Title:
Joist stud rafter connector system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention is a an improved wood metal attachment system to connect normal joists, rafters, main beans, and studs in a strengthened and replaceable manner. A hanger with sleeves on its side joins the main beam to the joist. The joist rested upon a notched stud. The upper stud is placed in a stud holder which stud holder has tunnels on its sides. A dowel rod with a stop and holes is placed through the stud holder tunnels and then through the hanger sleeves. The dowel rod is nailed or screwed to the upper stud and the notched stud to create strengthened joints. The invention has three embodiments, one for the basement joists and mainbeam, a second for connecting upper stories to lower stores. A third embodiment connects the rafters to the upper frame.



Inventors:
Devlin, George Andrew (Cincinnati, OH, US)
Application Number:
11/651642
Publication Date:
07/19/2007
Filing Date:
01/10/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B1/38
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20080083175Method and device for improving drainage away from buildingsApril, 2008Niemczyk
20060272279Composite panel having subsonic transverse wave speed characteristicsDecember, 2006Palumbo et al.
20040055245Wall cap corner aidMarch, 2004Fitch
20090139156FAST BEAM CLAMPJune, 2009Magno Jr. et al.
20080016813Tile And Fastener ThereforJanuary, 2008Fujii
20070186504Device for tying and centering reinforcing barAugust, 2007Gavin
20050115194Component modular foam based system for construction of concrete structuresJune, 2005Riley
20090211174Telescopic support towerAugust, 2009Henderson et al.
20050281979Loose fill insulation product having phase change material thereinDecember, 2005Toas et al.
20090211181Concealment deviceAugust, 2009Desena et al.
20090188203SUSPENDED ELECTRICAL SERVICE CONDUIT SYSTEM AND METHOD OF USEJuly, 2009Fox



Primary Examiner:
IHEZIE, JOSHUA K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
William M. Selenke (Cincinnati, OH, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A joist stud rafter main beam connector system comprising; a main hanger; said main hanger is a generally U shaped construct with P shaped up down side portions and a flat U back; said flat U back has attachment holes, the upper division of said P shaped side incorporates a fin top; said P shaped side has fastener holes; said fin top has holes; on each outer surface of said P shaped up down portion are permanently attached dowel rod sleeves; a stud holder which has sides, back, and stud holder bottom piece; said stud holder has an open space; said stud holder has dowel rod loops on said sides; a dowel rod with an insert end, an outer end, and a dowel stop; said dowel rod has fastener holes punched along its length; a lower stud with a notch; said stud notch has a hole; said stud holder is affixed to the bottom of upper workpiece stud; said stud holder rests on a workpiece sill and on workpiece sub-floor; in turn said workpiece sill and sub-floor rests upon workpiece joist or wood slug and workpiece mainbeam; said main hanger is attached to said workpiece mainbeam with flat U back attachment holes wherein said P shaped up down side points away from said mainbeam; said main hanger p shaped up down portion is attached to said workpiece joist or wood slug; said workpiece joist or wood slug rests on lower stud with a notch; wherein said dowel rod insert end passes through said stud holder loop; then through up down portion dowel rod sleeves; as dowel rod is further passed it is placed on side said workpiece lower stud; said dowel rod rests a dowel stop; and when dowel rod is completely inserted said dowel rod is affixed to both to the upper workpiece stud and the lower workpiece stud.

2. A joist stud rafter main beam connector system as in claim 1) wherein said studs are strengthen by a cross brace.

3. A joist stud rafter main beam connector system as in claim 1) wherein said connector system is strengthened by a firestop fuselage or a base fuselage or both;

4. A joist stud rafter main beam connector system as in claim 3) wherein said connector system firestop or base fuselage is made of reinforced concrete or wood.

5. A joist stud rafter main beam connector system as in claim 1) wherein said main hanger has a bridge attached to inner part of sides and flat U back creating a H shaped joist holder.

6. A joist stud rafter main beam connector system as in claim 1) wherein said main hanger has a flat metal bottom.

7. A joist stud rafter main beam connector system as in claim 1) wherein the connector systems is used for strengthened framing for buildings that are assembled and dissembled readily.

8. A basementmainbeam joist, stud, connector system comprising: a main hanger; said main hanger is a generally U shaped construct with P shaped up down side portions and a flat U back; said main hanger has a flat metal bottom; said flat U back has attachment holes, the upper division of said P shaped side incorporates a fin top; said P shaped side has fastener holes; said fin top has holes; on each outer surface of said P shaped up down portion are permanently attached dowel rod sleeves; a dowel rod with an insert end an outer end, and a dowel stop; said dowel rod has fastener holes punched along its length; a stud holder which has sides, back, and stud holder bottom piece; said stud holder is affixed to the bottom of workpiece stud; said stud holder rests on a workpiece sill and workpiece sub-floor; in turn said workpiece sill and sub-floor rests upon workpiece joists and workpiece basement mainbeam; wherein as assembled said main hanger flat U back is affixed to a floor joist on the perpendicular side; or said main hanger flat U back is affixed a wood slug on the parallel side; wherein said dowel rod insert end passes through stud holder loop; then through up down portion dowel rod sleeves; when dowel rod is completely inserted said dowel rod stop rests on top of said stud holder loop; and said dowel rod is affixed to workpiece stud.

9. A basementmainbeam joist, stud, connector system as in claim 8) wherein said studs are strengthen by a cross brace.

10. A basementmainbeam joist, stud, connector system as in claim 8) wherein said connector system is strengthened by or a base fuselage.

11. A basementmainbeam joist, stud, connector system as in claim 8) wherein said connector system base fuselage is made of reinforced concrete or wood.

12. A basementmainbeam joist, stud, connector system as in claim 8) wherein said connector system is used for buildings that are designed to be assembled and dissembled readily.

13. A stud rafter main beam connector system comprising; rafter holder; said rafter holder is a generally U shaped construct with an angled base; on each outer surface of said rafter holder up down portion are permanently attached dowel rod tunnels; a workpiece rafter which rests on a workpiece sill and workpiece sub-floor; in turn said workpiece sill and optionally sub-floor rests upon workpiece joists; a main hanger which is a generally U shaped construct with P shaped up down side portions and a flat U back; said flat U back has attachment holes, the upper division of said P shaped side incorporates a fin top; said P shaped side has fastener holes; said fin top has holes; on each outer surface of said P shaped up down portion are permanently attached dowel rod sleeves; a roof dowel rod with an insert end and a dowel stop at outer end, said roof dowel rod has fastener holes punched along its length; a lower stud with a notch; said stud notch has a hole; wherein as assembled said main hanger flat U back is affixed to a workpiece joist on the perpendicular side; or said main hanger flat U back is affixed a wood slug on the parallel side; said workpiece joist and said mainbeam rests on said lower stud with a notch; wherein when assembled, roof dowel rod with an insert end is passed through said rafter tunnels; on through the optional workpiece sills and optional workpiece sub floor; on through said hanger dowel rod sleeves; wherein said roof dowel rod is affixed through fastener holes onto side of said notched stud.

14. A stud rafter main beam connector system as in claim 13) wherein said workpiece rafter rests on a rafter triangle.

15. A stud rafter main beam connector system as in claim 13) wherein said notched stud is a short stud.

16. A stud rafter main beam connector system as in claim 13) wherein said main hanger has no fin top.

17. A stud rafter main beam connector system as in claim 13) used for strengthened framing for buildings that are assembled and dissembled readily.

Description:

FIELD OF INVENTION

The present invention, joist, stud, rafter connector system is concerned with ordinary housing and commercial buildings of indefinite height and size. It is especially concerned with buildings that need to be strengthened because they are subject to severe weather such as hurricanes, or with such natural disasters as earthquakes. Likewise, the present invention is concerned with structures and buildings that are built to last for hundreds of years and many generations. For this reason the stud connectors of the present invention are designed such that the studs and joists can be replaced with minimal effort creating buildings that regenerate. Likewise the invention can be used for rugged framing for disassemble buildings such as tents and so forth.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Through out prehistory and history, structures have been made out of rocks, bricks, and wood. Before the industrial revolution wooden buildings where made from posts and beams, or heavy timber, or the old box frame, (three names for the same thing), because there was no industrialized production of straight uniform pieces of wood. Also the heavy timber was easier to mortis and tendon, and dove tail. These traditional techniques were used because nails were made one at a time by hand and were quite expensive. Such techniques, (mortis and tendon, and dove tailing) are labor intensive, and are only used today in the construction of furniture.

Beginning in the early nineteenth century, the industrial revolution brought great change. Water, steam, and later electric power, and improved metallurgy lead to the common use of industrialized circular, and band saws, which allowed long in length, but small in cross-section wood stock such as 2×4s . . . 6s, 8s, 10s, 12s. These cut lengths allowed a great advance for the construction industry, that is balloon construction. At this time the USA had abundant original forests and large quantities of wood. Balloon framing was the first industrialized housing frame. The name balloon came because the skin was thinner, and lighter in weight than the old box frame. These balloon framed houses used 2×4s that reached from the foundation to the eaves. When a second, or third floor was desired for balloon framed houses, notches for a 1″×6″ ribbon were cut in the perpendicular side of the 2″×4″ exterior walls. The 1″ by 6″ ribbon was then nailed into these notches, and the second floor joists where placed on this ribbon. The ribbon supported the joists weight; the joists were then nailed to the 2″×4″ exterior studs for stability, and strength. From about 1850 to 1920 almost all wood housing construction was balloon framed. Since about 1920 platform framing has been the standard for almost all wood construction in the U.S.

In platform construction the first floor platform is built on top of the foundation. To this foundation 8 foot studs are nailed to sills, and headers at 16 inch intervals to produce walls. Trusts are then put on the headers and covered in plywood. Shingles are nailed to the plywood for roofing. If a second floor is desired, a second floor platform is attached to the walls below, and new walls are put on the second platform, hence the name platformed construction. Platformed construction is the common contemporary type of small frame buildings.

In the ordinary life of a building water damage, termites, or other aging problems may weaken joists, or studs. In such cases, under both the balloon, and platform systems such a joist, or stud can only be replaced with great difficulty. In such cases the ability to replace a single stud or joist with minimal difficult is desirable.

It follows therefore that if one wishes to have a wooden building that lasts indefinitely it is desirable to be able to replace rotten or damaged joist, or studs, and indeed all wooden parts such as the sill, beams, hips, headers. The present invention provides metal wood connectors that are permanently riveted to the sills, beams, and hips by means of having single headed nails driven through them. These nails are bent over at the back of wood members permanently affixing the metal wood connectors. The joist and studs are then attached reversibly to the metal wood connectors rather than directly to the beams, sills, header, and hips by clevis pins with hitch pins through their shafts.

Survivorframing of the present invention provides strength from three sources.

First is that all, the wooden and metal elements are held tightly together so that the house becomes one giant block. The second source is the reinforced concrete ribbons running around these things. All the structural elements are tied down to, and built around these reinforced concrete ribbons. For this reason the house becomes greatly strengthened. The third source is that all the studs, joists, and rafters are perfectly aligned to each other. It would be required that all perpendicular interior walls are built with some crossbracing to strengthen them, and built sandwiched in the conjunction of the studs, rafters, and joists. This will prevent these building from collapsing laterally. It would still be safe to build a survivorregenerating building without interior walls, if that is desired for whatever reason, but such a building would need interior corner bracing and some interior metal arches built and then sandwiched between the studs, joists, and rafters. As long as there are enough interior walls corner bracing, and interior arches would not be needed. It would be a small number of buildings needing the extra bracing, because most building have enough interior walls. It is hoped that advancements in manufacturing science will make it possible for survivor regenerating buildings to be put up at, or below the cost of the current platform frame. Likewise, the invention can be uses to construct strengthened framing for buildings that are designed to be assembled and dissembled readily such as tents or other temporary structures.

SUMMERY OF INVENTION

The invention is a joist stud rafter main beam connector system with a main hanger. The main hanger is a generally U shaped construct with P shaped up down side portions and a flat U back with attachment holes. The upper division of P shaped side incorporates a fin top. The P shaped side has fastener holes as does the fin top. On each outer surface of the P shaped up down portion is a permanently attached dowel rod sleeve. A further part of the invention is a stud holder which has sides, back, and bottom piece to make an open space within the stud holder. The stud holder has dowel rod loops on its sides. Another part of this invention is a dowel rod with an insert end, an outer end, a dowel stop, and fastener holes punched along its length. Included is a lower stud with a notch. That notch has a hole. When assembled to produce the strengthened connector system, the stud holder is affixed to the bottom of upper workpiece stud. That stud holder rests on a workpiece sill and on workpiece sub-floor. In turn the workpiece sill and workpiece sub-floor rests upon workpiece joist or wood slug and workpiece mainbeam. The inventive main hanger is attached to workpiece mainbeam or wood slug with attachment means such as nails through flat U back attachment holes. When attached the P shaped up down side points away from the mainbeam. The workpiece joist or wood slug rests on the lower stud with a notch. As part of the assembly process the dowel rod insert end passes through stud holder loop; then through up down portion dowel rod sleeves. As dowel rod is further passed it is placed on side of workpiece lower stud; it come to rest at the dowel rod stop. After the dowel rod is completely inserted the dowel rod is affixed to both to the upper workpiece stud and the lower notched stud.

Optional cross braces and firestop fuselage or a base fuselage (either made of reinforced concrete or wood) are used to strengthen the connector system.

The main hanger may have a bridge attached to inner part of sides and flat U back to create a H shaped joist holder or have a flat metal bottom joist holder.

A second embodiment the joist, stud, connector system has a main hanger. That main hanger is a generally U shaped construct with P shaped up down side portions and a flat U back which has attachment holes. The main hanger has bottom. The P shaped side incorporates a fin top with fastener holes. On each outer surface of P shaped up down portion are permanently attached dowel rod sleeves. Another part of the invention is a dowel rod with an insert end, an outer end, and a dowel stop. That dowel rod has fastener holes punched along its length. A third part of the second embodiment is a stud holder which has sides, back, and stud holder bottom piece which holder is is affixed to the bottom of workpiece stud. The workpiece stud rests on a workpiece sill and workpiece sub-floor. In turn the workpiece sill and sub-floor rests upon workpiece joists and workpiece basement mainbeam. As assembled the main hanger flat U back is affixed to a floor joist on the perpendicular side or affixed to a wood slug on the parallel side. The dowel rod insert end passes through stud holder loop; then through up down portion dowel rod sleeves. When dowel rod is completely inserted that dowel rod stop rests on top of stud holder loop. To complete the assembly the dowel rod is affixed to workpiece stud. The second embodiments system may be strengthen by a cross brace, and/or a base fuselage or firestop. The firestop or base fuselage may be made of reinforced concrete or wood.

The third embodiment of the system has a rafter holder. That rafter holder is a generally U shaped construct with an angled base. On each outer surface of rafter holder up down portion are permanently attached dowel rod tunnels. A workpiece rafter rests on a workpiece sill and workpiece sub-floor. In turn the workpiece sill and optionally sub-floor rests upon workpiece joists. A second part of the third embodiment is a main hanger which is a generally U shaped construct with P shaped up down side portions and a flat U back. The flat back has attachment holes. The upper division of said P shaped side incorporates a fin top with holes. Also the P shaped side has fastener holes and on each outer surface of said P shaped up down portion are permanently attached dowel rod sleeves. A third part of the third embodiment, rafter holder system is a roof dowel rod with an insert end and a dowel stop at its outer end and fastener holes punched along its length. The third embodiment has a lower stud with a notch. That stud notch has a hole.

As assembled, main hanger flat U back is affixed to a workpiece joist on the perpendicular side. The workpiece joist and mainbeam rests on lower stud with a notch. The roof dowel rod with an insert end is passed through the rafter tunnels, on through the optional workpiece sills and optional workpiece sub floor then through the hanger dowel rod sleeves. As a last step the dowel rod is affixed through fastener holes onto side of said notched stud. In the third embodiment, stud rafter main beam connector system, the rafter may rest on a rafter triangle. Likewise, the notched stud may be a short stud to increase attic apace. Optionally, in this third embodiment the main hanger has no fin top. Clevis pins may be used to affix wood and metal pieces securely attaching the whole system in a reversible manner. The connector systems is used for strengthened framing for buildings and shelters that are assembled and dissembled readily.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF FIGURES

FIG. 1, 2 and 3 show prior art. FIG. 4 shows some of the various formed metal and wood parts of the present invention. FIG. 5 shows Clevis pin. FIG. 6 shows the first embodiment of the joist, stud, beam connector system. FIG. 7 shows the second embodiment in an exploded and partly assembled manner. FIG. 8 shows some of the various formed metal and wood parts which connect two stories or floors within connector system. FIG. 9 shows the third embodiment of the overall invention connector system. FIG. 10 shows the fourth embodiment joist stud beam connector system. FIG. 11 shows some of the various formed metal and wood parts of the embodiment of the present invention which connect the roof to the frame. FIG. 12 shows how to join the roof to the body of the house. FIG. 13 shows the sixth embodiment of connector system. FIG. 14 shows prior art incorporated with the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF FIGURES

FIG. 1, 2, and 3 show prior art. FIG. 1 shows the old box frame or heavy timber and beam. FIG. 2 shows the old balloon framing structure. FIG. 3 shows the current platformed frame construction.

FIG. 4 shows some of the various formed metal and wood parts of the present invention. The basementmainhanger 110 is generally U shaped construct with a P shaped side and flat U back 112 with permanent attachment holes 111, and a flat metal bottom 118. The P shaped metal fin top is 115, the up down portion is 113. Fin 115 has fastener holes 116. Fin holes 116 provide for the attachment of plaincrossbrace 160 to the fin top 115 and basement joists 102. Fin 115 with fin holes 116 also attach parallel slug 201 on the parallel side of the construction. Up down portion 113 has a set of dowel rod sleeves 114 permanently attached. Basementmainhanger 110 has permanent attachment holes 111, which permanently fasten the hanger 110 onto perpendicular main beam 101, and to parallel mainbeam 202.

An alternative view of hanger 110 shows the metal hanger bottom 118. Metal bottom 118 retains the basement joist and basement slug in place.

Dowel rod 120 has an insert end 121 and a stop 123. Dowel rod 120 has fastener holes 124 punched along its length. Dowel rod 120 binds the basement construction to the first floor studs 105. Dowel rod stop 123 prevents the dowel rod from dropping through and aligns fastener holes.

Illustration 140 is the basecrossbrace. 144 is the fuselage. 141 shows the cut outs that make room for stud holders 130. The cross braces are 142. Center adjustment bobbin is 148. The front plate is 145; and the back plate is 143. Basecrossbrace 140 has feet 146 holes 147, crossbraces 142, bobbin 148, and placement nail 151 all of which pieces are identical to the ones on the firestopcrossbrace 320. Basecrossbrace slug 170 is shown with basecrossbrace slug holes 171.

Stud holders 130 affix the studs to the basement joist 102, or basement parallel slug 201 to the first floor sill 104. Dowel rod stop 123 rests on the stud holder loop 131. Stud holder 130 has sides 136 with back 133. Stud holder 130 open space 139 receives stud 106. Stud holder 130 has stud holder bottom piece 135. Stud holder holes 134 are permanent fastener holes through which nails 109 are driven through the sill 105 and then bent over sill 105 (See FIG. 7). Plain crossbrace 160 and basecrossbrace 140 provides a restraint against failure. Plain crossbrace 160 has attachment holes 164, bobbin 162, feet 163, and legs 161.

FIG. 5 shows Clevis pin 157, a special design (nail like clevis pin) used as an attachment means. Pointed end 155 is placed through pre-drilled holes in stud 105, as well as through holes 147 in the crossbrace feet 146. Hitch pin 156 has a flat head. Flat head aids needed removal with a claw hammer. Clevis pin 157 has a round flat head 158.

Placement nail 151 is an alternative means of joining the crossbraces to studs 105. Nails 151 are pre-fastened to the feet by placement within nipple 152. Nipple 152 is permanently welded to the feet.

Nipple 152 is designed so that nail 151 may be placed and removed. It makes the nail easy to remove because it extends beyond the flat portion 146A of the feet allowing hammer claws to readily get under it. Nipple 152 makes nail 151 into a double headed nail.

FIG. 6 shows the first embodiment 1000 of the joist, stud, beam connector system 10,000. FIG. 6 is illustrated in an exploded and partly assembled manner showing how the basement pieces attach to the first floor within the over all system 10,000. First embodiment 1000 illustrates basementmainbeam 101 attached to hanger 110 on the perpendicular side of basementmainbeam 101. Basemainbeam 101 is connected to sills 104, stud holder 130, and studs 105 by means of basement dowel rod 120. Clevis pins 157 may be used to affix wood and metal pieces securely while attaching the whole system in a reversible manner. Because of the interlocking nature of the system it can be completely done with the clevis pins alone.

Plain crossbrace 160 and basecrossbrace 140 provide restraint against shear of the up down studs. Sill 104 rests on basement joist 102 and mainbeam 101 on the perpendicular side. Parallel slugs 201, and mainbeam 202 rest on the parallel side. Sub-floor 103 rests on the floor joists 102. Parallel slug 201 is placed in hanger 110 beneath sill 104. Nails 109 are driven though hanger 110 on through main beam 202. Nails 109 are bent after placement.

Stud 105 is shown with stud holder 130 affixed in place. Basementhanger 110 extension is slightly less than the width of the mainbeams 101 (½″less) and joist 102 to allow for variation in wood size. The second or upper stud 105 is shown at rest on sill 104. Likewise basement hanger 110 is shown affixed to joist 102. The framing elements are held rigid by crossbraces. Basecrossbrace 140 has front plate 145, and back plate 143 attached to sill plate 104. Likewise cross bracing 142 is attached to the fuselage 144 and also affixed to studs 105 by means of clevis pins 157.

Basement dowel rod 120 has an insert end 121, and an outer end 125. Basement dowel rod 120 has fastener holes 124 punched along its length. Basement dowel rod 120 passes through stud holder 130 then through dowel rod sleeves 132, and extends into the dowel rod sleeves 114 of the basementmainhanger 110. Dowel rod stop 123 rests on the top of stud holder 130 dowel rod sleeve 132.

FIG. 7 shows the second embodiment, assemble 2000, of the invention connector system 10,000 in an exploded and partly assembled manner. Assemble 2000 shows the connections between the parallel basement pieces which are parallel main beam 202, parallel slugs 201, and basement main hanger 110. The parallel first floor connector system 2000 affixes studs 105, sill 104, stud holders 130, and dowel rods 120.

Sill 104 rests on basement parallel mainbeam 202, and basement slugs 201. Sub floor 103 rests beside sill 104. Stud 105R is shown with stud holder 130 affixed in place. Basement mainhanger 110 is permanently affixed to parallel basement mainbeam 202 by nails 109 being driven through openings 111 then through beam 202, and then bent over at the back of 202. Stud 105R is shown at rest on sill 104. Basecrossbrace 140 is attached to sill 104 by Clevis pins 157 which are attached through studs 105. Hitch pin 156 is inserted through the shaft of Clevis pin 157. Foundation dowel rod 120 passes through stud holder 130, dowel rod sleeve 131, and extends into main hanger 110 dowel rod sleeve 114. Second or upper stud 105R is shown at rest on sill 104. Likewise, hanger 110 is shown affixed to parallel slugs 201.

FIG. 8 shows some of the various formed metal and wood parts which connect two stories or floors within connector system 10,000. Part 300 shows how the wood pieces are assembled on the perpendicular side. Part 400 shows how the wood pieces are assembled on the parallel side. Mainhanger 340 is a generally H-shaped construct with a P shaped side having a metal fin 345 at its top and an up down portion 343. Bridge 348 is attached to inner part of sides 343 and flat U back 342 creating a H shaped joist holder. P shaped fin 345 has fastener holes 346, which holes provide for the attachment of plain cross brace 160 to the fin 345 itself, and to second floor joists 308.

The upper portion of the H contains this fin and supports the floor joist 308 on the perpendicular side and wood slugs 401 on the parallel side. Parallel main beam 402 is placed in notch 307 of stud 105 and at the end of slug 401. Main hanger 340 is permanently riveted to perpendicular mainbeam 304, and parallel mainbeam 402 by driving nails through holes 341, then through the main beam 304 and bent over at the back of the beam 304 and 402. The lower portion of main hanger 340 attaches the studs, and the upper portion attaches both the joints and the parallel wood slugs, 105 directly under joist 308, and attached to the mainbeams 304 and 402 by means of a reversible screw which passes through a predrilled hole 306 in notch knob 305, then through clearance hole 349 in back of mainhanger 340 and then into the perpendicular 304 and parallel mainbeam 402.

Main hanger 340 P up down portion 343 has a set of dowel rod sleeves 344 permanently attached to it. Dowel rod 310 binds the two floors together. Dowel rod 310 has an insertion point 311, a stop 314, and fastener holes 313 punched along its length. Top tip 312 is shown. Part 320 shows the firestopcrossbrace 320. Part 330 is a reinforced concrete and steel firestopcrossbrace slug 330.

FIG. 9 shows assemble 3,000, the third embodiment of the overall invention connector system 10,000 in a partly exploded and partly assembled manner. This third embodiment shows how the system connects two floors on the perpendicular side of the construction. Embodiment 3,000 shows the joists 308L, and 308R perpendicular to the main beam (framing length) 304 (shown in small section). Joist 308L is shown as a cut off to expose the inner workings of embodiment 3,000. Notch knob 305 is on upright stud 105. End of joist 308L will rest on notch knob 305 and bridge 348. Mainbeamhanger 340 will attach studs to the mainbeam through predrilled hole 306 in notch knob 305. The same screw will attach studs 105, and firestopcrossbrace 320 into the mainbeam 304. Firestopcrossbrace 320 is attached to the studs 105 and mainbeam 304 through holes 328 on the front plate 321 of firestopcrossbrace 320. Back plate 143 is hooked behind main beam 304 which binds the front plate 321 across studs 105 and inhibits stud movement backward or forwards in the event of a natural disaster.

Crossbraces 142 are attached to firestop fuselage 323. Plain crossbrace 160 has plug holes 164 which attach to mainbeamhanger 340 through holes 346. Base fuselage 323 has dowel rod grooves 322. Firestop and base fuselages are filled with reinforced concrete.

FIG. 10 shows the fourth embodiment, assemble 4,000 of joist stud beam connector system 10,000. Embodiment 4 shows the parallel side that connects two levels or stories of survivorregenerating buildings in a partly exploded and partly assembled manner. Notch knob 305L is on upright stud 105. Parallel wood slug (framing length) 401 rests on notch knob 306. The difference between embodiment 3, assemble 3,000 and embodiment 4, assemble 4,000 is that wooden slugs 401 are used instead of joists 308. Electrical conduit 421 passes through conduit openings 422 in sill 104, and through conduit opening 423 in base slug fuselage 144. Such conduit would pass through the perpendicular side of construction also; and through all the various embodiments of construction as needed.

FIG. 11 shows some of the various formed metal and wood parts of the embodiment of the present invention which connect the roof to the frame. Attic space is illustrated in drawing 500, (“rafter” type). Living space, (stud & rafter type) as illustrated in drawing 600. Most of the wood pieces are easily recognizable beams, studs, sills, and rafters as illustrated in drawings 500 and 600. Rafter triangle 505 is not in common use. Normally rafters are notched to fit on sills 503 and 604. Instead of notching, which cuts wood strength, the present invention has a triangle permanently joined to the rafter by means such as wood glue, and nails. Steel rafter holder 510 is attached to this triangle. Steel rafter holder 510 has an angled base 511 at top. Angled base 511 is bent at the same angle as the rafter to which it is attached. This attachment will prevent the rafter from routing off where it sits on the sill, which is a common problem in old balloon framed houses. Rafter holder 510 connects the rafter to the house below. Rafter holder 510 which has dowel rod holder tunnels 514 connects either to main hanger 340, which is permanently riveted to mainbeam 304, which would be underneath the attic sub floor 504 of attic type construction 500 (rafter type) or to the perpendicular stud & rafter mainbeam 602, and (stud and rafter) studs 603.

FIG. 11 illustrates dowel rod 520 which connects the rafters to the construction below. The same dowel rod is used in both rafter 500 and stud and rafter 600 construction. Stud & rafter mainhanger 610 through the conjoined use of rafterhanger 510 binds the walls and roof together to create a living or storage space for the attic. It is essentially the same as basement main hanger 110 without the P fin 115, and without the solid bottom 118.

FIG. 12 illustrates embodiment 5, assemble 5,000 in overall connector systems 10,000 the invention. FIG. 12 shows how to join the roof to the body of the house. The rafter type provides a house without living space but only attic space, (or insulation space) immediately below the roof. Embodiment 5 is shown in an exploded, and partly assembled manner to show the inner workings of that system. Embodiment 5 connects studs 105, and mainbeam 304 joist 506 to sill 503 and to rafter 501. Rafter 501 is shown with rafterhanger 510 affixed in place. Mainhanger 340 is used in embodiment 5 in conjunction with rafterhanger 510 and dowel rod 520 to connect the system. Mainhanger 340 is shown affixed to stud 105, joist 506, and to mainbeam 304 shown in short section (affixation not illustrated). Firestopcrossbrace fuselage 323 has dowel rod cuts 322 with front plate 321 which has fastening plug holes 324. Firestopcrossbrace fuselage 323 attaches studs 105 to both parallel and perpendicular mainbeams in embodiments 3, and 4 also attaches itself through studs 105 to mainbeam 304 in this fifth embodiment. Back plate 143 fits behind mainbeams 304 (perpendicular). Plain cross brace 160 has plug holes 164 which fastens to main hanger 340, and rafter hanger 510. Attic dowel rod 520 has fastener holes 523 punched along its length. Dowel rod 520 is affixed to rafter hanger 510 via dowel rod tunnels 514, then goes on through sill 503, and into main hanger 340 to which it is affixed via dowel rod sleeves 344, and then affixes to stud 105. Sub-floor 504 is optional. Rafters 501 and sub floor 504 can be replaced with roof trusts. Roof trusts have become the preferred method of roof construction in the US.

FIG. 13 shows the sixth embodiment, assemble 6,000 of connector system 10,000 in an exploded and partly assembled manner. Embodiment 6 is a system to connect short stud 603, rafter 501, and mainbeam 602. Rafter 501 is shown with rafterhanger 510 affixed in place. Stud and rafter mainhanger 610 has an extension length about ½″ less than the width of main beam 602. Likewise stud and rafter mainhanger 610 affixes stud 603 to rafter 501, mainbeam 602 in cooperation with dowel rod 520 and rafterhanger 510. Firestopcrossbrace 320 has dowel cuts 322, front plate 321 with fastening plug holes 324. Fastening plug holes 324 in addition to facilitating fastening firestopcrossbraces 320 to studs 105 is used in perpendicular mainbeams as in embodiments 5,000 and 6,000. Perpendicular main hanger 610 facilitates attaching short stud 603 through its first screw hole 605 A in notch knob 601, to stud and rafter mainbeam 602. The second hole does not attach the firestopcrossbrace but simply goes through knob 601 and therefore through stud 603 and then into mainbeam 602. The reason why knob 601 is so large, and has two holes is that it takes the place of the floor joists and parallel slugs which exist in embodiments 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 but do not exist within this sixth embodiments. The lack of joists is the reason why this sixth embodiment is called “Stud & Rafter.”

FIG. 14 illustrates the roof rafters joined to the roof's hip. Detail 700 shows the hip 701, and rafter 501 joined together by a metal hip rafter 710. The hip-rafter 710 has external casing 711. Rafter groove 712 accepts rafter 501. Rafter stop 713 is a solid top that retains rafter 501 in place. Rafter 501 also rests against back-plates 716. Single headed nails 714 permanently fasten the hip-rafter 710 to hip 701. Hip groove 717 is the open space which accepts hip 701. Installed hip rests on open space bottom 715. Fastener holes 718 attach plain-crossbrace 160 to hip-rafters 710, and consequently to rafters 501, and hip 701. Fastener holes 719 are punched along the outer shell 711, of hip rafter 710.