected on their outer perimeter to the valve wall 210a.

To open the valve a sucking force is applied to the top of the valve 210 opening which causes a vacuum which causes the upper valve wall 211 to rise which one flexes the upper spring action flexible arms 212 and two pulls the upper arm 215 which causes the arms pivot 219 to (seesaw) rise on its right side which causes its left side to go down (because its center is held in the same vertical plane) which push's down the lower arm 219b which in turn push's down the lower valve wall 219f. Thus the valve is opened where the contents flow between the lower valve wall 219f and the lower sealing element then around the arms and then between the upper valve wall 211 and the upper sealing element 216.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Also the pressure assists in holding the valve closed once it is closed and assists in holding the valve open once it is opened, and still is relatively easy to open. Also even if no pressure is present the valve still functions. The spring action flexible arms function can be replaced by a spring. The valve can be located inside a portion of a tube or a cap or a nipple (which means that the valve wall 210a can also be referred to as the tube wall when the valve is inside a tube or a nipple wall when the valve is inside a nipple or a cap wall when inside a cap). Washers may be placed on the sealing elements on the side that touches the valve walls to assist in sealing the valve. The valve can be any shape wherein adjusting the shapes of the valve walls and sealing elements.

FIG. 22A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 22B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 22A in the open Position. FIG. 22C thru FIG. 22G show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

Inside the valve lies a valve wall top 227 which has a circular plate with a hole at center shaped base wherein a ring projects upward from the perimeter of the hole in the circular plate shaped, then attached to the top end of the projecting ring are two latch arm elements 221 on opposite sides. On the ends of the latch arm element 221 is a cantilever lever 223 and a cantilever latch 225 which is held down by the latch groove element 222 which is why the valve wall top 227 cant move upward. Below the valve wall top 227 is the lower sealing element 228 which is circular plate with hole at center with inner circular plate with bars connecting the circular plate with hole at center and inner circular plate shaped, wherein contents can flow in between the bars. The inner plate of the lower sealing element 228 seals the hole at the center of the valve wall top 227 and the circular plate with hole at center part of the lower sealing element 228 seals the perimeter of the base of the valve wall top 227. The lower sealing element is hermetically connected at its outer perimeter to the valve wall 220.

When the cantilever levers 223 are pushed inward the cantilever latch 225 is pulled outward from under the latch groove element 222 thereby releasing the valve wall top 227 which is raised by the internal pressure of the container trying to escape and at the same time it rises off the lower sealing element 228 thereby opening the valve. It stops at the upper sealing stopping element 226, which is circular plate with hole at center shaped and is hermetically sealed at its outer perimeter to the valve wall 220. The top valve wall is now raised out of the valve and serves as the exit were a person can drink from. To close the valve the top valve wall 227 is pushed down and the cantilever latches 225 snap into the groove elements 222 closing the valve. Here we see an example valve that is manually opened and closed by a persons mouth.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Washers may be used on the top of the lower sealing element, the bottom of the upper sealing stopping element, around the outer perimeter of the top valve wall. The valve may be placed in the tube, cap, nipple in which case the valve walls 220 may be the tube walls, cap walls, nipple walls respectively. The automatic rising of an inner tube by the pressure inside the container can be applied in use with other types of valves.

FIG. 23A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 23B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 23A in the open Position. FIG. 23C thru FIG. 23G show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

The pivots 232, which are bar shaped, run diagonally. The top of the pivots 232 meet the valve wall 231 at their tops and are connected closer to their tops to the upper arms 237, which are bar shaped, which are connected to the valve wall 231. The pivots 232 are connected at their center to the arms 234 which are connected on their other end to the valve wall 231. To the pivots 232 bottoms, which end near the center of the valve, are connected the valve wall bases 235, which are triangle plate base shaped projecting in an upward direction. To the outer, relatively relative to the area center of valve, wall of the valve wall bases is connected the flexible sealing element 236, which when the valve is closed is plate with hole at center shaped. The flexible sealing element 236 is hermetically connected at its outer perimeter to the valve wall 231 and on its inner perimeter to the valve wall bases 235. When there is no pressure applied to the valve walls 237 at the horizontal plane area wherein lies the upper arms 237 the valve walls 231 which have spring action are pulling the upper arms 237 outward, relatively relative to the area center of valve, which in turn pull the top portion of the pivot 232 outward, relatively relative to the area center of valve, which in turn causes the bottom portion of the pivot 232 and the valve wall bases 235 to move inward meeting each other. The valve is closed by the valve wall bases 235 meeting at their inner walls, washers may be used, around which valve wall bases 235 outer walls is connected the flexible sealing element 236 which connects on its outer perimeter to the valve wall 231.

To open the valve pressure, pressing is applied to the valve wall 231 area which lies on the same horizontal plane as the upper arms 237 (valve walls 231 bellow and above this area may be strengthened) which in turn pushes the upper arms 237 which in turn push the top part of the pivot 232 inward, relatively relative to the area center of valve. Because the center of the pivot 232 is held on the same vertical plane by the arms 234 the lower part of the pivot 232 and valve wall bases 235 move outward, relatively relative to the area center of valve, which causes the flexible sealing element 236 to stretch opening the valve.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Also the pressure assists in holding the valve open once it is opened. Also even if no pressure is present the valve still functions. The spring action function of the relative portion of the valve walls 231 can be replaced by flexible sealing element 236 if the flexible sealing element 236 has spring action in that after releasing the pressure on the valve wall 231 which ultimately results in the stretching of the flexible sealing element 236, the flexible sealing element 236 automatically moves inward, relatively relative to the area center of the valve, to its rest position which in turn pushes the valve wall bases 235 inward, relatively relative to area center of the valve, sealing the valve (also a spring action flexible arm can be used to replace said spring action function to push the bottom of the pivots 232 together). The valve can be located inside the top portion of the tube or the cap or a nipple (which means that the valve wall 231 can also be referred to as the tube wall when the valve is inside a tube or a nipple wall when the valve is inside a nipple). Also when placed in a tube, cap or nipple the bottom portion of the valve can be placed inside the portion of the cap (tube or nipple) which is not easily accessible, for example below the top cap top horizontal wall since a person opening the valve does not need to apply pressure to this portion of the valve (person needs access only to the portion of the valve wall to be pressed upon).

FIG. 24A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 24B shows a right side view of FIG. 24A. FIG. 24C shows a front view of the embodiment shown if FIG. 24A in the closed position. FIG. 24D shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 24B in the closed position. FIG. 24E thru FIG. 24I show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

The sealing element 243, which is circular plate with hole at center shaped, is connected hermetically at its outer perimeter to the valve wall 241 lies directly above the valve wall 244, which is circular plate shaped (relatively same size horizontally as that of the valve when the valve is in the closed position) and connected at two points 242 to the valve wall 241. The outer perimeter area of the valve wall 244 is pressed against the sealing element 243 when there is no pressure, pressing applied to the valve walls 241 which have a spring action function.

To open the valve pressure is applied to the valve wall area wherein lie the connecting points 242 of the valve wall 244. This causes the valve walls 241 on these sides to move inward which in turn push the valve wall 244 ends connected to the valve walls 241 together and the valve wall 244 bends at its center line (horizontal line), center line being relatively relative to the valve wall 244 ends connected to the valve walls 241. The other two sides of the valve walls 241 that were not pressed upon move outwardly. The valve is opened wherein contents can pass between the sides of the valve wall 244 and the valve walls 241.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Also the pressure assists in holding the valve open once it is opened and closed once closed. Also even if no pressure is present the valve still functions. The spring action function of the valve walls 241 may be replaced by a spring or spring action flexible arm or spring action added to the valve wall 244 which would, push the valve walls 241 which were pressed together away from each other or to pull the valve walls that moved away from each other back, when the pressure, pressing on the valve walls 241 is released thereby closing the valve. The connection point 243 of the valve wall 244 may be a living hinge or integral hinge, etc. A washer may be placed on the sealing element 243 or the valve wall 244 on the area between them. The valve may be located in the tube, cap, nipple, wherein the valve wall 241 may also be the tube, cap, nipple wall respectively.

FIG. 25A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 25B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 25A in the open Position. FIG. 25C thru FIG. 25G show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

Around the inner valve wall 251 are attached the bulge elements 252, which are vertical ring base converted into a hemispherical bulge at its top projecting in an outward direction from valve wall 251 shape, to which are attached at their ends the stopper elements 253. To one side of each stopper element 253, when the valve is in the closed position are the ends of the pivot handles 254, which are bar shaped, that extend inward from said ends to meet at the point were they connect to the top of the valve wall leg 255. To the bottom of the valve wall leg 255 is connected the valve wall base 258, which is circular plate shaped, and has upper holes 257 in it. The valve wall base 258 is held stationary when valve is closed by the spring action flexible arm 256. Directly below the valve wall base 258 is the sealing element 259, which is circular plate shaped and is hermetically connected at its perimeter to the valve wall 251, and has lower holes 250 in it. The valve is closed because the upper holes 257 are not aligned with the lower holes 250.

To open the valve pressure, pressing is applied to the valve wall 251 wherein lie the bulge elements 252 which cause the ends of the pivot handles 254 to slide down, on a horizontal plane, the curved wall of the bulge element 252 causing the pivot handles 254 to move in the direction on the side of the stoppers 253 to which they lie. The pivot handles 254 in turn spin the valve wall leg 255 which in turn spins the valve wall base 258 (the spring action flexible arm 256 becomes flexed) which causes the upper holes 257 of the valve wall base 258 to align with the lower holes 250 of the sealing element 259 allowing contents to pass thru them. When the pressure on the valve walls 251 is released the spring action flexible arm 256 returns to its rest state and spins the valve wall base 258 back and the holes become unaligned and the pivot handles 254 which spin in conjunction with the valve wall base 258 are stopped by the stoppers 253 which stops the valve wall base 258 from spinning to far.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Also the pressure assists in holding the valve open once it is opened. Also even if no pressure is present the valve still functions. A washer may be placed around the upper holes 257 and or lower holes 250. The valve can be placed in the tube, cap, nipple, and also wherein the valve walls 251 may be the tube, cap, nipple walls respectively. The valve wall 251 below and above the area upon which pressure is applied to open the valve may be strengthened. The spring action flexible arm may be a spring. The stopper elements 253 are not necessary if the spring action flexible arm 256 is configured to hold the valve wall base 258 in place when the valve is in the closed position.

FIG. 26A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 26B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 26A in the open Position. FIG. 26C thru FIG. 26D show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of changing the shape of the means of regulating the release of the contents of a container.

When a square valve is placed in a round tube arms 263 can be placed between the valve wall 262 and the tube wall 261.

When the Tube wall 261 is pressed they in turn move the arms 263 inward which in turn press on the valve walls 262 (portion of valve were pressure is applied to open the valve).

This is just an example to show that any shaped valve can be placed in any shaped tube, cap, nipple (or just changing the shape of the valve itself) by sealing hermetically the area between their walls and adding any arms necessary to transfer the energy of any pressure applied to the tube, cap, nipple walls (or new valve walls with a desired shape) to the valve to open the valve.

FIG. 27A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 27B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 27A in the open Position. FIG. 27C thru FIG. 27F show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the release of the contents of a container

A nipple 272 has attached to its inner wall the holding element 276, which is ring shaped. The cap 270 at its top center which is holed has attached to the perimeter of the hole below the cap ceiling, the flow thru element 277, which is ring shaped, with vertical holes 279. Attached to the flow thru elements 277 bottom hermetically is the sealing element 278, which is circular plate shaped and attached to the bottom perimeter of the flow thru element 277. Attached to the sealing elements 278 roof are the permanent stopping elements 274, which are bar rising vertically then projecting horizontally towards nearest nipple wall. Attached to the permanent stopping elements 274 is the temporary stopping element 275, which is ring shaped. When the nipple is down the temporary stopping element 275 holds down the holding element 276 which is attached to the nipple 272 holding it down, therefore the nipple wall which is round and relatively the same size (slightly smaller) as the flow thru element 277 lies inside the flow thru element 277 blocking the holes 279 and since the flow thru element is hermetically attached at its top the cap 270 and attached at its bottom to the sealing element 278 the valve is closed.

To open the valve the nipple 272 is lifted, and the holding element 276 is pulled over the temporary stopping element 275, lifting the bottom of the nipple 272 walls out of the flow thru element 277 allowing contents to flow thru the holes 279. The cap is stopped from rising to high by holding element 276 which is stopped by the horizontal protrusion on the permanent stopping element 274.

This embodiment is just one example of many to come of a valve that also wherein lies means of utilizing the pressure in the container allowing for the valve to be sealed under high pressure yet opened with relatively little effort. Also the pressure assists in holding the valve open once it is opened. Also even if no pressure is present the valve still functions. This valve is an example of a fully manual with the permanent stopping element to stop the nipple from popping off especially when there is a lot of pressure on the valve. A washer may be placed on the part of the nipple wall 272 or flow thru element 277 which are in contact when the valve is in the closed position. The valve may be placed inside a tube wherein the cap walls 270 are replaced by the tube walls.

FIG. 28A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 28B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 28A in the open Position. FIG. 28C thru FIG. 28D show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the internal pressure or vacuum of the container.

A one way valve 282, which is circular base converted into a hemispherical bulge at its top projecting in an upward direction cone shaped with a pinhole at its top and is of stretchable material, is shown near the top of the container

When a vacuum is formed in the container air pushes thru the pinhole stretching the one way valve walls however when the pressure inside the container is equal to or greater than that outside the container the valve remains shut. This valve is similar to the valves contained in blood vessels of the human body.

The purpose of this valve is to show that when a pressurized container is being used with one of the many valves and tubes described before and a one way valve is present no internal pressure escapes thru the one way valve and the pressure can be utilized, but also the pressure does not have to be present for the person to drink from the container and the person doesn't have to perform any additional action when this type of valve is present in order for the person to drink from the container because when the person sucks out contents of the container a vacuum is formed which opens the one way valve allowing air to enter the container.

FIG. 29A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 29B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 29A in the open Position. FIG. 29C thru FIG. 29D show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the internal pressure or vacuum of the container.

These figures show a valve that is manual and is used to control the pressure (or vacuum) present inside the container. A bulge element 294, which is vertical circular plate with ring projecting from its perimeter to the perimeter of a hole in the container shaped, has a inner hole 295. A knob element 292, which is vertical plate with ring projecting from its perimeter in direction of container shaped and has outer hole 293. The knob element 292 fits snugly on to the bulge element 294 and has a slight ring protrusion which fits into a ring groove on the bulge element 294 and the knob element 292 is able to spin on the bulge element 294. When the inner and outer holes are unaligned the valve is shut.

The knob element 292 is spun until the outer hole 293 in the knob element and inner hole 295 of the bulge element 294 align thereby opening the valve.

The valve demonstrates a valve that can allow air to enter the container to relieve a vacuum and allow pressure to be released from inside the container.

FIG. 30A shows a front view of another valve embodiment in the closed position. FIG. 30B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 30A in the open Position. FIG. 30C thru FIG. 30D show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of release of dangerously high internal pressure.

A breakable sealing element 302, which is shown here as a circular plate with grooves 303 is placed on the underside of the container

When the pressure reaches a predetermined level the grooves 303 (which are cut relative to said predetermined level) on the breakable sealing element break open relieving the internal pressure.

This is an example of an embodiment add on that may be used as an emergency pressure release valve. It is placed on the underside in this case since that is most likely the place least to be close to a body part, however it can be placed anywhere on the container and an outer plate can be placed over it to absorb the impact of the contents exiting. The purpose of this valve is to control the release of contents when they reach a predetermined level of pressure to avoid the container exploding, the cap flying off, or the valve breaking, etc. Also to avoid injury to persons using or near the container.

FIG. 31A shows a front view of another embodiment add on in one position. FIG. 31B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 31A in another Position. FIG. 31C shows a top view of the individual part.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the internal pressure of the container.

The auto valve wall 313 is located in the container and is disk shaped with a hole in the center thru which runs the tube. The auto valve wall 313 floats on the liquid.

The weight of the auto valve wall 313 (which is relative to its floating ability) assists in adding extra downward pressure on the contents.

The auto valve wall can also be snugly fitted around the tube with a washer in between them and snugly fitted inside the container walls with a washer between them, not allowing any of the liquid contents to pass to its top side and as the contents level lowers so does the auto valve wall 313 because the area above the auto valve wall is pressurized at a level greater than the area below it. This type of optional embodiment add on may especially be useful in a weightless environment.

FIG. 32A shows a front view of another embodiment add on. FIG. 32B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 32A with an additional embodiment add on. FIG. 31C thru 31E show a top view of the individual parts.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the exit flow of the contents from the container.

At the top of the exit hole which may be at the top of a tube, nipple, cap is the bulge element 321, which is a circular base converted into a hemispherical bulge at its top projecting upwards, which is hermetically connected at its perimeter to the perimeter of the original exit hole (top of tube). The bulge element 321 has holes 322 at certain locations, such as close to its perimeter in this case, which directs the flow of the exiting contents.

Another add on is the propeller element 326, which is shaped like a curved propeller running along the wall of the bulge element 321, and is connected to the top center of the bulge element 321 by the propeller arm 327 which allows the propeller element 326 to spin around the bulge element 321. The propeller element 326 is spun around the bulge element 321 when contents exit the holes 322. Whichever hole 322 propeller element 326 is over, the contents exiting that hole hit the propeller element 326 causing it to spin over the next hole and the contents exiting that hole push it over to the next hole, so on and so forth until the contents stop exiting thru the holes 322. This creates a unique feeling in the mouth of the person.

The embodiment add on described in these figures will also work if the container is not pressurized and the person is using sucking force to suck the contents out of the container. These figure show an example of control of the exiting flow of the contents. Also highly flexible flap can be laced at the exit hole of the contents from the container which would also cause a disrupted exit flow creating a unique feeling in a persons mouth. Also the flow of the contents exit might want to be regulated to avoid a choking hazard, of the contents exiting the container at high velocity.

FIG. 33A shows a front view of another embodiment add on. FIG. 33B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 33A in a different position. FIG. 33C thru FIG. 33D show a front view of the individual parts. FIG. 33E shows another similar embodiment to the embodiment shown in FIG. 33A.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the liquid to gas ratio of contents exiting the container.

A inner tube 332 which has inner upper hole 336 and inner lower hole 337. The outer tube 333, which is closed at its bottom, has outer upper hole 335 and outer lower hole 338. The inner tube 332 is fitted snugly into the outer tube 333 and a washer may be added between them between in the area between the outer upper hole 335 and the top of the outer tube 333. The inner holes are aligned on the inner tube 332 relative to the outer tube 333 holes in that when the inner tube 332 is pushed down to its lowest point its lower hole aligns with the lower hole of the outer tube 333 and its upper hole becomes unaligned with the upper hole of the outer tube 333 therefore allowing contents in the container to flow thru the lower holes of both tubes while no contents can flow thru the upper holes of the tubes (because they are now unaligned). Washers may be placed around the holes. The inner tube is raised and lowered in this embodiment by the persons mouth or hand, with use of the flaps 331. Since in a pressurized liquid such as soda the liquid stays on the bottom of the container relative to the gas which remains above the liquid, in this paragraph, which is a relative description of FIG. 33A mostly liquid contents would be flowing thru the tube to the top exit of the inner tube 332.

By raising the inner tube 332 the upper holes begin to align while the lower holes begin to become unaligned and therefore more gas begins to flow thru the inner tube 332 and less liquid. FIG. 33E shows an embodiment relatively similar to FIG. 33A except the inner tube is only a tube at its top from which a bar 330d extends downward and first is connected to it a upper sealing element 330c which is plate shaped and slightly larger than the outer upper hole 335 of the outer tube. Further down the bar 330d is the lower sealing element 330d which is plate shaped and slightly larger than the outer lower hole 338. The sealing elements are held snugly against the outer tube 333 by the support elements 330b, which are ring shaped, and are connected to the bar and push the sealing elements against the inner wall of the outer tube 333. Washers may be placed around the perimeter of the sealing elements. The location of the sealing elements is relatively the same as the inner holes of the inner tube (336, 337) described in FIG. 33A. The embodiment in FIG. 33E functions in the same manner as that in 33A except that instead of allowing contents to flow thru certain points, it blocks certain points forcing the contents to flow thru the other points.

The regulating means of the flow of the contents of the container (valve) can be placed in the outer tube or the inner tube or the cap. The container contents can exit thru the outer tube 333 or the inner tube 332 top. The outer tube 333 can be attached to the cap or the container or partially to both. This embodiment can also be used when contents are not under pressure.

FIG. 34A shows a front view of another embodiment add on. FIG. 34B shows a front view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 34A in a different position. FIG. 34C thru FIG. 34D show a front view of the individual parts. FIG. 34E shows another similar embodiment to the embodiment shown in FIG. 34D.

These figures illustrate a means of regulating the liquid to gas ratio of contents exiting the container.

A inner tube 342 which has inner hole 345 is placed snugly in the outer tube 343 which has outer hole 344. A washer may be placed between the outer tube 343 and the inner tube 342. A washer may also be placed around the holes on the sides between them. The bottom of the outer tube 343 is open so contents can flow thru it from its bottom however if the inner tube 342 is raised the holes on the inner tube 342 and outer tube 343 become aligned and the gas which lies close to the top of the container pushes itself into the flow of liquid contents flowing up from the hole at the bottom of the outer tube 343.

The more the inner tube 342 is raised the more the holes align and in turn the more entrance area the gaseous contents have to push themselves into the flow of the liquid contents thru the hole.

A slight change in the embodiment shown in FIG. 34D is shown in FIG. 34E wherein the inner tube is replaced by a inner tube only at the top for support purposes from which a bar 340b projects downward onto which is connected a sealing element 340d which is plate shaped and slightly larger than the hole on the outer tube. A washer may be placed around the perimeter of the sealing element 340d on the side facing the outer tube wall. The supporting elements 340c which are ring shaped connect the sealing element 340d to the bar 340b and push the sealing element 340d snugly against the inner wall of the outer tube. When the inner tube in FIG. 34E is all the way down the sealing element 340d blocks the hole of the outer tube not allowing for gas to go thru therefore only contents from the bottom of the container flow thru the outer tube from its bottom. As the sealing elements 340d are raised the outer tube hole begins to open and the gaseous contents can push into the outer tube.

The regulating means of the flow of the contents of the container, (valve), can be placed in the outer tube or the inner tube or the cap. The container contents can exit thru the outer tube 343 or the inner tube 342 top. The outer tube 343 can be attached to the cap or the container or partially to both. This embodiment can also be used when contents are not under pressure.

FIG. 35A shows a front view of another embodiment add on

This figure illustrates a means of harnessing the energy of contents flowing thru the tube.

A wheel 353 with valve walls 352 is placed hallway into the tube 351 thru a hole wherein the hole sides meets the wheel 353 and valve walls 352 on their sides and is plate shaped running horizontally the lengthwise of 3 valve walls 352. The wheel 353 is attached on its sides to the center of said hole side via a ball and groove allowing the wheel 353 to spin. The hole bottom and top are also the length of three valve walls 352 and are curved. The purpose of the three valve wall lengths is that at all times a valve wall is in the hole assisting in blocking the exit of contents thru the hole. A length of two valve walls would also suffice. Know when contents are flowing up thru the tube 351 they spin the valve walls 352 which in turn spin the wheel 353 which in turn spins a rope 355 which can be harnessed at this point inside the container or the rope can run thru the walls and harnessed on the outside of the container. The possible uses of the energy harnessed is so abundant but some examples may be to generate electricity (to run a small light), to blow on a whistle, to make a toy connected to the container move, etc., etc., etc.

Although not depicted in the figures a catalyst may be used, be it a consumer performing an action, an example placing a catalyst into the container, that causes the internal pressure of the container to rise. Also a catalyst may be added to the contents whereby changing the contents state.

Know I will proceed in showing examples of possible combination of the parts and functions described before. Also I will show advantages of these combinations.

A container wherein any combination of any one of the following figures [FIG. 2, FIG. 3, FIG. 4, FIG. 5] and any one of the following figures [FIG. 7, FIG. 8, FIG. 9, FIG. 10, FIG. 11, FIG. 12, FIG. 13, FIG. 14, FIG. 15, FIG. 16, FIG. 17, FIG. 18, FIG. 19, FIG. 20, FIG. 22, FIG. 23, FIG. 24, FIG. 25, FIG. 27]. In any combination above the valve stays closed under high internal pressure yet is easily opened. Pressurized contents (such as soda, beer, wine) may be used in the container. Non pressurized contents (such as water) or contents that are pressurized at will but at the moment are not pressurized may be used in the container. Heated contents (such as coffee, tea) may be used in the container. Less energy (such as a person tilting his head, a person tilting the bottle) is used to drink from the container. It takes less time to drink since the cap need not be removed. The container can be controlled by a persons mouth, teeth, lips, hand and if FIG. 21 is used as the valve means it can be controlled by sucking action. Also their may be means for access to clean the inside of the container (such as a wide cap, a container that separates in half). The container may have the weights to its tube for example the embodiment described in FIG. 6 allowing the container to be in any orientation and still the liquid contents flow from the bottom of the tube. The container may have means of regulating the internal pressure or vacuum of the container, for example the embodiment described in FIG. 28 or FIG. 29. The container may have an emergency pressure release valve, for example the embodiment described in FIG. 30. The container may have a means of increasing the pressure on the contents of the container assisting in their downward force, for example the embodiment described in FIG. 31. The container may have a means of regulating the exit flow of the contents from the container, for example the embodiment described in FIG. 32. The container may have a means of regulating the liquid to gas ratio of contents exiting the container, for example the embodiment described in FIG. 33 or FIG. 34. The container may have a means of harnessing the energy of contents flowing thru the tube, for example the embodiment described in FIG. 35. The container may have means for able use in a weightless environment, for example the relative embodiment as described in FIG. 31.

All or some of the following may be included in the same container in any combination harmoniously; means of using the container in any orientation, means of means of regulating an internal vacuum and or internal pressure, means of regulating dangerously high internal pressure, means of regulating the liquid-to-gas ratio of contents exiting the container, means of regulating the exit flow of contents exiting the container, means of harnessing of energy, a cap.

In any possible combination prescribed in the previous paragraph the container may use pressurized contents, non pressurized contents, or heated contents and a person need apply relatively less energy and time to drink from the container, and when the container is used with any type of contents it has no spill feature in that the contents will not come out from the container other than thru the exit valve, and pressure is used to push out the contents from the container when the contents are pressurized, and it can be used as a spray bottle when the contents are under pressure, and it controls the loss of carbonation of carbonated contents, and it retains the heat of a hot liquid. All these advantages lie in the container [wherein any combination of figures prescribed in the previous paragraph] wherein the container need not change its physical form.

In any of the prescribed combinations, the individual units of a combination may be detachable and or reattach able to each other.

No matter what combination of figures, as prescribed before, is used with the container the means of release of the contents from the container stays closed under high internal pressure yet is relatively easily opened. The container wherein means of regulating the release of contents from the container wherein a portion of its closing means not in relation to a portion of its opening means wherein if any internal pressure is or becomes present said means of regulating the release of contents from the container distributes a portion of the pressure upon a portion of it closing means not in relation to a portion of its opening means. This is a unique process of operation of the regulating means (valve) that allows for the valve to stay closed under high internal pressure yet opened with relatively little effort.

The container can be of any relative useful size, shape or color.

Although the preferred embodiments of the invention have been disclosed for integral purposes, those skilled in the art will appreciate that various modifications, additions, and substitutions are possible, without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention as disclosed in the accompanying claims.