Title:
System and Method for Remote Real-Time Surveillance and Control of Pumped Wells
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A system and method is provided for facilitating remote real-time surveillance, management, optimization, and control of pumping systems at a wellsite. A variety of sensors are deployed along pumping systems, such as electric submersible pumping systems, positioned in wellbores. Data from the sensors is output in real-time to a remote location via a network. The system analyzes the data to identify problems and potential problems in the pumping systems and suggest possible causes and corrective measures. The network can be used to provide two-way communication such that control signals may then be sent from the remote location to the pumping systems. Alarms may also be triggered when sensor data or data trends fall outside predetermined ranges.



Inventors:
Kosmala, Alexandre (Royston, GB)
Cosad, Charles (Balcombe, GB)
Fielder, Lance I. (Sugar Land, TX, US)
Ollre, Albert (Sugar Land, TX, US)
Theuveny, Bertrand (Cambridge, GB)
Application Number:
11/307263
Publication Date:
08/02/2007
Filing Date:
01/30/2006
Assignee:
SCHLUMBERGER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION (Sugar Land, TX, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E21B43/12
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
WONG, ALBERT KANG
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SCHLUMBERGER TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION (ROSHARON, TX, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method of operating a pumping system at a welisite, comprising: sensing at least one parameter related to the pumping system in real-time; outputting a signal that corresponds with the sensed parameter to a distribution network; transmitting the signal over the distribution network to a location remote from the wellsite; processing the signal and displaying information related to the signal on a graphical user interface disposed at the remote location; and triggering an alert when the parameter indicates an operational concern.

2. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein the at least one sensed parameter comprises voltage, current, pressure, temperature, or vibration.

3. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein when an alert is triggered the graphical user interface identifies the symptom, the probable cause or causes, and suggests a corrective action.

4. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein sensing comprises sensing downhole parameters related to a plurality of electric submersible pumping systems.

5. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein outputting comprises outputting data from sensors deployed along a wellbore in which the pumping system is deployed.

6. The method recited in claim 1, wherein transmitting comprises transmitting the signal via satellite.

7. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein transmitting comprises transmitting the signal via cellular network.

8. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein transmitting comprises transmitting the signal via the Internet.

9. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein processing comprises processing the signal with a microprocessor-based system remote from the well.

10. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein triggering further comprises providing the alert at a computer workstation.

11. The method as recited in claim 1, wherein triggering further comprises providing the alert at a handheld communication device.

12. A method, comprising: operating downhole pumping equipment in a wellbore to pump a fluid; sensing a plurality of different parameters related to pumping of the fluid; outputting data, related to the plurality of different parameters, through a network; analyzing the data at a remote site via a control system connected to the network; and sending control signals to the downhole pumping equipment via the network.

13. The method as recited in claim 12, wherein outputting comprises making all data obtained from sensing available over the Internet.

14. The method as recited in claim 12, wherein outputting comprises routing the data through a site communications box located proximate the wellbore.

15. The method as recited in claim 12, further comprising displaying the data via a graphical user interface of the control system.

16. The method as recited in claim 15, wherein displaying comprises displaying all current parameter values from a plurality of input/output points.

17. The method as recited in claim 15, wherein displaying comprises displaying historical parameter values.

18. The method as recited in claim 15, wherein displaying comprises displaying pump performance data.

19. The method as recited in claim 12, wherein sending comprises setting specific alarm parameters for a specific wellsite.

20. The method as recited in claim 12, wherein sending comprises changing set points of the control system.

21. A system for facilitating operation of a wellsite, comprising: a plurality of electric submersible pumping systems deployed in a plurality of wellbores; a plurality of sensor devices deployed to sense pumping related parameters of each electric submersible pumping system; a site communications box to receive data from the plurality of sensors and to output control signals to the plurality of electric submersible pumping systems; a control center located at a remote location to receive data from the site communications box and to output control instructions to the site communications box; and a handheld device to receive alerts based on data sent from the site communications box regarding sub-optimal well parameters.

22. The system as recited in claim 21, wherein the site communications box and the control center are connected via the Internet.

23. A method of constructing a well management system, comprising: establishing a sensor system at a wellsite to detect pumping-related parameters along a plurality of electric submersible pumping systems; surveilling the plurality of electric submersible pumping systems in real-time, via the sensor system, at a remote location from the wellsite; controlling operation of the plurality of electric submersible pumping systems from the remote location; utilizing the sensor system in determining when well-related parameters fall outside a desired range, upon which event an alert is automatically output to a remote location; and analyzing data obtained from surveillance of the plurality of electric submersible pumping systems to enable planning for optimization of electric submersible pumping system operation from the remote location.

24. The method as recited in claim 23, wherein establishing comprises deploying pressure sensors, temperature sensors, and vibration sensors along each electric submersible pumping system.

25. The method as recited in claim 23, wherein controlling comprises providing control over a variable speed drive and over a remote start and stop capability for each electric submersible pumping system.

26. The method as recited in claim 23, wherein utilizing comprises providing alerts to a remote handheld device over a network.

27. The method as recited in claim 23, wherein analyzing comprises establishing historical data trends and displaying the historical data trends graphically on a graphical user interface at the remote location.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention generally relates to well systems, and in particular to the management and optimization of well systems that use pumps, such as electric submersible pump (ESP) systems or pumping systems located at the earth's surface, for pumping hydrocarbon-based fluids.

2. Description of Related Art

In many artificially lifted wells, pumping systems are used to produce a desired fluid, e.g. petroleum, to a collection point. For example, a wellbore may be drilled into a subterranean reservoir, and the pumping system is used to lift fluid from the reservoir location to the collection point. Pumps are used to intake fluid from the wellbore and to pump the fluid upwardly or laterally through the wellbore via, for example, production tubing. Instrumentation can be deployed in the wellbore to monitor operation of the pumping system, which may be submersible or surface-mounted.

Although wellbore pumping monitoring and diagnostics systems have been in use for many years, the ability to transfer the data and/or utilize the data in controlling and optimizing pumping system operation has heretofore been limited.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In general, the present invention provides an improved system and method for cost effective real-time surveillance, management, optimization, and control of wellbore pumping systems at one or more wellsites. The technique utilizes real-time surveillance of wellbore pumping systems, transfer of data to one or more remote locations, provision of warnings based on the data, analysis of the data, and control over the one or more wellsites, and is designed to make the identification of wells with performance deficiencies highly efficient. A communications network is used to carry surveillance data and control signals in two-way communication.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Certain embodiments of the invention will hereafter be described with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numerals denote like elements, and:

FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of a system for surveillance and control of a well fluid pumping system, according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a diagramatic representation of an automated system that can be utilized to acquire and manipulate data, according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a flowchart of one embodiment of a methodology for utilizing the surveillance and control system, according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a flowchart of one embodiment of a methodology by which a well operator obtains well data in real-time and uses the well data to optimize operation of the wellbore pumping systems, according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 5 is an elevation view of a plurality of electric submersible pumping systems deployed at a wellsite, according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a schematic representation of a network and remote observation and/or control stations to which two-way communication is provided from the wellsite, according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 7 is an illustration of a graphical user interface displaying information related to operation of pumping systems at a wellsite, according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is an illustration similar to that of FIG. 7 but showing other functionality related to operation of the pumping systems at the wellsite;

FIG. 9 is an illustration similar to that of FIG. 7 but showing other functionality related to operation of the pumping systems at the wellsite;

FIG. 10 is an illustration similar to that of FIG. 7 but showing other functionality related to operation of the pumping systems at the wellsite;

FIG. 11 is an illustration similar to that of FIG. 7 but showing other functionality related to operation of the pumping systems at the wellsite;

FIG. 12 is an illustration similar to that of FIG. 7 but showing other functionality related to operation of the pumping systems at the wellsite;

FIG. 13 is an illustration similar to that of FIG. 7 but showing other functionality related to operation of the pumping systems at the wellsite;

FIG. 14 is an illustration similar to that of FIG. 7 but showing other functionality related to operation of the pumping systems at the wellsite;

FIG. 15 is an illustration similar to that of FIG. 7 but showing other functionality related to operation of the pumping systems at the wellsite; and

FIG. 16 is an illustration similar to that of FIG. 7 but showing other functionality related to controlling operation of the pumping systems at the wellsite.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

In the following description, numerous details are set forth to provide an understanding of the present invention. However, it will be understood by those of ordinary skill in the art that the present invention may be practiced without these details and that numerous variations or modifications from the described embodiments may be possible.

The present invention generally relates to a system and method for remote real-time surveillance, control, and optimization of wellbore pumping systems, e.g. electric submersible pumping systems, at a wellsite. The technique enables a well operator or well field manager to better manage and optimize operation a plurality of pumping systems without physically attending the wellsite. For example, the system and methodology enhances the monitoring, surveillance, diagnostics, and optimization of electric submersible pumps using real-time and on-time data in a cost efficient manner.

Referring generally to FIG. 1, one embodiment of an overall surveillance and control system 20 is illustrated. In this embodiment, a wellsite 22 comprises one or more pumping systems 24, such as electric submersible pumping systems, for pumping fluid. In a typical application, the submersible pumping systems 24 are used to pump hydrocarbon-based fluids, e.g. oil, from geological formations beneath the surface of the earth.

Surveillance and control system 20 further comprises a remote control center 26 where surveillance data is obtained from wellsite 22 and pumping systems 24 on a real-time and on-time basis. Control center 26 may comprise one or more processor-based control systems 28, such as computer-based workstations where wellsite operators or managers can observe data obtained from wellsite 22 and pumping systems 24. This data is used for analysis, planning, and decision-making with respect to operation of pumping systems 24 and the overall wellsite. Additionally, control systems 28 can be used to provide control instructions to wellsite 22 along with, for example, action updates, data polling, and queries.

Either at remote control center 26 or at another remote location, surveillance and control system 20 comprises a data storage system 30 for retaining historical data. Data storage system 30 also can be used to provide user security controls, alarm and alert management, business process management, and other functionality in cooperation with remote control center 26. For example, remote control center 26 and data storage system 30 enable a multidiscipline collaboration and historical interrogation of wellsite data to aid in diagnostic analysis and optimization of pumping system operation.

Control system 28 in cooperation with data storage system 30 also can be used to instigate alarms/alerts when real-time data or data trends indicate changes causing concern with respect to operation of wellsite 22, e.g. movement of parameter values into a sub-optimal range or beyond a predetermined threshold value. The alerts can be provided at control system 28 and/or at a variety of other monitoring locations. For example, the alerts may be provided to remote handheld devices 32, such as cellular telephones 34 or personal digital assistants 36.

The two-way communication between wellsite 22 and the various remote locations, e.g. remote control center 26, data storage system 30, and remote handheld devices 32, is accomplished over a network 38. Network 38 can be established via a variety of transmission mechanisms, including wired and wireless mechanisms 40. For example, the two-way communication of data between wellsite 22 and the remote locations can be sent at least in part over the Internet. Portions of the network may be hardwired, may comprise satellites 42 for satellite transmission, may comprise cellular or radio towers 44 for wireless transfer, or may comprise a variety of other data transmission technologies for conveying data, including real-time data, between the wellsite 22 and the various remote locations of surveillance and control system 20.

Control system 28 is designed to automate processing of much of the data flow within surveillance and control system 20. In the present example, control system 28 is a computer-based system having a central processing unit (CPU) 46, as illustrated in FIG. 2. CPU 46 is a microprocessor based CPU for rapidly processing data obtained from welisite 22, from data storage system 30, and/or from other locations coupled to remote control center 26 via network 38. Furthermore, CPU 46 is operatively coupled to a memory 48, as well as an input device 50 and an output device 52. Input device 50 may comprise a variety of devices, such as a keyboard, mouse, voice-recognition unit, touchscreen, other input devices, or combinations of such devices. Output device 52 may comprise a visual and/or audio output device, such as a monitor having a graphical user interface. Additionally, the processing may be done on a single device or multiple devices.

As illustrated by the flowchart of FIG. 3, control system 28 and overall surveillance and control system 20 increase well management functionality while reducing costs by enabling easy use of real-time and historical data at any of a variety of locations remote from the managed wellsite. For example, surveillance and control system 20 enables the sampling of well-related parameters at individual wells within wellsite 22, as indicated by block 54. The system further promotes accumulation of this data at one or more remote sites, such as data storage system 30 and/or remote control center 26, as indicated by block 56. Control system 28 and CPU 46 enable the use of this data to generate a variety of reports, as indicated by block 58. The reports can be used to aid analysis, planning, and decision-making regarding operation of wellsite 22. Additionally, the storage of data output over network 38 from wellsite 22 enables the construction of data trends, as indicated by block 60. The data trends, including those developed on a real-time basis, also aid in the analysis, planning, and decision-making that allow operation of the wellsite to be optimized. Based on the data output from pumping systems 24 and wellsite 22, the management of wellsite 22 can be accomplished from a variety of remote locations, such as remote control center 26. Also based on analysis of the data, control signals can be output from remote devices, e.g. control system 28 or remote handheld devices 32, to wellsite 22, as indicated by block 62. The analysis can be automated analysis performed at control center 26.

The use of communication tools, such as network 38, control system 28, remote handheld devices 32, data storage systems 30, and other potential devices coupled into network 38, enables a well operator to facilitate surveillance and optimization of well behavior without traveling to the specific wellsite. As illustrated in the flowchart of FIG. 4, the well operator can access all well-related information via network 38, as illustrated by block 64. In this embodiment, the well operator has access to all well-related information via the Internet. The well operator also can enable many approaches to surveillance and control from a variety of remote locations via the two-way communication network 38, as illustrated by block 66.

Furthermore, the well operator can program control system 28 and CPU 46 to provide alerts/warnings when well-related parameters fall outside a desired range or cross a specific set point, as illustrated by block 68. In many applications, the set points can be changed by sending appropriate control signals to wellsite 22 from a remote location, e.g. from remote control center 26 or from remote handheld devices 32. The use of network 38 also enables a well operator to control multiple well systems from one or more remote locations, as illustrated by block 70. Additionally, the storage of data by data storage system 30 and the processing of both real-time and historical data on control system 28 enables a wide variety of analyses to be performed by the well operator and/or others to better plan and optimize well operation, as illustrated by block 72. In some applications, the combination of real-time monitoring and data analysis, either automatic analysis at control center 26 or human analysis, ensures optimum performance of wellsite equipment, including electric pumping systems, variable speed drive controllers, multisensor artificial lift monitoring systems, and a variety of other components and systems.

One example of a wellsite 22 and welisite equipment used in the production of hydrocarbon-based fluids is illustrated in FIG. 5. In this embodiment, wellsite 22 comprises a plurality of wellbores 74 drilled in a formation 76. Within each well bore 74, a pumping system 24, comprising an electric submersible pumping system 78, is deployed. Instrumentation, such as a plurality of sensor devices 80, is deployed along each electric submersible pumping system 78 and may be internal to the pumping system, external to the pumping system, and/or disposed at separate locations within the wellbore 74. Examples of sensor devices 80 include temperature sensors, e.g. distributed temperature sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, multisensors, flow rate sensors, voltage sensors, current sensors, and/or other sensors able to output signals corresponding to the measured parameter in real-time.

In addition to sensor devices and other surveillance equipment, surveillance and control system 20 may comprise a variety of controllable devices 82 which regulate operation of each electric submersible pumping system 78. Controllable devices 82 are controlled remotely via control signals sent over network 38 from one or more remote locations, such as remote control center 26. One example of a controllable device 82 is a variable speed drive that can be controlled remotely. However, controllable devices 82 may comprise a variety of other controllable devices, including valves, heaters, and other components that may be used in cooperation with the electric submersible pumping systems 78. Each of the controllable devices 82 responds to specific control instructions input at a remote location, e.g. control center 26.

In the embodiment illustrated, controllable devices 82, e.g. pump controllers, and sensor devices 80, interface with a site communications box 84 which is used to relay signals between the various wellsite devices and network 38. By way of example, the site communications box 84 may comprise a satellite radio and process-assisted communicator 86 for relaying signals to and from satellite 42. The data from wellsite 22, for example, can be transferred to a remote management system 88 that provides Internet access to the data from a variety of Internet accessible remote locations 90, as illustrated in FIG. 6. The remote management system 88 may form part of remote control center 26, or remote management system 88 may be located separately. In the latter embodiment, control center 26 is coupled in communication with remote management system 88 via the Internet.

As illustrated in FIG. 6 and FIG. 1, the structure of network 38 can vary substantially. This flexibility greatly enhances the remote surveillance and control capabilities of system 20 with respect to electric submersible pumping systems 78 and other equipment at wellsite 22. Access to surveillance and/or control can be provided at numerous remote locations 90 and to numerous types of devices. For example, surveillance and control functionality may be provided to a computer-based workstation 92 at, for example, remote control center 26. However, surveillance and/or control capability can be provided to portable devices such as a laptop computer 94 and/or one or more types of portable handheld devices 32.

In one embodiment, surveillance and control system 20 comprises a web-based application that allows individuals to monitor and control equipment at one or more wellsites 22 from virtually anywhere in the world. In this embodiment, an operator requires only a web browser and an Internet connection to gain access at a variety of remote locations 90. With the use of, for example, a graphical user interface, the operator can simply click on-screen buttons and select drop-down menus to easily access any monitored and/or control points, as discussed more fully below. Of course, access to the system can be controlled by various security measures, including user profile permissions as set by, for example, a project supervisor.

Examples of graphical user interfaces and of functionality available at these remote locations is illustrated in FIGS. 7 through 16. Referring first to FIG. 7, a graphical user interface 96 is displayed on, for example, a display screen 98, such as a computer display screen. By selecting, e.g. clicking on, one of a plurality of on-screen buttons 100, a variety of displays 102 can be chosen by an operator. In the example illustrated, display 102 provides an overview screen having a summary of important input/output points from the one or more wellsites 22. Examples of the information displayed may include a list of wells 104; a list of dates 106 that correspond with individual wells 104; a list of wellhead pressures 108; a list of casing head pressures 110; a list of drive frequencies 112; a list of currents 114; a list of corresponding voltages 116; a list of intake pressures 118; and a list of intake temperatures 120. The data for each of these input/output points is provided by the transmission of data from sensor devices 80, through network 38, and to, for example, control system 28 which utilizes CPU 46 to process the data and categorize the data as displayed via graphical user interface 96. It should be noted, however, that other or additional data can be selected for display.

Another example of the functionality of surveillance and control system 20 is illustrated in FIG. 8. In this example, an operator has selected the appropriate button 100 to display the “current” screen having current values for all input/output points at a specific well or wellsite. As illustrated, the data is arranged in columns listing the specific input/output point 122; the current values 124 of the measured parameters; the units 126 by which the parameters are measured; the status of the parameters 128 (e.g. whether each parameter is within an appropriate predefined range); and, if applicable, the exact time 130 at which each parameter was measured at the specific input/output point. Many of the input/output values are in real-time, however other parameters may be polled or measured on a periodic basis.

In FIG. 9, another example of the functionality of surveillance and control system 20 is illustrated. In this embodiment, an operator has selected the appropriate button 100 to display a “history” screen that enables the printing, graphing, exporting, and/or e-mailing of historical information obtained from, for example, sensor devices 80 and stored, for example, on data storage system 30. By way of example, the graphical user interface 96 enables selection of the historical period of interest (see block 132) and the selection of specific input/output points at wellsite 22 (see block 134).

The functionality of surveillance and control system 20 also enables an operator to set and monitor specific alarm parameters for one or more wells and wellsites 22, as illustrated in FIG. 10. In this embodiment, graphical user interface 96 provides an operator with information on specific wells. The information is arranged in columns by, for example, wellsite name 136; input/output 138 for which an alarm has been set; status of the alarm 140 for each well; time stamp 142 on last reported activity; and the action taken 144. If an alarm has been set for a specific parameter, the status area 140 indicates when the value of that parameter moves outside of a predetermined/optimal range or beyond a set threshold level. Control system 28 and CPU 46 also can be programmed to output an alarm signal to one or more remote handheld devices 32, e.g. cellular telephone 34 or personal digital assistant 36.

The adaptability of surveillance and control system 20 further enables use of an “overview” screen that provides an operator with a field map 146 of multiple wells, as illustrated in FIG. 11. Control system 28 can be programmed to output a variety of information related to each of the wells. For example, CPU 46 may be programmed to provide a color-coded guide as to which wells are performing well, performing poorly, or require future intervention. In one application, wells are identified by dots 148 that are illuminated on field map 146 in green for “no issue,” red for “well down,” and yellow for potential problems requiring further analysis. When a potential problem or operational concern (yellow alarm) arises, the system identifies the symptom, the probable cause or causes, and suggests a corrective action or actions. The operator can then enter appropriate commands via control system 28 which are sent over network 38 to specific pumping systems 24 to adjust controllable devices 82 for optimization of pumping system operation.

As discussed previously, the ability to conduct real-time surveillance and control from remote locations combined with the programmability of control system 28 provides great potential for adapting and customizing the overall surveillance and control system 20. In some applications, for example, it may be desirable to closely track the performance of individual electric submersible pumping systems 78. Data obtained from sensor devices 80 can be automatically processed by CPU 46 to determine pump performance and graphically display such performance via graphical user interface 96. As illustrated in FIG. 12, the correspondence of head to flow can be presented graphically for specific types of pumping systems, and the actual head and a flow rate for specific pumping systems can be plotted with appropriate graph points 150 on a displayed graph 152. With this type of data, CPU 46 can automatically develop a pump performance index graph 154 for specific pumping systems, as illustrated in FIG. 13. In this example, graph 154 presents a pump performance index plotted against date and time as well as a confidence index plotted against date and time.

A wide variety of other automatic analyses can be performed by one or more CPU's 46 deployed at one or more remote locations. In FIG. 14, for example, data collected from sensor devices 80 and wellsite 22 enable an operator to view the fluid level in a specific well for evaluation of system performance. In this example, the graphical user interface 96 is used to display a schematic illustration 155 of a specific electric submersible pumping system 78 with an indication of total liquid above the pump 156, gas free liquid above the pump 158, pump intake depth 160, and depth of casing perforations 162. Adjacent schematic illustration 155, a graph 164 is automatically constructed by control system 28 to graphically illustrate the amount of gas free fluid above the pump at specific dates. This information can be used to trigger an automatic control response or to advise an operator of, for example, the potential to increase production.

Other data observed in real-time at wellsite 22 and transmitted to one or more remote locations via network 38 can be used to construct, for example, pressure gradients, as illustrated by the graph 166 of FIG. 15. Graph 166 plots depths against pressures measured in the well. The depths are at specific components or locations, as indicated by labeled markings 168. The display of graph 166 via graphical user interface 96 enables an operator to, for example, validate well test results and assess pump performance. It should be noted that the functionality and the screens discussed above are only a few examples of the functionality and display potential of the surveillance and control system 20. Depending on the specific well environments and well applications, surveillance can be established for other parameters and/or control can be exercised over a variety of controllable components, either automatically via control system 28, or based on input to control system 28.

Referring to FIG. 16, graphical user interface 96 also can be used to facilitate inputting a variety of control functions. In this screen example, a variety of parameters are displayed in a variable table 170. Additionally, a selection bar 172 is displayed that enables an operator to select between different types of control functions, including varying a polling interval 174; remote start/stop of specific electric submersible pumping systems 176; changing the speed of variable speed drive 178; and changing parameter set points 180. Additional screening input buttons 182 can also be provided to facilitate aspects of remotely controlling pumping systems 24 at the one or more wellsites 22. For example, input buttons 182 may comprise start and stop buttons for the remote starting and stopping of specific electric submersible pumping systems 78. The control instructions are input via graphical user interface 96, and those instructions are output by control system 28 as control signals over network 38. The control signals are directed to site communications box 84 which further directs the control signal to the appropriate controllable device 82 for actuation. The ability to control surveillance and control system 20 remotely greatly facilitates the taking of immediate action should the system experience a problem, such as a power failure.

Surveillance and control system 20 greatly enhances the adaptability, functionality and cost effectiveness of well management. The system enables the generation of a wide variety of reports, reduces wellsite visits, decreases costs associated with installation, maintenance, and administration of the control system, improves pump operation, facilitates prioritization of well work, reduces well interventions, extends pump run life, and increases pump and well uptime. All of these characteristics of surveillance and control system 20 enable the cost efficient optimization of production at one or more wellsites 22.

Although, only a few embodiments of the present invention have been described in detail above, those of ordinary skill in the art will readily appreciate that many modifications are possible without materially departing from the teachings of this invention. Accordingly, such modifications are intended to be included within the scope of this invention as defined in the claims.