Title:
Temporary fence
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A temporary fence system comprises wire mesh segments, poles and base means in a modular structure. Each base element has a generally flat structure so devised as to be placed on the ground. Each pole may be inserted into a base means to hold it in a generally vertical orientation. Each pole may be inserted into one or two wire mesh segments to support them in a generally vertical orientation. Each wire mesh segment may include one or more stiffening areas thereon. A weather compensation unit helps reduce the false alarm rate in adverse weather.



Inventors:
Ribak, Yehezkel (Ramat-Hasharon, IL)
Application Number:
11/335781
Publication Date:
07/26/2007
Filing Date:
01/20/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04H17/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
PHAM, TOAN NGOC
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
YEHEZKEL RIBAK (RAMAT-HASHARON, IL)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A temporary fence system comprising wire mesh segments, poles and base means in a modular structure, wherein each base element has a generally flat structure so devised as to be placed on the ground, each pole may be inserted into a base means to hold it in a generally vertical orientation and each pole may be inserted into one or two wire mesh segments to support them in a generally vertical orientation.

2. The temporary fence system according to claim 1, wherein each wire mesh segment includes one or more stiffening areas thereon.

3. The temporary fence system according to claim 2, wherein each stiffening area comprises a folded area in the wire mesh.

4. The temporary fence system according to claim 2, wherein each wire mesh segment includes three stiffening areas, and each stiffening area has a generally horizontal orientation.

5. The temporary fence system according to claim 1, wherein each base means has a generally elliptical shape and includes means for attaching up to three poles thereto.

6. The temporary fence system according to claim 1, wherein each wire mesh segment has a vibration sensor attached thereto.

7. The temporary fence system according to claim 1, wherein each vibration sensor includes two fixed electrical contacts with a movable contact therebetween, and wherein the movable contact may break the electrical contact when the vibration sensor is moved.

8. The temporary fence system according to claim 7, wherein the movable contact further includes damper means attached thereto for cleaning the electrical contact between the fixed and movable contacts.

9. The temporary fence system according to claim 7, wherein the vibration sensor includes at least two sets of electrical contacts, each set including at least two fixed contacts and a movable contact, and wherein the two sets are mounted at a different orientation therebetween.

10. A temporary fence system comprising wire mesh segments, poles, base means and vibration sensors in a modular structure, wherein each base element has a generally flat structure so devised as to be placed on the ground, each pole may be inserted into a base means to hold it in a generally vertical orientation, each pole may be inserted into one or two wire mesh segments to support them in a generally vertical orientation, and a vibration sensor means is attached to each wire mesh segment.

11. The temporary fence system according to claim 10, wherein a plurality of adjacent vibration sensors are mounted together in a sensors group, and wherein the sensors are connected together by a multi-wire cable with multi-pin connectors attached to the cable at the two ends of the sensor group.

12. The temporary fence system according to claim 10, further including signal processing means connected to the sensors for processing signals from the sensors.

13. The temporary fence system according to claim 10, further including weather compensation means for reducing the false alarm rate in adverse weather.

14. The temporary fence system according to claim 13, wherein the weather compensation means includes wind strength sensor means.

15. The temporary fence system according to claim 13, wherein the weather compensation means includes rain or hail sensor means.

16. The temporary fence system according to claim 13, wherein the weather compensation means includes means for raising an alarm threshold level if there are strong winds, rain or hail.

17. The temporary fence system according to claim 10, further including communication means for reporting alarm-related information to a remote location.

18. A method for laying a temporary fence comprising: a. Placing elliptical bases on the ground, according to the desired layout of the fence; b. placing poles within their elliptical bases; c. attaching fence segments to the poles; d. placing vibration sensors on the fence segments and establishing connections as required.

19. The method for laying a temporary fence according to claim 18, wherein each elliptical base includes one, two or three base elements.

20. The method for laying a temporary fence according to claim 18, wherein the vibration sensors are connected using cables or wireless connections.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a novel fence system with means for manufacturing a modular and easy to install temporary fence.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

It is often required to set up a temporary fence, for various purpose such as protecting merchandise or restricting access to a certain area.

Such fences may require a considerable amount of work and materials, at a high cost to the user. Moreover, it may take a long time to perform the task.

To achieve mechanical strength, it may be necessary to dig holes in the ground for the pylons. On a hard ground, this may require a substantial effort. On sand or soft ground, it may be an unreliable support.

Sometimes it is required to change the layout of the fence. In prior art, this may prove difficult and expensive.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a novel temporary fence system. The new fence has a modular structure, with wire mesh segments, poles and base means so devised as to allow easy installation and adaptation to the topography of the location to be protected.

Two or more stiffening areas in the wire mesh segment may achieve a fence having improved mechanical strength.

Stackable base elements allow for easy handling thereof, together with a stable, heavy base as per system requirements.

Electronic sensor means integrated within the fence may improve the level of protection provided by the new fence system.

The fence system may be adapted to various requirements, to include “Y” splits, gates, etc.

The vibration means integrated within the fence provide a reliable threat detection with tri-dimensional sensitivity.

The electronics includes sensors, signal processing means and interconnections means in a modular, easy to install and very reliable alarm system.

The electronics may be easily adapted to various fence layouts as the need be.

Weather compensation means help reduce the false alarm rate.

Further objects, advantages and other features of the present invention will become obyious to those skilled in the art upon reading the disclosure set forth hereinafter.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates a temporary fence with vibration sensor and cable

FIG. 2 details a fence with enhanced back support and extended height

FIG. 3 details the mechanical support for a fence segment

FIG. 4 details a fence post and base

FIG. 5 details the fence post base element

FIG. 6 details a fence corner

FIG. 7 details a split (“Y”) in the fence

FIG. 8 details a fence with an inclined top

FIG. 9 details a gate in the fence

FIG. 10 illustrates a perspective view of a vibration sensor

FIG. 11 details a top view of the vibration sensor

FIG. 12 details a front view of the vibration sensor

FIG. 13 illustrates the electronic system with vibration sensors interconnections

FIG. 14 details a multi-zone electronic system

FIG. 15 details an enhanced electronic system

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The present invention will now be described by way of example and with reference to the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 illustrates a temporary fence which has a relatively simple structure, is easy to install and yet provides good protection. In one embodiment, the fence includes a plurality of fence segments 1, preferably made of welded mesh wire, of a size of about 2 meter high by 3 meter wide. The poles 2 support the two sides of each fence segment 1 and connect the fence segments into one contiguous fence.

Each pole 2 is preferably mounted on one or more elliptical bases 3. The elliptical base may help secure the fence, so that it will be more difficult to move it. The bases 3 may be laid on the ground.

The novel shape of the base 3 (elliptical rather than circular) allows to achieve improved stability in the direction that counts (along the long axis of the ellipse).

In a preferred embodiment, vibration sensors 4 are placed, such as one sensor on each segment 1 of the fence. This allows to detect if someone tries to break through the fence, climb over it or tries to sabotage the fence. The sensors may be connected, serially for instance, through a cable laid on the fence as illustrated.

The fence is made of modular components, thus it is easy to adjust it to the intended use, topography and the required dimensions.

In another embodiment, the fence can be built by placing one or more elliptical bases 3 for each pole 2, into which the poles 2 are inserted. The fence segments 1 are strung on the poles 2, forming a strong fence by connecting the poles 2 and the segments.

Where required, the fence may include enhanced back support using support beams normal to the plane of the fence and supported by another base 3, as illustrated.

Method of Laying a Fence

  • 1. Placing the elliptical bases 3 on the ground, according to the desired layout of the fence. One, two, three or more base elements 3 may be placed on top another, as required.
  • 2. placing the poles 2 within their elliptical bases 3.
  • 3. The fence segments 1 are attached to the poles 2. In one embodiment, each segment 1 is strung from above onto two poles 2.
    A gate (or several gates) may be installed where required.
  • 4. Placing electronic sensors 4 on the fence segments 1. Laying a cable between the sensors (except for sensors connected by wireless). The sensors may be connected to a control center or through a Signal Processing Unit SPU.
    The sensors may include inertia sensors, vibration sensors, etc.

In a preferred embodiment, each base element 3 weighs about 20 kg, thus it may be carried manually by one worker. When two or more such elements are placed on top of one another, however, they achieve a substantial mass to convey a massive structure where required. Preferably, each base element 3 is made of reinforced concrete, with B-400 steel rods as used in the construction industry.

The fence segments 1 may include holes in the mesh, through which they are strung on the poles 2.

The elliptical base 3 may include one or more holes, for one or more poles respectively, and as illustrated elsewhere in the present disclosure.

Using the above detailed structure, it is possible to achieve good mechanical strength without the need to dig holes in the ground for the pylons. On a hard ground, this may save a substantial effort. On sand or soft ground, it may help achieve a reliable support.

Sometimes it is required to change the layout of the fence. In prior art, this may prove difficult and expensive, whereas in the novel fence structure it is easy and simple to move the base elements 3 to relocate the fence when so desired.

FIG. 2 details a fence with enhanced back support and extended height. A fence segment 1 has a fence segment extension 120, also supported by a pole 2 with a pole extension 22 mounted thereon.

A horizontal support beam 24 with a slant support beam 25 are connected to another base 3 element, laterally mounted for enhanced lateral support.

FIG. 3 details the mechanical support for a fence segment fence segment 1, including two poles 2 located on each side of the fence segment 1. Each pole is mounted on a base 3, which includes two stacked elements in this embodiment.

The fence segment 1 has three stiffening areas 11—three horizontal stripes of folded mesh as illustrated.

Furthermore, in this preferred embodiment the fence segment 1 has a pair of pole-holding holes 12 made in each stiffening area 11, providing a convenient passage for a pole 2. Thus, the pole 2 is easily inserted through the three pairs of holes 12 to reliably hold the fence segment 1.

FIG. 4 details a fence post and base, including a pole 2 mounted in the central hole 32 of the base 3.

The base 3 may further include a left-side hole 31 and a right-side hole 33.

FIG. 5 details the fence post base element, including a base 3 center with a hole 32, a left-side hole 31 and a right-side hole 33. The base 3 may further include a pair of handles 35.

In a preferred embodiment, each base element 3 weighs about 20 kg. Thus, it may be carried manually by one worker. When two or more such elements are placed on top of one another, they achieve a substantial mass to convey a massive structure where required.

In a preferred embodiment, each base element 3 is made of reinforced concrete, with B-400 steel rods as used in the construction industry.

In a preferred embodiment, the base 3 has an elliptical protuberance 36 on its upper surface, with a corresponding depression on its lower surface. This may achieve a stable base structure, wherein the parts will not tend to rotate with respect to each other.

FIG. 6 details a fence corner, with fence segment 1 mounted on poles 2, with a pole 2 installed on an elliptical base 3. A second pole 23 may be inserted into a second hole in the base 3 at the corner. This configuration allows to achieve almost any angle between the two fence planes meeting at the corner, without the need to bend any fence segment 1.

FIG. 7 details a split (“Y”) in the fence, including a fence segment 1 with its left side mounted on the pole 2 supported on the elliptical base 3. A second pole 23, inserted into a second hole in the base 3, serves as the right side support for a second fence segment 1.

A third pole 23, inserted into the third hole in base 3 at the intersection at the corner, serves as the left side support for a third fence segment 1 mounted there.

From each fence segment, additional segments may be installed to continue the fence in that direction.

FIG. 8 details a fence with an inclined top. It includes a vertical fence segment 1 mounted on a pole 2, which is installed on the elliptical base 3. An inclined top fence segment 15 is mounted on top of the fence segment 1, with the fence segment 15 leaning toward the outer part of the fence, to prevent people from climbing the fence.

FIG. 9 details a gate in the fence. A fence segment 1 is supported on a pole 2 mounted on the base 3. A second pole 25, mounted on the same base 3, supports the gate 5. The gate may include two parts 5 as illustrated, or just one gate element.

FIG. 10 illustrates a perspective view of a vibration sensor 6, detailing its structure and operation.

The vibration sensor 6 includes a first fixed contact 61 and a second fixed contact 62, with a movable conducting element 63 or a pair of elements 63 between the contacts 61 and 62.

Normally, the element 63 rests on the contacts 61 and 62 to close the electrical circuit there. When moved, the element may break momentarily the electrical circuit, a situation easily detected by the electronic system.

Two or more contact elements may be used to achieve sensitivity and reliability of operation.

In operation, the contacts between the parts 61, 62 and 63 may become dirty and contaminated, thus causing an unreliable contact.

A damper 631, which is an inertia ring, may be mounted on the element 63 to shake it when the sensor 6 is moved, to clean the above contacts. This achieves a self-cleaning device, with the contacts achieving a longer operating life.

The first slant contact 613 and the second slant contact 623 help achieve sensitivity to movement in other dimensions, as detailed below.

Thus, the sensor 6 has a tri-dimensional sensitivity to vibrations. This is basically an inertia sensor.

FIG. 11 details a top view of the vibration sensor 6. A first fixed contact 61 ends in a first slant contact 613, and a second fixed contact 62 ends in a second slant contact 623. The sensor may include additional slant contacts 614, 624 as illustrated.

A cylinder 64 made of an electrically conducting material is mounted between the contacts 613, 62, 614 and 624 so that it always makes contact between two contacts when at rest—in its stable state. The actual connections being made—it depends on the orientation of the sensor.

When the sensor is moved (that is, in case of vibrations) the cylinder 64 momentarily breaks contact. Such disruptions of the electrical circuit may be detected by electronic means to signal an alarm when certain conditions are met.

The above contacts may be mounted on an electrically insulator substrate, for example a printed circuit board (PCB) 65, with external contacts (outlets) 651, 652 to connect to external electronics.

FIG. 12 details a front view of the vibration sensor 6. The second fixed contact 62 (like the first contact 61) are mounted on the printed circuit board (PCB) 65 as illustrated. Also shown is the cylinder 64 and the outlet 652.

FIG. 13 illustrates the electronic system with vibration sensors 4 interconnections.

Preferably, one sensor 4 is mounted on each fence segment 1. Each segment is about 4 meter wide, and a zone 73 may include 33 detectors 4 for example, thus spanning a fence length of about 100 meter.

In a preferred embodiment, an alarm being activated allows to pinpoint its source to one of the zones in the system. Thus, in each zone the sensors are connected together.

Each group of sensors 4 are preferably connected on a common cable at the required intervals therebetween, with connectors 72 at both ends of the cable to connect to others such groups.

A sensors group thus includes a cable with sensors and connectors, preferably assembled at the factory into a reliable, hermetically sealed unit. When installing the fence, each sensor 4 is attached to a fence segment and the integral cable already connects the sensors; groups of sensors are connected by cables.

Programming may be required (i.e. by setting wires or jumpers) so that each zone corresponds to a different, predefined line. These may be implemented in the SLT units 71 and/or in the cable/sensor units themselyes.

Thus, using multi-wire cables and multi-pin connectors with each group wired so as to be connected to a different pin in the connector and with unique marking thereon, the system is easily assembled in a short time, whilst transferring the separate signals for each zone among different zones.

FIG. 13 illustrates vibration sensors 4 for two zones 73, Z-1 and Z-2 in this embodiment, with Sensor Line Terminator (SLT) 71 units at both ends of each zone, and a multi-pin connector pair 72 for connecting groups of sensors.

FIG. 14 details a multi-zone electronic system, with a Signal Processing Unit (SPU) 75 being connected to a plurality of zones 73—eight zones in this embodiment, Z-1 to Z-8. The SPU may include filter and protection means as required for the electrical signals from the vibration sensors there.

The Signal Processing Unit (SPU) 75 may be connected to a Personal Computer (PC) 76 for signal processing and alarm detection when certain predefined conditions are met.

A plurality of SPU units 75 may be connected to each other in a chain, to further expand the system in a modular structure, as deemed necessary. A large number of units 75 may be thus linked together (practically to an unlimited number), to support fences for large area facilities.

Programming may be required (i.e. by setting wires or jumpers) so that each zone corresponds to a different, predefined line. These may be implemented in the SPU units 74.

The units 74 may be pre-programmed at the factory with corresponding external markings to aid in their assembly, so practically no programming is required in the field. This embodiment is preferable, to prevent human errors and strive to achieve a fool-proof system, easy to install in a short time.

FIG. 15 details an enhanced electronic system, including a plurality of zones with Sensor Line Terminator (SLT) 71 between them. SLT units 71 may be connected to a Signal Processing Unit (SPU) 75 for signal processing of the sensors signals.

Preferably, the system may include a weather compensation unit, to adapt to various weather states and to reduce the false alarm rate, even in adverse weather. The weather compensation unit may include a wind strength sensor using for example a windmill sensor 753 with F/V converter. An adverse weather sensor 753—rain, hail, etc. may also be included.

The system's operation is such as to raise the threshold for activating an alarm, or to even disable sensors in one or more sectors, where adverse weather is detected. The algorithms for setting an adaptive alarm threshold may take into account the actual measure of sensors activation as a function of the weather state, based on past experience.

The system may further include a power source 764 for supplying electrical energy to the system, an alarm panel 762 for activating the system and displaying the state of each zone and the location of alarms being activated, together with optional additional information.

The dialer means 763 may be used to dial to a remote location, such as an alarm center, and to communicate alarm-related information to that center.

It will be recognized that the foregoing is but one example of a system and method within the scope of the present invention and that various modifications will occur to those skilled in the art upon reading the disclosure set forth hereinbefore.