Title:
PORTABLE GOLF CLUB SUPPORT SYSTEM
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A golf club holder for organizing golfing accessories and removably supporting a golf club above a ground surface, the golf club holder comprising a shaft and a handle that are each coupled with a joint. The handle and the shaft may be movable between a first position where they are substantially parallel, and a second position where they are substantially perpendicular and locked in either position. The shaft may include a ground-piercing member. The ground-piercing member of the first shaft can be pushed into the ground and supported thereby. The golf club holder can be folded up to be transported.



Inventors:
Miller, James V. (Itasca, IL, US)
Application Number:
11/626433
Publication Date:
07/05/2007
Filing Date:
01/24/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B53/00
View Patent Images:
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20040242353Racket weightDecember, 2004Okamoto
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20040152542Reference height golf teeAugust, 2004Blum et al.



Primary Examiner:
BLAU, STEPHEN LUTHER
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ICE MILLER LLP (INDIANAPOLIS, IN, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A golf club holder comprising: a shaft having a first end and a second end, the second end configured to couple with a surface at a first angle; a handle coupled with the first end of the shaft and configured to support a golf club at a second angle and comprising a cavity configured to receive at least a portion of the shaft; a joint coupling the handle with the first end of the shaft wherein the joint comprises a positive engaging mechanism; wherein the joint enables the shaft and the handle to be pivotably moveable between a substantially parallel position and a substantially perpendicular position.

2. The golf club holder of claim 1, wherein the first and second angles are substantially equal and the holder is further configured to be supported by the club.

3. The golf club holder of claim 1, wherein the second end of the shaft is configured to penetrate the surface.

4. The golf club holder of claim 1, wherein the positive engagement mechanism comprises a detent member coupled with the handle and protruding a distance into the cavity.

5. The golf club holder of claim 4, wherein the handle further comprises an aperture coupled with the cavity.

6. The golf club holder of claim 5, wherein the positive engagement mechanism further comprises a cap coupled with the first end of the shaft and comprising a top, a first side, a second side, and a cavity, the first side and the second side each having a protrusion therefrom and configured to be received by the aperture of the handle, the top comprising a contoured surface and a flange, the contoured surface including a recess corresponding to the detent member and the flange extending past the cap and being configured to engage the detent member, and the cavity configured to receive the first end of the shaft.

7. The golf club holder of claim 6, wherein the protrusion engages the aperture of the handle, whereby the shaft and the handle are pivotably moveable between the substantially parallel position and the substantially perpendicular position.

8. The golf club holder of claim 5, wherein the positive engagement mechanism further comprises an aperture located on the first end of the shaft.

9. The golf club holder of claim 8, wherein the positive engagement mechanism further comprises a pin slidably coupled with the aperture of the handle and the aperture of the first end of the shaft.

10. The golf club holder of claim 9, wherein the shaft and the handle are pivotably moveable about the pin between the substantially parallel position and the substantially perpendicular position.

11. The golf club holder of claim 6, wherein the recess of the cap engages the detent member when the shaft and handle are in the substantially perpendicular position.

12. The golf club holder of claim 6, wherein the flange of the top engages the detent member when the shaft and handle are in the substantially parallel position.

13. The golf club holder of claim 12, wherein the handle comprises a flange configured to couple and uncouple of the flange of the cap and the detent member.

14. The golf club holder of claim 13, wherein the at least one flange of the handle comprises a flat surface extending from the handle.

15. The golf club holder of claim 13, wherein the flange of the handle comprises a thumb tab configured to couple and uncouple the flange of the top and the detent member.

16. The golf club holder of claim 4, wherein the shaft further comprises an aperture located on the first end of the shaft and the handle further comprises at least two protrusions extending into the cavity and configured to be received by the aperture of the shaft, wherein the at least two protrusions engage the aperture of the shaft, whereby the shaft and the handle are pivotably moveable between the substantially parallel position and the substantially perpendicular position.

17. The golf club holder of claim 5 further comprising a grommet inserted within the handle where the grommet is configured to couple with a ball marker.

18. The golf club holder of claim 17 configured to couple with a divot repair tool.

19. An umbrella and golf club holder, the holder comprising: a shaft configured to be received by an umbrella and having a first end and a second end, the second end configured to couple with a surface at a first angle; a handle coupled with the first end of the shaft, configured to support a golf club at a second angle, and comprising a cavity configured to receive at least a portion of the shaft; and a joint coupling the handle with the first end of the shaft wherein the joint comprises a positive engaging mechanism and enables the shaft and the handle to be pivotably moveable between a substantially parallel position and a substantially perpendicular position.

20. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 19 wherein the umbrella comprises a hollow shaft to slidably receive the umbrella therein.

21. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 19, wherein the umbrella further comprises a handle configured to mirror the shape of the handle of the holder, whereby the handle of the umbrella and the handle of the holder cooperate when the shaft is received by the umbrella.

22. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 19, wherein the handle of the holder is configured to be received by the umbrella.

23. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 22 wherein the handle of the umbrella is configured to receive the handle of the holder.

24. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 23 wherein the handle of the umbrella is configured to receive a ball marker.

25. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 22, wherein the handle further comprises a plurality of ribs extending across the cavity.

26. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 25, wherein the plurality of ribs are configured to receive a ball marker.

27. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 22 wherein the handle of the umbrella further comprises an end cap configured to communicate with the handle of the holder.

28. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 22 wherein the handle of the umbrella further comprises a funnel shape.

29. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 28 further comprising a ring configured to couple with the shaft of the holder whereby the shaft is fixedly received by the umbrella.

30. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 29 wherein the umbrella comprises an aperture configured to receive the ring.

31. The umbrella and golf club holder, the holder comprising: a shaft configured to be received by an umbrella and having a first end and a second end, the second end configured to couple with a surface at a first angle; a handle coupled with the first end of the shaft, configured to support a golf club at a second angle; and a locking mechanism coupled with the first end of the shaft.

32. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 31, wherein the handle of the holder is configured to be received by an umbrella.

33. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 32, the umbrella further comprising a handle configured to receive the handle of the holder.

34. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 33, the handle further comprising a clear handle cover coupled thereon.

35. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 33, the handle of the umbrella further comprising an aperture configured to receive a finger.

36. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 33 wherein the handle of the umbrella is configured to receive a ball marker.

37. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 32, wherein the handle further comprises a plurality of ribs extending across the cavity.

38. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 37, wherein the plurality of ribs are configured to receive a ball marker.

39. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 32 wherein the handle of the umbrella further comprises an end cap configured to communicate with the handle of the holder.

40. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 32 wherein the handle of the umbrella further comprises a funnel shape.

41. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 40 wherein the handle of the umbrella further comprises a plurality of ridges configured to provide stability to the holder.

42. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 40 wherein the locking mechanism further comprises a ring configured to couple with the shaft whereby the shaft is fixedly received by the umbrella.

43. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 42 wherein the umbrella comprises an aperture configured to receive the ring.

44. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 31, wherein the umbrella comprises a hollow shaft configured to slidably receive the umbrella therein.

45. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 44, wherein the umbrella further comprises and handle and the handle comprises a locking mechanism coupled thereto.

46. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 45, wherein the locking mechanism of the shaft is configured to engage the locking mechanism of the umbrella whereby the shaft is fixedly received by the umbrella.

47. The umbrella and golf club holder of claim 46 wherein the locking mechanism of the umbrella further comprises a compressive material to engage the locking mechanism of the umbrella.

48. A golf club holder, the holder comprising: a shaft configured to couple with a surface at a first angle; a rest including a clip coupled with a protrusion; a handle configured to couple with the protrusion of the rest and coupled with the shaft to pivot relative to the shaft between a substantially parallel position and a substantially perpendicular position; and a joint coupling the handle with the first end of the shaft wherein the joint comprises a positive engaging mechanism and enables the shaft and the handle to be pivotably moveable between a substantially parallel position and a substantially perpendicular position.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. application Ser. No. 11/550,164, filed Oct. 17, 2006, which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/727,411, filed Oct. 17, 2005. Each of the above-identified applications are each individually incorporated herein by reference in their entireties.

BACKGROUND

Golf is a popular sport that can be played by people of all ages. In this sport, a typical golfer driving a golf ball onto or adjacent to a green often carries two clubs, one club being an iron to be used in making an approach shot, the other club being a putter for attempting to sink the ball into the hole cup. This is particularly true because golf cart paths rarely come close enough to golf greens so as to permit the golfer to select clubs conveniently from his or her golf bag. When the golfer is using one club, the other club is often placed on the ground. As a result, the handle of the other club often becomes wet and difficult to use. Moreover, the golfer may forget, walk away, and leave the unused club on the ground.

In recognition of the fact that it is frequently necessary to take one or more clubs in addition to the putter when one approaches the green, a number of accessory-type devices are known for holding one or more clubs while another is being used. One such device is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,127,530 to Ortuno (“Ortuno”). Ortuno discloses a wire-type golf club stand, the top (proximal) end of which is deformed to provide a receptacle for the grip of one or more golf clubs. In Ortuno, the head of the club rests on the ground. The device disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 2,887,137 to Robb (“Robb”) teaches the use of a disk element at the top of a support rod. The disk comprises a plurality of slots therethrough for receiving the handle portion of the golf club. In Robb, the head of the club rests on the ground.

The device disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,149,087 to Thompson comprises an elongated rod, the distal end of which may be inserted into the ground. A hook-type structure is provided in the vicinity of the handle of the rod so that one or more clubs may rest therein and be supported thereby, with the head of the supported club resting on the ground.

A similar device is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,080,239 to Roland (“Roland”). The holder disclosed in Roland also comprises an elongated rod, the distal end of which is inserted into the ground. Mounted adjacent to the handle of the rod are a series of ring-like members. To support the club, the handle of the golf club may be placed within a ring-like member and the head of the club will rest on the ground. U.S. Pat. No. 5,597,363 to Leote (“Leote”) discloses a similar device for supporting the shaft of a club while the head rests on the ground. The device of the Leote patent also includes a holder for other golf accessories such as, for example, a golf ball or a towel.

The device disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,285,990 to Engel is a golf club rest for supporting the shaft of a club with the club head sitting on the ground. The device of U.S. Pat. No. 5,390,916 to Govoni discloses another such device wherein the supporting rod not only has a hook-type member extending from the top thereof, but the rod also comprises a hollow tube for receiving the shaft of a golf club. Thus, the shaft of a first club can be held within the tube, with the head of the first club up, and a second club can be received and supported by the hook such that the head of the second club rests on the ground, thereby supporting the club in a substantially vertical position.

The disclosures of U.S. Pat. No. 699,291 to Johnson and U.S. Pat. No. 5,417,334 to Wu each show holders for golf clubs wherein the grip of the club is oriented downwardly and the head of the club extends upwardly. Finally, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,616,749 and 4,991,839 each disclose golf club supports which hold one or more golf clubs in a generally prone position with the head of the club sitting on the ground and the grip of the club at least slightly elevated above the ground.

Another common problem facing golfers is the continual loss of small devices such as divot repair tools, ball markers, and the like commonly used during the game of golf. Typically, these accessory devices are kept within a large pouch on the side of a golf bag or in a pocket of the golfer. As previously noted, the golfer must often leave his or her golf bag at the cart and walk to the green. Therefore, golf accessory devices must also be carried to the green along with any clubs that the golfer requires. It is not uncommon that, before the round of golf is complete, he or she has either lost or misplaced one or more various devices used in the game of golf.

Furthermore, individuals oftentimes desire to smoke a cigar, cigarette, or pipe while golfing. As previously mentioned, golf is sometimes played when the grass is wet, either from rain, morning dew, or from watering. The individuals that desire to smoke a cigar while playing golf on a wet course oftentimes cannot find a location to rest their cigar while they tee-off or otherwise hit their golf ball, thereby forcing the cigar smoking golfers to lay their cigar upon wet grass. Wet grass may undesirably extinguish or ruin the cigar, thereby forcing these golfers to either re-ignite a wet cigar or to dispose of the wet cigar and light a new cigar. In addition, considering the amount of tools a golfer often carries, there may not be ample room left in the pockets of a golfer to carry a cigar or cigarette holder.

Finally, as golf is an outdoor sport, umbrellas are often used during the game during both rain periods as well as sun periods. The umbrella protects the golfer from the heat of the sun and also protects the golfer and his or her golf clubs from rain. Manually holding an umbrella can prove quite cumbersome. As the golfer takes each shot, the umbrella must be temporarily discarded. In addition, as previously noted, an umbrella is not the only item which golfers must carry around the course.

To solve these problems, umbrella holders and golf accessory devices have been developed in the art. Such umbrella holders relieve the golfer from manually holding the umbrella by attaching the umbrella to either a golf cart or to the golf bag. However, prior art devices are either too complex to build or use, require a permanent alteration to the golf bag, or are adapted to attach only to a golf cart thereby being unusable by golfers who do not employ golf carts. In addition, such golf accessory organizers often times compile all golfing accessories into one area, but still require the golfer to carry the golf accessory organizer on the course.

SUMMARY

There is a need in the art for an umbrella holder and accessory holder that is one unit and easy and quick to use, even in the event the golfer carries the device and the clubs he or she will need onto the green. A golf club holder is provided for removably supporting a golf club above a surface in such a manner that the club has a head which contacts the ground surface and a shaft which extends above the ground surface. The golf club holder may have a handle and a shaft that are each coupled with a joint. The handle and the shaft may be pivotably movable between a first position where they are substantially parallel to each other, and a second position where they are substantially perpendicular to each other. The joint may comprise a positive engaging mechanism to retain the handle and the shaft in either the first position or the second position. The handle may be capable of retaining various golfing accessories therein. Further, an umbrella and golf club holder is provided. The umbrella and golf club holder may have a shaft configured to be received by an umbrella and a handle, the shaft and the handle are coupled by a joint. The joint may comprise a positive engagement mechanism that enables the shaft and the handle to be pivotably moveable between a substantially parallel position and a substantially perpendicular position. Similar to the golf club holder, the shaft and handle are capable of being inserted into a surface at a first angle and supporting a golf club thereon. In addition, the umbrella and golf club holder comprises a locking mechanism and allows the user to combine an umbrella and a golf club holder into one device. A further embodiment includes a golf club holder comprises the aforementioned elements, but may further include a rest that may be inserted into the holder.

Other systems, methods, features, and advantages of the invention will be or will become apparent to one with skill in the art upon examination of the following figures and detailed description. It is intended that all such additional systems, methods, features, and advantages be included within the description, be within the scope of the invention, and be protected by the accompanying claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

The invention can be better understood with reference to the following figures. The components in the figures are not necessarily to scale; emphasis is instead being placed upon illustrating the principles of the invention. Moreover, in the figures, like reference numerals designate corresponding parts throughout the different views.

FIG. 1 is a front view of a golf club holder in a second position;

FIG. 2 is a side view of a the golf club holder of FIG. 1 in the second position;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a golf club supported by the golf club holder of FIG. 1 in the second position;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the golf club holder of FIG. 1 in a first position;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view in an exemplary operational environment of the golf club holder of FIG. 1 in the second position;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of the golf club holder of FIG. 1 in a first position;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of the golf club holder of FIG. 1 in a second position;

FIG. 8 is a bottom perspective view of an alternative embodiment of a golf club holder in a first position;

FIG. 9 is a bottom perspective view of the handle of the golf club holder of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10A is a side view of the golf club holder of FIG. 8 in a first position;

FIG. 10B is a side view of the golf club holder of FIG. 8 in a second position;

FIG. 10C is a detailed perspective view of the cap of the golf club holder of FIG. 8;

FIG. 11 is an exploded perspective view of the golf club holder of FIG.8;

FIG. 12 is a side view of an alternate embodiment of the golf club holder shown in FIG. 8.

FIGS. 13A and 13B are a side view of an alternate embodiment of the golf club holder shown in FIG. 8; and

FIG. 14 is a side view of the cigar holder aspect of the golf club holder of FIG. 8.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of the golf club holder shown in FIG. 8, wherein the embodiment is illustrated in two different positions.

FIG. 16 is a perspective bottom view of the umbrella handle aspect of the alternative embodiment of the golf club holder shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 17 is a bottom view of an alternative embodiment of the handle aspect of the golf club holder of FIG. 8.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

As shown in FIGS. 1-5, golf club holder 10 is adapted for removably supporting a golf club 50 above a ground surface (not shown) in such a manner that the club 50 has a club head 52 which contacts the ground surface and a club shaft 54 which extends above the ground surface. The golf club holder 10 includes a shaft 12, ajoint 20, and a handle 30. The joint 20 may include a pivot pin 24. The shaft 12 has a longitudinal axis B-B and may include a ground piercing end 16. The handle 30 has a longitudinal axis C-C, may be substantially cylindrical, and may include a plurality of indentations 32.

The shaft 12 may be fabricated from a metal, a wood, a plastic, or another rigid material. The shaft 12 may be fabricated as a solid or hollow, tubular structure. In one embodiment, the shaft 12 comprises aluminum. However, as will be appreciated by one of ordinary skill in the art, the shaft 12 may be comprised of almost any material. The handle 30 may be fabricated from metal, wood, plastic, foam, rubber, foam rubber, or a combination of these or other materials. In one embodiment, the handle 30 is fabricated from rubber similar to that found in a golf club grip. Again, one of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that handle 30 may be comprised of many different materials without affecting the operation of the golf club holder 10.

The piercing end 16 of the shaft 12 is shown in the drawings as a symmetrical solid of revolution, but a variety of shapes for piercing end 16 of the shaft 12 are possible. For example, the piercing end 16 of the shaft 12 may be an angled planar surface bisecting the shaft 12. Several methods of providing a ground piercing shape are known in the art, and the pictorial description of the piercing end 16 of the shaft 12 is merely illustrative and is not intended to limit the claimed invention in any way.

The shaft 12 is coupled by the joint 20 to the handle 30. The joint 20 allows the shaft 12 and the handle 30 to pivot with respect to one another via an axis A-A. The pivot pin 24 of the joint 20 may extend through a first and second opening in the shaft 12 and the handle 30, respectively, and may be, for example, flared at each end to hold the shaft 12 and handle 30 together. In one embodiment, the pivot pin 24 may comprise a rivet. In another embodiment, the pivot pin 24 may comprise a bolt and a nut. Several methods of coupling the shaft 12 to the handle 30 together while providing for relative pivoting are known in the art, and the descriptions of the joint 20 and pivot pin 24 are merely illustrative, and are not intended to limit the claimed invention in any way.

The shaft 12 and the handle 30 may pivot between a first position wherein the longitudinal axis B-B of the shaft 12 and the longitudinal axis C-C of the handle 30 are substantially parallel and substantially collinear (shown in FIG. 4), and a second position wherein the longitudinal axis B-B of the shaft 12 and the longitudinal axis C-C of the handle 30 are substantially at a right angle to one another (shown in FIGS. 1-3). The relative positions of the longitudinal axis B-B of the shaft 12 and the longitudinal axis C-C of the handle 30 are maintained by a set of protrusions 14 that are incorporated into the handle 30. The protrusions 14 extend into a cavity 36 (which is a hollow area) of the handle 30. The cavity 36 extends from one end of the handle 30 to a middle portion along the length of the handle 30, and may be a longitudinal opening, such as the u-shaped notch shown in FIG. 2. The joint may be coupled with the handle 30 near an interior end of the cavity 36, as shown in FIG. 1.

The cavity 36 is substantially configured for receiving a portion of the shaft 12, such that the first position a portion of the shaft 12 is partially, substantially, or completely enveloped by the handle 30. The protrusions 14 extend into a cavity 36 far enough to inhibit relative movement between the shaft 12 and the handle 30 between either the first or second position, but not so far into the cavity 36 so as to prevent movement altogether. Therefore, the protrusions 14 provide a clearance less than the diameter of the shaft 12 such that the protrusions 14 engage and releaseably retain the shaft 12 when the golf club holder 10 is in the first position (substantially parallel). Thereby, the protrusions 14 function to keep the handle 30 in either the first position (substantially parallel) or the second position (substantially perpendicular). The degree of incursion by the protrusions 14 into the cavity 36 and the overall tolerance of the cavity 36 relative to the shaft 12 will determine the “tightness” of the locking of the golf club holder 10 into either the first or second position.

The handle 30 may be coupled with the shaft 12 such that in the first position, shown in FIG. 4, the longitudinal axis C-C of the handle 30 is substantially parallel and substantially collinear to the longitudinal axis B-B of the shaft 12. In this first position, the golf club holder 10 resembles a walking stick or a ski pole. As shown in FIG. 4, in the first position the golf club holder 10 may be easily stored in a golf bag. Furthermore, in the first position, the golf club holder 10 is also easy to carry, and may be used as a walking stick, as a position marker, or as a spear to aid in picking up and removing trash. The handle 30 may include a plurality of indentations 32, which can prevent the club shaft 54 of the club 50 from sliding off of the handle 30 while the golf club holder 10 is in the second position. Additionally, the plurality of indentations 32 may facilitate gripping of the handle 30 when the piercing end 16 of the shaft 12 is driven into the ground surface 100.

The shape of the indentations 32 may be circular, v-shaped, u-shaped, squared, parabolic, or the like. The indentations 32 may each, in some fashion, decrease in diameter from the diameter of the handle 30 to about the diameter of the shaft 12. Alternatively, the handle 30 could have a series of elevated rings, such that the shaft has a first diameter and each ring has a second diameter greater than the first diameter. In yet another alternative, the handle 30 may have no indentations or rings at all, and may have a single diameter, or a gradually changing diameter from end-to-end or middle-to-end. Many configurations of the handle 30 are possible such that the handle provides sufficient friction to support the club shaft 54 of the club 50.

In operation, a golfer locates the golf club holder 10 in a desired position such that the piercing end 16 of the shaft 12 is touching the ground surface, and the shaft 12 is at an angle of about between thirty (30) and sixty (60) degrees to the ground surface at that point. The golfer then applies pressure to the golf club holder 10, thereby forcing the piercing end 16 of the shaft 12 into the ground surface. The ground itself will support golf club holder 10. Next, the golfer pivots the handle 30 away from the shaft 12, until the longitudinal axis C-C of the handle 30 is substantially parallel to the ground surface 100. Of course, the golfer may also “open” the handle 30 prior to placing the piercing end 16 of the shaft 12 into the ground.

As shown in FIG. 3, in this first position the golf club holder 10 is adapted for removably supporting one or more golf clubs 50 above the ground surface in such a manner that the club 50 has a head 52 which contacts the ground surface and the club 50 has a club shaft 54 which extends above the ground surface. The golfer may later remove the golf club holder 10 by folding the handle 30 back so that the longitudinal axis B-B is parallel and substantially collinear to the longitudinal axis C-C, and pulling on the handle 30, which will cause the golf club holder 10 to become dislodged from the ground surface. Of course, the golfer may also fold the handle 30 back parallel to the shaft 12 prior to removal from the ground.

Turning to FIG. 5, a perspective view of the golf club holder 10 in an exemplary operational environment is shown. The shaft 12 of the golf club holder 10 has penetrated a ground surface 56. The club shaft 54 of the golf club 50 is shown resting on the handle 30 such that the club shaft 54 of the golf club 50 forms a first acute angle a with the shaft 12 of the golf club holder 10. The shaft 12 is shown inserted into the ground surface 56 at a second acute angle β, where the second acute angle β is between about thirty (30) and sixty (60) degrees. While the second acute angle β is between about thirty (30) and sixty (60) degrees, the first acute angle α and the second acute angle β are inversely related such that as one increases, the other decreases. Where the second acute angle β is about forty-five (45) degrees, the majority of the force exerted by the golf club 50 on the golf club holder 10 due to gravity is in the direction of the shaft 12, thereby holding the shaft 12 into the ground surface 56. As more golf clubs 50 are rested against the golf club holder 10, the force of gravity acts to hold the golf club holder 10 in place, rather than to remove it from the ground.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the golf club holder 10. In this alternate embodiment, the golf club holder 10 includes fabric shade 42, fabric supports 44, and couplings 46. The couplings 46 may be hinged to allow the fabric supports 44 to move from a first position substantially parallel to the shaft 12 to a second position wherein the fabric supports 44 extend radially from the shaft 12 of the golf club holder 10. In this embodiment, the golf club holder 10 is essentially an umbrella. This embodiment allows for a golfer to have a golf umbrella that also acts as a golf club support.

FIGS. 7-10 show various views of an alternative embodiment of the golf club holder 10 shown in FIGS. 1-5. Similar to golf club holder 10, golf club holder 100 of FIG. 7 is adapted for removably supporting a golf club 102 above a ground surface (not shown) in such a manner that the club 102 has a club head 104 which contacts the ground surface and a club shaft 106 which extends above the ground surface.

The golf club holder 100 includes a shaft 112, a joint 124, and a handle 130. The shaft 112 has a longitudinal axis D-D, a first end 118, and a second end 116. The second end 116 may comprise a shape capable of piercing a ground surface. The handle 130 has a longitudinal axis E-E and comprises a top 140, a first end 142, a second end 144, and a bottom 146. The bottom 146 of the handle 130 may comprise a longitudinal cavity 150 that extends from the first end 142 of the handle 130 to a middle portion thereof. The cavity 150 of the handle 130 may be a longitudinal opening, such as the u-shaped notch shown in FIGS. 7 and 9.

The first end 118 of the shaft 112 may be coupled with the handle 130 by the joint 124. The joint 124 may be coupled with the handle 130 near an interior end of the cavity 150, as shown in FIG. 8. The joint 124 allows the shaft 112 and the handle 130 to pivot with respect to one another via axis F-F. The joint 124 may comprise any mechanism known in the art that will allow the shaft 112 and the handle 130 to pivot with respect to one another around axis F-F.

The shaft 112 may be fabricated from a metal, a wood, a plastic, or another rigid material. The shaft 112 may be fabricated as a solid or hollow, tubular structure. In one embodiment, the shaft 112 comprises aluminum. However, as will be appreciated by one of ordinary skill in the art, the shaft 112 may be comprised of almost any material. The handle 130 may be fabricated from metal, wood, plastic, foam, rubber, foam rubber, or a combination of these or other materials. In one embodiment, the handle 130 is fabricated from rubber similar to that found in a golf club grip. Again, one of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that handle 130 may be comprised of many different materials without affecting the operation of the golf club holder 100.

In one embodiment, the joint 124 comprises a positive engagement mechanism. In this embodiment the cavity 150 of the handle 130 comprises at least two apertures 164 extending outwardly from the cavity 150. The at least two apertures 164 may be aligned substantially parallel to axis F-F and formed concentrically around a first axis. The first end 118 of the shaft 112 may be coupled with a cap 170. The cap 170 comprises a top 180, a first side 172, a second side 174, a third side 176, a fourth side 178, and a cavity 182 (not shown), and may be fabricated from metal, wood, plastic, or other rigid materials. The first side 172 and the third side 176 each may have a protrusion 188 extending laterally therefrom. Each protrusion 188 is substantially configured to be capable of moveably engaging with one of the at least two apertures 164 of the cavity 150. The cavity 182 of the cap 170 is substantially configured to receive the first end 118 of the shaft 112 and engage therewith.

The first end 118 of the shaft 112 is inserted into the cavity 182 of the cap 170. Thereafter, the protrusion 188 of the first side 172 and the protrusion 188 of the third side 176 are both engaged with the respective apertures 164 of the cavity 150 in such a manner that the shaft 112 and the handle 130 are capable of being pivotably moveable about axis F-F.

In an exemplary embodiment, the joint 124 may further comprise a detent member 160 and contoured aspects on the top 180 of the cap 170 (as shown in FIG. 10) to allow the shaft 112 and the handle 130 to retain their position relative to each other. The detent member 160 may be coupled with the handle 130 and protrude a distance into the cavity 150.

The top 10 of the cap 170 may further comprise a contoured surface 184 and at least one flange 186. The contoured surface 184 of the top 180 may include at least one recess configured to correspond to the detent member 160 of the handle 130. The at least one flange 186 of the top 180 may be substantially configured to engage the detent member 160 and may extend from the top 180, past the second side 174 or the fourth side 178 of the cap 170. In an alternative embodiment, the flange 186 may extend past the second side 174 and a second flange 189 may extend past the fourth side 178.

The shaft 112 and the handle 130 may pivot about the joint between a first position wherein the longitudinal axis D-D of the shaft 112 and the longitudinal axis E-E of the handle 130 are substantially parallel and substantially collinear (shown in FIG. 8), and a second position wherein the longitudinal axis D-D of the shaft 112 and the longitudinal axis E-E of the handle 130 are substantially at a right angle to one another (shown in FIGS. 7, 10A, and 10B). When the handle 130 and the shaft 112 are in the first substantially parallel position, a portion of the shaft 112 may be partially, substantially, or completely within the cavity 150 and enveloped by the handle 130.

The relative positions of the longitudinal axis D-D of the shaft 112 and the longitudinal axis E-E of the handle 130 are maintained when the detent member 160 engages either the contoured surface 184 of the top 180 or the at least one flange 186 of the top 180. Specifically, when the at least one flange 186 of the top 180 is engaged with the detent member 160, the shaft 112 and the handle 130 are maintained in the first substantially parallel position. Alternatively, when the contoured surface 184 of the top 180 engages with the detent member 160, the shaft 112 and the handle 130 are maintained in the second substantially perpendicular position.

The handle 130 may further comprise at least one flange 190 coupled with the handle 130 and extending into the cavity 150 at a location adjacent to the first end 142 of the handle 130. The at least one flange 190 may be configured to function as a thumb tab to facilitate the coupling and uncoupling of the at least one flange 186 of the top 170 and the detent member 160. Specifically, the at least one flange 190 provides a surface for which a golfer may use his or her thumb to apply force and easily disengage the detent member 160 from the at least one flange 186 of the top 170, thereby moving the handle 130 and the shaft 112 from the substantially parallel position to the substantially perpendicular position.

In an alternative embodiment, the detent member 160 may be coupled directly to the first end 118 of the shaft 112, the contoured surface 184 may be located on the handle 130, and an aperture may be located through the first end 118 of the shaft 112, formed concentrically around a second axis. In this embodiment, the joint 124 comprises a pin joint. In this embodiment, the first axis of the apertures 164 and the second axis of the aperture in the first end 118 are collinearly aligned and a pin is extended through each of the apertures 164 and the aperture of the first end 118. The pin secures the apertures of the first end 118 of the shaft 112 to the handle 130 such that the shaft 112 and the handle 130 are pivotably moveable between the substantially parallel position and the substantially perpendicular position.

It is also contemplated that as an alternative to a pin, at least two protrusions may extend from the handle 130 into the cavity 150. The at least two protrusions each may be configured to engage with the aperture of the first end 118 of the shaft 112. In this embodiment, the detent member 160 and the contoured surface 184 may engage in the same manner as previously described with respect to the other embodiments disclosed herein.

In yet another embodiment of the joint 124, the detent member 160 may be coupled with the top 180 of the cap 170 and the contoured surface 184 may be located on the handle 130. In this embodiment, at least one aperture is located on the handle 130 and extends from the cavity 150, toward the second end 144 of the handle 130. The at least one aperture may be concentrically formed about a third axis. This third axis may be perpendicular to axis F-F and the at least one aperture may be substantially configured to receive the detent member 160. The detent member 160 may engage the contoured surface 184 may engage in the same manner as previously described with respect to the other embodiments disclosed herein. Furthermore, the detent member 160 may engage the aperture on the handle 112 in the same manner as previously described with respect to the other embodiments disclosed herein.

Each of the aforementioned embodiments allows a golfer to use the golf club holder 100 to prop up golf clubs with minimal set up. In addition, the embodiments also allow the golfer to easily fold and store the golf club holder 100 in a golf bag or similar location when it is no longer in use.

Turning now to FIG. 11, a perspective exploded view of one embodiment of the golf club holder 100 is shown. This embodiment further comprises an aperture 204, a grommet 202, a first recess 208, a second recess 210, and a ball marker 206. The ball marker 206 may be a conventional ball marker known in the art and, in this embodiment, comprises a disk with a first diameter, a relatively thin profile, and a projection extending therefrom. Similarly, the grommet 202 is merely a rubber grommet conventionally known in the art.

The aperture 204 is formed concentrically about axis D-D (shown in FIG. 7) in the handle 130 and communicates with the cavity 150. The first recess 208 comprises a certain depth and a certain diameter and is substantially configured to receive the grommet 208. The first recess 208 is formed concentrically about axis D-D such that the first recess 208 surrounds the aperture 204. The second recess 210 also comprises a certain depth and a certain diameter, the depth of the second recess 210 being less than the depth of the first recess 208 and the diameter of the second recess 210 being larger than the diameter of the first recess 208. The depth and diameter of the second recess 210 may be substantially configured to receive the ball marker 206. Similar to the first recess 208, the second recess 210 may be formed concentrically about axis D-D such that the second recess 210 surrounds the aperture 204 and the first recess 208.

The grommet 202 is inserted into the first recess 208 and a portion of the grommet 202 is inserted through the aperture 204 as is conventionally known in the art. The grommet 202 functions, in part, to retain the ball marker 206 within the aperture 204 by providing adequate friction therein. The protrusion of the ball marker 206 is inserted through the grommet 202 and the disk of the ball marker 206 is allowed to rest within the second recess 210. In this manner, ball marker 206 is removably coupled to the top 140 of the handle 130. When the ball marker 206 is fully inserted into the handle 130, the ball marker 206 may be flush with the top 140 of the handle 130.

In another embodiment, a divot repair tool (not shown) may also be removably coupled with the top 140 of the handle 130. A conventional divot repair tool comprises a prong portion and a planar portion with an aperture located thereon. Similar to the embodiment disclosed above, the grommet 202 is inserted into the first recess 208 and a portion of the grommet 202 is inserted through the aperture 204. Thereafter, the divot repair tool is positioned over the aperture 204 such that the center of the aperture located on the planar portion of the divot repair tool is concentrically aligned about axis D-D. The ball marker 206 is inserted into the aperture 204, necessarily penetrating the aperture of the divot repair tool. In this manner, the divot repair tool is sandwiched between the top 140 of the handle 130 and the ball marker 206 and is removably coupled to the ball marker 206 and the handle 130.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the golf club holder 100. In this alternate embodiment, the golf club holder 100 is combined with a modified umbrella 300 to form an umbrella and golf club holder 400.

The modified umbrella 300 is comprised of a shaft 302, a handle 304, a plurality of fabric supports 306, a fabric shade 308, and a plurality of couplings 310. The shaft 302 consists of a hollow, cylindrical tube and has a proximate end 312, a distal end 314, and an interior surface. The proximate end 312 further comprises an aperture 316 of a first diameter, the aperture 316 communicating with the interior surface of the shaft 302. The handle 304 is coupled with the proximate end 312 such that the aperture 316 is exposed. The plurality of fabric supports 306 surround the outside of the first shaft 302 in a location adjacent to the distal end 314 of the shaft 302. Each of the fabric supports 306 are comprised of a first end 318 and a second end 320 and are displaceable between a collapsed position wherein the fabric supports 306 are disposed adjacent to the shaft 302 in a manner substantially parallel thereto, and an open position wherein the fabric supports 306 extend radially from the shaft 302. The fabric shade 308 is coupled with and supported by the plurality of fabric supports 306. The plurality of couplings 310 are hingedly coupled with the first end 318 of each fabric support 306 and the first shaft 302 in a location proximate to the distal end 314 of the first shaft 302. The configuration of the plurality of couplings 310 allows the fabric supports 306 and fabric shade 308 to move between a collapsed position and the open position, thereby allowing a user to raise and lower the modified umbrella 300.

The umbrella and golf club holder 400 is further comprised of the golf club holder 100. In this embodiment, the shaft 112 of the golf club holder 100 has a diameter less than the diameter of the aperture 316 of the first shaft 302 and is configured to be received by the shaft 302 of the umbrella. The handle 130 of the golf club holder 100 has a diameter greater than the diameter of the aperture 316 of the first shaft 302. The shaft 112 of the golf club holder 100 may be slidably received through aperture 316 of the modified umbrella 300, such that the distal end 116 of the shaft 112 is located within the distal end 314 of the shaft 302. Because the diameter of the handle 130 is larger than the diameter of the aperture 316, the handle 130 is not received into the interior of the shaft 302 of the modified umbrella 300. Therefore, the handle 130 cooperates with the proximate end 312 of the shaft 302 in a position adjacent to the handle 304 of the modified umbrella 300.

It is within the scope of this embodiment that the handle 304 and the handle 130 are configured such that the handle 304 is substantially the mirror image of the handle 130. In this manner, when the shaft 112 of the golf club holder 100 is fully received within the shaft 302 of the modified umbrella 300, the handle 112 and the handle 304 are positioned in a substantially parallel position and may cooperate to form a single, larger handle. In this manner, a golfer may hold the single larger handle to operate the combination umbrella and golf club holder when the golf club holder 100 is not in use.

It will be appreciated by one of ordinary skill in the art that the combination umbrella and golf club holder does not require an umbrella manufactured specifically for this apparatus. For example, conventional umbrellas typically contain a hollow shaft as the central aspect of the umbrella. It is within the scope of this disclosure to use a conventional umbrella and merely puncture the handle thereof to allow the shaft 112 of the golf club holder 100 to be inserted and received into the shaft of the conventional umbrella. In this embodiment, the handle of the conventional umbrella and the handle 130 of the golf club holder 100 are unlikely to be positioned immediately adjacent to one another. Therefore, the shaft 112 of the golf club holder 100 may function to elongate the central shaft of the conventional umbrella, thereby providing more height to the fabric shade when the umbrella is opened and in use.

Turning now to FIGS. 15 and 16, an alternative embodiment of the umbrella and golf club holder 400 shown in FIG. 12 are shown. In this embodiment, a modified umbrella and golf club holder 500 is comprised of a modified umbrella 501 and a golf club holder 503. The modified umbrella 501 is capable of wholly receiving the golf club holder 503. As the structure of the umbrella and golf club holder 500 is substantially equivalent to that of the umbrella and golf club holder 400 previously described, only the aspects that differ will be described in detail herein.

The golf club holder 503 comprises a handle 530 coupled to a shaft 522. The handle 530 of the golf club holder 503 comprises a proximate end 532, a distal end 534, a top 536, and a bottom 538. Further the handle 520 may be substantially configured to be received within the modified umbrella 501. Similar to the embodiments previously discussed, the shaft 522 is coupled with the distal end 534 of the handle 530. The proximate end 532 may be of either of an open or closed configuration.

The bottom 538 of the handle 530 may comprise a cavity (not shown), substantially similar to the cavity 150 of handle 130 shown in FIG. 9. As illustrated in FIG. 17, the handle may further comprise a plurality of ribs 570 that traverse the cavity. The plurality of ribs 570 may be configured to couple with and removably retain a conventional ball marker 580 within the cavity of the handle 530. In another embodiment, a plurality of ribs 590 may be configured in a curved orientation such that a user could easily disengage the golf club holder 503 from the modified umbrella 501 by inserting his or her finger into the cavity and applying pressure to one of the ribs 590.

The modified umbrella 501 comprises a handle 504, a shaft 502, and a fabric shade portion. The handle 504 of the modified umbrella 501 may comprise an interior, an exterior, a first end 510, a second end 512, a top 514, and a bottom 516. In one embodiment, the first end 510 and the bottom 516 may be open, thereby allowing access to the interior of the handle 504.

The second end 512 of the handle 504 may be configured in a substantially funnel-like shape and is coupled with the shaft 502. A plurality of ridges 508 may extend along the second end 512 to provide support to the second end 512. In an exemplary embodiment, the narrow end of the funnel-shaped second end 512 may be coupled with the shaft 502 and configured such that the plurality of ridges 508 extend in a direction parallel to the longitudinal axis of the handle 504.

In one embodiment, the golf club holder 503 is slidably inserted into the modified umbrella 501 such that the handle 530 and the shaft 532 are both enclosed therein. When the golf club holder 503 is wholly received within the modified umbrella 501, the proximate end 532 may either be positioned flush with the first end 510 of the handle 504 or at some distance within the handle 504.

When the golf club holder 503 is wholly inserted within the modified umbrella 503, a cap 525 may be coupled with the first end 510. The cap 525 may be configured in any shape. In an exemplary embodiment, the cap 525 is configured to provide a seal on the first end 510 and cooperates with the proximate end 532 of the handle 530. The cap 525 may also be configured to seal the bottom 516 of the handle 504 as well as the first end 510 of the handle 504. Once the first end 510 is sealed by the cap 525, a label may be applied to the first end 510, thereby sealing the golf club holder 503 within the modified umbrella 501. In an exemplary embodiment, the label may comprise a Mylar dome label. It will be appreciated by one of ordinary skill in the art that the addition of the label is beneficial to equipment manufacturers and the like because it provides a convenient place to adhere a trademark or logo.

It is also within the scope of this disclosure that the umbrella and golf club holder 500 further comprises a locking mechanism to secure the golf club holder 503 within the modified umbrella 501. The locking mechanism may comprise any locking mechanism known in the art that is capable of removably retaining the golf club holder 503 within the modified umbrella 501. In one embodiment, the locking mechanism may comprise an aperture 527 and a ring (not shown). The second end 512 of the umbrella handle 504 may comprise the aperture 527 wherein the aperture 527 communicates with the interior of the handle 504. In an exemplary embodiment, the aperture 527 is located proximate to the tapered end of the funnel-shaped second end 512. The ring is configured to couple with the shaft 522 of the golf club holder 503 and may comprise a protrusion extending therefrom.

When the golf club holder 503 is received within the modified umbrella 501, the ring may be inserted through the aperture 527 and removably coupled with the shaft 522 of the golf club holder 503. The protrusion of the ring is configured to extend through the aperture 527 toward the exterior of the modified umbrella 501. In this manner, the protrusion prevents the golf club holder 503 from sliding within the modified umbrella 501. The ring may be fabricated of any material that is substantially rigid and sufficiently durable to withstand pressure on the protrusion in the event the golf club holder 503 slides toward the first end 510 of the modified umbrella 501.

The locking mechanism of the umbrella and golf club holder 500 may also comprise an alternative embodiment of the cap 525. The locking mechanism portion of the cap 525 may comprise a protrusion extending from the cap 525 into the interior of the handle 504. The protrusion of the cap 525 may be configured to prevent movement of the golf club holder 503 by obstructing the first end 510 of the handle 504.

In yet another embodiment, the handle 504 may be coupled with a clear handle cover 528. The clear handle cover 528 may be removably secured to the handle 504 in any manner known in the art. The clear handle cover 528 may form a removable sleeve over a portion of the handle 504, thereby allowing for a label to be affixed between the handle 504 and the clear handle cover 528. For example, a golfer could insert a personal information label between the handle 504 and the clear handle cover 528, or a manufacturer could insert a logo identifying the company that manufactured the equipment. The use of the clear handle cover 528 eliminates the risk of a label degrading or detaching. Moreover, the clear handle cover 528 provides a secure way to affix ownership information to the umbrella and golf club holder 500.

Now referring to FIGS. 13A and 13B, two front views of an alternative embodiment of the golf club holder 100 of FIGS. 7 and 8 are shown. In this alternative embodiment, a golf club holder is combined with an umbrella to form an umbrella and golf club holder 350.

Similar to the embodiment shown in FIG. 12, the umbrella and golf club holder 350 comprises an umbrella portion, an embodiment of the golf club holder 100 and a axis G-G. The umbrella portion comprises a first shaft 352, a first handle 354, a plurality of fabric supports (not shown), a fabric shade (not shown), and a plurality of couplings (not shown). The fabric shade portion of the umbrella and golf club holder 350 is a conventional umbrella shade and is commonly known to those of ordinary skill in the art.

The first handle 354 of the umbrella portion consists of a hollow, cylindrical tube comprising a first diameter, a distal end 357, and a proximate end 359. The proximate end of the first handle 354 may comprise an insert portion 366 of a twist lock fitting mechanism 358. The insert portion 366 of the twist lock fitting mechanism 358 comprises an aperture comprising a first leg 372, a second leg 374, and a third leg 376. The first leg 372 extends distally and parallel to the axis G-G for a first distance. The second leg 374 forms a first right angle and extends perpendicular to the axis G-G for a second distance. The third leg 376 forms a second right angle and extends toward the proximate end 359 in a direction parallel to the axis G-G for a third distance. The third distance may be shorter than the first distance, such that the third leg 376 does not extend completely to the edge of the proximate end 359. In this manner, the insert portion 366 forms a hook shape in the proximate end 359 of the first handle 354. The distal end 357 of the first handle 354 contains an aperture therein (not shown), the aperture having a second diameter that is less than the diameter of the first handle 354. The aperture on the distal end 357 communicates with the first shaft 352.

The first shaft 352 of the umbrella portion consists of a hollow, cylindrical tube comprising an inner surface, an open, proximate end 355, and a closed, distal end (not shown). The proximate end 355 of the first shaft 352 comprises a third diameter equal to or greater than the second diameter of the aperture on the distal end 357, but less than the first diameter of the first handle 354. The interior of the first shaft 352 communicates with the interior of the first handle 354 via the aperture on the distal end 357. The fabric shade portion and the plurality of couplings are coupled with the first shaft 352 in a location adjacent to the distal end of the first shaft 352. Therefore, the umbrella portion of the umbrella and golf club holder 350 comprises a conventional umbrella having a hollow shaft and handle, with the interior of the shaft and the handle exposed at the proximate end 355 of the first handle 354.

The aspects of the golf club holder included in this embodiment directly correlate with all aspects of the golf club holder 100 illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8; however, the golf club holder of the umbrella and golf club holder 350 may not comprise a moveable joint allowing the handle and the shaft to rotate relative to one another. Therefore, in this embodiment, the golf club holder portion may be permanently fixed in the substantially perpendicular position described previously herein.

The golf club holder aspect of the umbrella and golf club holder 350 comprises a second shaft 362 and a second handle 364. The second handle 364 of the umbrella and golf club holder 350 is equivalent to the handle 130 of FIGS. 7 and 8, and is coupled with the proximate end 370 of the second shaft 362. However, as mentioned previously, in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 13A and 13B, the second handle 364 and the second shaft 362 may be coupled in such a manner so that the second handle 364 and the second shaft 362 do not rotate relative to one another.

The second shaft 362 comprises a a proximate end 370, and a distal end (not shown), and is configured to be received by the umbrella portion. The distal end of the second shaft 362 is equivalent to the second end 116 of the shaft 112 in FIG. 7. The second shaft 362 may be slidably moveable into and out of the first handle 354 and the first shaft 352 through the proximate end 359 of the first handle 354 and the aperture of the first handle 354, respectively.

The proximate end 370 of the second shaft 362 may further comprise a key portion 368 of the twist lock fitting mechanism 358. The key portion 368 is configured to insert into the insert portion 366 and lock therein. In this manner, the golf club holder and umbrella portion of the umbrella and golf club holder 350 may be effectively secured together. It is also within the scope of this embodiment to include a compressive material, such as a spring, within the distal end of the first shaft 352. Such compressive material provides a degree of resistance to the complete insertion of the second shaft 362 into the first shaft 352, therefore providing an upward force capable of further securing the key portion 368 within the third leg of the insert portion 366.

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of a rest aspect 400 of the golf club holder 100 of FIGS. 7 and 8. The rest 400 comprises a clip portion 402 and a protrusion 404 extending from the base of the clip portion 402 and may be configured to retain a cigar or similar object.

The clip portion 402 comprises at least two prongs configured to sufficiently retain a cigar or other similar object therein. The clip portion 402 may be fabricated of metal, wood, plastic, or other similar material that is sufficiently rigid to retain a cigar or similar shaped object within the clip portion. The protrusion 404 may be comprised of the same material as the clip portion 402 and extends outwardly from the base of the clip portion 402.

A plurality of apertures 406 may be located in the surface of the handle 130, particularly at first end 144. The apertures 406 are substantially configured to receive and engage the protrusion 404 of the rest 400. Similarly, the protrusion 404 may be substantially configured to be insertable into the plurality of apertures 406 located on the surface of handle 130. The protrusion 404 of the rest 400 may be removably inserted into one of the plurality of apertures 406 located on the handle 130 such that the clip portion 402 is projected away from the handle 130 in a manner capable of supporting a cigar or similar object. In this manner, a golfer may place a cigar in the rest 400 when it is their turn to swing.

While various embodiments of the invention have been described, it will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that many more embodiments and implementations are possible that are within the scope of this invention. Accordingly, the invention is not to be restricted except in light of the attached claims and their equivalents.